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A small study suggests that the marijuana compound cannabidiol (CBD) may reduce cravings in those with heroin addiction.
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This is the first evidence of sharks eating terrestrial birds.
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Jupiter's magnetic field has changed since the 1970s, and now physicists think they know why it's happening.
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For the first time, scientists have evidence that a layer deep beneath Earth's surface can create volcanoes.
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Scientists have used an X-ray laser to create the loudest possible underwater sound on Earth.
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The moon's farside has thicker crust and is made up of a number of craters, while its nearside is a land of open basins.
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The carved "jars of the dead" are scattered across miles of the rugged, tiger-haunted Xiangkhouang province.
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The mysterious Plain of Jars is an archaeological site in central Laos that has thousands of stone vessels scattered across the ground.
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The breathtaking fictional landscapes of "Game of Thrones" had a tumultuous past that involved volcanic eruptions, mountain-building and entire continents splitting apart, scientists say.
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Decades of climate change have severely weakened 24% of western Antarctica's ice.
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