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Want to support Language Stories? Now there’s a way. And you get to read the story behind Language Stories too.

I’m SO excited to share this post with you today. I’ve been working on this for well over a year now (I wrote the first drafts of parts in November 2017!).

It’s an honour to finally announce my very first book – Not A Year Off: The Story Behind Language Stories. Yay!

From first mentions of the very idea of Language Stories to people, years before we even set off, people were asking how they could support the project. We opted (at least so far) not to have a Patreon or crowd-funding and instead self-fund the first two seasons of the project.

There are a few reasons for this:

1) As well as being a trip to create Language Stories, our year making the episodes was also in part our honeymoon!

It felt very wrong to ask people to fund that. Drawing a thick line between “work” and “play” would have been very difficult for a lot of the trip.

2) We didn’t know where the project would lead.

I wouldn’t have wanted to ask people for crowd-funding support to then not be able to deliver on our promise. When we first set out, we had connections for the New York and Montreal episodes but after that, we were going in blind.

Of course, we had faith that we would make it work (which I hope you’ll agree, we did!) but it felt unfair to bring others on board with that at a point when we didn’t know what to expect or guarantee.

However, I do get why people would want to support something like Language Stories.

That’s one reason I wrote Not A Year Off: The Story Behind Language Stories.

Another is quite simply that I wanted to write down all the memories I could before they became hazy. Ha!

The book is very new to me and like nothing I’ve ever created before.

It’s primarily a travelogue, but one that’s probably more interesting if you share with me a curiosity for languages.

You can expect our stories – the ones it took to make Language Stories and the stories surrounding the rest of the trip too.

From interviewing Mayan rappers in Mexican shopping malls to meeting Galápagos tortoises for the first time.

From visiting a school for Deaf students in Vietnam to running a “race” through Cambodian traffic.

And from chatting for hours with speakers of language I knew nothing about in Malaysia to collapsing in the bus station days later.

It’s the full story of what it took to make seasons one and two of Language Stories, and I can’t wait for you to read it.

If you enjoy non-fiction books, if you enjoy Language Stories, or if you simply wish to support the project, buying a copy of Not A Year Off is a great choice.

Click here to get your copy now and choose between digital Kindle ebook version or physical paperback (I wrote a book! Woop!).

One way you can really support Language Stories is by purchasing multiple copies and sharing them with people you think will enjoy it. That’s also a great way to share the word about Language Stories too.

Watch Language Stories Live With Me!

Between now and the 23rd May 2019, I’ll be hosting regular Watch Parties on the Lindsay Does Languages Facebook Page.

This is a chance to check in and re-watch (or maybe even watch for the first time!) episodes from Seasons 1 and 2 of Language Stories.

Here’s the schedule of what to expect…

Monday 13th May – New York & the 7 Line (you can catch up here!)

Tuesday 14th May – Montreal: Beyond Bilingual (catch up on that one here too!)

Wednesday 15th May – Maya Isn’t Dead

Thursday 16th May – Unbelizable!

Friday 17th May – Keeping K’iche’ (this one’s our award-winning episode!)

Monday 20th May – Nicaraguan Sign Language, Guarani in the Heart of South America, and Learning Vietnamese

Tuesday 21st May – Singapore Takes The Floor, Teaching English in Laos, and Discovering Hmong

Thursday 23rd May – Make Hokkien Cool Again, Hands for Vietnam, and Kristang: A Tale of Two Cities

After each Watch Party, I’ll be going live on my Instagram for a little live Q+A to share more about the behind the scenes of the episodes.

Want to join? Click here to like and follow my Facebook Page and be notified when the Watch Parties happen each day.

Is there an episode of Language Stories you enjoyed most? Which bits of the book are you most looking forward to? Share in the comments!

The post Announcing…Not A Year Off: The Story Behind Language Stories appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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We’re already in May! I guess that’s means it’s time to set some language learning goals for the month. You ready? Let’s do Clear The List for the month!

Your Free Language Planner

Before we dive in, be sure to grab a copy of your free My Month in Languages Planner. It’s got weekly planning and review pages, a monthly calendar, and more. It’s a great start if you’ve been struggling lately with organising your language learning and actually getting stuff done.

Click below to download it now.

Not sure how to use a language planner? This blog article will help you get started.

What happened in April?

April was all about getting ready to open up enrollment on the Online Teaching Starter Kit. And it’s been a busy one as a result.

I interviewed previous students of the program, Tamara from Spanish Con Salsa and Jessica from French Sunny Side on the Teach Languages Online Podcast.

I added a whole new Unit to the program, plus updates, which meant lots of days scriptwriting, filming, editing, and uploading well over 20 new videos for the program so it’s the best it can be.

At the time of writing, there’s still a few hours left to join if you want to and haven’t already. Click here to find out more and enroll now before enrollment closes (for at least 6 months).

As I’m sure you know by now, Easter also fell really late this year, which meant 2 weeks of last month I got to spend more time with Ashley while his school was on Easter break (he’s a teacher).

OH! And…big news…I’m going to South Korea with Shannon!

Language Learning Review for April

I love spending more time with Ashley but the school holidays always switch up my language learning routine, especially true given all the work we were doing on Online Teaching Starter Kit updates!

Not a problem though, as I hadn’t set myself any big language goals for April.

Language Learning Goals for May Korean

Now that Shannon and I finally have our flights booked (seriously, we’ve been wanting to go to South Korea together even since we started learning Korean back in 2016!) I’m feeling more of a draw to Korean. I think finally having a date in the calendar has given me a solid reason to want to learn the language.

I’ve always felt a struggle with Korean. It’s not been an easy language for me to learn on my own, and I think now I’ve realised that a big reason for that was not having, well…a reason, I guess. Going to Korea felt really far away, I have no Korean friends or family, the nearest Korean restaurant is 40 miles away – you get the idea.

I still haven’t found my “love” for Korean yet, however, having the flight booked (for the end of August) is the deadline I need to study harder. Let’s do this!

Week 1

Introduction to Korean, Future Learn – I’ve just started this course. So far so good! The structure of it is one I’m really enjoying and possibly one of the best I’ve found (and that’s coming from someone who’s taken many an “Introduction to Korean” course!). My plan is to finish this within a week.

Drops – I’ve been using Drops pretty consistently at breakfast lately to help increase my vocabulary. I’ll keep using this.

Hyori’s Bed and Breakfast – I know that for many Korean learners K-drama was either a major inspiration to start learning Korean or something that you’ve discovered and enjoyed throughout your studies. With the exception of Boys Over Flowers, I have to admit I’ve never really been taken by K-dramas. I tend to find the storylines a little eyeroll-inducing and repetitive. But I’m not a huge fan of drama shows in general, so maybe that has something to do with it!

I am, however, a sucker for reality TV (Made In Chelsea, anyone?). So I’m quite enjoying casually watching Hyori’s Bed & Breakfast on Netflix right now. My plan is to keep watching this series in the mornings when I’m washing up after breakfast and sometimes in the evenings when I start to cook.

LingQ – I’m a pretty casual user of LingQ, but I’ve noticed that when I replace reading bits of news in the morning with reading one news article in Korean on LingQ, I do tend to then spot that story in English later on and understand what I’ve read that morning. My goal here is to replace my morning glance at the news in English with LingQ instead.

I also recently spoke to Steve Kaufmann, one of the co-founders of LingQ, about how to really make the most of it. If you’d like to check out that video recording, here’s the link.

Talk To Me In Korean – I used the first TTMIK Grammar course (available on their website here) to help give me a foundation of the grammar and am now working my way through the Grammar 2 course.

Week 2

italki lesson – My plan is to have an italki lesson with my Korean tutor once a month from now until I go to South Korea. I know I could definitely see more success with more lessons but I’ve also got a lot of other things to do before then too! I’m training for an ultra marathon (and I’m a slow and steady runner so that takes A LOT of time), I’m working with new students on the Online Teaching Starter Kit, and I may or may not have something new Language Stories related to share with you soon…so one lesson a month is a solid goal for me that I’m happy with.

Everything else – Drops, LingQ, TTMIK, and Hyori’s Bed and Breakfast will happen throughout the month.

Weeks 3 + 4

Transport – You may have seen over on Instagram a few weeks ago that I put together a mindmap for Korean and used transport as a base topic for my first attempt at this. I then used YouTube videos to extract useful sentences for the topic. My plan is to take this further and get active with learning the important bits from this through writing and speaking activities.

Everything else – of course, I’ll keep using Drops, LingQ, TTMIK, and Hyori’s Bed and Breakfast here too.

Your Free Language Planner

Missed it up top? Click the image below to grab a free download of your monthly language learning planner to help keep you focused this May.

Join Clear The List + Share Your Goals!

1. Share your goal post whether it includes your aspirations for the month or year. Submissions unrelated to the theme or links to your homepage will be deleted.

2. Link back to this post. You can use our button code below if you wish.

3. Follow the hosts: Lindsay from Lindsay Does Languages and Shannon from Eurolinguiste.

4. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT RULE: Please visit the site of the person who linked up immediately before you and leave them an encouraging comment! By hosting this linkup, we’re hoping to create a positive community where we can all share our goals. If you do not do this, you will be removed from the linkup.

5. Share on social media using #ClearTheList.

Inlinkz Link Party

How did your language learning go this month? What are your language goals for next month? Share in the comments below!

The post Language Learning Goals: #ClearTheList – May 2019 appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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March well and truly whizzed past! It was a busy one for sure, but what about my languages? And what are my language learning goals for April?

Your Free Language Planner

If April is time for a fresh start for your language learning, grab a copy of my free monthly planner to help you set better goals for the coming month. Click the image below to join my email list and get it in your inbox.

And if you’re really ready to get planning for your language learning goals this month, you need to get hold of The Solo Language Learner Planner with much more detail and planning pages to see you right at every stage of language learning.

What happened in March?

Language Stories finished! – Woohoo! Seasons one AND two of Language Stories are now complete. Missed any? There’s plenty of time to catch up on everything here.

Women In Language happened! – It feels like a long time ago now but Women in Language happened early in March and was a great success! We had over 500 people join us across the 4 day event to hear from an awesome line up of 25+ speakers. Looking forward to next year already!

Language Stories won a film festival! – Ashley entered Keeping K’iche’ to Northampton Film Festival, we went along to the screening, just beyond excited to see it on the big cinema screen and then…we won! One thing we were keen on from the start with the series was to make this pretty niche topic accessible and interesting to a wider audience. It’s so exciting to know that with this win, we must be going in the right direction. Yay!

Language Learning Review for March

There were a couple of days when my language learning routine didn’t happen – the first couple of days after Women in Language and the morning after we won the film festival. So clearly, both things I don’t mind missing a language study session or two for.

Women in Language inspired me to experiment with many new things for my language study. So far, I’ve tried mind mapping for Korean. I really enjoyed this!

As Shannon and I are planning to travel to Korea, I started by focusing on the topic of transport and in particular thinking of the transport methods I’m most likely to use and then expanding out from there.

Here’s a little snapshot of my first draft:

As you can tell, I wrote everything in English first and then went back around and squeezed in my Korean translations (using Naver dictionary online). I’ll talk about what needs to happen next below.

Language Learning Goals for April Guarani

For April, I’m going to keep things going as they are with Guarani. The coursebook I have isn’t structured how you’d typically expect a coursebook to be. It’s quite a random order of vocab lists, grammar points, short dialogues and now also longer texts.

That means that I have to take small parts of it at a time and then really expand on them on my own by writing my own sentence examples, checking with the dictionary and grammar book, and then looking through my story book for examples. Learning a language with limited resoruces is possible but it requires more patience and openness for sure!

Here’s my list of what I’m using in rotation right now. (For more resources, especially for beginners, click here)

Five books that I bought in Paraguay (and can’t seem to find online to recommend for you, sorry!)

My notebook. I write my own sentences and practice using examples from my books I find as well.

ABC News in Guarani. I sometimes read their short articles on this page in Guarani.

Korean

With Korean, I’m going to start by re-writing my transport mindmap. I’ve got three big topics that I circled on my first draft as things that deserve their own mindmap or further study – Food, Weight, Time. These three will be next on my list this month.

Once I’ve got everything confirmed and finalised on my mindmap, I’ve got a few options and I’ll see what fits best depending on what I feel I need most.

I might record the words, I might make a Decks (Memrise) course, I might write more sentences and scenarios using the words, I might search them online to give me more context. We shall see!

Others

My ‘Others’ 20 minutes each day is still a lot of fun. I’ve also started 2 language exchanges after Women in Language (told you it was inspiring!) so I’m also getting extra speaking for Spanish, Italian, and German now too, which is great!

Here’s some of the things I’m using for each language:

French – 750 French Verbs and Their Uses, 712 More Things to Write About

Spanish – 750 Spanish Verbs and Their Uses, 712 More Things to Write About

Italian – Italian Grammar You Really Need To Know (I have an older version), Online Italian Club, language exchange

German – Online German Club, language exchange, LyricsTraining

Portuguese – Novo Avenida Brasil 2 (I have an older version)

Japanese – Read and Write Japanese Scripts, Terrace House on Netflix, LyricsTraining

Indonesian – Teach Yourself Complete Indonesian

Esperanto – lernu.net

Dutch – Learn Belgian Dutch at learndutch.org, LyricsTraining

Chinese – YoYo Chinese, Chineasy, an old Ikea table chess instructions manual!

Your Free Language Planner

Missed it up top? Grab a free copy of your My Month in Languages planner when you join my email list. Click the image below to do just that.

Join Clear The List + Share Your Goals!

1. Share your goal post whether it includes your aspirations for the month or year. Submissions unrelated to the theme or links to your homepage will be deleted.

2. Link back to this post. You can use our button code below if you wish.

3. Follow the hosts: Lindsay from Lindsay Does Languages and Shannon from Eurolinguiste.

4. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT RULE: Please visit the site of the person who linked up immediately before you and leave them an encouraging comment! By hosting this linkup, we’re hoping to create a positive community where we can all share our goals. If you do not do this, you will be removed from the linkup.

5. Share on social media using #ClearTheList.

Inlinkz Link Party

How did your language learning go this month? What are your language goals for next month? Share in the comments below!

The post Language Learning Goals: #ClearTheList – April 2019 appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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Kristang is a language spoken in Malacca, Malaysia and Singapore. But with almost 10 times as many speakers in Malacca than Singapore, how do things differ for the language in both cities? Find out in this episode of Language Stories.

Why Kristang?

Back when I was wrapping up season one of Language Stories and requesting suggestions for interviewees for season two, a handful of suggestions came in for the same person: Kevin Wong, founder of Kodrah Kristang in Singapore. So that interview was always going to happen. But would it be part of the Singapore episode or its own episode?

As I researched more, I learnt that the city of origin of the language, Malacca in Malaysia, has around 1,000 speakers mostly geographically concentrated compared to Singapore’s estimates of 100-200, mostly since Kevin’s classes. I knew I had to find someone to tell the Malaysian side of the story. At risk of sounding like a clickbait headline, what happened next will surprise you…

The Video

Kristang: A Tale of Two Cities - Language Stories - YouTube

The Podcast

Featuring

(in order of appearance in the podcast)

Sara Frederica Santa Maria
Sara teaches free classes in her home for groups of local children in the Portuguese Settlement in Melaka, Malaysia. She also co-authored the book Beng Prende Portugues Malaká.

Philomena Singho
Philomena shares daily videos on Facebook teaching Kristang and co-authored the book Beng Prende Portugues Malaká.

Michael Singho
Michel is the head of the Malacca Portuguese-Eurasian Association and co-authored the book Beng Prende Portugues Malaká.

Kevin Martens Wong
Kevin started Kodrah Kristang in 2016. He teaches free classes in Singapore for locals to learn from scratch.

Melissa De Silva
Melissa De Silva is the author of ‘Others’ Is Not A Race, a powerful book about the Eurasian experience growing up in Singapore.

Further Reading + Resources

Papia Kristang: The Creole Portuguese of Malacca and Singapore – Kreol Magazine – Great introductory article to the language.

Understanding the Culture of Malacca’s Kristang Community – Destinasian – Another introduction to learn more about Kristang.

How to revive a 500-year-old dying language – BBC – Article from the BBC about Kevin’s efforts to revive Kristang in Singapore.

Malacca Portuguese deny Kristang language is dying – Malay Mail – A response in part to the BBC article above.

Our Sponsor

A huge thank you to Lingora for sponsoring season 2 of Language Stories!

Lingora is a new online language community where you can share written and spoken practice in the language you’re learning and get real feedback from the community. What’s great about Lingora is that they help to eliminate the “umms” and “ahhs” by giving you prompts for your writing and speaking. And the really great bit? It’s 100% free. Yup. Totally free feedback on your language practice.

But there’s more to Lingora. You’ve also got the option for free lessons, live chat, and paid for lessons with tutors. Basically, all bases are covered.

You can support Language Stories by signing up for free to Lingora at elingora.com.

Support The Show

The best thing you can do right now to support the project is threefold, and if you’ve ever listened to any podcast before, I’m sure you’ll be familiar with what I’m about to say!

1. Subscribe – by subscribing to the Language Stories podcast in your favourite place and YouTube for the sister videos, you’re going to keep up with all future episodes. Woop!

2. Review – when it comes to the tech stuff, reviews are pretty important. Reviews help to tell iTunes that people like the podcast, and that helps to raise the profile so that new people can find it easily. Yay!

3. Tell a friend – word of mouth still wins! If you know someone who would love Language Stories, tell them about it. And if they’re new to podcasts, walk them through the process to subscribe them. Woohoo!

To make it as easy as possible to share the podcast, click here to tweet about episode.

Share Your Story

This is the final episode in season two! My plan for season three is…The United Kingdom!

It seems appropriate after two seasons exploring far away to come home for this season, especially with Brexit looming, to take a closer look at languages in the UK.

If you have a Language Story from the UK you’d love to share, or if you know someone that does, get in touch.

I always love to hear from you! Your feedback helps to shape future episodes so thank you.

How did you enjoy this episode of Language Stories? What did you learn about Kristang? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

The post Language Stories: Kristang – A Tale of Two Cities appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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What do you know about Vietnamese Sign Language? How many sign languages are there in Vietnam? And how does sign language education work? Find out in this episode of Language Stories.

Why Vietnamese Sign Language?

When I came across Jeff and Nancy’s website, Hands for Vietnam, I knew we’d have to stop in Danang. I was struck by their hard work and dedication to what they do and really wanted to learn more from them.

Like most trips to Vietnam, ours involved going from one end of the country to the other. We started in Ho Chi Minh City and finished in Hanoi, filming interviews for two other Language Stories episodes too (Learning Vietnamese and Discovering Hmong).

And if you’re interested in learning more about sign languages around the world, be sure to take a listen to our season one episode about Nicaraguan Sign Language.

The Video

Hands for Vietnam: Language Stories - YouTube

The Podcast

Featuring

Hands for Vietnam – Jeff and Nancy run Central Deaf Services in Danang, Vietnam.

Happy Heart Cafe – we also spoke with Binh from Happy Heart Cafe.

Further Reading + Resources

Hands for Vietnam FAQOne of the best sources I found for explaining Vietnamese Sign Languages.

The Alphabet of Vietnamese Sign Language (North), Seek The World – learn the alphabet of one of the sign languages of Vietnam from this Deaf travel YouTube channel.

Helping Deaf Children in Vietnam Communicate and Access Education through Sign Language, The World Bank – an article covering Deaf education in a different part of Vietnam.

Our Sponsor

A huge thank you to Lingora for sponsoring season 2 of Language Stories!

Lingora is a new online language community where you can share written and spoken practice in the language you’re learning and get real feedback from the community. What’s great about Lingora is that they help to eliminate the “umms” and “ahhs” by giving you prompts for your writing and speaking. And the really great bit? It’s 100% free. Yup. Totally free feedback on your language practice.

But there’s more to Lingora. You’ve also got the option for free lessons, live chat, and paid for lessons with tutors. Basically, all bases are covered.

You can support Language Stories by signing up for free to Lingora at elingora.com.

Support The Show

The best thing you can do right now to support the project is threefold, and if you’ve ever listened to any podcast before, I’m sure you’ll be familiar with what I’m about to say!

1. Subscribe – by subscribing to the Language Stories podcast in your favourite place and YouTube for the sister videos, you’re going to keep up with all future episodes. Woop!

2. Review – when it comes to the tech stuff, reviews are pretty important. Reviews help to tell iTunes that people like the podcast, and that helps to raise the profile so that new people can find it easily. Yay!

3. Tell a friend – word of mouth still wins! If you know someone who would love Language Stories, tell them about it. And if they’re new to podcasts, walk them through the process to subscribe them. Woohoo!

To make it as easy as possible to share the podcast, click here to tweet about episode.

Share Your Story

If you have a Language Story you’d love to share, or if you know someone that does, get in touch.

I always love to hear from you! Your feedback helps to shape future episodes so thank you.

How did you enjoy this episode of Language Stories? What did you learn about Vietnamese Sign Languages? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

The post Language Stories: Hands for Vietnam appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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Spring has most definitely sprung! It’s warm, it’s sunny, and it’s not even March. Although it almost is. Here’s my language learning goals for March 2019.

Your Free Language Planner

Are you already in the Little Language Library? Every month, I update the free planner with a current calendar page so you can easily keep track of your language learning for the month ahead. Click below to join my email list and get it now.

If you’re looking for something more thorough that you can use month after month, be sure to check out my Solo Language Learner Planner too. It’s got everything you need to stay totally on top of your language learning.

What happened in February?

Language Stories: Make Hokkien Cool Again – The most recent episode of Language Stories season 2 was about Hokkien, and in particular in this episode, Penang Hokkien. Listen and watch what our interviewees are doing to make Hokkien cool again.

How to Overcome Shyness When Speaking a Foreign Language – We’ve probably all felt shier than we’d like at some point when attempting to speak. This post gets you started on overcoming it.

How to Get the Most from Your Online Language Lessons with a Tutor – This article was sponsored by Lusa Language School. After 10 hours of their Portuguese lessons online, I share my advice on getting the most from your online language lessons.

8 Things You’ll Learn at Women in Language – Not long now! To share a little about what to expect from this year’s Women in Language, I picked 8 presentations at random to share with you. (There’s still time to get your ticket too!)

Language Learning Review for February

The first couple of weeks were great for language learning then half term came! I love having extra time with Ashley (my teacher husband) but school holidays do always affect my language learning routine. I don’t mind too much though as I think it’s good to disrupt a routine every once in a while to make sure it’s still worth doing and give you a chance to check in when you get back to it.

I did get the chance to look at Ainu though as part of my challenge to learn more about indigenous languages this year. It’s pretty interesting!

Language Learning Goals for March Guarani

I’m working my way through my course book and mixing this with writing my own sentences based on the translation exercises in the book or just from what I want to write that day.

Korean

Vocabulary – I will keep using Drops on an (almost!) daily basis.

Grammar – My focus is still reviewing each lesson of the Talk To Me In Korean Grammar 1 online course with my notes.

Reading – Not something I’m focusing on much this month.

Listening – I listen each workday to an episode from the SBS Korean podcast feed. I also end most of my 20 minute study sessions with a quick song on YouTube. I know it’s not regular spoken speech but I find it helpful to follow the letters and words and see if I can keep up!

Writing – As I review each of my TTMIK Grammar 1 notes, I type out my attempts for each lesson and submit the text to Lingora (our sponsor for Language Stories!). It helps a lot, as typing and handwriting in a language like Korean with a different script are 2 different skills.

Speaking – I’m not planning on a lesson in March as our weekends are quite busy but I might get to practise some Korean on the Speak Easy sessions for Language Study Club! Woohoo!

Others

I’m still using Streaks app, which works well at keeping track.

I use a mixture of things in my sessions. As I tend to end up with 2 sessions a month for each language, I try and use the first session for each language for input and the second session for output.

Here’s what I’m using for each language:

French – Nothing specific! Writing prompts, news, Easy French etc.

Spanish – Nothing specific! Writing prompts, news, Easy Spanish etc.

GermanOnline German Club for listening

ItalianOnline Italian Club for listening

PortuguesePractise Portuguese for listening and my notes from my lessons with Lusa in January

Japanese – an older version of this Teach Yourself Japanese book, Terrace House!

Chinese – I’ve been enjoying using YoYo Chinese lately!

Indonesian – reviewing Teach Yourself Complete Indonesian, which I used to study the language a few years ago.

DutchLearndutch.org for listening

Esperanto – I’ve been going through some lessons on Lernu.net

Your Free Language Planner

Every month, you can download your free My Month in Languages Planner to help organise your language learning. Click below to get yours for March 2019 now. And, of course, you can always get the bigger and better Solo Language Learner Planner.

Join Clear The List + Share Your Goals!

1. Share your goal post whether it includes your aspirations for the month or year. Submissions unrelated to the theme or links to your homepage will be deleted.

2. Link back to this post. You can use our button code below if you wish.

3. Follow the hosts: Lindsay from Lindsay Does Languages and Shannon from Eurolinguiste.

4. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT RULE: Please visit the site of the person who linked up immediately before you and leave them an encouraging comment! By hosting this linkup, we’re hoping to create a positive community where we can all share our goals. If you do not do this, you will be removed from the linkup.

5. Share on social media using #ClearTheList.

Inlinkz Link Party

How did your language learning go this month? What are your language goals for next month? Share in the comments below!

The post Language Learning Goals: #ClearTheList – March 2019 appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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Women in Language is back! I want to share a few of the exciting things you’ll learn at Women in Language 2019 so picked 8 at random. You ready? Here we go!

Wait…There’s More than One Sign Language?

Destiny Yarbro founded InterSign University to help people from anywhere learn many of the 350+ sign languages that exist around the world.

I’ve learnt more about a couple of interesting sign languages in Nicaragua and Vietnam (that episode is coming soon!) for Language Stories. So with that, I can’t wait to learn even more from Destiny’s talk.

The 2 Keys to Making Language Learning Into a Tool Against Anxiety

Elena Gabrielli, in her own words from her website Hitoritabi, is an introvert, grammar geek and proud Ravenclaw.

If you’ve ever suffered from anxiety yourself, or know a language learner who does, this is going to be a great presentation for you.

Bringing Endangered Languages and Cultures Back to Life

Inky Gibbens founded Tribalingual after witnessing “how numerous organisations document and archive languages, never to be in the public domain. As the child of a culture whose language is facing impending extinction (Buryat), she realised that the only real way to save these languages is by getting more people to speak them.”

Do you find yourself curious to learn more about endangered languages and cultures? 2019 is the International Year of Indigenous Languages. We couldn’t be more excited to have Inky share this talk with us at Women in Language this year.

Identity Crisis: The Ups and Downs of Living, Working and Dating in a Foreign Language

Lindie Botes is a South African designer and language learner who has recently moved to Singapore, which I’m beyond excited about for her! With her recent move, it seems like great timing for this topic.

If you’ve ever lived, worked, or dated in another language (or even dreamt of doing so) then this presentation will be invaluable for you.

Language Travel (Why I Love It) and How to Plan a Trip

Penny Wilson is the lady behind Lingo Mama, who’s all about combining a love for language learning with travel. As well as this solo presentation, you’ll also hear from Penny in one of our two Panel Discussions at Women in Language 2019. Penny will be at the Panel, Balancing Languages, Loved Ones & Little Ones with Seonaid Beckwith, Marianna DuBosq and hosted by Shannon Kennedy.

If you’re spinning your globe right now and eyeing up a trip somewhere exciting for 2019, Penny’s presentation is going to get you packing your bags.

The Fine Art of Language Exchange

Elizabeth Bruckner was a great supporter of Women in Language in 2018 and just started writing for Fluent in 3 Months. We’re super excited to have her speak at the 2019 event!

Language exchange is one of those tricky things to master. I have to say I agree with Elizabeth when she describes it as a ‘fine art’! If you know you need to speak more, Elizabeth’s presentation could be the one to give you the final push you need.

Meaningful Learning and How to Apply It for Learning Languages

Paloma Marín Arraiza is a Spanish native who collaborates with Sprachheld and its Spanish school.

There’s a lot to be said for the benefits of learning something meaningfully. If you’ve ever found yourself in a language rut, Paloma’s presentation will be a good one to help get you out of it. Oh, and you get recordings of all presentations too. Any time you’re stuck in that rut in the future, you’ll be able to check back on Paloma’s talk (or any!) when you need it.

Beyond The Smiley Face: Communicating Affect Online

Dr Monica Riordan is an experimental psychologist currently living in Pennsylvania in the United States. Her current work examines how non-verbal attributes such as bold font, repeating punctuation, and emojis express and intensify affect. If you follow me on Instagram, you know I’m all about emojis so can’t wait for this presentation!

Ever found yourself scratching your head at that three letter acronym that keeps popping up online? Or wondering how “word” of the year could be awarded to an emoji? You’ll love what Dr Monica Riordan has to say on the subject.

Get your ticket to Women in Language!

These are just a selection of the presentations happening at Women in Language this year. There’s so much more happening – including 2 Panel Discussions and a chance for YOU to present too!

Ready for it? Women in Language is happening live and online over 4 days from Thursday 7th March to Sunday 10th March 2019.

Everyone is welcome (the ‘women’ in Women in Language only refers to the line-up of speakers!) and we’d love to have you join us for the live event. Click below to get your ticket now for Women in Language 2019.

Which presentation are you looking forward to the most? Share in the comments!

The post 8 Things You’ll Learn at Women in Language 2019 appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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Ever feel like you’re not sure how to get the most from your online language lessons with a tutor? Here’s my guide to make sure that your online language lessons are as useful as they can be.

In January 2018, I gave one language in particular a little extra focus time: Portuguese. I’m working with Lusa Language School on this article. They kindly gave me 10 online Portuguese lessons in a month, which is the inspiration for this sponsored article.

Lusa Language School is a Portuguese language school in the heart of Lisbon. They offer Portuguese courses both in Lisbon and online. Judging by their Instagram, there’s plenty of extra social activities beyond the lessons too when you study in Lisbon!

My online tutor was Diogo, who really helped to highlight and work on improving my common mistakes with Portuguese. Mainly that involves using Spanish words; vowel pronunciation; and lack of general vocabulary, which is what tended to lead towards me using Spanish words…!

Over our 10 lessons, I definitely felt more confident and able with Portuguese, and look forward to visiting Portugal some day soon to put it all into practice.

Anyway, enough about me and my Portuguese. Here’s what I learnt about how to make the most of your online lessons from my online lessons with Lusa Language School.

Count On Yourself

Especially when we’re unsure of our own language learning abilities, we have a tendency to book a lesson with a tutor and sit back and expect the language to just magically go into our brains simply because we’re spending time with a tutor.

The truth is that if that time isn’t valuably used by us, then we won’t be learning anything, or very little at most.

The first step to get the most from your online language lessons with a tutor is to recognise your role in your own success and progress.

Your tutor is there to guide you and inspire you, but your success really lies with you and the decisions you make towards that success.

I found that having my lessons booked in advance proved a great help in making sure that I made time for my lessons.

Ask for Corrections

One of the real benefits of having time with an online tutor is the chance to speak. For many of us, especially if we’re looking for online lessons, we don’t have the chance to speak and practice that language in real life all too often.

However, if you’re chatting away for a whole hour and your tutor isn’t offering you any corrections of tips for areas of improvement then you’re not getting as much from your tutor time as you could be.

Every tutor is different and every learner is different too. You may prefer a tutor who corrects you as you go, or you may prefer a tutor that allows you to finish what you’re saying before allowing time for corrections and improvements. Decide which suits you best and don’t be afraid to ask your tutor to correct you as you prefer.

Typically, I prefer corrections after a chance to speak and finish what I want to say. However, with a language like Portuguese that in the past I’ve learnt pretty ‘slap-dash’, it was important for me with my lessons with Lusa Language School that Diogo corrected me as I made mistakes so I could see exactly where I was going wrong.

Record Your Calls

You may never need to go back to re-watch every single minute of every single call, but especially when tutors are explaining mistakes or covering important bits, ask if you can record your calls for later reference.

Most online lessons are an hour, which is a long time to stay completely on form speaking a different language and learning actively. By recording your calls, you’re giving yourself a chance to go back and review what your tutor is correcting, and with their correct pronunciation too rather than you guessing how stuff should sound when you stumble upon your notes down the line.

Skype now allows you to do this direct within the application, which is a great feature to make use of!

Of course, it’s important here that you ask and let tutors know each time you choose to record your call.

Review Your Notes

As your tutor is correcting you, they’ll likely be adding notes to the Skype chat or a Google Doc.

When I try and make my own thorough notes during a lesson, I’m never getting as much from the tutor as I could be. So I don’t do this anymore. Instead, I make my notes after an online lesson.

Start by reviewing your tutor’s notes actively in your study time. Make time to do this. Having 1 lesson a week and time to go over stuff is better than rushing ahead with multiple lessons a week if you have no time to check in to work on improving your mistakes.

I found that reviewing notes from my lessons with Diogo was surprisingly helpful at reminding me of the things we’d learnt in a lesson, especially when we’d covered pronunciation mistakes I’d made and Diogo had given me extra words and examples of the sound in context.

For each lesson, I made some review notes by simply copying my tutor’s Skype notes that I wanted to remember or study again and adding translations and further examples where necessary.

Put it into Practice!

When you’ve made your final notes from your lesson, put it into practice and write full sentences in context, perhaps even record yourself saying them.

One thing I love about online lessons is when tutors give homework. Yes, the word brings memories of school flooding back but homework is good!

Homework forces you to connect again with the language in between your lessons. Remember the first step I shared – recognising your role in your own success – it’s not always easy to find the time outside of lessons to study. Homework gives you that focus knowing that your tutor will be waiting on the results.

One homework that Diogo set a few times for me was to write a longer text based on what we’d been learning and speaking about that lesson. This worked so well.

However, even if your tutor doesn’t set homework, it’s still worth finding the motivation to put what you learn from your lesson and your notes into practice.

Take it back to your tutor

When you have created something – a written text or recorded spoken example – whether it was homework or not, share it with your tutor.

This gives you a chance to ask for more corrections and consequently improve even more. This is what your tutor is there for.

When Diogo had given me a homework to write things, we’d always start the following lesson reviewing this and working on improving it, Diogo explaining my mistakes so I knew how to improve next time. It really helped.

Rather than have a tutor correct stuff outside of lessons and then simply send it to you, if you can, it’s worth doing this together in your lesson time so you can actively see where the mistakes are and how they can be made better.

Learn Portuguese with Lusa Language School

As I mentioned up top, this post is sponsored by Lusa Language School, who I studied Portuguese with in January.

My lessons were a great boost to my Portuguese and I can definitely recommend Lusa Language School.

If you’re interested in learning Portuguese with them either in Lisbon or online, click here to learn more.

Your Free Language Lesson Notes Review

If you want to make the most of your online language lessons, I’ve got the perfect free download for you! Click below to download your free Language Lesson Notes Review to help you easily keep track of everything you’ve learnt and put it into practice too.

How do you make the most of your online language lessons with a tutor? Share in the comments!

The post How to Get the Most from Your Online Language Lessons with a Tutor appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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No matter how much you study the grammar and the verb tables, something you come to actually speaking a language for the first time and…nothing comes out. And it’s not because you don’t know what to say, it’s that you’re shy, afraid of making mistakes, or both. So just what can you do? Well, you can start by reading this blog article to learn how to overcome shyness when speaking a foreign language.

What Even Is Shyness?

Shyness is actually an emotion.

For some people, it may be a personality trait, something that you experience in most situations.

But for other people, it may be an emotional response to a certain situation, such as speaking a foreign language.

What makes shyness often quite difficult to deal with is that in many western cultures, shyness is typically seen as a detrimental quality. We believe it’s going to hinder our success.

However, when we cast a wider net, we learn that in some cultures, shyness is considered a positie trait.

For example, Zimbardo, who conducted much research into shyness, found Japanese people to be naturally shyer than some other cultures. Interestingly, it’s also considered a much more positive trait in Japanese society.

So when you think about shyness and ask yourself the question “Am I shy?”, if the answer is yes (even only in the situation of speaking a foreign language), don’t dismiss that as a negative quality. It’s only a negative quality if you perceive at as such.

Why are we shy?

There’s been lots of research into what causes students to feel a lack of confidence in the language classroom. We go into more depth on the points above in this month’s Language Study Club. Click here to learn more and join the Club to get access to that (+ LOTS of other good stuff).

Rather than go into all of them in this blog post, we’ll focus on 3 key points that we can work on improving:

1. Afraid of making mistakes
2. Not having people to speak with comfortably
3. Lack of knowledge of the language

Embrace Mistakes

I’ve been big on shouting from the rooftops (not literally) the power of embracing your mistakes for a few years now.

I even spoke about it at the Polyglot Gathering in Bratislava a few years ago.

Lindsay Williams: The Joy of Mistakes & The Beauty of Imperfection [EN] PG2017 - YouTube

It all started when I was using Snapchat to practice speaking the languages I was learning.

Rather than just rehearse a script that I’d written, maybe even had checked by a native for mistakes, and then memorised, I decided to just speak. To show the language I knew that day. To show where I was at that point in the language learning process.

This led me to setting myself Mistake Goals, which I know at first sounds contradictory. I mean, goals are achievements to celebrate, right?

Exactly.

When we reposition our thinking around what a mistake is, it can become something much more positive, and something we actually want to make.

So if I want to speak, I set myself a mistake goal of 5 mistakes. As I speak, perhaps I notice mistakes here and there and can keep a mental tally.

But maybe there’s some mistakes I don’t even know I’m making. This is where recording comes in. I can watch back what I said and I might just spot even more mistakes. Brilliant!

If you’re doing this by yourself, you might not have access to the last option, so don’t worry. But here, I could then even share my recording with my tutor, language exchange partner, friend, or even just on social media.

If you don’t hit the number of your mistake goal, then repeat the process again the same day (ideally as soon as possible, while you’re focused on the task) until you do get all 5 mistakes.

And this works at every level of language learning.

Let’s say I’m practising French, a foreign language I’m relatively strong in. It might take me longer to hit that mistake goal, but that means I’ve just been speaking for a lot longer than if I hadn’t set a mistake goal and had just said “speak for a minute”, or worse, not set myself a goal at all.

And if I’m using this for a language I don’t know so well, it works too. I won’t be speaking for as long as French, but I’ll be speaking from the start of that language learning process and noticing and fixing my mistakes sooner rather than letting them become engrained in my brain.

And how does this help when you’re actually speaking with people?

By embracing your mistakes when you’re practising speaking alone with mistake goals, you can begin to feel much more comfortable with the idea of making mistakes when speaking in a foreign language with others.

If you’re speaking with people you know and trust, like a tutor or friend, you can even set a mistake goal with them for the conversation you’re having and ask them to point out your mistakes.

This helps you to feel more comfortable with being corrected because you’ve invited it, rather than wanting to switch tutors because your one corrects you too much and it’s having a reverse effect.

Get your Free Mistake Goal Setter

If you’re new to the idea of Mistake Goals, click below to download my free Mistake Goal Setter. It’s designed to introduce you to the idea and give you somewhere to keep track. Enjoy!

Speak in a Safe Space

On that note, make sure that if you are feeling shy when speaking a foreign language, rather than putting yourself in an overly uncomfortable position such as a conversation with a native speaker who’s not a teacher or friend right away, start by finding a space you feel comfortable speaking in.

It may not happen right away, but once you have some people in your language learning that you know, like and trust, you’ll be able to speak more with them, which will help to overcome that awkward “Erm” when you find yourself speaking in an unexpected situation.

There’s a lot that teachers and people you’re speaking with can do here to help overcome your speaking shyness, such as simply acknowledging you’re feeling anxious about speaking, making the space an enjoyable place to be where you can laugh off mistakes, and sharing techniques to help you deal with your speaking shyness. However, they may not know how you feel, so if possible tell them.

What’s important with finding a safe space to speak, however, is that you don’t rely solely on that safe space forever. If that happens you’ll perhaps never get to speaking that foreign language with natives you don’t know.

To avoid this, make sure you set yourself a goal of when you’d like to speak outside of your safe space.

This safe space doesn’t have to be in real life either, it can totally be online!

One option is the Speak Easy sessions we host as part of Language Study Club.

These are weekly live video calls with separate rooms for different languages members want to practice that day.

Want to learn more? Click here to join Language Study Club now.

Listen + Read + Write

Speaking a language sans shyness isn’t just a case of “Speak! Now! Always! More! Speak!”.

Confident language use is a combination of the 4 key skills associated with around half the world’s languages (roughly the other half don’t have a written form): listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Those first three all help with your speaking in the long run (even if it doesn’t feel like it) but listening will likely help the most.

Remember that finding above that we’re likely to be more shy when we have a lack of knowledge of the language? Yep. That’s where this comes in. Keep learning beyond simply pressuring yourself to speak.

Some ideas include:

Listening to podcasts
Listening to audio courses
Listening to radio
Listening to music
Watching films
Watching TV
Watching YouTube
Watching videos on social media
Reading books
Reading newspapers online
Reading article online
Reading captions and comments on social media
Writing a sentence or two first thing in the morning or last thing at night
Writing captions and comments on social media
Writing a text with a writing prompt
Writing a poem, a song, or getting creative in other ways!

Expose yourself to the language as much as possible in your daily life (including giving it a go yourself, not just taking it in) and you’ll be well on your way to improving your knowledge of the language and therefore overcoming shyness when speaking a foreign language.

Want to overcome shyness speaking a foreign language?

As I mentioned above, Speak Easy sessions are a weekly feature of Language Study Club.

It’s a chance for you to speak the language you’re learning in a safe space with me or Shannon + other members of Language Study Club (aka people you know, like + trust!)

But Language Study Club is more than Speak Easy sessions. Each month, we have a focus topic that’s all about making you a better language learner. And when you’re a better language learner, you’re more confident in your abilities – something we saw earlier than contributes to overcoming shyness when speaking a foreign language.

We’re also not afraid to dig into the science of it all too, and present that to you in an understandable way that can help you to improve areas of your language learning you didn’t even know could be improved!

For February 2019, our topic is Increasing Confidence and Overcoming Shyness. I’m hosting and we go a lot deeper than what we’ve discussed in this post.

(Oh, and if you’re reading this after February 2019, you’ll still get access to that topic!)

Here’s what Language Study Club member Cheryl shared with us recently about her experience:

Want to learn more and join Language Study Club? Click here to do just that.

Get your Free Mistake Goal Setter

If you missed it up top and you’re new to the idea of Mistake Goals, click below to download my free Mistake Goal Setter to get you started on improving the first tip. Enjoy!

What have you found helps to overcome shyness when speaking a foreign language? Share in the comments below!

The post How to Overcome Shyness When Speaking a Foreign Language appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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Is Hokkien a language or a dialect? What happened to lead to its demise? And what’s being done to help slow the death of Penang Hokkien? Find out in this episode of Language Stories.

Why Hokkien?

Hokkien kept popping up when I was searching for languages to explore for the series in Malaysia, in particular in Penang. We visited for a few days towards the end of our trip and funnily enough, we didn’t actually meet anyone for this episode in Penang!

I wanted to cover Hokkien because it would be great to one day to a whole series of Language Stories about China but that would be a huuuuge project, and is definitely a long way off. So Hokkien gives a nice chance to explore that from a different perspective, especially given that Hokkien is often considered a dialect…

The Video

Make Hokkien Cool Again: Language Stories║Lindsay Does Languages - YouTube

The Podcast

Featuring


Sim Tze Wei – One of the people behind Speak Hokkien Campaign.

John Ong – Founder of the Penang Hokkien Podcast.

Kee How – Co-host of the Penang Hokkien Podcast.

Further Reading + Resources

Learn to Read and WriteThis page from Speak Hokkien Campaign is a helpful introduction to reading and writing the language.

The Chinese Repository – One edition of The Chinese Repository, as mentioned in Sim Tze Wei’s interview.

Basic Penang Hokkien – Memrise – There’s a basics course available on Memrise specifically for Penang Hokkien.

Taiwanese Hokkien – Simply Learn App – If you’re curious to learn about the differences between different dialects of Hokkien, this app for Taiwanese Hokkien is a good starting point.

Penang Hokkien Basics – Penang Travel Tips – A thorough PDF from Penang Travel Tips for Penang Hokkien.

Hokkien In PenangGreat introduction to the language in Penang.

Hokkien Card Game – Say What – Remember Lilian from the Singapore episode? She has an edition of her Say What card game for Hokkien!

Glossika – And if you’d like to learn more about Chinese languages, one of my favourite resources you might enjoy is Glossika, which at last count, has courses available for 7 different Chinese languages, including Taiwanese Hokkien.

Our Sponsor

A huge thank you to Lingora for sponsoring season 2 of Language Stories!

Lingora is a new online language community where you can share written and spoken practice in the language you’re learning and get real feedback from the community. What’s great about Lingora is that they help to eliminate the “umms” and “ahhs” by giving you prompts for your writing and speaking. And the really great bit? It’s 100% free. Yup. Totally free feedback on your language practice.

But there’s more to Lingora. You’ve also got the option for free lessons, live chat, and paid for lessons with tutors. Basically, all bases are covered.

You can support Language Stories by signing up for free to Lingora at elingora.com.

Support The Show

The best thing you can do right now to support the project is threefold, and if you’ve ever listened to any podcast before, I’m sure you’ll be familiar with what I’m about to say!

1. Subscribe – by subscribing to the Language Stories podcast in your favourite place and YouTube for the sister videos, you’re going to keep up with all future episodes. Woop!

2. Review – when it comes to the tech stuff, reviews are pretty important. Reviews help to tell iTunes that people like the podcast, and that helps to raise the profile so that new people can find it easily. Yay!

3. Tell a friend – word of mouth still wins! If you know someone who would love Language Stories, tell them about it. And if they’re new to podcasts, walk them through the process to subscribe them. Woohoo!

To make it as easy as possible to share the podcast, click here to tweet about episode.

Share Your Story

If you have a Language Story you’d love to share, or if you know someone that does, get in touch.

I always love to hear from you! Your feedback helps to shape future episodes so thank you.

How did you enjoy this episode of Language Stories? What did you learn about Hokkien? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

The post Language Stories: Make Hokkien Cool Again appeared first on Lindsay Does Languages.

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