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As a new painter, or a painter looking for a change of direction, when you think of landscape paintings you probably think of Bob Ross – an array of wonderful meadows, valleys and talent-filled canvasses tinted with a hint of personality. His paintings instil a sense of calm and happiness, and at the heart of many landscape artists is that inner serenity in the face of chaos. Traditional landscape paintings are also without anger or hatred and are instead steeped in calmness.

A range of Landscapes

There are other forms of landscape aside from the traditional ones that we’d usually think of. Fantasy landscapes where the fields of purple contrast the skies of green, or the stormy skies that show a brewing sense of chaos, as well as the dramatic western landscapes. Whatever your preference, Mark Mitchell Paintings have a top tip on how you can make your landscape paintings that much better.

After learning about all the different shades of green, painting from photographic references, being adventurous and maybe creating a series, your paintings still aren’t perfect. Why? Well, you might be trying too hard.

Painting with Feeling

The first and foremost thing to remember is that it’s a painting, not a photograph. Yes, some artists have the uncanny ability to capture every detail and create a painting that can be mistaken for a photograph. But art is about emotion, not just about realism, so instead of focusing on capturing every little detail, you should be given the observer a sense of what it is. The objects and the overall scene should be recognisable, but the true test of a painting is the emotion behind it, so focusing on capturing the feeling of a landscape is arguably more important than making it look exactly like what it is.

Take Claude Monet as an example. Monet is widely regarded as a great landscape painter and is arguably one of the finest. Monet’s pieces aren’t what you would regard as intricate or photo-perfect, instead, they capture the feeling of summer’s or a day at the beach or a beautiful and flowery garden.

You can check out some of our landscape paintings at Mark Mitchell Paintings & Drawings, including pieces by George Weissbort and Terry Watts.

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Moving home with valuable paintings can be stressful. However, you can make sure that your treasured artworks arrive safe and undamaged by packing them correctly.

Have Your Paintings Appraised Prior to Moving

When planning your move, you should arrange to have pieces of high-value artwork appraised professionally to establish their current market and replacement values. This will enable you to take out adequate insurance cover for your artwork so that you’re protected in the event of theft or damage during transit.

It’s also a good idea to take photos of your paintings to accompany your home inventory to avoid confusion should anything go missing.

Packing Your Paintings

There are two different methods of packing artworks, depending on whether they are framed or not.

Framed paintings

An antique frame can be almost as valuable as the picture it contains. Framed paintings should therefore always be packed in special crates to prevent jarring and to shield the contents from damage by other adjacent items that may move around in transit.

You can obtain gallery-grade crates from specialist art dealers or you could obtain a custom-built wooden crate to fit the piece’s precise dimensions if you prefer. Before crating your paintings, cover the front of each piece with a sheet of acid-free glassine paper to prevent damage to the paint from moisture and dust.

Unframed paintings

Removing paintings from their frames can make them easier to transport and leaves them less open to damage.

Always wear cotton gloves when you are handling the painting so that the media remains undamaged. Lay each painting on its back on a sheet of cardboard, and then place a sheet of acid-free tissue paper over the front. Use small pieces of tape to secure the paper in place, sticking the tape to the reverse of the painting. Sandwich the painting between several more sheets of cardboard to form a sturdy foundation that won’t bend. Wrap the cardboard with tape to hold the package securely. Finish by placing the packaged picture between two sheets of corrugated cardboard and secure it with more tape.

Moving Your Paintings

Oil paint will melt in the excessive heat, so it is advisable to place valuable oils in storage until the cooler months of the year when it is safer to move them.

For more advice on how to keep your paintings safe during house moves, why not have a chat with the experts at Mark Mitchell Paintings and Drawings?

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In recent years more and more people have taken a shine to the art of sneaking around at night and painting your chosen image onto brick walls. From palaeolithic cave paintings to Banksy, the art of graffiti has been pretty popular for many years.


Parietal Art

Parietal art is also known as cave paintings and is often referred to as the original form of graffiti. This palaeolithic form of art is dated to about 40,000 years ago, and much like the graffiti of today consisted merely of images drawn onto the wall. Many different versions of this kind of art pop up often throughout history, found also in the Catacombs of Rome or at Pompeii.

Cornbread

Cornbread marks the beginning of modern graffiti and street art. It is the nickname of Darryl McCray, who is regarded as the father of modern graffiti. The story goes that Cornbread fell in love with a girl called Cynthia Custuss, and so in order to win her affections he wrote Cornbread loves Cynthia all over his local area.

Blek Le Rat and Stencils

After years of modern graffiti being centred on ‘tagging’ your name across many creative places, Xavier Prou came onto the scene. As Blek Le Rat, he created art on the streets of Paris and became known as the father of stencil graffiti. Inspired by the work of early New York graffiti, Blek Le Rat set about taking his art to the public of Paris, often using themes of social consciousness. It is of popular opinion that Banksy was heavily influenced by Blek Le Rat’s work.

Banksy

Banksy transformed street art and graffiti in the 21st century. He started as a freehand graffiti artist in the 90’s within the famous underground graffiti scene in Bristol. By 2000, he had switched to stencil art, making him one of the most talked about graffiti artists in the art and wider world. His artwork is now worth a small fortune, and demand for his work is high.
Are you interested in learning more about art, or discovering Mark Mitchell‘s collection? Contact us today.

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It’s a commonly held belief that you have to be rich to own your own original artworks. It isn’t true – you can buy gorgeous original pieces of art at all price points – and an investment in an original artwork is one which could pay real dividends in the future.

Keeping Costs Down

If you’d like to own an original artwork but it feels like it’s out of your budget, take a look at some works by smaller local artists. It’s often possible to pick up works for a steal that are only likely to grow in value over the time that you own them.

You can also look for numbered prints; often cheaper than buying the original piece of art, they’re nonetheless produced in a limited, numbered run and therefore will retain their value relatively well. A print may also be easier to care for and store than, for instance, an oil painting.

Short Term Value

The biggest short-term value of a piece of art is its aesthetic value – unlike another investment which might sit in a bank account earning interest, you get to display your investment proudly for all to see.

There’s no other type of investment that you can enjoy being around every day without it losing value – jewellery or classic cars can be damaged by use, but a painting or artwork should be fine, hung on your wall.

Long Term Value

As long as you’ve invested wisely, your art will increase with value, and whether you choose to sell it in a decade or 50 years, you’ll often get much more for it than you paid. Of course, the aesthetic value might outweigh that, and you might decide to keep your original artwork for the rest of your life!

Buy Original Art

Are you looking for a piece of original art to hang in your home? Take a look at the beautiful pieces we have available by artists including Martin Swan, Stephen Rose and George Weissbort. If you’re interested in seeing a work in person or finding out more about what we do, don’t hesitate to get in touch.

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In art as in life, the 20th Century was one in which things moved quickly; the world of modern art exploded and art became a much greater part of the average person’s life.

We’ve taken a look at three of the 20th Century’s biggest art movements d what they were all about:

Modernism

Modernism actually began towards the end of the 19th Century, but it blossomed in the 20th. Fauvism in France and Die Brucke in Germany championed the use of non-representational colour, figurative painting and emotional expressionism, leading on from the impressionism of the 19th Century, in which the ‘impression’ of the subject was prioritised over exact realism.

Eventually, modernism broke up into many different movements, including Cubism (practised by Picasso) which introduced multiple viewpoints into a two-dimensional image.

Surrealism

Based on the psychology of Sigmund Freud, surrealism explored the hidden subtexts of dreams and the subconscious through the medium of art. It quickly became one of the most memorable art movements of the century thanks to the wacky subject matter and installations it spawned. They were instantly recognisable.

One of the biggest names in surrealism was Salvador Dali, who remains one of the last century’s most famous artists to this day.

Pop Art

Inspired by the brashness of commercial imagery and the growing consumerism of the developed world, Pop Art sprung onto the scene in the 1960s. Andy Warhol was one of the original artists involved in the Pop Art movement and became one of the first bonafide celebrity artists at the same time, as famous for his nightlife and girlfriends as he was for what he produced.

Warhol also moved the focus of art away from its production in some ways, often employing assistants to help create his works and for the first time, employing methods such as silk-screening which meant that art was easy to reproduce, and not necessarily by the original artist.

If you’re interested in purchasing original artwork for your home, contact us to find out more about the paintings and drawings that we have on offer right now.

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