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LIFE IS NOISE are proud to announce the return of WOLVES IN THE THRONE ROOM to east coast Australian shores for the first time since 2010, as well as their first visits to Perth and New Zealand.

Coming off the back of their searing new record, Thrice Woven, the Washington-based black metal titans again establish themselves as leaders of the genre. Ranging from pure barbaric riffs to moments of imperial clarity, Wolves in the Throne Room have again mastered the art of setting the mood - often one steeped in loss, existentialism and inevitability.

Candle covered floors and rolling fog often precede the band's live show - a performance simultaneously atmospheric and energetic. Wolves in the Throne Room are revered for putting their blood and soul into shows, much to the joy of fans worldwide.

Due to the rare nature of these shows, tickets are expected to sell fast - don't miss out. Tickets will be available from lifeisnoise.com and the venues for Australian shows andundertheradar.co.nz for New Zealand shows.

 

April 13 - Wellington - San Fran

April 14 - Auckland – Whammy

April 17 - Brisbane – Crowbar

April 18 - Adelaide – Fowlers

April 19 – Melbourne – The Corner

April 20 - Sydney – Manning Bar

April 21 - Perth - Badlands

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LIFE IS NOISE by Jack Midalia - 3M ago

LIFE IS NOISE is proud to announce the return of Chelsea Wolfe to Australia for her first full tour since 2012, as well as her first ever New Zealand shows.

Seamlessly fusing elements of gothic-rock, folk, and doom metal, Wolfe will be performing in Wellington, Auckland, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, and finally Perth throughout March of 2018.

Wolfe's music offers a combination of the delicate and the crushing, brooding and visceral, lyrically steeped in introspective dread. The end product is a winning formula that has earned Wolfe critical commendation for the best part of a decade. Her latest release, Hiss Spun, unveiled in September this year, is receiving similar praise.

Wolfe has garnered a considerably larger audience since her 2012 shows. With the release of the critically acclaimed Hiss Spun, it's expected that these shows will sell out quickly. Grab your tickets early - don't miss out.

Catch Chelsea Wolfe on the following dates:

 

San Fran, Wellington - Friday, March 9

Whammy Bar, Auckland - Saturday, March 10 [SOLD OUT]

Whammy Bar, Auckland - Sunday, March 11

Crowbar, Brisbane - Wednesday, March 14

Manning Bar, Sydney - Thursday, March 15

Max Watt's, Melbourne - Friday, March 16

Badlands, Perth - Saturday, March 17

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LIFE IS NOISE by Jack Midalia - 5M ago

LIFE IS NOISE is proud to announce the return of seminal stoner/doom trio Sleep to Australian shores in January, as well as their first ever performances in New Zealand. The band will be slinging bong-rattling riffs to venues in Wellington and Auckland before crossing the Tasman to play shows in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne.

 

“Sleep don’t play songs so much as build them with a deliberate patience that seems like meditation. Intros go for minutes on end, picking up momentum and power almost imperceptibly until, like storm clouds unable to bear their own weight, they finally unleash their awesome power.”
- Henry Rollins

Few can compare to the monolithic sounds of Sleep. The band set a new framework for stoner-metal enthusiasts through worship of the walloping tone of ‘70s tube amps, Iommi-esque riffwork and marijuana. Dopesmoker changed the genre as we know it, turning weed into its own religion as listeners followed the smoke to the riff filled land.

"With a band like Sleep the only thing to really do is let the music take you over and focus on what comes across as one continuous composition. The music is abrasive yet strangely comforting in its ability to lock the listener into a trance-like state, stoned or not."
- Glide Magazine

Seeing Sleep live is an experience that blows eardrums and minds alike. Witnesses to the band’s appearance at 2014’s Meredith Music Festival (or the associated Australian tour) will attest to the mind-bending tones and tar-soaked grooves emanating from a ludicrously oversized wall of amplifiers. The experience is akin to drenching yourself in resin, allowing the music to slowly burn and dance through you like a wandering flame.

“What seems disorienting and monochromatic at first grows richer and more rewarding upon repeated exposure. It’s like a Mark Rothko painting hitting you over the head with a bag of hammers.”
- The New York Times

Sleep arrive in New Zealand and Australia in January, 2018. Be sure to grab tickets quickly, as the rare chance to see these titans of metal won't last for long.

 

Catch Sleep on the following dates:

San Fran, Wellington - Monday, January 15

Galatos, Auckland - Tuesday, January 16

-----

The Triffid, Brisbane - Thursday, January 18

Manning Bar, Sydney - Friday, January 19

Max Watt's, Melbourne - 

 

Get tickets from Life Is Noise

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LIFE IS NOISE by Thomas Brand - 6M ago

Kollaps' Sibling Lovers, the much anticipated follow-up to their Heartworm EP, is a release as primal as it is loud. The noise/industrial three-piece have gone to efforts to create something that feels claustrophobic, droning and bound to repetitive cycles which, conceptually, works in their favour.

Hearing the word 'repetitive' as a description could conjure up negative connotations and rightly so - it's often attached to irritation or boredom (see: pop music). However, Kollaps flip the concept of repetition on its head by turning it into a soundscape of rhythm and evolution. Tracks like Sibling Lovers, Capitalism and Suck work with repeating bass riffs and percussion hits that work like a musical equivalent of monastic chanting. Vocalist Wade Black then guides and raises the music with his voice, creating tension and pressure as he turns his lyrical delivery from groans and whispers into distortion soaked howling - an effective meter for the music. This isn't the first time a band has used this effectively, and comparisons to the wails and song structure found on early Swans recordings wouldn't be too far of a stretch.

The lyrical/vocal elements of the album lack in flowery poetry but more than make up for it in the delivery. To deconstruct the music, it's almost crucial to that the vocals perform hastily stab at the listener to keep the theme and the aggression in the music quick and to the point. A fine example of this is rolls in from the start of the album with whispers of 'I am cancer/and I love you' creating something unsettling while fairly straightforward. It doesn't need to paint a giant whimsical picture to bathe the listener in their own sick, proving you don't need to dress up your vocals to easily and effectively make a point. 

As a final note, the mix on the album is definitely cleaner than Kollaps' live performance, which is often dominated by the acoustics of whatever venue dares to hold them. While their live show earns reverence for the deafening headfuck of raw noise, distortion and reverb echoing off the walls, the recording captures subtle aspects of the band's composing skills otherwise missed – tinny clashes off the percussion and ambient undertones being two examples of neat added touches hidden behind the wall of noise. Sibling Lovers both live and recorded ticks huge boxes for making a listener feel something savage, disgusting and engaging at the same time - and for that it's something worthy of respect.

  

 

Kollaps' Sibling Lovers comes out on Trait Records on September 29. Listen to the first two singles on their bandcamp, here.

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LIFE IS NOISE by Thomas Brand - 6M ago

SUNDR’s The Canvas Sea came as the result of a lot of prior thought, precise planning and a tight deadline. The entire project has had a careful approach to certain elements of it's creation which breathes life into the music, their performances and the way that the band interact with each other. Chatting over a few pints in a quiet Fitzroy pub, Scott Curtis, Troy Power, Adam Turcato and Dan Neumann - joined by their friend and tour manager for Japan Luke Frizon - all seem confident with the final product. Yet as Power and Curtis explain to LIFE IS NOISE, the calm air hanging over this moment and the completed album might not have even happened without Neumann's arrival.

“We were pretty set – realistically if we didn’t find Dan, we weren’t going to start Sundr. It had to be the right person. It really had to be,” says Power. “It kind of came out of the blue – I started playing with another band, thinking ‘this is happening’. I was almost ready to commit to writing an EP with those guys and Dan just came out of the woodwork who we met through Luke.”

“With all the drama and shit with the album, the drummer, the old band, we started to focus on that darkness from that time and put it into the new band,” Curtis adds. “Dan then helped us re-write the Sundr stuff again.”

The band kept a focused approach on the release of The Canvas Sea to create something more than just an album, but rather a completed product that matched their vision. Elements such as smoke, lights and robes are added to their stage performance and specific album artwork was commissioned to keep a feeling of ominous dread lasting beyond the listening experience. Oddly enough, Neumann contributed to this vision beyond his drumming – his sister Imogen added haunting vocals for the record.

“You think that a lot of bands we listen to like Svalbard, Oathbreaker – all these bands that have these eerie pieces,” says Power. “We’d spoken about it, Dan had told us that Immy could sing and we got her on board. It just clicks again because Immy has her quirks. She’ll be more involved – there’ll be parts that we’re throwing in the air to get her more involved.”

“I think we were craving a little more melody with the material as well,” adds Neumann. “We’d done music that was dark and spacious, we needed a little more shade as well. Because we’re playing such slow music live, you need a little more to stimulate the audience while you’re performing – finding ways to mix it up to get people’s attention.”

“Beyond Imogen, the smoke and the stage lighting is all about trying to get people into our headspace,” says Power. “That’s where that came from. We want to create something to let people know that if they’re going to a Sundr show, it’s a whole package. We’re not relying on up-tempo beats or moving around, it’s all mood. We’re trying to get it as moody as possible to create a sense of resonance.”

Power continues. “What constitutes a good show for me is something that captures and keeps my attention. I get drawn in by people playing music that obviously love what they’re playing. I’m not all for bells and whistles, choreographed hyped shows – I’m more into watching or being drawn in by a bunch of guys playing country if they’re really into it, vibing it in the pocket. That’s just as infectious as watching Raised Fist jump around.”

  

Strangely enough, a large driving factor behind Sundr’s idea of a ‘good show’ is more about creating a balance between headspace and planning it out. The vibe for such dark and emotive music is equally as important as nailing the performance.

“We want to maintain that seamlessness – it’s for us as much as it is for the crowd,” says Power. "Because it is so guttural – we’ve all been through the wringer, we want people to feel that.”

“The more we get ourselves in that headspace, the better we’ll play,” adds Neumann. “It’s always been that way for me. We’re doing our best to keep it interesting for the audience, so much of that is about putting ourselves in a place where we can play that set.”

“It comes back to the question about what I want to give live is something infectious,” says Power. “TTDC – holy shit. That’s just three dudes jamming out. They’re funny dudes but it’s captivating. The half an hour that they play, they’re just like ‘wow’.

“When we perform, it’s always that head space thing. It’s why we have nerves. You need to get a little bit nervous as you need that thing to feed off.”

The recording process for the album saw Sundr taking deliberate steps to make sure it captured their live sound – the band are big believers that over-layering the music loses the final product’s authenticity.

“Everyone who plays guitar plays with an individual style,” says Turcato. “If you cut it down into three second clippets and put it together, you lose the way you play.”

“It’s that whole, not just instrumental style, it’s the same with Scott as well doing every second line and piecing it together in that run-of-the-mill recording process that most producers try to do,” adds Power. “I like it better without that, when Scott’s a little bit out of breath. It adds the angst. That’s Scotty. Why wouldn’t you want that on the record?”

For all the talk of inspired motifs and attention to elements such as stage presence, The Canvas Sea as a record was actually more of a shotgun recording - somewhat counterbalancing those other pre-planned elements.

 “We weren’t as prepared as we thought we would have been," says Curtis. "We had the song, The Canvas Sea, still in the jammy stage and a few of the boys were going on holidays. We could have either pumped and gone into the studio and done it or waited two or three months. We went in early. There’s improv on the record, and we’re so much happier for doing it that way.”

“The title track is the best example of that, and that’s why we picked it as the title for the record,” says Neumann. “We didn’t go in there planning to do an album – Troy had a thing in a vague blueprint type phase and we had a few weeks to go, and we just said fuck it, jammed it out and lets see what comes together. By the time we hit the studio, it was so loose, it was barely a song. We turned Troy’s riff into this weird rhythmic thing and we just added this whole jam section in the middle for no reason at all."

“Especially me and Adzy, we come from that technical note for note shit which makes this so much fun,” says Power. “The Canvas Sea is my favourite track on the album. There were parts in there that came off as jazzy for example, and I just grabbed it. It wraps up where Sundr is now – I can’t get enough of this song. That’s very rare for me. Usually I’ll record something, put it down and I won’t listen to it, but I can actually listen to it.”

SUNDR begin their tour of Australia's east coast on Saturday, August 26. 

Catch Sundr at one of the following dates:

Saturday August 26 - The Brisbane Hotel, Hobart w/ DÉPARTE, CASCADES, BREAK THROUGH
Saturday September 9 - Fat Louie's, Brisbane w/ SIBERIAN HELL SOUNDS, EMPRESS
Saturday September 16 - The Crown and Anchor, Adelaide w/ TOMBSEALER, SWAMP LUNG, FAITHEATER
Saturday September 22 - The Old Bar, Melbourne - SUNDR/CASCADES Double LP Launch

Facebook events for the shows can be found here. Tickets available from the venues.

SUNDR

Official Website
Facebook
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Bandcamp
I Still See Plagues Film Clip

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LIFE IS NOISE by Thomas Brand - 7M ago

Sundr are about to embark on a whirlwind tour through Japan, performing next to an impressive list of the country's heavy acts in the process. Japan has always been a hotbed for darker music, each with own unique, refined twists - yet uncovering these bands is a mild struggle unless you do your homework or have a few friends in the know. Thankfully, Sundr has gone ahead and done the digging for you. Plug in your headphones and have a listen to a couple of hot-takes from the tour's supporting acts – you might be surprised at what you find.

 

NoLA

NoLA’s Dead Beat is gritty, nasty and unrelenting. The distorted, layered howls really complement the singer’s vocal range, plus the combination of a tight start-and-stop rhythm structure creates a unique sound – something jagged, serrated and refreshing to hear. The drawn out finish hits with an aching sense of slowness before returning into catatonic noise, followed by pummelling drums, a riff reminiscent of ‘Killing In The Name’ and a sharp cut into silence. It’s a big track for sure.

  

Palm

Palm are relentlessly grindy, combining D-beats and a fiery sense of energy which results in formidable and tight song structure. By the time you reach the catastrophic mid-section of gritty chugging and cyclic drum patterns, one thing becomes evident – Palm has fangs. It’s the kind of music that could hunt you down in the woods, every instrument hounding you like an individual member of a wolf pack. The closing of My Darkest Friends rolls out to an uncharacteristically high bass riff, coupled by a droning guitar that simmers over the top.

  

Wombscape

Of all the bands on this tour, Sundr may find themselves best matched up to Wombscape’s atmospheric, cold and precise music. The addition of field recordings, cleanly sung vocals and calmer instrumentals creates a mix between beauty and tension. There’s a feeling to it all akin to an uneasy confidence – it evokes a sense of anxiety. The song picks up into a post-hardcore midsection, full of interesting riffs and excellent tone. It seems to become more and more pained as the song climbs, the vocals copying suit while giving a subtle nod to Deftones style wailing. A focal point for the song is the bizarre noise riff at the tail end of the song, seemingly coming out of nowhere. Up until this moment, the song seems so heavily steeped in progression and feeling, making the change somewhat genre defying and dissonant. It kind of works - listen for yourself.

  

Stubborn Father

There’s a lot to take in when listening to Stubborn Father. The cleaner, punkier production style gives a lighter feel to riff structures that, with the right pedals, would sound heavy as shit. It’s a nice blend of spaciousness, force and fury. Winning points include the elements of hardcore and riff dissonance that sits bare-chested compared to other, similar sounding bands – possibly sitting around the emotional alternative hard/metalcore scene. A lot of similar sounding western acts run the risk of homogenising their noise in that booming, high-gain ballou-esque produced sound, so for something different and clear in comparison while still offering a throwback to that style of music is a refreshing change.

  

Nibs

Forgiving the Papyrus font on the album cover, Nibs’ fat bass tone and Sabbath-esque riffs make for a satisfying listen. Full of warm tones, slow pacing and killer hooks, this is pretty meaty doom/stoner stuff worthy of a slow head-bang. There’s a lack of lyrics which in turn becomes replaced by unexpected twists and turns in the song structure – there’s about four or five different paced riff segments in the song as it plods along. There’s a jam band ethos at play here, paying homage to acts as diverse as the previously mentioned Sabbath all the way through to Neurosis. A stalwart addition to your doom library for sure.

  

Redsheer

While the mixing on the drums is a little strange, Redsheer’s drummer cannot be faulted for skill – the talent at play here is incredible. Big hits of the toms create a bass heavy feel to the drumming, using high toned guitars to counteract this in a balance of extremes. Instrumentally and pacing wise, everything that’s going on here is on point. The music feels drastic, tumultuous and seething. As the song paces on, a middle riff cuts through the track like a dagger before jumping to an Envy-esque clean segment and taking one more leap into a thrashy black metal riff. Very impressive, in your face music.

  

Terror Squad

Terror Squad have a defining element that pulls them apart from the other bands on this list – they’re unashamedly thrash. Employing a grindy riffwork that puts them close to Pig Destroyer with a bit more of a crust-oriented veneer, there’s plenty of noodly sections holding together an interesting song structure. However, it has to be said that of all the bands here, they sound the least like Sundr and it's hard to imagine the pair on the same bill. Variety is the spice of life though, right?

For whatever reason, the Terror Squad Youtube link prevents embedding. Listen to them here.

 

The Donor

Take a dash of Trap Them, dial the drumming down, mix in a bit of doom-paced riffwork and you have The Donor. In a nutshell, this track is metalcore mixed with doom. The intricate droning guitar segments are a real asset to the music, sprinkled like salt over crunchy, drawn out riffs. It’s big, crushing and doesn’t head anywhere too fast, but offers its own intricacy that’s well worth exploring further.

  

 

SUNDR begin their tour of Japan on Saturday, August 12 before returning to Australia in late August to commence their east coast tour. 

Catch Sundr at one of the following dates:

Saturday August 26 - The Brisbane Hotel, Hobart w/ DÉPARTE, CASCADES, BREAK THROUGH
Saturday September 9 - Fat Louie's, Brisbane w/ SIBERIAN HELL SOUNDS, EMPRESS
Saturday September 16 - The Crown and Anchor, Adelaide w/ TOMBSEALER, SWAMP LUNG, FAITHEATER
Saturday September 22 - The Old Bar, Melbourne - SUNDR/CASCADES Double LP Launch

Facebook events for the shows can be found here.

 

SUNDR

Official Website
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Instagram
Bandcamp
I Still See Plagues Film Clip

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LIFE IS NOISE by Thomas Brand - 8M ago

Credit: Zo Damage

  

LIFE IS NOISE Publicity is proud to announce the release of The Canvas Sea, the sophomore album from Melbourne based sludge/ambient act SUNDR.

The Canvas Sea is an album steeped in an all-enveloping darkness.

It presents both lyrics and music pieced together from the band’s collective experiences, feelings and observations – the product dark times and darker thoughts. “I honestly felt like a new person when I finished my tracking, like every negative emotion I had was transferred into the songs,” vocalist Scott Curtis recalls of the recording process.

The album, recorded at The Black Lodge in Brunswick, Melbourne and engineered by Mike Deslandes, went through a process that ensured the final product captured a fluidity and a jam-like improvisational structure that’s become crucial to the music itself. The title track The Canvas Sea was nominated to represent the album as it’s a perfect example of the writing process. Created off the back of time constraints, the band used both their improvisational and technical experience to work with a pre-existing blueprint of their design to create a striking balance between fierce and forlorn – fusing brooding ambience with heavy instrumentals to devastating effect.

The Canvas Sea has its own spirit, something that transcends the music. Anyone who’s witnessed Sundr’s gripping and evocative live shows can attest to the fact. There’s a conscious effort to create a larger picture through use of art, eerie stage presence and a culpable passion that needs to be seen, heard and felt to be truly understood.

The end result is seven tracks of music, each song hypnotic, drowning and loud - a rare form of composition that leaves your neck hairs standing on end. A must have record for anyone who loves their music lengthy, dark and capable of balancing between heavy riffs and soaring ambience.

The Canvas Sea is now available for physical purchase/digital download.

 

SUNDR

Official Website
Facebook
Instagram
Bandcamp
I Still See Plagues Film Clip
 

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LIFE IS NOISE by Thomas Brand - 8M ago

Whether they intended to do it or not (most likely not), BØG's second full length record, JIM, unintentionally evokes a wider reflection on sludge metal as a whole. While it’s a great listen by itself, there’s a palpable essence to the record as if it's divorcing itself from the scene it spawned from ­- like a cell that splits and mutates to give birth to something similar yet new. It may be due to trading off polished production for primal harshness – it may come from creating allegoric music that captures the highs and lows of an engaging story. However, the palpable difference that JIM offers is a carefully crafted and even matured approach to song-writing, riffwork and delivery.

To start off on a blunt note – the vocals don’t make for easily listening which could be considered a two-edged sword depending on the listener. Weaker ears might find the higher rasping barks and howls to be a little off-putting in their crackling delivery, but there's a definite artistic merit to it. A voice that breaks is a voice that's actively trying to push itself to the limit. It's a voice that carries a certain realness that you can only find in the roars of a madman, guys you might spot walking down the other side of the street spluttering and ranting to themselves.

While the album is consistantly impressive on a track by track basis, Fractured is a song that haunts and sticks in the back of the mind. A song that keeps to a single sort of riff or feel isn't something that's often seen in heavy music and when it is, it's either trying to come from a band who doesn't know what they're doing or a band who are trying to convey something with great effect. Luckily, it's the latter – the ambience of cluttering tins, cars across roads and a rustling breeze carries over clean hypnotic guitar, snagging the listener's ear like barbed wire to wool.

Peat for Scars bursts forth as an excellent high point and finish to a menacing record – the clambering instrumentals rise like a tide of tar, every heavy drum beat erupting like a bubble at the surface before the song delves back into a mire of guttural howls and marched pacing. Running just over nine minutes, the Peat for Scars covers a lot of turf – shape-shifting from rhythmic fluidity to intensely dark low end howls that could curdle the blood of a mass-murderer.

There's a lot of great sounding music coming out of Australia's vast heavy scene at the moment, but it's easy to draw similarities to international acts while listening to many of these acts. If BØG are drawing any influences, they're masking them so well through (apparently) unique drum timing and riff structure. It's an album that could only come from a bunch of people who really knew their shit, guys who know how to play their instruments - guys who know both what a good record sounds like and how to achieve that goal. JIM is smart, structured and carries enough variety to keep every song conveying a different sense of emotion. Above all, it gets lots of bonus points for ensuring that BØG sounds ahead of their contemporaries.

  

BØG's Jim is available for streaming and purchase from their Bandcamp page. Find it here.

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LIFE IS NOISE by Thomas Brand - 8M ago

Pallbearer’s Heartless saw a somewhat different writing process for the record, taking the band’s lyrical themes away from the metaphysical and targeting something more realistic. Suffering, an important theme on the record, tends to come from social, mental and political factors and it’s not surprising that they’ve had an effect on the final product, especially with the chaos of the 2016 United States Election. However Heartless serves as something of an imprint for these turbulent times – an imprint that we can hopefully look back upon from a brighter future. Vocalist/guitarist Brett Campbell spoke to LIFE IS NOISE about the writing process of Heartless along with the ideas of suffering and hope – the tools that help forge their evocative music.

“The political environment certainly had an impact when it came around to where our heads were at when we were writing the lyrics,” says Campbell. “I think it was inevitable with the subject matter we typically talk about not being sunshine and rainbows. I’d rather talk about things that are concerning to me, not from a gratuitous perspective but rather as a reflection or a warning. It’s not that we have any huge power to make a difference, other than just to say ‘these are the things that I see in the world’ – these views aren’t even necessarily tied to things that are happening now but rather trends that people and society that have fallen into over time in history.

“Nationalism, these non-empathetic ways of living where people who are different than you are ‘bad’ or ‘scary’ - particularly in America right now it’s been really divided - living in the south and being surrounded by that all the time is really concerning to myself as a person. I consider myself very liberal. Seeing people on both sides of that philosophical divide – both sides are guilty of demonising each other and there needs to be some sort of dialogue, it’s crazy. Everyone gets worked up into a frenzy which degrades into name calling and nobody listens. The messages we’re talking of are dark, but it’s more just us saying ‘these are our problems and they maybe can be fixed’. Some of the material is also about personal things on our lives that aren’t fully connected with those ideas but those themes remain in a lot of the material on Heartless.”

 
PALLBEARER - I Saw The End (OFFICIAL VIDEO) - YouTube
 

Campbell’s concerns about the philosophical divide between left and right can be applied to two spheres – the digital and the physical. Regardless of where you lie on the compass, the chances of witnessing or getting involved with a political debate are much, much higher on the internet than they are in real life. As time progresses and platforms such as Facebook evolved, so did the anger – it’s as if the Promethean fire of the internet is burning us the more we use it. It could be appealing to disconnect and avoid this sort of confrontation, but Campbell believes this isn’t the correct approach.

“I’ve been a victim of that too,” Campbell begins. “I read a lot and I try to be as knowledgeable in as many realms as I can. Ignorance is bliss – and while I think that’s completely true, I also think it’s irresponsible. However I do believe there’s a certain degree of self-restraint you need to have. If become completely obsessed with politics and the shit that changes every day in that area, even in society in general, you’ve got to remember your underlying values. Don’t get too invested in what bad thing is happening today – worry a little bit but really focus on what kind of ideas and concepts you’re trying to bring into the world. We’re mouthpieces for ideas. That’s what a person is at the end of the day. Just a bunch of ideas in a fuckin’ stone bowl and we’re sharing ideas with each other. What ideas are important to you? Spread those ideas, that’s what your responsibility is. And that’s more powerful than just taking stuff in and worrying about it. You just have to have a focus.”

Outside of these ideas, the concept of hope on Heartless offers a breath of fresh air in a scene that often relies on pure nihilism. Finding a light in the darkness and being in control of your own fate is evidently integral to Campbell’s core, yet there’s still questions as to how hope is found.

“I play in a metal band and I love metal, but I don’t define myself by metal,” says Campbell. “I’ve never been one for groups. I have friends, but they’re from everywhere – maybe being from Arkansans has something to do with that or maybe that’s how I am because the place isn’t very clique-ish. It’s very small so everyone associates with each other and there’s no dividing lines between scenes. If you’re in the music or arts, you probably know everyone or are friends with everyone, but I’m digressing.

“The concepts of hope in spite of hardship maybe just comes from real life and my perspective on things and what I felt, the conclusions I’ve drawn, from living. I’ve seen a lot of really dark shit. You can either succumb to it and let it overpower you, let yourself become a slave to some external darkness or your own inner darkness, or you can choose to persevere and find a reason to keep going and try to push back against it - some of it is just fucking stubbornness… ‘you can’t let the bastards win’ you know?” he laughs. “Yet it’s not just other people, its circumstances of life. Stuff can get real bad. You can figure out a solution or wallow in it, but I prefer to look for answers. That makes more sense to me.”

  

Catch Pallbearer on the following dates:

Rosemount, Perth – Friday, June 30
Crowbar, Brisbane – Saturday, July 1
Manning Bar, Sydney – Tuesday, July 4
Northcote Social Club, Melbourne - Thursday, July 6
Northcote Social Club, Melbourne – Friday, July 7
Whammy Bar, Auckland – Saturday, July 8
San Fran, Wellington – Sunday, July 9

 

Tickets available from lifeisnoise.com and undertheradar.co.nz for Auckland and Wellington shows.

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LIFE IS NOISE by Jack Midalia - 8M ago

We spend a couple of minutes with Triumphs ahead of their support slot for Pallbearer at San Fran in Wellington on July 9...

What are five words you’d use to describe your band?

Two Sad Boys Play Music

What’s been going on in the world of Triumphs?

We're putting finishing touches on our second record! It'll be out super soon. Other than that we've been playing a few out of town shows with some pals from up North, and we're looking to play out of town as much as possible. Book us in Australia (hint hint). 

What drives Triumphs to make music?

We've been playing together in various forms for I think more than ten years now. And it's always been heavy music too. We've whittled it down from a five piece, to a four piece and now there's just us two. It lets us be a lot more prolific which is awesome really. Essentially, we don't know how to stop making music.

What’s the weirdest thing that’s happened at one of your shows?

A combination of weird stuff happened when we played in Palmerston North actually. We had booked at a motel and when we went to check in, the old conservative couple who ran it were mortified to meet us in person. We had to essentially convince them to let us stay in the place we'd booked. I mean, we're unattractive, but that was unusual for us. Then just before we were about to play, an elderly gent had a discussion with us about how Erwin Rommel was still alive and employing people in Auckland and if we wanted to have long lives (150 years plus) we would need to up our intake of St John's Wort.

What can people expect at one of your gigs?

Loud music

If you could open for any Australian or New Zealand based artist, who would it be and why? Feel free to choose acts that no longer exist.

John: Buffalo would have been rad!  

Mathew: Lord of Tigers, saw them at Big Day Out years ago when I was maybe 16 or so and they were amazing.

What’s the best compliment you’ve received at a show? What’s the weirdest?

A compliment I'm very happy to receive (and it happens at almost every show) is when people say "I thought there were more people playing and then I saw it was just you two." Makes all the pedals and amps worth it! The weirdest happened really recently, when we got told in the same conversation that we sounded like "Russian folk" and "happy pirate music." Maybe we do? 

You’re supporting Pallbearer on their upcoming tour. Has the band had an effect on you in one way or another?

Oh for sure. Sorrow and Extinction was massive for us when it came out, and John just saw them at Roadburn this year actually. 

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