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Philanthropist Donald Sussman avidly collects fine art.

He also invests in the healing arts afforded to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.

His passions took form after meeting Dr. Marc Agronin, a geriatric psychiatrist at Miami Jewish Health and expert on aging. Sussman was captivated by Dr. Agronin’s brainchild, a loving, village environment where those with Alzheimer’s will live with purpose.

With his $15-million gift, The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare Village is closer to becoming a reality. Sussman is confident others will be moved to donate when they understand how the village will revolutionize eldercare. “It is my hope that the village will be built as soon as possible.”

Main entrance to The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare Village from the Miami Jewish Health campus.

“I thought about how ideally it would have suited my cherished dad, Michael, when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s,” says Edie Laquer, owner of Laquer Corporate Realty Group. “I’m certain he would have retained his active lifestyle longer and his decline would not have taken the toll it did on me and my mom.”

‘The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare Village is a model for what senior facilities should be.’

Louis Wolfson III, chairman of The Mitchell Wolfson Senior Foundation and immediate past chairman of the Miami Jewish Health Foundation Board of Directors, is an outspoken advocate. “The heart of EmpathiCare aligns perfectly with our desire to support Miami’s growing aging population.”

Edie Laquer Foundation Grand Gateway providing a covered pavilion and pick-up/drop-off location for residents and visitors.

“The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare Village is a model for what senior facilities should be,” says Jeffrey Freimark, president and CEO at Miami Jewish Health.

To learn more, please contact Churé Gladwell, vice president and chief development officer, Miami Jewish Health Foundation, at 305-762-1409 or cgladwell@miamijewishhealth.org.

Aerial view of The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare village and adjoining parking garage, facing west from the Miami Jewish Health campus.

The post Donald Sussman’s $15-million gift helps create the Miami Jewish Health EmpathiCare Village appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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Philanthropist Donald Sussman avidly collects fine art.

He also invests in the healing arts afforded to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.

His passions took form after meeting Dr. Marc Agronin, a geriatric psychiatrist at Miami Jewish Health and expert on aging. Sussman was captivated by Dr. Agronin’s brainchild, a loving, village environment where those with Alzheimer’s will live with purpose.

With his $15-million gift, The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare Village is closer to becoming a reality. Sussman is confident others will be moved to donate when they understand how the village will revolutionize eldercare. “It is my hope that the village will be built as soon as possible.”

Main entrance to The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare Village from the Miami Jewish Health campus.

“I thought about how ideally it would have suited my cherished dad, Michael, when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s,” says Edie Laquer, owner of Laquer Corporate Realty Group. “I’m certain he would have retained his active lifestyle longer and his decline would not have taken the toll it did on me and my mom.”

‘The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare Village is a model for what senior facilities should be.’

Louis Wolfson III, chairman of The Mitchell Wolfson Senior Foundation and immediate past chairman of the Miami Jewish Health Foundation Board of Directors, is an outspoken advocate. “The heart of EmpathiCare aligns perfectly with our desire to support Miami’s growing aging population.”

Edie Laquer Foundation Grand Gateway providing a covered pavilion and pick-up/drop-off location for residents and visitors

“The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare Village is a model for what senior facilities should be,” says Jeffrey Freimark, president and CEO at Miami Jewish Health.

To learn more, please contact Churé Gladwell, vice president and chief development officer, Miami Jewish Health Foundation, at 305-762-1409 or cgladwell@miamijewishhealth.org.

Aerial view of The S. Donald Sussman EmpathiCare village and adjoining parking garage, facing west from the Miami Jewish Health campus.

The post Donald Sussman’s $15-million gift helps create EmpathiCare Village, part of Miami Jewish Health appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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Get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of how our 2018 Art Basel cover shoot with Jessica Goldman Srebnick came together in Wynwood:

INDULGE Art Basel 2018 – Behind the Scenes

We’re so ready to BASEL. Here’s a peek behind the scenes in the making of our Art Basel 2018 Issue with cover star Jessica Goldman Srebnick of Goldman Properties!Video by Katrina Vargas VilaPhotography by Nick Garcia PhotographyFashion Direction and Styling by Elysze HeldHair by Danny JelacaMakeup by Osvaldo PerezEditor in Chief Evan BennPhotography Production by Angela BonillaPhotography Assistance by Ricardo MestreStyling Assistance by Angelica Poise ZieglerFashion Assistance by Samantha Torres, Simone Ganthier and Elisa RamirezFilmed on Location at Wynwood Walls, Goldman Global Arts Gallery andGoldman Properties

Posted by Miami Indulge Magazine on Friday, November 30, 2018

The post Behind the scenes of our Art Basel cover shoot at Wynwood Walls appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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Gilda Garza, one of the most exciting up-and-coming artists at Art Basel Miami Beach 2018, will be meeting fans at Bar Bevy (90 Northeast 39th Street) on Thursday, December 6, from 6 to 10:30 p.m. Her art has been featured on the cover of Playboy magazine and has been incorporated into a one-of-a-kind design from Roberto Cavalli. Her work also has been on display at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. For more information and to RSVP, email artsylaevents@gmail.com.
Gilda Garza with her one-of-a-kind piece in collaboration with Roberto Cavalli.

The post A chance to meet up-and-coming artist Gilda Garza in Miami appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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Jaimie Nicole Shepard, founder and head designer of Jaimie Nicole, created her luxury jewelry brand out of necessity. She couldn’t find any bracelets that fit the way she liked, so she started making custom bracelets from the comfort of her couch. Shepard received compliments for her creations, and eventually she discovered her hidden passion for jewelry design. With a newfound confidence, she officially launched Jaimie Nicole in 2009.

A Miami native, Shepard was inspired by all the culture and color in the Magic City, which have influenced her collections. In recent years, Jaimie Nicole’s success has skyrocketed. Shepard spoke with INDULGE about what she sees for the future of her line and how she hopes to make every woman feel beautiful and confident.

Courtesy Jaimie Nicole.

How has growing up in Miami influenced your decision to design jewelry and start your own business?

“Having Miami as my home has been the perfect place to find confidence and explore several different career paths. The city has such an entrepreneurial spirit, and I am grateful that I stumbled upon a dream I didn’t know I had. Deciding to design jewelry was a leap of faith, and I hope that anyone wanting to start a business believes in themselves and takes a chance!”

At the University of Miami, you pursued a double major in business law and history. So what inspired you to make the jump into the world of jewelry design?

“Funny enough, I started making jewelry out of a selfish desire to wear cool beaded bracelets. I have tiny wrists, and no bracelets would fit me. I decided to source some gemstones from local bead stores and started stringing together bracelets — there was a lot of trial and error (more error!). Eventually I got the hang of it and, with compliments, I gained confidence. And with confidence, I started a career!”

What is the design process like for you?

“I always keep my eyes open and draw a lot of inspiration from my clients and people walking on the street. Beauty is all around us, especially in Miami, and I never want to miss an opportunity to feel inspired. The design process begins with a team collaboration. We all sit down and discuss the colors we are gravitating toward, new styles we want to incorporate and anything that has caught our eye over the last season. It is always fun to see the designs evolve from start to finish.” 

This year’s holiday collection is all blue and gold circles. What was the inspiration behind the collection?

“I stumbled upon a fabulous photo that felt just right for our inspiration to design our holiday collection. I interpreted it as our version of celestial. The vibrant blue enamel, regal gold and sparkle all fits together in the ‘out of this world’ theme for this year’s Jaimie Nicole Holiday collection.”

Golds, blues and other colors are hallmarks of Jaimie Nicole’s vibrant collection.

What trends are you excited about for the holiday season?

“This holiday season I am loving all the color! Most winter collections are black, burgundy and navy, but this year you can find every color in the rainbow on accessories and clothing. It is exciting to see everyone enjoying and wearing so much color!”

What does the typical Jaimie Nicole customer look like?

“The typical Jaimie Nicole customer is multifaceted – she is always on the go and needs an on-trend beautiful piece of jewelry to finish off her outfit in style. Jaimie Nicole has been worn by Adriana Lima and several local celebrities. Lynn Martinez from Deco Drive and Lisa Petrillo from CBS 4 are often seen wearing their Jaimie Nicole!”

When you launched Jaimie Nicole in 2009, did you ever imagine how much success you would have?

“Absolutely not! I am always flattered walking down the street and seeing someone wearing my collections or having a customer walk out of our Coral Gables showroom so excited to wear their new pieces. I am grateful for my loyal following and excited for what the future holds for Jaimie Nicole.”

What are your goals for the future?

“Our three top goals are happy customers, beautiful jewelry and a thriving e-commerce site!”

What is the message you want to spread with Jaimie Nicole Jewelry?

“A confident and happy woman is the most beautiful, both inside and out. At Jaimie Nicole we hope to build confidence in your accessory wearing. If you love it, we love it!”

The Jaimie Nicole Showroom is located at 4649 Ponce de Leon Boulevard, Suite 305, Coral Gables; 305-351-7704. 

The post The founder and designer of Jaimie Nicole tells her jewelry line’s story, from dream to reality appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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To Jessica Goldman Srebnick, walls are bridges, not barriers. The Wynwood Walls — in essence an outdoor museum of highly sophisticated street art — uses walls to showcase artwork rather than shield public access.

“Museums and galleries are wonderful,” Goldman Srebnick said. “But there’s also an intimidation factor for the majority of people to go to a museum or gallery. Whereas, if you put it out on the street and you put it in an open-air place, it becomes much less intimidating, and, I hope, we have helped to democratize art and make it for everybody.”

As curator of the Wynwood Walls, Goldman Srebnick can directly communicate with the million or so people said to visit the colorful Miami neighborhood each year. Every Miami Art Week for the past nine years, Goldman Srebnick and her family have invited artists to use the exterior walls of their 80,000-square-foot, six-building complex in the heart of Wynwood to convey special messages. The theme this year: Beyond Words.

Jessica Goldman Srebnick wears a dress by Zero + Maria Cornejo from Barneys New York, jewelry by Sevan Biçakçi at Miami Design District. Artwork: Tristan Eaton. Photograph by Nick Garcia. Styling by Elysze Held.INDULGE Democratizing Art

“I felt like we had this amazing platform,” Goldman Srebnick, 48, said to INDULGE during an exclusive interview in her Miami Beach. “Why not use that platform to talk about something that was important to me, and something that was important to us as a company, something that was important to our family? So, we started this program of coming up with a theme. Super simple, and it can mean different things to different people. When we try to create themes, in some ways we leave them a little open-ended so that you can interpret what that theme means to you.”

Goldman Srebnick curated her first themed show in 2013. It was a way to honor her father, Tony Goldman, the legendary real estate developer who died the year before at age 68. Three years before his death, Goldman, along with gallerist Jeffrey Deitch, created the Wynwood Walls using the outer walls of warehouses as a blank canvas.

Tony Goldman was a visionary who revitalized distressed properties. He helped transform Miami Beach from God’s waiting room into the vibrant seaside city it is today and is hailed as the savior of SoHo, Wall Street and Center City Philadelphia. He also saw promise in Wynwood, Miami’s belle-laide neighborhood.

In 1968, he was not yet 25 when he founded Goldman Properties and purchased his first property — mostly with money given as wedding gifts. His daughter now heads the company, which turns 50 this December. In addition to her role as CEO of Goldman Properties, she also teamed up with artist Peter Tunney in 2015 to found Goldman Global Arts.

Tunney refers to his partner as “our earth mother, guiding light and patron saint.”

Goldman Srebnick in dress and shoes by Dolce & Gabbana from Neiman Marcus at Merrick Park; earrings by Daniella Kronfle, necklace and rings by Sevan Biçakçi at Miami Design District. Artwork of Tony Goldman by Brian Batt. Photograph by Nick Garcia. Styling by Elysze Held.INDULGE Get People Talking

Through their partnership, they explore ways to provide art to both private and public collections. Additionally, they established a gallery behind the Wynwood Walls in a place called the Wynwood Garden. The Goldman Global Arts gallery provides an avenue for some 70 street artists from 26 countries around the world to sell their work. The rotating exhibition mainly features the work of artists who have exhibited on the Wynwood Walls.

‘Wynwood has become radically transformed in the years that Jessica has taken over,’ says Craig Robins.

This year during Art Basel Miami Beach, the gallery is slated to host a solo exhibition by Vhils, the tag used by Portuguese street artist Alexandre Farto.

“I want to hijack Art Basel and have everyone talking about our show,” said Tunney, who also goes by his initials, P.T. “I’m like P.T. Barnum.”

He said envisions the show opening with visitors walking through one of Vhils’ creations on the museum’s outer front wall. “My vision is that Vhils jackhammers the whole wall, and you enter through the sculpture.”

Urban artist Fin DAC painted a 4,000-square-foot mural of a woman in a bathtub on the roof of Goldman Global Arts at Wynwood Walls.INDULGE Art for Sports Fans

Known for the monumental portraits he creates by chiseling concrete walls, Vhils was one of the first artists displayed at the Wynwood Walls. He also features prominently in the first major project of Goldman Global Arts — the transformation two years ago of the Hard Rock Stadium into a monumental public art venue that appeals to sports fans and art aficionados alike.

‘Do not come to me with problems. Come to me with solutions,’ Goldman Srebnick says.

The mural Vhils created outside the stadium’s 72 Club even appeals to former Dolphins coach Don Shula.

“I really enjoy seeing the chiseled, concrete art piece and am honored to have my likeness there,” Shula said in an email. “I look pretty tough! Miami is well known to the world for being a city where you can enjoy seeing or purchasing fine, contemporary art.” 

He also praised Goldman Srebnick for making the mural and other works possible, lauding her for “an excellent job providing football fans the opportunity to experience art at the Hard Rock Stadium, which is unexpected and an added bonus to game day.”

Dress by Balmain and shoes by Balenciaga from Neiman Marcus at Merrick Park, “Serpenti” necklace, earrings and bracelet by Bulgari at Miami Design District. Artwork: Fin DAC. Photograph by Nick Garcia. Styling by Elysze Held.INDULGE On a Different Path

In light of such monumental success, it’s almost hard to believe that Goldman Srebnick once envisioned a totally different life. After studying psychology Boston University, she planned to take a gap year working at Saks Fifth Avenue before returning to school to obtain her doctorate and become a child psychologist. Instead, she got accepted into the Saks executive training program and ended up becoming the associate fashion director for the company by the time she left, five years later.

‘In family business, you have a responsibility to contribute.’

Again, she had no intention of going into the family business. Instead, she wanted to go to Harvard for an MBA. “It was really just a conversation with my mother that changed the trajectory of my life,” she said. “My mother said, ‘You really should go work for your father and take that opportunity. He’s a brilliant thinker. There’s no one who would want to see you succeed more than him. Take the opportunity and learn from him.’”

But Goldman Srebnick was still leery.

“I told my dad that I would give him a one-year contract, because I was really worried,” she said. “I had this amazing relationship, this amazing father-daughter relationship, and I didn’t want to damage that. So I said, let’s try it for one year, because I wanted to be able to have an elegant out if it wasn’t working.”

A Family Affair

That year she worked in all the different parts of the business and wanted to make sure she was making a contribution. “I’m a big believer that family business doesn’t just mean that you have this pot to pull from,” she said. “Family business is just the opposite. You have a responsibility to contribute.” 

She also believes that young people should work somewhere else before joining the family business. Even though you may know the business inside and out from discussions at the family dinner table, she warns against taking the easy route, because others likely will question whether you advanced based solely by birth.

“I think you have to go out into the world and be known for your first name and not your last name,” she said with emphasis. “I think it’s really important. I think that when you come back, you have to find your own way of contributing, different from other members of the family.”

She called her one-year experiment “going to the Tony Goldman School of Business,” and laughed, “My one year is up, and I blink and it’s been 21 years.”

Although the company has 250 employees with a combined employment of 1,251 years, Tony Goldman relied most heavily upon his immediate family — his wife, Janet; son, Joey; and daughter, Jessica. “My dad used to say we’re like a table with four legs,” she said. “And then one of the legs is no longer there, and that creates an imbalance in your family.”

Dress by Marc Jacobs from Neiman Marcus at Merrick Park, jewelry by Guerreiro at Miami Design District. Artwork: Risk (Kelly Graval). Photograph by Nick Garcia. Styling by Elysze Held.INDULGE Lessons in Confidence

Goldman Srebnick emphasizes the importance of family unity as part of the business model for Goldman Properties. That business model also includes injecting life into rundown neighborhoods by serving up good food. “Part of the model that we believe helps to ignite neighborhoods is to have a place to go to,” she said. “People will go into a neighborhood that’s a sketchy neighborhood for a really great restaurant. Unlike other things, that turns the lights on in the neighborhood. Then also, people want to see that somebody else is committed. Owning and operating your own restaurant shows our commitment to a neighborhood.” In Wynwood, Goldman opened two restaurants: Her brother runs Joey’s, and she runs Wynwood Kitchen & Bar.

In addition to running his namesake restaurant, Joey Goldman plays a strategic role in the company. So does his mother, who founded a successful jewelry operation called Fragments before becoming chair of Goldman Properties after her husband’s death. “Everybody talks about my dad, and some talk about me,” Goldman Srebnick said. “But I always want to be super respectful to my mother and my brother. I think that collaboration is really important for leaders. At the end of the day, somebody has to make a decision. It has to be one person. So, a lot of times that falls to me. Sometimes it falls to my mother.”

Goldman Srebnick started working for her father in September 1997. A year later he shipped her to Miami. “He said, ‘I’ve got a hotel for you to open,’” she remembered. “I knew nothing of the hotel business. He just tossed me into the deep end. There were many days that I called him up, wanting to cry. He said, ‘I wouldn’t have put you in that role if I didn’t think you could do it.’”

Goldman was training his daughter to think for herself and be confident in her decisions.

“He had really high expectations of me,” she said. “It was not easy. He always used to say to me, ‘Do not come to me with problems. Come to me with solutions.’”

She said she hopes to one day memorialize his wisdom and business acumen in a book called Lessons from a Father to a Daughter. It’s another tribute to her father, “almost like Natalie Cole when she sang that song with her father,” Goldman Srebnick said. “He had passed. It was pretty amazing at the time that you could actually do that.”

Dress by Oscar de la Renta from Neiman Marcus at Merrick Park, “Diva’s Dream” necklace and earrings by Bulgari at Miami Design District. Artwork: Audrey Kawasaki. Photograph by Nick Garcia. Styling by Elysze Held.INDULGE Friend and Collaborator

Craig Robins, who developed the Miami Design District, was close with Tony Goldman and remains close with Goldman Srebnick. Tony Goldman was his first business partner and “an important teacher,” he said. While his former partner saw the potential in Wynwood, he credits Goldman Srebnick for expanding on a good idea.

“Tony was definitely a catalyst for putting Wynwood on the map,” Robins said. “But it’s become radically transformed in the years that Jessica has taken over. It’s become a much bigger, more solid place. She’s really managed to continue and nurture that area and bring it to another level.”

Robins and his family hold a special place in Goldman Srebnick’s heart. Robins’ sister, Sandy, introduced Goldman Srebnick to her husband, Scott Srebnick, a Harvard-educated criminal defense attorney.

Jessica Goldman Srebnick and her husband, Scott Srebnick, met on a blind date. Her sweatshirt by Moschino, pants by Urban Zen, earrings by Flowen fl-o-wen.com), bracelets by Guerreiro. Rock artwork: Ken Hiratsuka. Photograph by Nick Garcia. Styling by Elysze Held.INDULGE Built to Last

“She fixed us up on a blind date,” Goldman Srebnick said. “He picked me up and we went to lunch. I would not give him dinner, just lunch.” They dined on Ocean Drive and played tennis afterward. “I wanted him to see me in a tennis dress,” she said with a sly grin. Seven months later, they were engaged.

“When you know, you know,” she said. “We got married at Vizcaya. And we will be married 18 years. I love him more now than ever. I’m very lucky. We have a beautiful, beautiful marriage.”

They have three sons, ages 11 to 16, and live in a house filled with art that reflects Goldman Srebnick’s work with the Wynwood Walls. In the living room, near the grand piano and conga drums, hangs a word painting by Tunney: LOVE MORE. Just off the kitchen is a large mandala mural by Cryptik that covers an entire wall. Hidden inside the calligraphic design is the Gandhi quote: “Where there is love, there is life.”

When asked if her husband might one day become the fourth leg of the table at the family firm, Goldman Srebnick looks heavenward. She smiles and raises both arms high in silent ecstasy.

Jessica Goldman Srebnick and husband Scott Srebnick share a moment in front of a sculptural work by artist Bordalo II. She wears a sweater and skirt by Morgane Le Fay New York, boots by Jimmy Choo, and jewelry by Flowen (fl-o-wen.com). Photograph by Nick Garcia. Styling by Elysze Held. Six Years of Themed Wynwood Walls

Every year, Jessica Goldman Srebnick brings in artists to create works on the Wynwood Walls that revolve around a theme.

* 2013: Women on the Walls. “As a new woman CEO, it was important for me to shine a light on women artists and push the discussion on women’s leadership,” Goldman Srebnick said.

* 2014: The Art of Collaboration. “It was putting together artists who had never worked together before, because I feel that when we collaborate it brings out the best in us.”

* 2015: Walls of Change. “Wynwood was really an incredible example of how taking a gravel parking lot and turning that into one of the most beautiful outdoor street art museums in the world was so simple, but transformed the community.”

* 2016: Fear Less. “For me, that resonates not just with the general feeling that I was feeling at the time in our country, in our cities, in the world. I also recognize that what we do as a company — Goldman Properties — what we’ve been doing for 50 years now is that we go into neighborhoods that people fear. In order to fear less, you have be fearless. So, since I was 7 years old, we’ve been going into neighborhoods and we don’t think twice about the fact that they are dilapidated or crime-ridden or hopeless.  There is that element of fearlessness that’s necessary to be a pioneer.”

* 2017: humanKIND. “I just felt like people needed to be kinder to one another.”

* 2018: Beyond Words. Peter Tunney texted this year’s theme to his partner, noting the theme is apt on so many levels. “I think that we could talk about politics – anyway you want to slice it, it looks beyond words,” Tunney said. “For me, one of the heaviest parts of Beyond Words is the violence and man’s inhumanity to man. I always thought, and was hopeful, growing up in the ’60s, that we would get smarter and more peaceful and give peace a chance. It doesn’t quite look like that to me. So, it’s beyond words.” —SM

Editorial Credits

Words by Siobhan Morrissey

Photography by Nick Garcia

Fashion Direction and Styling by Elysze Held

Hair by Danny Jelaca

Makeup by Osvaldo Perez

Story Design by John Michael Coto

Story Editing by Evan S. Benn

Photography Production by Angela Bonilla

Photography Assistance by Ricardo Mestre

Styling Assistance by Angelica Poise Ziegler

Fashion Assistance by Samantha Torres, Simone Ganthier and Elisa Ramirez

Photographed on Location at Wynwood Walls, Goldman Global Arts and Goldman Properties

The post Jessica Goldman Srebnick carries the creative torch ignited by her father appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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Where does one begin when there’s so much to share in this year’s INDULGE Art Basel issue? Yes, our very own mini-masterpiece is bigger and better than ever! Our contributors have truly outdone themselves with inspiring stories and frame-worthy photos. And because we’ve artfully covered everything going on around town, I encourage you to pick up your day-planner as you page through the issue to map out your own personalized itinerary.

Let’s get started with a couple of unique options — first, the nation’s largest map fair. Even if you think that maps have gone the way of the dinosaurs in the day of GPS, I recommend this fascinating event. As Michael Perlman, CEO of BrandsMart USA, says, “People stumble into it all the time and get hooked.” Next, gather your pals for Nu Deco Ensemble’s biggest concert yet. They’ll bring their own talented friends and take on a range of genres sure to stir the soul – like the music of late, great Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin. 

On the heels of some stirring music, it’s time for some mind-blowing art. Lean in to The Guide to find out what’s new at this year’s Miami Art Week. This issue comes alive with insider tips about spectacular exhibitions, can’t-miss events and what to wear to the whirlwind of parties. Two of my personal favorites are Art Miami and CONTEXT, which— thanks to Nick Korniloff — is now permanently located at the old Miami Herald site, where you can enjoy stunning works of art while taking in the breathtaking views of Biscayne Bay.

Lesley DeCanio. Photograph by Nick Garcia.INDULGE

Art for me has always been about storytelling, and in this issue we paint with a fine-detail brush and jewel-tone colors for our Movers department. Weaving together art and science, public artist Xavier Cortada is on a mission to promote climate change awareness through a unique eco-minded medium, while actively engaging 6,000 of his Pinecrest neighbors. Selfishly, I can only hope he ventures a little north and paints similarly compelling messages across Miami. If you like your art a bit more whimsical, and ’80s music and neon lights make you happy, so will Daniella Kronfle’s Midnight Color Code collection. This Miami-based haute jewelry designer has a flair for creating colorful, daring pieces that are elegant yet modern; I recommend beginning your collection with one of her exquisite Charmed Collection amulets.

While Art Week has much to offer, we would never neglect your passion for wine and travel. Far from your typical fancy wine guy, Heath Porter of Heathen Wine Tours is our guide to international vineyards and wine cellars “without pretense or snobbery.” For more travel inspiration for foodies and art lovers, writer Eric Barton documents his recent trip through Peru — from the hip neighborhoods of Lima to the vivid colors of the Rainbow Mountain of Vinicunca — in our Escape feature. A little closer to home, the Bahamas are calling — specifically, the new Rosewood Baha Mar, to which you can plot your next trip with our Staycation column.

So whether you’re sipping a glass of Champagne at Art Basel Miami Beach or exploring the boutiques of the Design District, we hope that this issue of INDULGE, like a talented sommelier, is your trusted guide to the many buzzworthy attractions that make winter in Miami so memorable.

INDULGE Advertising 

VP of Advertising and INDULGE Publisher Lesley DeCanio

Associate INDULGE Publisher Kristina Schulz-Corrales

Strategic Accounts Director Orlando Comas

SMB Director Michael Jellson

SMB Managers Donna Boase, Omar Mercado

Real Estate & Travel Accounts Manager Greg Romanelli

Events & Partnerships Manager Silvia Larrieu

Automotive Accounts Manager George Dagnesses

Magazine Coordinator Yvonne Cloud

Advertising, sales and distribution information: kcorrales@miamiherald.com; 305-376-2801.

The post From the Publisher: Miami takes flight during Art Basel Miami Beach appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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As a Miami transplant, I’m always fascinated to hear stories of how others landed here. The pages of this special Art Basel issue are filled with people who, like me, came from other places as well as people who were raised here and left for a while until the magnetic pull of the Magic City brought them back.

Our cover star, Jessica Goldman Srebnick, is a New York native who came to Miami two decades ago to learn the family business from her father, the late real estate maven Tony Goldman. She told him she’d stay here for a year. Next thing you know, she says, “my one year is up, and I blink and it’s been 21 years.”

The cover photograph of Jessica that accompanies our feature story by Siobhan Morrissey was shot by Nick Garcia at Jessica’s Wynwood office. She’s standing in front of a painting by Miami artist Tatiana Suarez. It’s called Luna Bloom, and Tatiana painted it this year while she was pregnant with her daughter, Luna, who was born in September.

Inspired by Tatiana’s painting, we asked pastry chef Rebekah Brooks to re-create it, in cake form, for our Recipe feature. Rebekah is also a Miami transplant, coming here from Vancouver, where she worked as a line cook at the Four Seasons before finding her calling in Miami as a master cake maker.    

Local artist Troy Simmons moved from Texas when his wife took a job here. Now Miami’s urban core is a major aesthetic of his work, which frequently embeds vibrant colors and geometric patterns into concrete slabs. Morel Doucet, one of four Miami artists to know who are profiled by veteran INDULGE writer Nicole Martinez, departed Miami for a spell to attend art school in Maryland. He returned, he says, because he “wanted to have a real impact on the community in which I was raised.”   

Tens of thousands of visitors from all over the world will descend on Miami during Art Basel Miami Beach. I’m guessing that more than a few of them will decide to come back soon or stick around permanently. I think every page of this issue — and every person we’ve spotlighted — gives a compelling reason why they should.

The Art of INDULGE

This issue marks my 20th edition as editor. Here’s a look back at five of my favorite images of that we’ve run so far. 

1. Dr. Paul George: June 2016. This portrait by Nick Garcia at HistoryMiami earned INDULGE our first gold-medal Charlie Award from the Florida Magazine Association. We rarely run black-and-white photos, but this serves as a reminder of how powerful such images can be.   

Photograph by Nick Garcia.INDULGE

2. Arson Restaurant: June 2017. Felipe Cuevas shoots all of INDULGE’s food photography. Every time he turns in a new assignment, the pictures are so striking I wind up making one my computer background image.

Photograph by Felipe Cuevas.INDULGE

3. Pauldine France: December 2017. We ran 12 Movers profiles in last year’s Art Basel issue, and this one by Andrew Innerarity is the one that I’ll always remember. That vivid red dress, those piercing eyes, the symmetrical cinder-block lines.   

Photograph by Andrew Innerarity.INDULGE

4. Deborah Mitchell: December 2017. Sometimes you get a subject who’s just a really great sport. Christina Mendenhall and Carina Mask persuaded Deborah Mitchell to wade into the Everglades for this shot; the rainbow in the background was icing on the cake.

Photograph by Carina Mask and Christina Mendenhall.INDULGE

5. MadLab Creamery: June 2018. We’ve never not had a person on the cover of INDULGE, but we came close to putting this cone on the cover of our latest summer issue. This pic by Felipe is so good you can almost taste it, and the colors and over-the-top toppings are just so Miami.

Photograph by Felipe Cuevas.INDULGE INDULGE Editorial Masthead

PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER ALEXANDRA VILLOCH

Editor in Chief Evan S. Benn

Contributing Design Director John Michael Coto

Miami Herald Special Publications Manager Roberto Hernández-Alende

Contributing Beauty Editor Jennifer Scruby

Contributing Style Editor Claudia Miyar

Contributing Stylist Elysze Held

Contributing Automotive Editor Mark Baruth

Contributing Editorial Assistant Christiana Lilly

Contributing Writers Stephanie Sayfie Aagaard, Jennifer Agress, Eric Barton, Lori Capullo, Angela Caraway-Carlton, Lauren Comander, Charlie Crespo, Christie Galeano-DeMott, Josie Gulliksen, Alona Abbady Martinez, Nicole Martinez, Marcia Morgado, Siobhan Morrissey, Erin Michelle Newberg, Heath Porter, Christian Portilla, Minhae Shim Roth

Contributing Photographers Felipe Cuevas, Nick Garcia, Manny Hernandez, Andrew Innerarity, Carina Mask, Christina Mendenhall

Contributing Social Media Manager Katrina Vargas Vila

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Intern Abigail Castro

Color Correction Wilbert MooYoung

Marketing and Community Partnerships Director Lourdes M. Alvarez

The post From the Editor: Art Basel issue points to the Magic City’s magnetic pull appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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Every time Rebekah Brooks and her dad would take on projects, he always had an intricate, detailed plan.

It didn’t matter if it was house repairs or her fourth-grade science experiment. Her father, a truck driver with a knack for disciplined schedules, insisted on a set of exacting steps to ensure perfection.

“I was his little helper,” she said. “I would try to predict his next move. I wanted to hand him the wrench he needed before he asked.”

That methodical approach is part of what has made Brooks a master at making cakes. While other bakers may be content with writing Happy Birthday in icing or decorating with a few dyed-sugar stars, Brooks creates some of the most ornate, over-the-top cakes Miami has ever seen. Think Millennium Falcon in a field of stars, a fairy house floating above a fantastical garden, or a purple octopus perched atop an underwater world.

Rebekah Brooks re-created a painting called Luna Bloom by Miami artist Tatiana Suarez in cake form. The painting appears on the cover of INDULGE’s 2018 Art Basel issue. Photograph by Felipe Cuevas.INDULGE Finding Her Creative Outlet

Back in 2002, Brooks was a line cook at the Four Seasons in her hometown of Vancouver. She started dating a fellow cook there who would become her husband: Aaron Brooks, now executive chef at Edge Steak & Bar at the Four Seasons Miami. In 2008, after their daughter was born, Rebekah Brooks took a break from restaurant life and found herself in need of a creative outlet.

She started making and decorating cakes for friends’ birthdays and anniversaries. Every time she baked, she’d make the cake a bit more complicated than the last time. She used the skill her dad taught her: Come up with a plan and execute it.

‘It took me years to find a cake recipe I was happy with.’

One of her first complex projects was a massive carrot cake with cream-cheese frosting to serve 60 people. She made it in the shape of a tractor-trailer and served it at a backyard retirement party: her father’s.

“Oh, that one was stressful,” Brooks said. “I learned that fondant doesn’t stick to cream-cheese frosting.”

Rebekah Brooks. Photograph by Felipe Cuevas.INDULGE Cakes That Put Personality on Display

Word of her cakes has spread in large part because of the photos she uploads to Instagram (@rebekahbrookscakedesign). Her contracts usually begin with a direct message followed by a phone call to assess the client’s hobbies and charisma. Each cake “is like a glimpse into that person’s personality,” Brooks said. “I try to put a little piece of them into it.”

It’s a lot of pressure to bake a cake that will be the centerpiece of a milestone moment, she said, acknowledging that she often dreads the big reveal, fearing they’ll hate it. (That hasn’t happened yet.)

For the base recipe she shared with INDULGE, Brooks picked her vanilla buttermilk batter. Using the perfectionist planning her father taught her, Brooks studied dozens, maybe hundreds, of vanilla cake recipes before creating her own. It rethinks the standard dry-then-wet method of ingredient mixing, employing a technique closer to biscuit making.

“It took me years to find a cake recipe I was happy with,” she said. “This is my go-to. That’s my recipe now.”

Recipe: Vanilla Buttermilk Cake

By Rebekah Brooks

MAKES 1 CAKE

INGREDIENTS

2 1/2 sticks butter, at room temperature

2 1/2 cups white sugar

3 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 cups plus 1 tablespoon buttermilk

5 whole eggs

2 egg yolks

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

  1. In a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, combine butter, sugar and flour. After it becomes sandy in texture, slowly add buttermilk. Once incorporated, turn mixer to high and whip until thick and fluffy. Scrape bowl and mix once more to make sure it’s combined.
  2. In a separate bowl, use a stick blender to blitz eggs, yolks and vanilla. Add egg mixture to bowl of stand mixer with butter, sugar and flour. Use low setting to combine.
  3. Pour batter into cake pans and bake at 325 degrees until middle of cake springs back to touch — about 20-30 minutes, depending on depth of pan.

Click here for more recipes from INDULGE

The post Sweet success: Master cake maker Rebekah Brooks creates magic in fondant and icing appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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Eight pieces of artwork and menswear that are inspired by geometry:

1. Lynne Golob Gelfman thru 3.9 On view at Pérez Art Museum Miami, 1103 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami; 305-375-3000; pamm.org. 2. Tom Ford Abstract Angle Pocket Square $180. Tom Ford, 103 Northeast 39th Street, Miami; 786-749-2600; tomford.com.

3. Calvin Klein 205W39NYC Triangle Print T-Shirt $490. The Webster, 1220 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach; 305-674-7899; thewebstermiami.com. 4. Marni Nylon Tote Bag in Metro Print  $600. Marni, 3930 Northeast Second Avenue, Suite 100, Miami; 305-764-3357; marni.com. 5. Saint Laurent Boxy Graphic Sweater  $1,350. Saint Laurent, 149 Northeast 40th Street, Miami; 305-704-4144; ysl.com. 6. Marcel Wanders Objets Nomades Diamond Screen  Price upon request. Louis Vuitton, 140 Northeast 39th Street, Miami; 305-573-1366; louisvuitton.com. 7. Coach Patchwork Print Shirt $895. Coach, 701 South Miami Avenue, Miami; 305-350-7451; coach.com. 8. Ingrid Armchair Price upon request. Roche Bobois, 3454 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami; 786-655-4747; rochebobois.com.

More: Step into Miami Art Week with these bold and bright looks for women.   

The post Good gridlock: Geometric patterns that make menswear and art mathematically cool appeared first on Miami Indulge.

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