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Exciting times! Issue 76 is out today and this month we’re all about making your (quilting) life easier. Inside the issue you’ll find 17 projects to play with. Take a look at our issue preview…

From retro rainbow stripes to Susi Bellingham’s Foundation Paper Pieced fox, EPP diamonds and and solid curved units, our August issue is packed with quick quilts to sew. Order your copy here and dive into our project gallery below.

Psst! We’re especially excited about this month’s gift – we’ve teamed up with quilting superstar Karlee Porter to bring you a set of 7 exclusive stencils, featuring modern patterns to boost your quilting game. We’d love to see what you make with them so remember to tag your snaps #lovequiltingmag

Look inside issue 76

We’ve all been there, right? After months of emotionally investing in a quilt top, we finally finish it… then face the daunting prospect of doing it justice with some machine quilting. Luckily Karlee Porter’s quilting stencils will inspire you to try some new tricks! Read all about them here.

Firecracker quilt by Art Gallery Fabrics

Transform simple stripes of fabric into a kaleidoscope of stars and hexagons in this easy to sew strip-pieced design.

In the Meadow quilt by Minki Kim

Pair precise points with sweet ditsy prints to make a big-block triangles quilt design that comes together quickly.

Harvest Falls quilt by Shannon Fraser

Whip up a quick quilt with super-size borders featuring fresh prints with a distinctly retro sensibility.

Fox and Flora by Susi Bellingham

Celebrate festival season by making a Foundation Paper Pieced friend complete with sweet felt flower garland.

Bright Spark quilt by Lorna Slessor

Push your curved piecing skills with rainbow waves and sunny circles in a minimal, print-mixing design.

Sky at Night quilt by Karen Lewis

Showcase monochrome shades with strip piecing and straight line quilting for a design that sparkles.

Monsoon Season by Nicole Calver

Mix up pattern and colour with a bold block design that places our favourite prints centre stage. Nicole shares her step-by-step guide for how to make a matching cushion in our bonus blog tutorial.

Desert Bloom quilt by Rebecca Reid

English Paper Piece interlocking diamonds in succulent-inspired shades to make a stylish circular stool cushion.

Crimson and Blush quilt by Daisy Aschehoug

Embrace curves and whip up classic Drunkard’s Path units in four solid shades to make our modern blossom design.

Paws and Plusses quilt block, by Sarah Griffiths

Give classic Bear Paw blocks a modern twist with the second design in our Medallion sew-along! Read more about our Block of the month series here.

The post Up your quilt skills on with issue 76 appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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Add the perfect finishing touch to your quilts with our brand new set of quilting stencils! Issue 76 of Love Patchwork & Quilting magazine comes with seven exclusive designs by Karlee Porter, to stitch your quilt sandwich together in style.

How many times have you stared at a quilt top wondering how on earth you’re going to quilt it?  Well delay no longer because we’re setting you up with seven striking geometric quilting stencils to help stitch intricate patterns with ease. And the good news is that they’re super easy to use!

Read on to find out how to make a Flying Geese mini quilt to practise your new quilting skills.

How to make a Flying Geese mini quilt You will need
  • Fabric A (teal) 7in x 61⁄2in
  • Fabric B (turquoise) 7in x 61⁄2in
  • Fabric C (light blue) 7in x 61⁄2in
  • Fabric D (grey) 14in x 61⁄2in
  • Fabric E (background fabric) 1⁄2yd
  • Backing fabric: 22in x 20in
  • Batting: 22in x 20in
  • Binding: 1⁄4yd
  • Quilting stencil
Finished size
  • 19in x 18in
Notes
  • Seam allowances are 1⁄4in, unless otherwise noted.
  • Press seams to one side, unless otherwise instructed.
  • RST = right sides together.
  • WOF = width of fabric.
Cutting out

Step one: From each of Fabrics A, B and C cut:

  • Two (2) 31⁄2in x 61⁄2in pieces.

Step two: From Fabric D cut:

  • Four (4) 31⁄2in x 61⁄2in pieces.

Step three: From Fabric E cut:

  • Twenty (20) 31⁄2in squares.
  • Two (2) 151⁄2in x 31⁄4in strips.
  • Two (2) 18in x 21⁄4in strips.

Step four: From the binding fabric cut:

  • Two (2) 21⁄2in x WOF strips.
Piecing the Flying Geese

Step five: Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse of every background fabric 31⁄2in square.

Step six: Arrange a background fabric 31⁄2in square at one end of a Fabric A 31⁄2in x 61⁄2in rectangle, RST. Sew along the drawn line, trim with a 1⁄4in seam allowance and press. Repeat on the opposite corner to make one Flying Geese unit (Fig 1).

Step seven: Repeat step 6 with each Fabric A, B, C and D 31⁄2in x 61⁄2in piece and all the background fabric 31⁄2in squares, to make ten Flying Geese units.

Assembling the quilt top

Step eight: Arrange the Flying Geese units in two columns of five, referring to the photography for colour placement. Sew the units into columns, then sew the columns together.

Step nine: Join the background 151⁄2in x 31⁄4in strips either side, press, then sew the background 18in x 21⁄4in strips at the top and bottom to finish the quilt top.

Quilting and finishing

Step ten: Press the quilt top and backing well. Make a quilt sandwich by placing the backing fabric right side down, the batting on top, then place the quilt top centrally and right side up. Baste the layers together using your preferred method.


Step eleven: Quilt as desired. We used one of the templates by Karlee Porter from issue 76 to quilt a repeat free-motion design (check out our video guide to using quilt stencils + Karlee’s top tips post). Place the stencil on top of your quilt sandwich in the position you want. We started in the bottom left hand corner. 

Step twelve: Use a fabric marker to draw through the gaps in the stencil, making sure that your marks are clear.

Step thirteen: Move the stencil to the side of your markings, joining the lines to create one continuous design (the packaging shows how the stencils join together). 

Step fourteen: Continue in this way, matching up the pattern until your quilt is covered. Use the lines as a guide while you quilt. We used a bright blue thread to make the quilting pop. Trim off the excess batting and backing fabric and square up the quilt.

Step fifteen: Sew the binding strips together end-to-end using diagonal seams. Press the seams open. Fold in half lengthways, wrong sides together, and press. Sew the binding to the right side of the quilt, creating a neat mitre at each corner. Fold the binding over to the back of the quilt and hand stitch in place to finish.

The post How to make a mini quilt with your quilting stencils! appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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Brighten up your sofa with Nicole Calver’s quick-sew cushion project! Read on for our step-by-step guide with extra jungle vibes.

We’re excited to feature a brand new quilt from one of our favourite designers, Nicole Calver, in issue 76 of Love Patchwork & Quilting magazine. Our new issue is out this week – scroll down to the bottom of this post for a sneaky peek of Nicole’s Monsoon Season quilt, featuring Leah Duncan’s Wild collection for Cloud9 Fabrics.

As an extra treat, Nicole’s created this bonus cushion project to help you continue the wild theme throughout your home. Read on to find out how to sew a patchwork cushion using jungle prints or why not sew your stash and use it to show off your favourite scrap fabrics?

How to make an easy patchwork cushion You will need…
  • Twelve (12) assorted scraps (at least 3in square)
  • Eight (8) assorted scraps (at least 51⁄2in square)
  • Border fabric: one (1) fat quarter
  • Backing fabric: one (1) 151⁄2in x 201⁄2in piece
  • Lining fabric: 19in x 24in
  • Batting: 19in x 24in
  • 18in zipper
  • Cushion pad
Finished size

15in x 20in

Notes
  • Seam allowances are 1⁄4in, unless otherwise noted.
  • RST = right sides together.
Fabrics used

Prints are from the Wild collection by Leah Duncan for Cloud9 Fabrics.

Solids are from the Cirrus Solids collection by Cloud9 Fabrics.

Cutting out

Step one: From the smaller assorted scraps cut twelve (12) 3in squares.

Step two: From the larger scraps cut two (2) 51⁄2in squares and six (6) 3in x 51⁄2in rectangles.

Step three: From the border fabric cut two (2) 3in x 201⁄2in strips.

Piecing the cushion

Step four: Using 3in squares make two four patch blocks, by sewing the squares in pairs, then sewing the pairs together.

Step five: Sew the remaining 3in squares into two pairs. Sew one 3in x 51⁄2in rectangle to each pair, sewing along the long edge, to make two 51⁄2in square blocks.

Step six: Sew the remaining four rectangles into two pairs down the long edges to make two 51⁄2in square blocks.

Assembling the cushion

Step seven: Sew the blocks and remaining 51⁄2in squares together in two rows of four. Refer to our photograph at the top of this post for placement. Press the seams in opposite directions row by row.

Step eight: Sew the rows together, nesting the seams together. Press row seams open. Sew the two border pieces to the top and bottom and press away from blocks.

Quilting and finishing

Step nine: Make a quilt sandwich with the cushion top, batting and lining and quilt as desired. Trim away excess batting and backing and square up.

Step ten: With RST sew one side of the zipper to the bottom edge of the cushion cover. Making sure the zipper is centered. Then again with RST sew the other side of the zipper to the backing fabric. Make sure that the zipper is lined up evenly on both the front and back pieces of the cushion.

Step eleven: Open the zipper up at least halfway. With RST and starting at one end of the zipper, sew around all sides of the cushion finishing at the opposite end of the zipper to close the cushion cover. Making sure to backstitch at the beginning and end. Clip your corners and turn right side out to finish.

Now sew a quilt top to match! Find Nicole Calver’s Monsoon Season quilt in issue 76 of Love Patchwork & Quilting magazine. 

The post Free project! ‘Wild Rumpus’ cushion by Nicole Calver appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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Happy days, it’s time to share our fresh batch of quilting templates. Read on to find all the essential patterns and shapes you need to sew the projects inside issue 76 of Love Patchwork & Quilting magazine.

Downloading your templates is handy if you don’t want to damage your magazine, or if we couldn’t fit a template on the magazine page at 100% size. It’s also super-useful if you’re a digital subscriber!

Whether you use Apple NewsZinio or Google Play, this is the easiest way to print your templates onto paper – no fuss!

This issue’s set includes everything you need to sew the projects in the magazine…

  • Fox & Flora: Sew our Foundation Paper Pieced fox pattern (below)
  • Crimson & Blush: Whip up classic Drunkard’s Path blocks
  • Desert Bloom: Get ready to enjoy some diamond English Paper Piecing
  • In the Meadow: Pair precise points with Minki Kim’s big-block quilt design
  • Firecracker: Use our triangle template to turn simple stripes into a kaleidoscope of stars (above)
  • Bright Spark: Use our curved piecing templates to sew rainbow waves
Download your issue 76 quilt templates here

The post Issue 76 quilting templates appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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We’ve noticed a small error in the instructions for Walk in the Park from issue 73.

On p36, steps 2 and 3 should read: ‘From the navy and hot pink prints cut three (3) 21/2in x WOF strips’, rather than three (3) 41/2in strips’.

We’re really sorry about this, we check every pattern as thoroughly as we can before we go to print, but this time an error has slipped through the net!

The post Pattern Correction: Issue 73 Walk in the Park appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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We talk to 3 designers for Riley Blake about what it’s like to do our dream job: creating and fondling quilting fabric for a living!

Amanda Herring, Gabrielle Neil and Sara Davies talk to LP&Q about how they got into fabric design, what the role involves and share their tips for anyone out there who would love to give it a go.

How did you get started in designing fabric for a living?

Amanda: I started out designing quilting patterns as a side hustle. I really wanted to design fabric, too, but I didn’t know how to do it. It took me almost a year to figure out how to do it and get my first collection designed. There were a lot of frustrating and tearful moments along the way, but the moment I got it was wonderful! After that, I was designing two lines a year for almost 10 years.

Gabrielle: My journey to becoming a fabric designer was definitely not straightforward – I didn’t dream about it as a child or know it was what I wanted to be when I ‘grew up’. As a kid I always loved drawing and art class was my favourite. When it was time to graduate high school I still wasn’t sure what I wanted to do, all I knew was that I wanted to spend my days doing something creative. I moved out of home and started a course in Interior Design, but realized it wasn’t for me. The next year I began a Bachelor of Graphic Design, which I loved, and halfway through completing my degree I was lucky enough to start working for Sue Daley as her graphic designer. It was through Sue that I was exposed to the world of textile design, and found a new passion. I suddenly found myself spending all my free time practicing repeats, experimenting with design ideas, and choosing colour palettes.

Sara: I’ve always been creative. From a very young age, I baked, knitted and crocheted with my mum and grandma. That creativity turned to business while I was studying for my business degree at university; I spotted a gap in the market for a papercraft tool that enabled crafters to create envelopes in all sizes. I worked with my dad (a retired engineer) to develop it, setting up the Crafter’s Companion business from my university bedroom in the process. The product was an overwhelming success, and from then on, we’ve worked hard to develop new, innovative products for the craft market. In recent years, we’ve established our sewing and soft crafts sector, which is where I’ve taken my background in designing paper to designing fabric. I never fail to get excited to see designs printed onto fabric – especially when I think of all the beautiful things that can be made with it!

Tell us about your latest fabric collections for Riley Blake

Amanda: My latest collection for Riley Blake is called Harry and Alice go to the Sea and it is a follow up collection from the first Harry and Alice collection. Harry and Alice like to go on adventures, and this time they are heading to the sea. Nautical collections are so fun, and can be made into so many great things. I particularly can’t wait to make a beach bag and beach accessories, but this line will look great in quilts and clothing as well. There is a fun panel with an anchor design that will be fantastic for appliqué, a few preprinted stitcheries and more. You could have fun for days with the panel alone!

Amanda’s Harry and Alice go to the Sea collection for Riley Blake in action

Gabrielle: My new collection for Riley Blake, Midnight Rose, is an exploration of my love for combining florals, geometrics and subtle textures. To be honest I didn’t have a clear vision for this collection when I started – I just began with what I love and the collection came together from there. While the colour palette is simple, the contrast in tone looks wonderful when used for quilting projects. It’s hard to pick a favourite thing about Midnight Rose, but I am proud of its subtle versatility. 

Gabrielle’s Midnight Rose range for Riley Blake. “I can imagine the damask and floral prints as women’s apparel and the navy geometric, honeycomb and bud prints as men’s shirts,” she says.

Sara: Sew Retro is a collection that I’m incredibly excited about, especially as it’s my first collection with Riley Blake. It’s inspired by taking a step back in today’s busy world, pausing and enjoying the present moment. The collection incorporates a playful and modern-retro twist on my love of florals and geometric patterns, and I’ve combined this with a fun and uplifting colour palette to evoke happy days of embracing the simple things in life.

Sara’s first collection for Riley Blake combines retro tones with on-trend geometrics. “I love that alongside this collection, we have also developed a co-ordinating papercraft range to make it so easy to create beautiful stitched and papercraft projects,” she says. “I can’t wait to use the collection myself to sew a handmade gift and create a co-ordinating card for a loved one.”

Do you sew or quilt yourself?

Amanda: I have been sewing since I was young. Sewing is one skill that always seems to come in handy, and I have been able to make clothes for my kids, curtains and pillows for my house, and, of course, lots of beautiful quilts. My teenage daughters are learning to sew, and I love that it is something that we can pass from one generation to the next.

Gabrielle: My mum is an enthusiastic crafter, so I grew up with her teaching me to use the sewing machine, learning some basic embroidery (I still don’t know how she gets her stitches so perfect), and spending AGES in our local fabric store while she looked around and bought what looked exactly like the fabric we already had at home. While working for Sue my appreciation and obsession with fabric grew and I now understand why Mum always took so long in fabric shop. Sue taught me her awesome English Paper Piecing method which I could then teach my mother, which was a nice change of roles for us.

I am definitely no sewing expert but I give it my best go and love designing quilts for my collections. Recently I find myself prioritizing my time to allow for painting and developing my textile design portfolio, but it is definitely nice to sit down every now and then with a small hand sewing project.

Sara:  I love to find time to take in the pleasures of sewing – it’s my way of relaxing. I’ve dabbled with sewing, knitting and crochet while growing up, but only recently picked up the needle and thread again having being inspired by the sewing sector of our company as they develop innovative die-cutting products. I’m already familiar with die-cutting in papercraft, and seeing the advantages of using the technique with fabric to cut multiple layers with ease and accuracy had me hooked! I love to make quilts, bags and purses, and you’ll often find me in our retail store unable to resist purchasing more beautiful fabrics for my next project.

What fabric collections or designers have inspired you recently?

Amanda: I always love Deena Rutter’s collections and am inspired by her kind and generous spirit; I’m also crushing on Hedge Rose by Kelly Paanaci. I think it’s a great line!

Gabrielle: I’m loving the palette of the Golden Days collection by Fancy Pants Designs, and the whimsical and undeniably nostalgic illustrations from Minki Kim. Also, I wouldn’t be a true floral addict if I didn’t say Liberty. I am always drawn to their timeless prints.

What advice would you give anyone reading who wants to follow in your footsteps and design fabrics for a living?

Amanda: It’s important to know the difference between who you are and what you create. Rejection will always be a part of design, and learning to separate yourself from what you create is important. It is natural to be attached to something create, but important to be able to see it from an outside perspective. Not everyone will love what you make, and that’s okay! Being open to critique is important, because that is the best way to make your creations even better.

 Gabrielle: Designing is tough. There are so many amazing artists in this world, and I think it is normal to question ‘am I good enough?’.  With social media it is so easy to see what fellow designers are working on, and all too easy to compare yourself against them. My advice is to be true to what you love, don’t get caught up chasing trends or comparing yourself against others. This is something that is a constant struggle for me, and I try to remind myself that if I love what I’m creating, chances are that many others will too. People respond to authenticity and there will always a be a niche for you. So, just be yourself! And work hard.

Sara: Follow your dream, but be prepared to work hard for it! Find a design style that suits you and combine this with thinking commercially about your designs; it’s all too easy to design for yourself and what you like, but you also need to appeal to your key customer for success. Don’t be afraid to showcase your designs and get your name out there and find those opportunities!

Sara’s Sew Retro fabrics are singing out to be stitched into modern quilt tops.

The post Behind the scenes: what’s it like being a fabric designer? appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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Drum roll please… we’re launching our new sewalong this week! We’ll bring you a new quilt block every month to help build your skills and create an eye-catching, modern medallion quilt, block by block.

Starting with issue 75, every issue of Love Patchwork & Quilting magazine will feature a new quilt block from the Paws and Pluses series by Sarah Griffiths. We’re kicking things off with this centre design (above), and this post is for everyone who’s joining in at home. Keep reading to find out how much fabric you’ll need to make the whole quilt, see the finished quilt diagram and discover Sarah’s top tips for sewing your quilt.

So, what’s the story?

This medallion quilt will feature modern adaptations of the Bear Paw block, as well as a plus block throughout. We’re starting in issue 75 with the centre of the quilt, and then in our coming issues we’ll talk you through how to sew up the outer rounds. Feature blocks for each of the rounds will be made up over six issues, with two colourways for each. Then towards the end, we’ll move on to the borders and finish up the quilt.

The Bear Paw block features plenty of Half Square-Triangles, and throughout the series Sarah will take you through several different methods to make these blocks – this way you’ll get to try out new techniques as we go. However, if you want to make your triangles using a different method, it’s fine to stick with your favourite way of piecing them. Your fabric requirements may alter slightly if you do this, so you might want to order a bit of extra fabric to be on the safe side, although we’ve allowed some margin in our requirements below to allow for this too.

If you’d like to sew along with us for this series, show us how you’re getting on! Share your finished blocks using the hashtag #pawsandplusessewalong.

What will the finished quilt look like?

To help give you an idea of how the finished quilt will look, here’s a sneak peak at our quilt layout diagram.

Finished size

84in square

You will need

To make the entire quilt:

  • Dark Blue (Pacific) 3⁄4yd
  • Medium Blue (Algeria) 3⁄4yd
  • Light Blue (Lake) 3⁄4yd
  • Dark Green (Ultra Marine) 3⁄4yd
  • Medium Green (Cypress) 3⁄4yd
  • Light Green (Ice Frappe) 1yd
  • Dark Yellow (Curry) 3⁄4yd
  • Medium Yellow (Duckling) 1⁄2yd
  • Light Yellow (Bright Idea) 1⁄2yd
  • Dark Red (Sangria) 3⁄4yd
  • Medium Red (Watermelon) 3⁄4yd
  • Light Red (Creamsicle) 3⁄4yd
  • White (includes binding) 7yds
  • Batting: 88in square
  • Backing fabric (at least 45in wide): 5yds
Sarah’s top tips for sewing this series
  • We’re making our blocks entirely from Kona Cotton Solids here on the Love Patchwork & Quilting team, so if you’re using prints at home, you may need slightly more yardage if you want to fussy cut or match prints in the correct direction.
  • Make sure to sew a test seam, and check you’re sewing an exact 1⁄4in seam. Adjust the position of your needle as necessary.
  • With medallion quilts, it’s important to reach the exact measurements between rounds. So it’s a good idea to check the measurements of blocks and borders as you work to make sure everything is matching up. It’s easier to fix blocks at the beginning than to keep sewing and just hope for the best! If you don’t check as you go, you may find by the time you reach the outer border, things could stop lining up correctly.
  • Press your Half-square Triangle seams to one side, so they will nest when you’re sewing a larger block together. This allows you to hit any points exactly without using pins. However, if you’re struggling with this, you can also press seams open and match points with pins. We always encourage people to try different methods, until they find the method that works best for them.

The post Introducing our new Block of the Month series appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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Choose colours with confidence and sew the summer sun with our new issue! Issue 75 is packed with modern quilts for you to sew and it’s out this week. Take a peek inside…

“The key to a tropical vibe is to think outside the box: clashing colours and print mixing,” writes Editor Alice in her introduction to our new issue. We’re throwing ourselves into the tropical trend this month so expect to find sun-drenched patchwork projects and some seriously sunny colour palettes. We’re a bit excited about this month’s project selection for you to sew – including ombré pineapple, Foundation Paper Pieced birds and appliqué botanicals.

Issue 75 is on sale from Wednesday 12th June – pre-order your copy here and read on for our issue preview.

Look inside issue 75

Mix and match! Printed copies of issue 75 come with a handy set of acrylic templates to help you piece multi-size tessellating hexagons, jewels and triangles! Find out how to use them here.

Peach & Pomegranate quilt by Daisy Aschehoug

Play with placement and smooth curves with this three-shade quilt top that makes the eye dance. It’s great excuse to practise sewing a curve within a curve – we’ll show you how it’s done.

Feeling Fruity quilt by Gracey Larson

Did somebody say pineapple quilt? Have fun with Gracey’s novelty quilt block, pieced in ombré solids using traditional piecing techniques.

Shade Parade quilt by Alyce Blyth

Throw yourself a print party with some gems from your stash and piece up a modern floral quilt with fresh rainbow vibes!

Pretty Polly FPP hoops by Susi Bellingham

Use a mix of print and solid scraps to Foundation Paper Piece two chirpy birds that will brighten your walls this summer.

We Got The Beat quilt by Lysa Flower

Bring on a mix of Foundation Paper Piecing and traditional piecing to make a retro cassette tape design that’s a blast from the past!

Jungle Weave quilt by Jo Westfoot

Set your sights on strip piecing and sunny shades to make a fun zigzag quilt design that comes together row by row.

Perfect Match quilt by Art Gallery Fabrics

Arrange bright rainbow shades in rows of half hexes to make a machine-pieced quilt that demands a closer look.

Quick make: Sew an eye mask using favourite finds from your stash

Whip up this simple quilted eye mask to slumber in style and ensure a perfect night’s sleep!

Summer Blues patchwork bag by Nydia Kehnle

Piece sleek strips into a unique tote bag to take on your travels.

Crouching Tiger quilt by Stefanie Satterwhite

Pair Half-square Triangles in solid shades with an unusual geometric arrangement to create a striking, abstract feline.

Urban Paradise appliqué cushion by Allison Richter

Bring the troops inside with a modern cushion featuring intricate appliqué leaves and bright, blooming florals.

Paws and Pulses quilt block, by Sarah Griffiths

Block of the month: Join our new medallion quilt sew-along, starting this issue! We’re excited to bring you the first block in our brand new series

The post Sew tropical vibes with issue 75 appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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Issue 75 of Love Patchwork & Quilting magazine comes with a handy set of multi-size tessellating hexagon, jewel and triangle templates. Here’s how to use them on your quilts…

Before you begin…

Step one: Decide which size you want to use for your project. The pieces in this template set are designed to work together in three size groups. Cut out the pieces that will be joined together using the same coloured line across the set. You can use the green line, the purple line, or the outer edge of the templates.

In this tutorial, we’ve used the green line to make the smallest set, but the instructions are the same, regardless of which size you decide to use.

Step two: Cut strips to the size listed on the template set for the coloured line you’re using. We are using 11⁄4in wide strips for the triangle and half hexagons, 2in wide for the hexagon and 23⁄4in wide for the jewels.

Triangles

Place your template at the left edge of your strip, so the bottom edge aligns with the marked line on the template. Cut along both sides of the template. Turn the template to cut the next triangle (Fig 1). Continue along your strip in this way until you’ve cut all your pieces.

Hexagons

To cut hexagons, place your template at the left edge of your strip, so the marked lines align at the top and bottom of the strip for the size you are cutting. Make sure the entire marked hexagon is over the strip. Cut along the right edge of the template. Turn the cut piece 180-degrees and align with the marked hexagon. Cut along the right edge of the template to complete the hexagon (Fig 2).

Half hexagons

To cut half hexagons, place your template at the left edge of your strip, aligning the marked hexagon at the top of the strip and the black centre line at the bottom. Cut along the right edge of the template. Turn the cut piece to the wrong side, and align with the marked half hexagon. Cut along the right edge of the template to complete the half hexagon (Fig 3).

Jewels

To cut jewels, place your template at the left edge of your strip, so the marked lines align at the top and bottom of the strip. Cut along the right edge of the template. Turn the cut piece to the wrong side, and align with the marked jewel. Cut along the right edge of the template to complete the jewel (Fig 4).

Issue 75 is on sale from Wednesday 12th June – pre-order your copy here and check out our issue preview here.

The post Introducing our 3-in-1 Patchwork Templates appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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Oh what’s that? Our new issue is out this week and this means it’s time to share a new set of modern quilting templates with you all? Read on to get stitch with the quilt templates and patterns from issue 75 of Love Patchwork & Quilting.

Downloading your templates is handy if you don’t want to damage your magazine, or if we couldn’t fit a template on the magazine page at 100% size. It’s also super-useful if you’re a digital subscriber! Whether you use Apple NewsZinio or Google Play, this is the easiest way to print your templates onto paper – no fuss!

This issue’s set includes everything you need to sew the projects in the magazine…

  • Urban Paradise: appliqué botanical leaves pattern (see below)
  • Block of the month: sew geo shapes with our + sign
  • Sweet dreams: Stitch a sleep mask
  • Perfect Match: Half Hexagon
  • Pretty Polly: Foundation Paper Piece a pair of parrots!
  • Peach and Pomegranate: Piece soothing curves with our Orange Peel patterns
  • We got the beat: Go retro and stitch a vintage juke box
Download your issue 75 quilt templates here

The post Issue 75 Quilt Templates appeared first on Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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