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Anti-aging – who needs it?  Surely, striving to master or embrace the aging process is better than trying to defy it.  It is a philosophy we at Live Long and Master Aging share with Tara Gadomski, writer, filmmaker and director of a new short film, Signs of Aging. The story explores, through dark humor, the methods used to sell so-called anti-aging products to older women. A powerful message emerges about the appreciation of life over vanity. In this LLAMA podcast interview, with Peter Bowes, Tara explains her distaste for what she calls the shaming of older people, who’re beginning to show their age. Published on: 13 Jun 2019 @ 15:17 PT. NOTES & QUOTES Connect with Tara: Website Tara is a 2019 Sundance Knight Foundation Fellow. Signs of Aging: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook Watch the film via Amazon Prime: In the US | In the UK In this interview we cover: “Shaming” older people and why the term anti-aging should be outlawed. Why some people are made to feel like “lesser human beings ” because they don’t comply with a certain beauty standard. Flaws, imperfections, fixes and corrections. “It makes me sad that I for many years … felt shame about
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Living long and well involves focussing on multiple lifestyle practices, including our spiritual awareness. It is a pillar of human longevity that sits alongside a clean diet, vigorous exercise and optimal sleep habits. So let’s meditate. James Brown once thought that his life was “too crazy” to involve meditation, but after a 25-year career in advertising he is now a teacher of the practice and founder of San Francisco based Vedic Path Meditation. In this LLAMA podcast interview with Peter Bowes, James explains his journey from stressed out executive to one of the world’s leading experts in what’s known as a “flow” approach to meditation. Published on: 30 May 2019 @ 11:58 PT NOTES & QUOTES Connect with James:  Instagram Websites: vedicpathmeditation.com At flowmeditation.cc James’s online course is available. Use the code LLAMA to get a 10% discount off the $250 cost.  Offer expires after July 31st, 2019. Thanks James! In this interview we discuss: What does the ticking clock mean to you? Being blessed genetically and putting in place practices that sustain vitality. Living a frenetic lifestyle and discovering spirituality. “One of the things that made me feel the oldest in my life was buying a lawnmower.” How does an
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Innovation in human biology is evolving at breakneck speed. Artificial intelligence, data science and pharmaceutical discoveries – combined with a deeper understanding of how the body works at a cellular level – are creating exciting opportunities to extend health span.   Dr. Ron Alfa is Senior Vice President of Discovery & Product at Recursion, a clinical-stage biotechnology company, recently named by Fast Company as one the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2019. In this LLAMA podcast interview, with Peter Bowes, Dr, Alfa explains Recursion’s mission to create a map of human cellular biology and find novel treatment for the diseases of aging. Published on: 13 May 2019 @ 17:27 NOTES & QUOTES   Connect with Dr. Alfa: Bio | Recursion This conversation was recorded at TEDMED In this interview we cover: How Recursion is using machine learning and computational biology to change the way drugs are getting to patients from the laboratory. Building tools to better understand the safety and efficacy of new molecules for use in the clinic. How drug discovery works and why it is such a long scientific process. “When we think of aging, when we think of drug discovery, we are ultimately always focused on human
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They say sixty is the new forty. Seventy, the new fifty. But what does that mean? We are living longer, but are we living better? Sandra Feaster, a registered nurse and health coach, approaches aging with the same ghusto that an accomplished mountain climber tackles the highest peaks.  She says growing older is an “incredible journey” that embraces the realities of aging while continuing to live life to the full. Along with her husband, William Feaster, MD, Sandra runs the blog T60+, a website dedicated to sharing science-based information about health and wellness, for people turning 60. In this LLAMA podcast interview, with Peter Bowes, Sandra explains her retire, pivot or die philosophy, her disdain for “fake” health news and why she believes we should all lead a more “mindful” life. NOTES AND QUOTES Connect with Sandra: Website | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn In this interview we explore: What it means to live a healthy and active life well beyond 60. Is 60 really the new 40? How the blog T60+ covers the business of health and wellness and separates the fads from facts. When did the realities of aging first resonate with Sandra? Tackling and moving beyond cancer.
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The Annual Biohacking Conference, hosted by Upgrade Labs, is a mind-boggling, mind-enhancing gathering of people, from all walks of life, who want to live better and longer.  LLAMA’s Peter Bowes attended this year’s event, in Beverly Hills, California, to meet Dave Asprey, the movement’s poster boy for self-improvement, along with some of the conference’s key speakers and exhibitors. In this episode we explore everything from cryotherapy to enhancing neuroplasticity, flow meditation, mitochondrial health and infrared saunas. Dave explains how biohacking has come of age, why he believes he will live to be at least 180 and how he says everyone – not just the rich and famous – could benefit from being in better control of their bodies and biology. We also meet: Dr. Barry Morguelan, Chinese energy grandmaster Dr. Charles Brenner, Chromadex Lauren Hansen, Cryo Science Dr. Patrick Porter, BrainTap Tom Griffin, Halo Neuroscience Dr. Chris Shade, Quicksilver Scientific James Brown, Vedic Meditation Dr. Raleigh Duncan, Clearlight Infrared Notes & Quotes 01:52 Dave Asprey | Founder, Bulletproof Dave, the original biohacker, explains how and why the practice has come of age and how we can all benefit from it. “Biohacking is largely the art and science of changing the environment around you, so that you have more
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Could listening to music be an important pillar of longevity? If you feel down and listen to a favorite song it can pick you up. Some people say music helps them work harder and the power of music to evoke memories is second to none. There is anecdotal evidence that playing an instrument or enjoying a favorite album can have a lasting impact on our state of mind and, as a therapy, it can help people suffering from the chronic conditions of old age. Brandon Carone is a research assistant in the Memory and Lifespan Cognition Lab at UCLA and research coordinator with Music Mends Minds, a non-profit group that creates musical support group bands for patients with Alzheimer’s, dementia, Parkinson’s, traumatic brain injury, stroke, and for veteran’s with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this LLAMA podcast interview with Peter Bowes, Brandon explains why music could be much more than a soundtrack to our lives and why, at 21, he has dedicated his life to understanding music as a therapy. NOTES & QUOTES Connect with Brandon: Memory and Lifespan Cognition Lab | Music Mends Minds In this interview we explore: How Brandon’s fascination with the power of music started
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A simple smile, a friendly gesture or an offer of help and friendship, could help us all live longer, healthier lives. International Day of Happiness (March 20) is celebrated by the United Nations as a way to recognize the importance of happiness in the lives of people around the world.  There is scientific data that suggests people who embrace the benefits of a positive attitude, are rewarded with a greater sense of well-being. Catherine Sanderson is a psychologist and professor in Life Sciences at Amherst College in Massachusetts. In her book, The Positive Shift: Mastering Mindset to Improve Happiness, Health, and Longevity, Dr. Sanderson explores the science behind our mindset, and how, she says, anyone can learn to adopt a more positive outlook. In this LLAMA podcast interview, with Peter Bowes, Dr. Sanderson explains how kindness, gratitude and genuine friendships can help promote better physical and mental health. NOTES & QUOTES Connect with Dr. Sanderson: Website | Book: The Positive Shift | Facebook | Twitter In this interview we explore: Why someone who is not “naturally happy” has written a book about happiness? What does it mean to be happy? Are we genetically programmed to be either happy or more
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How many times have you checked your ‘likes’ or searched for positive feedback in your social media feed today?  Perhaps you’re the kind of person who always strives to be perfect and feels deflated when you fail to live up to your own expectations. What about being judged by others for not achieving your full potential? Perfectionism, says Dr. Thomas Curran, is “everyone’s perfect flaw.” Dr. Curran, an assistant professor in the Department for Health at the University of Bath, studies the personality characteristic of perfectionism, how it develops, and its impact on mental health. If we all relaxed a bit or stopped being hard on ourselves, would our lives be better?  In this LLAMA podcast interview , recorded at TEDMED, Dr. Curran explains why he believes perfectionism can be harmful and the impact, he says, social media is having on our relationships and self-worth. NOTES & QUOTES Connect with Dr. Curran: Twitter | Bio | TEDMED In this interview we cover: What does perfectionism mean in the modern world? “It’s the like the emblem of the successful.” Why pursuing perfectionism, in today’s culture, is potentially beneficial. When does perfectionism begin to be harmful. What are the three core elements
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Every two seconds, someone in the world will have a stroke. Almost two-thirds of survivors leave hospital with some form of disability.  It is a battle against time to get the most appropriate medical intervention and treatment for stroke victims and every second counts. Viz.ai, a San Francisco-based applied artificial intelligence company, was established by British neurosurgeon Dr. Chris Mansi with the goal of using A.I. to make healthcare work faster and smarter. He was inspired by a patient who underwent a successful brain operation but died because the surgery came too late. In this LLAMA podcast interview, recorded at TEDMED, Dr. Mansi explains why rapid treatment can mean the difference between life and death – and why he believes medical technology is on the cusp of transforming healthcare and dramatically improving the odds of making a full recovery from a stroke. Published on: 19 Feb 2019 @ 16:06 PT NOTES & QUOTES Connect with Dr. Mansi:  viz.ai | Twitter | LinkedIn   In this interview we cover: The anatomy of a stroke and large vessel occlusions. What is mechanical thrombectomy and why is it a “game changer” treatment? The devastating impact of strokes and why speed is of the
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The sudden onset of a common cold or the flu can stop us in our tracks. Seasonal outbreaks of infectious diseases can be both debilitating and irritating, especially for those people who strive to live a healthy lifestyle. But are they inevitable? Lydia Bourouiba is the director of the Fluid Dynamics of Disease Transmission Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her work involves trying to better understand the role that sneezes play in the spread of infections. She focusses, not only on the common cold, but as-yet-unknown diseases that could have widespread and devastating consequences, were they to get out of control. In this LLAMA podcast interview, recorded at TEDMED, professor Bourouiba explains how we are all vulnerable to infectious diseases – and probably more than we realize. She also dissects the anatomy the sneeze – how far it can go and how long it can linger. Published on: 4 Feb 2019 @ 17:23 PT NOTES & QUOTES Connect with Prof. Bourouiba:  The Bourouiba research group | Bio | Recorded at TEDMED. In this interview we explore: How colds are transmitted. Why, no matter how healthy we are, we are all vulnerable to infectious diseases. Living in dense populations
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