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Cơm tấm is pure gastronomic pleasure: barbecued pork on broken rice, topped with a fried egg and other accoutrements. Saigon and cơm tấm are inseparable: the two most distinctive smells in this city are exhaust fumes and grilled pork." -Vietnam Coracle
Broken rice is a traditionally cheaper grade of rice produced by damage in harvest, milling or transport. It is mainly used as a food industry ingredient in America and Europe, but in Southeast Asia is used for human consumption. Broken rice is fragmented, not defective as there is nothing wrong with it. Due to the different size and shape of the grains, broken rice has a different, softer texture from "unbroken" rice and absorbs flavours more easily. It cooks faster and can be used to make rice porridges and congees, which need long cooking times. The broken varieties are often less expensive and have historically been preferred by poorer consumers, but they are also eaten by choice, with some cookbooks describing how to break unbroken rice to produce the desired texture or speed of cooking.
In Vietnam, cơm tấm is a popular rice dish with pork. "Tấm" refers to the broken rice grains, while "cơm" refers to cooked rice. Also known as cơm tấm Sài Gòn as it is particularly served in southern Vietnam, Saigon, now known as Ho Chi Minh City.
"Cơm tấm is pure gastronomic pleasure: barbecued pork on broken rice, topped with a fried egg and other accoutrements. Saigon and cơm tấm are inseparable: the two most distinctive smells in this city are exhaust fumes and grilled pork." -Vietnam Coracle
In the past, the fractured grains were difficult to sell because most people preferred to eat the long, whole grain rice. With their broken rice unsold, farmers traditionally used it as animal feed. However, food is rarely wasted in Vietnam and at some point farmers and poor families (who could afford the broken grain) began to cook it for their own consumption. They would eat this cheaper rice with egg and bits of meat. Nowadays, broken rice is often favoured over long grain rice for its texture and no longer "poor man's food".
When serving broken rice in combination plates, the rice should be moderately sticky. Many Vietnamese restaurants serve the broken rice shaped into a small dome. (This is done by filling a small rice bowl with cooked broken rice, pressing it gently into the bowl and then inverting onto a plate.) The rice dome is actually a really good test to see if the broken rice is cooked properly. The broken rice should hold its molded shape when you put your chopsticks or fork into it. If the rice spills onto your plate, it’s too dry. If it sticks together in one big clump, it’s too wet. Properly cooked broken rice is a bit drier than regular white rice but still fluffy and hearty - Trang of Runawayrice
Cơm tấm” has become a famous dish thanks to the a varied and sophisticated combination of toppings. It is usually served with grilled pork chop (“sườn nướng”), shredded pork skin (“bì”), steamed egg cake (“chả trứng”), sunny-side-up fried egg (“trứng ốp la”) over broken rice. The rice and meat are served with sides such as slices of fresh cucumber and tomato, pickles (“đồ chua”), and sauté green onions with crispy pork fat (“mỡ hành tóp mỡ”). 

Typically, restaurants would serve this popular dish with a small bowl of nuoc cham (dipping sauce made from fermented fish sauce), as well as a small bowl of clear broth (canh) with garlic chives (to cleanse the throat).
In the beginning, Cơm tấm was only sold as breakfast, but due to rising demand of customers, is available the whole day. In Ho Chi Minh, late night broken rice shops (“Cơm tấm đêm”) are multiplying rapidly with increasingly diverse toppings

Want to try for yourself? Broken Rice is sold in Asian markets where various rice and grains are sold.
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Our one day trip in Suphan Buri was short and sweet but it made our bellies full of food and love - Parita Nobthai of @thecrafthumpy
In May, I went on a family trip to visit my aunt in Suphan Buri, Thailand. For those of you who may not be familiar with this province, it is a 1 hour and 45 minute drive north of Bangkok, provided the traffic is flowing freely.
Most of the province is built around rice farming, as it is mostly lower-lying river plains which that make this place wonderful for freshwater fish and river prawns. We visited the popular 100-year old Samchook สามชุก market, located on the Tha Chin River near the centre of town.
The Samchook market has its own unique character with Thai traditional wooden townhouses lined in front with stores that offer a variety of goods from clothes, household items, food, drinks, sweets and fresh ingredients. Fresh food markets are like heaven for me, with plenty of tasty snacks to try and no matter which stall you buy them from, they are always delicious. I got lost in the market for an hour with the seemingly endless line of shops and different pathways to follow. I ended up buying 3kg of Salid fish. When I am in Australia, I usually get frozen Salid fish and cook it at home. If you deep fry the fish, it becomes very crispy and is a perfect to eat with rice.
After we did our fair share of shopping, we ended up heading to my aunt’s home in Suphan Buri. She has a number of beautifully crafted Thai traditional wooden houses surrounded by paddy fields which is open to the Tha Chin riverfront. The ambience was stunning despite the temperature soaring to almost 39°C.
My aunt prepared three dishes for us, two entrees and one dessert. We didn’t cook too much as we planned to visit a nearby restaurant, which is famous for its river prawns, which we were all craving. I helped her cook fish cakes or what my mum calls “Pla Hed” which means mushroom fish. Even if there is no mushrooms in the ingredients, it’s believed that Pla Hed is a Khmer word meaning marinated meat with curry paste, which is then made into a small ball and deep fried. The fish we normally uses for this dish is Clown Knife Fish which is mixed with red curry paste, a pinch of salt, some sugar and sliced snake beans.
Next, we moved on to satay pork skewers. The marinade we used for these satay pork skewers was her family’s secret recipe, handed down from her grandparents who used to run a stall at the 100 Year Markets. The marinated pork satay skewer were so soft and tender. I liked our cooking instrument, a rectangular stove made especially for cooking satay skewers over coals. We ate the skewers with a peanut sauce and Arjad อาจาด, which is a mix of white vinegar, sugar, salt and water with sliced cucumber, red onions and chopped chilli on top.
For dessert we ate Nam Khang Sai น้ำแข็งใส, which is my mum’s favourite dessert ever since she was a child. It’s also my favourite kind of dessert which I bought when I was in high school. It’s so refreshing and gives you plenty of energy to survive the hot days in Thailand. The recipe for this dish is so simple, all you need is some ice cubes, a loaf of bread diced into about 1 inch in size, Hale’s Blue Boy for topping (Sala Flavour is recommended) and then it’s finished with condensed milk. The secret is my aunt’s magical ice crushing machine which you can turn ice blocks into a soft and fluffy snowflake texture.
Our one day trip in Suphan Buri was short and sweet but it made our bellies full of food and love. All meals were cooked with fresh ingredients found locally at the markets. It is so lovely to catch up with family and relatives, eat homemade food that I grew up with. I realise how much I miss this place, it’s so good to be home again.

Have a great day!
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Parita Nobthai runs The Craft Humpy
"a homely place where you can get beautiful handcrafted gifts directly from the maker"
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Braised Chicken with Pickled Green Mustard Recipe - YouTube
The original recipe was from Chinese migrants and again, like other dishes, over time the recipe has been adapted to suit Thai preferences - Charinya Ruecha of @charinyas_kitchen
Last time when I posted the braised beef recipe a few friends that said they don't eat beef. In this blog post let's do something similar, but use chicken instead.
I adapted the braised chicken recipe I want to share with you today from the recipe for braised pork leg or 'kow kha moo', which is a popular rice dish in Thailand.
The original recipe was from Chinese migrants and again, like other dishes, over time the recipe has been adapted to suit Thai preferences.
Braised chicken is perfect when served with rice and chilli garlic sauce. This time however I used chilli garlic from the jar, which is just perfect as well.
Ingredients
  • 1 kg chicken Maryland
  • 2 star anise
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 coriander roots
  • 1 tbsp pepper
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 60g palm sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp seasoning sauce
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce
  • Water to cover chicken
  • 1 tbsp cooking oil
Method
1. Toast the black pepper, cinnamon stick, star anise, garlic and sliced galangal in a frying pan until fragrant.
2. Wrap the ingredients in step 1, along with coriander roots, in a thin white cloth.
3. In a frying pan add some cooking oil and fry the chicken until it is brown. Remove the chicken and set aside.
4. Add palm sugar into the frying pan and stir until caramelised.
5. Add the chicken and water to cover.
6. Add the ingredients from step 2 followed by salt, soy sauce, oyster sauce and mushrooms.
7. Cover and braise the chicken for 30 mins.
8. Add the boiled eggs and green mustard and cover for another 30 mins.
Your chicken is now ready to serve!
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seriouseats.com
Whenever a Thai recipe calls for toasted rice powder, even just a smidgen of it, don’t be tempted to leave it out. Don’t get me wrong; I am all about shortcuts and convenience as long as the quality is not severely compromised. But when it comes to toasted (sometimes called ‘roasted’) rice powder, in my opinion, it is never optional. This insignificant-looking khao khua is what differentiates a vaguely Thai-inspired dish from what a Thai mother serves her family somewhere in Thailand as we speak -  Leela Punyaratabandhu, Author
If you are wondering why your home cooked laab does not taste close to your local Thai restaurant, it's probably missing khao khua (ข้าวคั่ว), or toasted sticky rice.
A quick Google search shows that a good proportion of laab recipes are missing this ingredient, however khao khua is a really essential part of Thai laab as it gives the dish a crunchy bite and a roasted fragrance.
Is your laab missing khao kua?
What is khao khua ?
In Thai, khao (ข้าว) is rice and khua (คั่ว) is to dry roast.
The rice in khao khua is sticky rice, which is then dry roasted in a pan and finally pounded into a coarse powder.
Khao khua is used in a variety of meat salads like nam tok (น้ำตก) and laab (ลาบ), sometimes in soups like gaeng om (แกงอ่อม), and finally in chili dipping sauces like nam jim jaew.
As an ingredient, khao khua acts as a thickener, contributes a crunchy texture (which I sort of think tastes and feels like those un-popped popcorn kernels at the bottom of the bag), and also adds a wonderful smoky roasted flavor to dishes that use it - Mark Wiens, Migrationology
Although it’s a simple ingredient, be sure not to leave it out of recipes that include it, because you can really taste it and it really enhances dishes its included in.
For dishes, usually just 1 – 2 spoons of the powder is added.
Whenever a Thai recipe calls for toasted rice powder, even just a smidgen of it, don’t be tempted to leave it out. Don’t get me wrong; I am all about shortcuts and convenience as long as the quality is not severely compromised. But when it comes to toasted (sometimes called ‘roasted’) rice powder, in my opinion, it is never optional. This insignificant-looking khao khua is what differentiates a vaguely Thai-inspired dish from what a Thai mother serves her family somewhere in Thailand as we speak -  Leela Punyaratabandhu, Author
Some people say regular long grain rice works just as well. I disagree.Long grain rice is much more dense than glutinous rice, and while the latter melds seamlessly into the dish, the former tends to create the undesirable gritty texture - Leela Punyaratabandhu Author
Directions
  1. Place rice in a skillet and shake pan to distribute grains into an even layer. Cook over medium heat, shaking skillet frequently to redistribute rice into an even layer, until rice is lightly golden, about 10 minutes
  2. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature
  3. Transfer toasted rice to a spice grinder or the bowl of a mortar and pestle. Grind to a coarse powder. Allow rice powder to cool to room temperature, then store in a dry, airtight container.
seriouseats.com
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Thai Golden Cups Recipe | Kra Thong Thong |กระทงทอง|Thai Recipe - YouTube
Thai Golden Cups (Kra-Thong-Thong) is one of the easiest appetizers I have made and very popular not only back in Thailand but popular as an entrée with Thai restaurants throughout the world - Warattaya Smith of @loveslittlekitchen
Thai Golden Cups (Kra-Thong-Thong) is one of the easiest appetizers I have made and very popular not only back in Thailand but popular as an entrée with Thai restaurants throughout the world.
Once an appetizer only for royalty and the well to do it now populates many markets and street stalls throughout not just Thailand but much of South East Asia where the different regions have their own twist on the delicious filled fried pastry.
This is a great snack for kids as well as it’s not just yummy and fresh to eat but a fun and easy recipe for them to help you with.
There aren’t any strict filling ingredients with Kra-Thong-Thong as you can use almost anything from chicken, pork, beef and fish to just a vegetarian filling. You can also use up frozen packet vegetables in your freezer if you want to save time.
I’m lucky enough to have Kra-Thong-Thong moulds that I brought from Thailand (You can find them online). If you don’t have these moulds you can use anything that will shape like a cup such as a soup ladle for example.
Cup Ingredients
  • Rice flour 3/4 cup
  • All Purpose flour 1/3 cup
  • Corn starch 1 tbsp
  • Egg yolk 1
  • Salt 1/2 teaspoon
  • Coconut milk 1 cup
  • Lime water 4 tbsp
  • Sugar 1  tbsp
Cup Instructions
  1. Mix all flour and starch ingredients in a mixing bowl and add corn starch, sugar, salt, egg yolk, lime water  and gradually stir in coconut milk.
  2. Continue stirring until mixture is consistent and when you are happy pour through a sieve to remove any lumps.
  3. Heat vegetable oil in a pot and place your moulds inside to heat as well. (your mixture will stay on a hot mould when dipping better than a cool one)
  4. When ready dip your mould into the mixture and fry in the pot moving about so it can work its way off. Keep the mould near the top of the oil as you move about and as it’s starting to come away from the mould I like to touch the mould to the bottom as I find that flattens any bubbles that form at the mould bass.
  5. Fry until golden and place onto paper towels to dry.(Sometimes a wood skewer is handy to help remove the cup from mould)
  6. TIP: Stir the flower mix each time you dip with your mould as this will help stick.
Filling Ingredients:
  • Chopped chicken ¾  cup
  • Green curry paste 1 tbsp
  • Carrots, peas, corn. 1 cup mixed
  • Coconut milk ½  cup (Just use as much as you feel you need)
  • Palm sugar ½  tsp (add as little or as much as you like)
  • Fish sauce ½  tsp (add as little or as much as you like)
  • Basil chopped 1/3 cup
Filling Instructions
  1. In pan low heat stir a little coconut milk with green curry paste
  2. Add chopped chicken and stir with your coconut green curry until cooked and starting to dry
  3. Add some more coconut milk then carrot, pea’s, corn and stir well.
  4. Add palm sugar and fish sauce. Don’t cook vegetables too long as you want to retain their fresh crispiness and colours.
  5. Place your cooked filling into a serving bowl ready to add to your golden cups.
  6. TIP: Best to add filling just before eating as it can make crispy cup soggy if left too long.
  7. TIP: If using another day place both in a separate sealed container’s.
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Don't miss out on her other posts!
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Recipe: Thai Kanom Luk Chup  (ขนมลูกชุบ)
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Thai Fish Cake Recipe: Tod Mun Pla (ทอดมันปลา)
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Skaman/GettyImages
In Bangkok, if you go to a Thai restaurant, there are no chopsticks - Bangkok-born chef Ian Chalermkittichai
One fact that comes as a surprise to those that are not familiar with Thai culture is that Thai people generally use forks and spoons instead of chopsticks. This is contrary to what you would expect considering the ubiquity of chopsticks among East Asian countries. The reason why chopsticks are present in many Thai restaurants is because Australians always ask for them.
"In Bangkok, if you go to a Thai restaurant, there are no chopsticks," - Bangkok-born chef Ian Chalermkittichai
They do have their place in Thai cuisine as Chinese-style noodle soups are eaten with chopsticks and a soup spoon. However, stir fried noodle dishes such as pad Thai, and curry-noodle dishes such as khanom chin nam ngiao, are eaten with a fork and spoon in the Thai fashion.
Traditionally Thais ate food with their hands (known as perb-kaao).  In more traditional households, the custom of food being eaten with the right hand while seated on mats or carpets on the floor customs is still found today.
The habit of eating food with a spoon and fork was adopted later by the Siamese elite during the period when Siam first associated with western culture. During the the reign of king Rama lll (1788-1851), it was determined that the use of spoon and fork as the formal eating manner for every class. This was particularly important at royal banquets to which the foreigners were invited. However it was likely during this time that the utensils were misunderstood and did not achieve mainstream popularity.
Rama III
In 1870 Rama V took a trip to Singapore which marked the first time in Thai history that a king of Siam had traveled to another country. After the King returned, western style parties were held at the palace, using knives, spoons and forks. The king went to Europe twice and sent many of his children and courtiers to European colleges. The court also employed many westerners and resulted in the adoption of western customs. During this time, the court wished to display their civilized culture as equal to that of the influential westerners and Western silverware was used on the dining table. The king was keen to adopt this westernised habit which rapidly spread among his courtiers, who wished to follow the royal footsteps.
Rama V
In the modern Thailand, there is a classical way of using the fork and spoon. Important to Thai dining is the practice of 'khluk', mixing the flavors and textures of different dishes with the rice from one's plate. The food is pushed by the fork, held in the left hand, into the spoon held in the right hand, which is then brought to the mouth.
Knives are not generally used at the table as they are considered weapons. Thai food is served in bite size pieces so there is no theoretical need for a knife at the dining table (in practicality the spoon is often used to section off smaller pieces).
Utensil Etiquette Summary
  • Eat with your spoon and not your fork; the spoon in your right hand, fork is in your left. Use the fork to push food onto your spoon and put the spoon in your mouth.
  • Do not ask for a pair of chopsticks if they are not provided. The Thais only use chopsticks to eat Chinese-style noodles in a bowl. Pad Thai, Pad See Ew, Pad Kee Mao, Rad Na or any other noodle dish served in a flat plate will also be eaten with fork and spoon.
  • Do not ask for a knife. Everything in Thai food is normally bite-sized.

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Braised Beef and Tendon Recipe | Thai Recipe - YouTube
This soup is perfect served on its own, with steamed rice or by adding the noodles. The dish takes time to make so it is often considered a weekend cooking dish. In Thailand we traditionally cook it in a big pot, which ensures a few days of feasting for a family - Charinya Ruecha of @charinyas_kitchen
Cold season is here, so it's time to head to the kitchen to make a hearty, warming meal. This time I would like to share with you a delicious Asian soup, braised beef and beef tendon.
Braised beef and beef tendon is found in many Asian countries included Thailand. The original recipe is believed to have arrived with Chinese migrants, but over time the recipe has evolved to suit Thai preferences.
Many Westerners might think that beef tendon and other offal is unappealing, but they are very popular in Asian cuisines.
This soup is perfect served on its own, with steamed rice or by adding the noodles.
The dish takes time to make so it is often considered a weekend cooking dish. In  Thailand we traditionally cook it in a big pot, which ensures a few days of feasting for a family.
Ingredients
  • 1.5 kg Beef brisket, shank and tendon
  • 200g Beef bone
  • 1 tbsp. Coriander seed
  • 1 tbsp. Black pepper
  • 1 Cinnamon stick (I didn’t use it this time)
  • 3-4 Star anises
  • 5-6 sliced galangal
  • 3-4 Bay leaves
  • 3 Coriander roots
  • 3-4 Pandan leaves (optional)
  • 5-6 pieces of white radish
  • 1 tbsp. rock sugar
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 3 pickled garlic
  • 3 tbsp. pickled garlic juice
  • ¼ cup Seasoning sauce
  • ¼ cup Soy sauce
  • ¼ cup of oyster sauce
  • ¼ cup dark soy sauce
Additional ingredients for serving
Bean sprout, fried garlic, chopped coriander, chopped spring onion, chilli flakes and beef balls.
Method
1. Toast Coriander seed, Black pepper, Cinnamon stick, Star anises and sliced galangal in a frying pan until fragrance.
2. Wrap the ingredients in step 1 (along with bay leaves and coriander roots) in a thin white cloth or put in a stainless steel strainer mesh. Place in the pressure cooker with the beef.
3. Boil the beef, beef tendon and bone in the boiling water for 15 minutes and discard the water. Give the beef and bone a good rinse.
4. Add the beef, beef tendon and bone in the pressure cooker followed by the ingredients in step 2, the rest of ingredients and sauces then add water to cover the meat and ingredients.
5. Braise until tender. Pressure cookers vary, but I cook mine for 40 mins. Your braised beef is now ready to serve the way you like.
Happy cooking!
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https://mgronline.com/travel/detail/9580000040193
Let’s imagine how the Thai people coped with the heat before ice had been introduced. Instead of having steamed rice, a common Thai dish, Thais came up with a dish called Kao Chae. Kao Chae is cooked rice which is then soaked in cold water and served with various side dishes - Parita Nobthai of @thecrafthumpy
April is the hottest month in Thailand and the temperature this year is soaring close to 44 degrees Celsius with around 70% humidity. This month is also recognised for Thai Traditional New Year and the famous Songkran (Water Festival) across the country which Thai people created to escape from the hot weather.

Let’s imagine how the Thai people coped with the heat before ice had been introduced. Instead of having steamed rice, a common Thai dish, Thais came up with a dish called Kao Chae. Kao Chae is cooked rice which is then soaked in cold water and served with various side dishes. It is believed that Kao Chae can help reduce body heat. The side dishes for Kao Chae also contains many Thai herbs that help improve blood circulation.

https://www.sanook.com/health/10585/
What is Kao Chae?
“Kao” means rice and “Chae” means soaking. Kao Chae is cold rice served in the hot days of summer. This dish has an influence from the “Mon” or “Peguan” from the southern part of Burma. In Mon culture, they make Kao Chae during the Songkran festival and offer it to monks and the elderly to bring themselves the best of luck in the New Year. In Thailand, the creation of Kao Chae began with the royal family and was considered as a royal cuisine. Each royal family had their own recipe to distinguish their dish from others. The dish became known to the public during the reign of King Rama Five, around 200 years ago.

Khao Chae was, in the past, eaten only in the royal court and at the homes of the affluent because it required fine ingredients, culinary craft and a lot of time. Today, however, Khao Chae has become more common and is offered at many restaurants around town (Time Out Bangkok staff writer, 2019)
From left to right 1. Deep-fried stuffed shallots filled with grilled catfish floss 2. Sweet crispy shredded beef or pork 3. Egg-wrapped steamed green chili stuffed with minced pork or prawns 4. Cooked rice scented with Pandan leaves 5. Sweet and salty stir-fried turnip 6. Shrimp paste balls 7. Flower-scented water www.brighttv.co.th/lifestyle/362186
The combination of side dishes to have with Kao Chae are all sweet tasting as anything too spicy will make our bodies sweat. Popular condiments consist of steamed green chilli stuffed with minced pork or prawns which is wrapped in an egg net, there are shrimp paste balls as well as sweet crispy shredded beef or pork, there are deep-fried stuffed shallots filled with grilled catfish floss, some enjoy sweet and salty stir-fried turnip and others sweet stir-fried ray fish. Each side dish adds its own distinct flavour to Kao Chae.
How to make Kao Chae?
The process of making Kao Chae is as fascinating as it is delicate. The recommended rice to use for Kao Chae is “old crop” because this type of rice has less moisture and the rice grains will look beautiful once it is cooked and soaked in water. In the past, Thai people kept rain water in a clay pot in order to maintain the cold temperature of the water, even in hot weather.
  1. Cooked rice
    • Wash jasmine rice old crop by using alum to scrub rice around 3 times or until water become clear. This process is to get rid of the rice powder so it won’t make the flower-scented water dirty.
    • Put rice in a straining cloth and cook it in the steamer. For this process, you need to check side of the rice grain. If it is slightly open, quickly take it off the heat.
Rinse steamed rice in cold water to get rid of the stickiness and to help it cool down
http://atkitchenmag.com/recipe-kao-chae-summer/
2. Flower-scented water
  • Rain water is recommended. If you use tap water, decant it and leave it sit overnight
  • 5 types of fragrant flowers are recommended – ylang-ylang, bread flower (chomanad), damask rose, white champaka and jasmine. You can also add Pandan leaves
  • Clean flower and take the stem out to avoid flower resin
  • Float flowers in water for 2 nights
  • Light up aromatic candle to smoke flower-scented water
https://krua.co/cooking/cook-to-know/62/-lsquo-อบร่ำ-rsquo-กลิ่นหอมของขนมไทย
How to eat Kao Chae correctly and get the best taste from this dish?
Not many Thai people know how to eat it properly. Some people eat it like congee by adding side dishes in the rice but actually the right way to eat Kao Chae is to keep the rice and the flower-scented water clean and clear.
There are easy steps to follow to taste the best of Kao Chae
  • Add flower-scented water to a bowl of cooked rice
  • Eat one side dish with fresh vegetables and then follow with a spoonful of soaked rice
  • It’s nice to pair deep-fried shrimp paste balls with fresh green mangoes
  • It’s nice to pair young Kachai with egg-wrapped steamed green chili stuffed with minced pork or prawns
  • Don’t forget to get the taste of each side dish and fresh vegetables before having the soaked rice
https://mgronline.com/travel/detail/9580000040193
Nowadays, it’s easy to find Kao Chae at most markets in Thailand. Some street vendor sells it as a set with rice, side dishes and a bottle of flower-scented water. Some add crushed ice to Kao chae or some still keep the traditional way of keeping it cool by using rain water in a clay pot. In Bangkok, you can even order Kao Chae online and have it delivered to your door. Kao Chae is a great Thai snack for summer. It is refreshing, delicious and delicate. I hope you will get a chance to try this beautifully prepared dish when you visit Thailand. Don’t forget to follow the correct steps on how to eat it and let me know how much you enjoy Kao Chae in the comments below.
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Parita Nobthai runs The Craft Humpy
"a homely place where you can get beautiful handcrafted gifts directly from the maker"
Check out her amazing work here!
WEB https://thecrafthumpy.com
IG @thecrafthumpy
FB @thecrafthumpy
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Kanom Thai | Thai Steamed Dessert Recipe | Kanom Kluay - YouTube
Due to... year-round warm weather and the abundance of water and fresh fruits, the rich culture of steaming desserts and snacks remains strong and you will find steamed desserts in every corner of Thailand. Kanom Kluay being amongst the most popular - Warattaya Smith of @loveslittlekitchen
Kanom Kluay is banana, Kanom Fak Thong is pumpkin, and Kanom Mun Maung is purple potato.
Kanom Kluay is the more traditional flavour but with the variety of foods today you can try all types of flavours and colours.
Kanom Kluay is one of many Thai desserts that is steamed in it’s making and one the easiest and quickest to do.
Steaming today is extremely common in Thailand as most household kitchens and roadside stalls didn’t have the oven’s and stoves available today as recent as 30-40 years ago.
Due to this along with year-round warm weather and the abundance of water and fresh fruits the rich culture of steaming desserts and snacks remains strong and you will find steamed desserts in every corner of Thailand, Kanom Kluay being amongst the most popular.
Similar in its process to my last recipe Kanom Tuay (Thai Coconut Rice Custard) your mixture is steamed most commonly in small balls within a steamer.
A variety of flavours and colours can be made using things such as pumpkin(yellow) and a favourite of mine purple potato(purple) which is full of anti-oxidants and health benefits.
Adding grated fresh coconut over the top doesn’t just look good but compliments the sweetness Kanom Kluay has.
There’s a slight difference in the Ingredients between banana, pumpkin and purple potato you can see below but the method is the same.
For Banana
Ingredients
  • Mashed banana 500 g.
  • Rice flour 100 g.*
  • Tapioca flour 80 g.*
  • Arrowroot flour 80 g.*
  • White Sugar 100 – 130 g.
  • Palm sugar 70 g.
  • Coconut milk 400 g.
  • Salt 1 tsp.
  • Shredded or grated coconut meat  70 g.
*You can purchase at any good Asian grocery store
For Pumpkin
Ingredients
  • Mashed Pumpkin 500 g.
  • Rice flour 100 g.*
  • Tapioca flour 80 g.*
  • Arrowroot flour 80 g.*
  • White Sugar 130 g.
  • Palm sugar 70 g.
  • Coconut milk 350 g.
  • Salt 1 tsp.
  • Shredded or grated coconut meat  70 g.
*You can purchase at any good Asian grocery store
For Purple Potato
Ingredients
  • Mashed purple potato 500 g.
  • Rice flour 100 g.*
  • Tapioca flour 80 g.*
  • Arrowroot flour 80 g.*
  • white Sugar 130 g.
  • Palm sugar 70 g.
  • Coconut milk 450 g.
  • Salt 1 tsp.
  • Shredded or grated coconut meat  70 g.
*You can purchase at any good Asian grocery store
Items
Steamer
Small bowls or moulds or cups
Method
1.Mash the banana just like you would if you mashed potato. In a large bowl add the rice flour,
tapioca flour, arrowroot flour, coconut milk, white sugar, palm sugar and salt and mix together with hands until well combined and becomes like liquid. This may take at least 10 minutes of kneading with your hands.
 
2. Now add the banana and continue to knead and mix with hands until the ingredients is well combined. I prefer hands as it’s far easier to feel for any lumps of banana that I can squish.
*Utensils such as potato mashers and whisks can also be useful when breaking down the ingredients
*You can mix grated coconut in now or the same time as the banana. It adds a flavoursome texture
 
3. Place out your small bowls and start spooning your mixture in (you should be ok to fill to the top of each bowl as the mixture won’t expand to much)
Start boiling the steamer and once ready place your small bowls inside it.
If you wish to add grated coconut meat then do it now so once steamed it will appear to have partly melted into to the cake.(pre-mix the grated coconut for topping with a little salt)
 
4.When the water is boiling, steam the cakes for 10-15 minutes, and it’s done. You can poke them with a kebab stick to see if they are set the whole way through. The longer you steam them, the tougher and chewier they get (which some people prefer).
 
5.Let cool and serve. Usually they are served cool but you can have them warm if you choose.

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hakkasan.com
We've moved on from the sweet and sour pork...Australians wouldn't accept tofu at all once...Now it's a popular dish - Gavin Chan, Happy's Restaurant Canberra
In a previous post we looked at the prevalance of Thai restaurants in Australia and how it was part of an intentional campaign by the Thai government.
However another ubiquitous sight in Australia is the presence of Chinese restaurants.

When Chinese men first arrived in Australia as indentured rural labourers, many found positions as cooks on outback stations and country pubs. It was during the gold rush in the 1850's that Chinese migration to Australia exploded and small food stores called "cookhouses" to serve the Chinese mining community hot meals.
These cookhouses that the Chinese started provided gold miners with meals and catered for Chinese and European tastes. There were a number of these cookhouses in Victoria during the gold rush and the same phenomenon happened again later, during gold rushes in Queensland and WA - Jan O'Connell, Author
Originally the cookhouses served traditional Cantonese dishes but gradually began to seek out western customers as well. 
Victoria's first 'Chinese' restaurant to actively seek out the patronage of Westerners was probably that established by John Alloo on the Eureka Lead, Ballarat, offering roasts and puddings.
By 1890, one third of all cooks in Australia were Chinese. However anti-Chinese sentiment flared up on the goldfields and measures were taken to make the immigration of Chinese miners more difficult and expensive.
Chinese migration to Australia ground to a halt with the introduction of the White Australia policy in 1901.
sbs.com.au
Despite this Chinese food soon started to be appreciated by ‘bohemian’ Australians and workers requiring late-night meals.
By the turn of the 20th century, the city’s emerging intelligentsia of artists, writers and later, university and college communities were venturing into Chinatown, City workers, suppliers of local Chinese businesses, and nurses and doctors coming off late shifts at the hospital also started eating at Chinese restaurants or getting take-away Chinese food. They were grateful for the welcoming atmosphere of Chinese restaurants in a city [Melbourne or Sydney that was] almost closed down at night - Barbara Nichol, Historian
In the mid 30's exceptions to White Australia Policy were granted to chefs and restaurant traders were able to apply to bring in workers from China.
But they were not permitted to bring in relatives, so any familial connection had to be hidden. Many of these 'cooks' had no cooking experience whatsoever.

Eligibility to bring in staff was also determined by the type of food served and customer base. 'Chinese' food and Western customers being regarded favourably by authorities. 'Australian' Chinese - sweet and sour dishes, for instance, became standard fare around this time, and rather more beef dishes, than the staple Cantonese emphasis on pork and fish. 

If a restaurant's menu was considered too 'ordinary' or servicing the 'lower' end of the market (working class Chinese and Westerners),  these applications were generally rejected.
The second Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) also saw another influx of Chinese and refugees to Australia leading to a boost in the restaurant trade.
During World War II, American service men liked to eat out in preference to eating in their barracks and many credit the American presence with changing local attitudes towards Chinese food.

In 1958 and then 1966, when the White Australia legislation was amended which opened the gate for Asian immigration
That’s when really a new wave of Chinese restaurants started to emerge... It was only after the 1960s that we became more accepting of Chinese migrants and more people in Australia embraced the idea of going to Chinese restaurants to eat. By the time we reached the 1970s, different varieties of Chinese cooking started to arrive in Australia and the more upmarket Chinese restaurants started to attract non-Chinese diners
Two world wars, discriminatory government policies and immigration hurdles over the past 100 years have not been able to stop the growth of Chinese cuisine in Australia. Now, Chinese ingredients — unheard of 20 years ago — make regular appearances in Australian kitchens.

"We've moved on from the sweet and sour pork...Australians wouldn't accept tofu at all once...Now it's a popular dish - Gavin Chan, Happy's Restaurant Canberra
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