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I had been in two minds about joining the protest march in central London yesterday:  racism/corruption/wall/incarcerated children/Roe v Wade/LGBTQ rights etc etc vs another country’s president/trade/special relationship etc etc  but Trump’s shocking bad manners, and divisive and ill-informed actions and words during his UK visit decided me firmly in favour of participation.

It’s true that we don’t all get on the streets when our government hosts other corrupt world leaders but Trump truly is in a special league all of his own.

(And watching my dog, Lettice, go berserk thanks to his sodding helicopter convention above Regent’s Park for the past two days hasn’t warmed me up much either. I am loving my friend Debora’s description of it as a helipram – for a president to scared to travel by road because of the protestors everywhere.)

I joined my Americans in London posse – Ayla, Chloe and Anne for a little light protesting on Regent Street.

The Daily Mail may have called us a mob of some 10 000 pro Corbynists but don’t believe their propaganda. The march was well in excess of 100 000, with some reports putting it as high as 250 000. And I’m pretty sure George Osborne is no Corbynista…

The post TRUMP PROTEST – LONDON JULY 2018 appeared first on Liberty London Girl.

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This is a Sponsored Post in association with Le Caprice

It’s always surprising to me how few places there are that I would like to have a drink in the afternoon and evening in and around Mayfair that aren’t  hotels. Sure there are lots of pubs, many exceedingly smart and very busy bars, and the afore-mentioned chic hotels (Duke’s and The Stafford are particular favourites), but finding somewhere that isn’t rammed, where I can always sit down (heels and age do not make me a fan of standing in any circumstance).

So hurrah a thousand times over for the Caprice.

This summer, they’ve turned their small but perfectly formed Arlington Street terrace into a secret jardin; which serves a menu of lighter bites, alongside a specially created Grey Goose cocktail menu.

I love the Caprice – I used to book tables there for my very first bosses at Conde Nast – the legendary Peter Stuart and Nicholas Coleridge at Conde Nast, in my very early twenties, graduated to eating there of my own account a few years later, and even celebrated my thirtieth birthday there with my family, so I am very happy to know that I can now go there for something a little lighter – and sit outdoors…

To create the Secret Jardin, the terrace has been enclosed with a wall of plants, herbs and botanicals; citrus trees line the sides of the space, walls of climbers create a barrier between the terrace and street, wisteria flowers hang from the ceiling and a selection of potted herbs reflect the ingredients of a specially created Grey Goose cocktail menu.

Le Caprice Head Chef, Will Halsall, has selected a number of Le Caprice’s lighter bites, creating a menu of dishes which are ideal for enjoying al fresco, so for those who are ravenous post-work can enjoy a lovely aperitivo.

I took Holly Hannah and Chloe for drinks and snacks after our day at Royal Ascot )happily no one batted an eyelid at our spectacular Rachel Trevor Morgan hats.)

After a long day in the sun at the races, we were delighted to see lovely, long refreshing drinks on the menu – the Secret Jardin cocktails created especially for the space by Grey Goose include a Garden Goose, made with Grey Goose vodka, elderflower cordial, lemon juice, thyme, rosemary, sage and basil leaves, a Le Grand Fizz, with Grey Goose vodka, St-Germain, lime juice and soda, a French Negroni, with Grey Goose L’Orange, Campari, Martini Rosso, and a Goose Bloody Mary.

We mulled over the menu – too many things amongst which to choose – from Norfolk asparagus, served hot with hollandaise or cold with herb vinaigrette, to a crispy duck salad with pineapple, pink grapefruit and spiced cashews.

Above: the pickled and raw beetroot salad, goats cheese and multi seed granola crisp, and the Isle of Mull scallops. And, because I am a fervent lover of the high low mix – some of the Caprice’s legendarily delicious French fries.

And, if you ask, nicely, they’ll even let you order pud from the main menu.

HEAVEN

The Le Caprice x Grey Goose Secret Jardin is open from now until Sunday, 30 September

The post LONDON LIFE: APERITIVO ON THE LE CAPRICE X GREY GOOSE SECRET JARDIN SUMMER TERRACE appeared first on Liberty London Girl.

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Well, the garden is almost approaching the state I imagined when I plotted out my ideas in the spring – you may have seen my beginning of summer post here. I bought the bare minimum of furniture last summer from Ebay – the amazing double lounger, a large parasol, an 8ft folding table (easier to store over the winter than a large wooden one, and easily disguised with a pretty tablecloth), and then there’s the lovely John Lewis Croft Bench that my mother gave me as a housewarming present – and now I have to work out what else I need.

I took these photos in the middle of May, just over a month ago and goodness what a transformation from my beginning of April post. I hired a local gardener/handy man who did the brute force work: he dug out the dead box hedge, weeded all the borders and beds, dug over the vegetable patch, weeded and cleared all the flagstones and patios, pruned all the hedges, and helped arrest the gradual encroachment of the Virginia creeper.

Meanwhile I went to Camden Garden Centre, and to my local Camden Morrison’s and spent around £150 on plants. I bought a few key shrubs and plants – a peony, euphorbia, a beautiful Choisyia (Mexican Orange Blossom), as well as umpteen boxes of bedding plants for my hanging baskets and  window boxes. (Nicotiana, violas, pansies, ivies, lavenders, mint and the palest of pink fuchsias.) I also robbed a large alchemilla mollis from my father’s garden border.

Above – lovely empty main bed waiting for plants

The amount of garden waste has been quite astonishing: this is the box hedge chopped into pieces, stuffed into IKEA bags, and on its way to the Regis Road Recycling Centre in Kentish Town in the boot of a Zipcar.

The ash tree is now in full bloom, and providing some much needed shade. I’ve also got the large 3metre umbrella from last year up again. I spent ages looking for parasol weights – first I bought the ones that needed to be filled with ballast, and I just couldn’t face dealing with builders’ sand, and water wasn’t heavy enough, so I bought these brilliant ones. (Was surprised to discover that weights cost the same as the parasol – around £50 each.)

Below is the back wall and patio with the bare patch where the box hedge was removed to the left – the plan is for this to be weeded and I want to find an outdoor sofa set to place here for lounging and working. It’s a great spot for both as it’s pretty much always in shade, so it also means that any garden furniture I put here won’t be bleached by the sun. (I’ve got my eye on this set.)

We’ve now dug over the vegetable patch and I’ve found a new home for the Japanese Maple (Acer)  via the NextDoor app, as I don’t have another bed for it, and it’s not very happy being stuck in this corner which it has outgrown.

The small cream canvas umbrella was from Argos last summer – a bargain at around £30, but I bought the wrong size stand and it blew over one day and a strut broke, so I need to replace this and buy a heavier stand. Still extremely pleased with the double lounger. (The cushions were from Homesense, and the delightful leopard  fleece rug was also from Ebay)

I found the compost in the most amazing special offer in Camden Sainsbury’s of all places. The dogs are loving having access to the sunshine, and roast themselves outside at every opportunity.

I bought this pretty hanging basked on Columbia Road a few years ago. That’s rosemary in the bottom, and I plan to put fuschias in the top basket.

I am extremely pleased with my herb window box – I can just lean out of the kitchen window and snip what I need. I’ve planted thyme, oregano, sage, chives, Greek, and Italian basil. The silver zinc planter is one of five I’ve bought from Primrose for all my window sills.

Here are the plants I’ve collected waiting to go in the beds, borders, and baskets. Camden Morrison’s has been a particular joy and the source of most of my bedding plants.

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Now that’s a cut and colour! I’m somewhat ashamed to admit that I haven’t engaged with a proper hairdressing session since the beginning of September last year. I’ve had two cuts in the interim -not enough – at local Camden chain salons which weren’t great, (walking in at the last minute and taking an appointment because a stylist is free and you’ve got a big event the next day probably isn’t the best way to get a haircut) and it grew out badly both times.

(The recent experiences of my sister and me make very good arguments for doing your research, building a relationship with, and investing in, a good hairdresser. I know I usually hop off to the shiny of the shiniest, but good hair doesn’t have to cost the earth; my sister used a Camden national chain salon last time which gave her a seriously bad colour job, and charged her more than the Mayfair salon I love – woah, was I FURIOUS on her behalf. So she went to the Toni & Guy Academy on Monday for a cut and colour by a stylist with four years of experience, and overseen by a director; it cost her £35 and she looks incredible.)

Anyway, there’s no real reason why I didn’t get round to getting my highlights done apart from the usual – time and inclination, and, now that I’ve seen these before and after images I am resolved not to leave it ten months until my next session. I wear my hair every day – it’s one of the first things people notice about you, and it’s such a simple thing to get right.

And so it was that when I finally pitched up at the Daniel Galvin hair palace on George Street (a few blocks from Marble Arch, and just west of Marylebone High Street), the lovely Chelsey actually looked aghast when I said the last time I had my highlights done was last September.

I’m a natural blonde  – I have the pale eyelashes and brows of a bunny rabbit, but our northern climate and my insistence on wearing a hat anywhere near a sunbeam means that the top of my head starts to look decidedly murky without a little helping hand. A half head of highlights to be precise.

I had an actual line where the old highlights had grown out six inches down from the tip of my head.

And let’s draw a veil over the greys lurking on my temple. (Fun fact: both my mother and sister have the same swoosh of grey on their temples too.)

So here are my highlights baking:

So hurrah for my lovely new summer hair, thanks to Chelsey who has restored me to my happy blonde place. And a big shout out too to the lovely Lauren Greene for the perfect blunt cut and softening layers at the front: she took all the time to check in with me about my hair and meticulously – and rapidly made it look wonderful, taking off just enough to get rid of the frizz, but not so much that I felt scalped. I’ve washed it twice since, and it fell just perfectly each time when I air dried it.

And HELL-O perfect, super rapid, blow dry.

This was a complimentary press appointment for a cut and colour in June 2018

www.danielgalvin.com 

For more information call on 0207 486 9661 or to book online click here

58-60 George Street
London W1U 7ET

The post BEAUTY: BLONDE HIGHLIGHTS & CUT FOR SUMMER AT DANIEL GALVIN appeared first on Liberty London Girl.

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Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe Cuff and ring.
Ascot 18kt Yellow Gold Vermeil Crown Charm and Essentials 18kt Yellow Gold Belcher Chain
All pieces by Links of London
Hat by Rachel Trevor-Morgan & Silk Tea Dress by Suzannah

This is a Sponsored Post in association with Links of London

It’s just under a week until the Royal Ascot race meeting opens. I am lucky enough to be invited to attend each season in the Royal Enclosure as a guest of the racecourse – it’s a highlight of my year, from the world class racing to the joy of dressing up in one’s absolute best. I take huge pleasure in choosing my outfits each time; from the top of my head to the tips of my toes, no detail is too small.


Links of London Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe Cuff
Hat by Rachel Trevor-Morgan. Dress by LK Bennett. Bag by Bulgari.

From April onwards I receive dozens of emails and messages from readers asking for advice on what to wear to the race meeting – I always reply that it is, in effect, quite simple. Nothing too short, too tight, or too bare is the essence of a chic Ascot look, regardless of whether one is in the Royal, the Queen Anne, Windsor, or Village Enclosures.

Links of London Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe Cuff and ring
Dressing credits as before. Heels by LK Bennett

Accessories are key: always choose a pair of your most comfortable heels – you’ll be on your feet for the majority of the day, so a bag that is big enough for a tiny pair of folding flats for when your feet start to hurt is a clever move, and, of course you’ll need a beautiful hat. (Don’t forget that if you are in the Royal Enclosure your hat or headpiece must have a base wider than 10cm.) And regardless of which Enclosure you are in, it’s always best to go for a hat rather than a fascinator  – they’re banned in both the Royal and Queen Anne Enclosures anyway.

Links of London Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe ring
Hat by Rachel Trevor-Morgan. Navy Silk Dress Coat by Suzannah.

If I’m wearing a statement hat and dress – and it’s Ascot so I will be, then I keep my jewellery subtle and elegant. I like chic and simple rings and bracelets, and I always choose neat, discreet earrings, so that they don’t fight with my headpiece.

These are the Links of London Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe Earrings, and the Essentials 18kt Yellow Gold Belcher Chain
worn with Edwina Ibbotson’s Rose Hat


Links of London Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe Cuff
Dress by Suzannah. Heels by LK Bennett

So hurrah for Links of London who, in their  second year of working with Royal Ascot as their official jewellery license holders, have designed a lovely collection of pieces inspired by British racing traditions, in sterling silver, and 18kt rose and yellow gold vermeil, including extensions to some of their most iconic collections, as well as striking brand-new pieces.

The Ascot Horseshoe suite is available in rose gold vermeil, yellow gold vermeil or silver, can be completed with a necklace, a delicate bracelet, and a cuff.

Links of London Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe Cuff
Dress by LK Bennett. Hat by Edwina Ibbotson.

The charms are, indeed, charming. In rose gold there’s a miniature jockey on his horse, in gold the crown, and a lucky clover horseshoe, in sterling silver, a jockey’s boot, a Champagne bucket, a crown, a hat, a horseshoe, and a lucky clover. They can be strung on a necklace like a pendant, as I have done in the pictures above, or added to a classic charm bracelet (like these Capture Charm Bracelets). There’s also a matching bracelet to the necklace that I am wearing – the 18kt Yellow Gold Vermeil Mini Belcher Bracelet).


Links of London Ascot 18kt Yellow Gold Vermeil Crown Charm
Essentials 18kt Yellow Gold Belcher Chain 
Hat by Edwina Ibbotson

Dress by COS. Bag by Asquith. Shoes by Whistles. Hat by Edwina Ibbotson

For this story I am wearing the following pieces by Links of London:

Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe Earrings £250.00
Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe Cuff £425
Ascot Diamond Essentials 18kt Rose Gold Vermeil Horseshoe Ring  £180.00
Ascot 18kt Yellow Gold Vermeil Crown Charm £70
Essentials 18kt Yellow Gold 2.5mm & 50cm Belcher Chain £395
(with the signature Links of London logo and a bolt ring clasp fastening)

With huge thanks to LK Bennett, and Suzannah,
and to the milliners Edwina Ibbotson and Rachel Trevor-Morgan
for lending me the pieces for this story

The post SUMMER: DRESSING FOR ROYAL ASCOT GUIDE WITH LINKS OF LONDON appeared first on Liberty London Girl.

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This is a Sponsored Post in association with Schweppes 1783

Well, I think it is fair to say that I was not expecting a vintage Daimler DS420 from the 1970s, complete with uniformed and peak capped chauffeur, to be waiting outside my home to take me, Hannah and both sausage dogs to Goodwood.

I was thinking more along the lines of a Ford Galaxy people mover…apparently my neighbours were verreee interested in knowing who could be travelling in such style but George the Chauffeur says that discretion is his middle name so he would never divulge the names of his passengers to onlookers.


You may remember that I have stayed at Goodwood before – back in 2014 I shot a lovely story for The Great Boden Diaries all around the Goodwood Estate, and we overnighted at The Goodwood Hotel.

This trip was somewhat different – fewer trunks of clothes and props, (although the same number of dogs), and more cocktail making and eating of the delicious snacks and meals at every opportunity, as we were staying at Goodwood’s very discreet and insanely luxurious private house Hound Lodge, as guests of Schweppes 1783.


Getting into the swing of this travelling in style business with my tiny furry sidekick

oh that car WAS wonderful. It’s the same car in which the Queen Mother used to travel; it has very low and wide windows so the impression inside is of endless light and air. Truly Schweppes outdid themselves with this.

I think the funniest moment was as we drove past all the tourists queuing for 221B Baker Street. They started waving at me thinking I must be important, maybe even royal, to be travelling in this glorious car. Of course we waved back (Lettice already had her paws on the window sill, so I lifted one for her).

I teased Hannah via WhatsApp all the way from my house in Camden to hers in Putney so, by the time George knocked on her door forty minutes later, she was expecting some ropey old minicab.

Her face! Just brilliant.

Ninety minutes later we entered the Goodwood Estate and thus Hound Lodge, to be welcomed by the buttling team.

I had been thrilled when the very nice people at Schweppes asked if I would like to bring a dog on our country retreat. And they didn’t then bat an eyelid when I suggested bringing a brace of sausages.

As it turns out, Goodwood’s The Kennels (now the estate’s members’ club), and later Hound Lodge where we were staying, were once considered to be the most luxurious dog houses in the world. That’s because Goodwood was the home of the world’s first major fox hunt and the very reason the first Duke of Richmond bought a house at Goodwood in 1697.

The Duke was renowned for spending far more time and money on his hounds and horses than on his friends and guests. He even famously installed central heating in The Kennels 100 years before the human owners were able to enjoy it at Goodwood House. (Rest assured, the central heating and open fires at Hound Lodge are in excellent working order.)

These days Hound Lodge is a butler-staffed, ten bedroom country house sitting at the very apex of English luxury – it has recently been completely restored for humans to enjoy, and hounds (and hunds) are warmly welcomed as not only do they form part of the heritage and history of the building, they provide a source of inspiration for much of the interior. If necessary, visiting dogs can even stay in one of the old whelping kennels. (Above.)

Although I was dying to check out my room, first things first – a little leg stretch for the hunds around the building.

Then it was back inside to find our room. We had been placed in Dido, (named for one of the past Duke’s favourite hounds) in the far corner of the ground floor, and goodness it was magnificent.

Here’s Maisie exploring the corridor between our room and the drawing room.

And, of course, our room came with supplies. Of the whisky, Schweppes ginger ale, and homemade biscuit variety. Essentials of life.

The hunds were well-provisioned too. I no sooner took out their tin of food from Lettice’s own overnight bag than it was whisked away from me by our butler, and returned some minutes later in enamel bowls almost big enough for Lettice to bathe in,

There were also two very plump beautiful cushioned dog beds, on to which Lettice (wo)manfully tried to climb.

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I love hanging out with my father at car events – he knows more than I ever will about motoring, and it’s from him that I have inherited my love of cars.

Over the years we’ve been involved in all manner of car events – RAC road rallies around the UK in his Jaguar XK120, track days at Goodwood in his MGA,  FI driver training with Rob Wilson at Bruntingthorpe in a Vauxhall Astra, and luxe-ing it up in the Tag Heuer Drivers’ Club at the Festival of Speed.

With him egging me on from the passenger seat, I’ve driven faster than my mother ever needs to know on the circuits at Brands Hatch, Mallory Park, Rockingham, Goodwood, Castle Coombe, Snetterton and, of course, our home track, Silverstone. Together we’ve braved the speed bowl at Millbrook in an Aston Martin, the hill climb at Prescott (where I ended up in the kitty litter after getting stuck in 2nd), and c0untless time trials and cone tests on aerodromes around the south of England.

(I shall draw a veil over the day that he span a couple of 360s with me in the passenger seat of the 120 on the national circuit at Silverstone. It is the reason why I rarely go on any circuit as a passenger these days unless I’m being coached.)

Which brings me neatly back to Silverstone, where we found ourselves last weekend as guests of our friends at Blancpain for round four of the Blancpain GT Series Endurance Cup.

We’ve attended once before, back in 2015 – my story is here, so we were looking forward to this.

The Blancpain GT Series is arguably the best international GT3 championship on the motorsports planet. It consists of five Sprint events, (forming the Blancpain GT Series Sprint Cup) and five Endurance events, (forming the Blancpain GT Series Endurance Cup) the Silverstone round being one of the latter.

A Blancpain GT Series Sprint Cup event consists of two races of one hour per event, while the Blancpain GT Series Endurance Cup races range from three-hour events through a 1000 km race, to the season highlight of the Total 24 Hours of Spa, the world’s leading 24-hour race reserved for GT3 cars. The Silverstone event is a three-hour race, with two mandatory pit stops.

The manufacturers represented on this year’s starting grid are Aston Martin, Audi, Bentley, BMW, Ferrari, Honda, Jaguar, Lamborghini, Lexus, McLaren, Mercedes Benz, Nissan, and Porsche, with top level drivers participating, from former Grand Prix and Le Mans-winners to the best GT drivers in the world.

These are some of the guest cars parked by hospitality. *drools*. As we arrived, we caught the tail end of the Lamborghini Super Trofeo, before heading to lunch.


After lunch we caught the Formula Renault 2.0 Eurocup (a thirty minute race.)

And admired the privately owned Lamborghinis parked up in formation, which we spotted as we toured around the team trucks parked up in the paddock.

Then we headed off for a pit inspection.

It’s truly another world out there – it’s motoring, but not as you know it.

We were in the pits to check out this extraordinary car: it’s a Lamborghini Gallardo R-EX, run by the Reiter Young Stars team, with the three drivers Mads Siljehaug from Norway, Lenny Marioneck from Germany, and Patric Niederhauser from Switzerland.

(Other cars in the Series include two other lambos – the Huracan GT3, and the REX, a Bentley Continental GT3, an Aston Martin Vantage V12 GT3, a Ferrari 488 GT3, an Emile Frey Jaguar G3, a Lexus RC F GT3, a BMW M6 GT3, an Audi R8 GT3, a Porsche 911 GT3 R, a Nissan GT-R Nismo GT3, a Mercedes AMG GT3, and last, but not least, a McLaren 650S GT3.)

This Gallardo has an aluminium chassis (wth an awful lot of carbon fibre around it), with a V10 engine, rear wheel drive, and a semi automatic, 6-speed sequential gearbox.

I can tell you now that the car is almost impossible to get in and out of. Not including the problem of wedging my bottom into the seat. Those drivers are whippet-y thin – they have to be not just because weight affects the car’s performance, but for the split second importance of the driver changes – three drivers for the endurance race; they need to be in and out of that seat in a second. It took me quite some minutes. Very chastening

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The colander is one of those pieces of kitchen equipment which doesn’t seem especially important until you try to cook without it. I use all of mine several times a day, whether I’m emptying a can of chickpeas, washing fruit, or draining pasta, and they’re invaluable.

It’s also surprising how many variants there are on the humble colander – John Lewis lists thirty-three. So, having just bought my best-yet colander (above), I thought it was time for a run down of the options out there.

The absolute classic plain metal colander (1) comes in all colours from straight stainless steel to enamel. Do check that it has enough holes in the bottom as well as around the sides – I was very pleased with the bargain catering-sized one I bought from a discount kitchen shop once until I realised all the water pooled in the bottom as it wasn’t pierced enough. I rather like this one for everyday – plenty of holes! (£15).

If space is an issue then I always recommend ditching the colander to buy a fine gauge sieve (2) instead which can work as both pieces of equipment. However, don’t be tempted to buy the cheapest sieve that you can find, as I’ve made this mistake before – the sieve will be practically useless as the wire gauge will be too wide. This matters as a sieve is there not just to remove lumps  – some of which will fall through a wider gauge – but to aerate flour. We aren’t talking a big investment here – John Lewis have a brilliant version for a tenner here.

My long term, slightly esoteric, favourite, which I bought in the MoMA shop in New York’s SoHo of all random places, is the multi-tasking small silicone OXO Good Grips Collapsible Long Handle Colander £22 (3).  It’s slightly unfortunate that the most recent iteration comes in such a vile colour (mine is a lovely mid-grey), but it’s just brilliant for small kitchens and, because of its saucepan shape, it also makes a great plunge-in semi-steamer as you can balance a lid on top. I use mine for cooking small amounts of delicate foods that you don’t want to be waterlogged –  gyoza, dumplings, and dim sum, as well as broccoli and asparagus

(If it’s too small for you, but the collapsible nature appeals, it also comes in a 4litre model £25 (4), but this won’t work for steaming or plunge cooking in the same way.)

If you cook a lot and have a standard-sized sink you you might like to consider Joseph Joseph’s set of two Square Nest Colanders £12, (5) sadly available in bile green. (What IS it with this love of green in kitchenware? What’s wrong with neutrals? Thus speaks the eternal fashion editor.) It’s handy as you can drain two sets of food without needing to empty the colander.

The time-poor cook with lots of storage space night consider a Pasta Colander Insert, like this one from Tefal Ingenio £25.59,(6) so that they can cook and drain with ease.

But my new absolute favourite is the over-the sink version (7) in the photo at top. I found it on TK Maxx’s site whilst I was distracted looking for dresses for our recent collaboration. I’ve wanted an over the sink colander for years but it seemed a piece of equipment too far for someone who already has at least three perfectly functioning colanders.

But I love it.

My sink is often full of washing up when I’m cooking so I love that the handles extend with ease across the top of the sink, and I don’t need to clear a space at the base of the sink. That means my counter space isn’t then filled with dirty dishes too. It’s also narrow enough that I can leave the colander on one side of the sink whilst I run water from the tap or rinse other things. It also avoids the base of the colander standing in water, and its flatter width means that delicate food such as cherries or berries can be spread out so that they don’t get squashed.

It’s £12.99 and available here. Amazon also have a version here

The post KITCHEN EQUIPMENT: THE BEST COLANDERS EDIT appeared first on Liberty London Girl.

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Even though I work from home, there is still something particularly delicious about the idea of a Bank Holiday. Sunday turns into one long idyllic day with none of the usual Sunday night dread. The extra day off feels like the nicest kind of gift.

I can’t say that I usually plan anything particularly note-worthy for Bank Holidays. Not working in an office means there’s no need to string together a cheeky week off, so I tend to treat them as a blessed break from email, and a chance to hunker down and Get Stuff Done.

This past one was a great example – I managed to combine large amounts of endeavour with lots of time with family and friends; really that’s the perfect combination.

I started Friday with a PR breakfast at Colbert in Sloane Square, which is notoriously dog-friendly, and bakes the only dog biscuits that madam will deign to eat.

Friday afternoon was spent in taking my sister the Royal Free hospital in Hampstead for her monthly MS drug infusion on Friday, and collecting the dogs from her so that she could recover in peace overnight.


I then darted around NW1 on long-overdue errands, from stopping at the cobbler to collect my winter boots, now re-heeled, polished and de-scuffed, (although it’s painful shelling out all that cash on things that won’t be worn for months, it’s worth it not to pull out knackered footwear when the seasons change again; I use K&H on Eversholt Street) via ParcelForce & the sorting office to collect missed parcels.

Hannah and Mark were in Kings Cross for meetings so they swung by Camden at the end of the day for restorative tea and chat, and we ended up strolling down the road into Camden Stables Market to eat Mexican by the Regents Canal at Café Chula, and then bickered gently over the nitrogen ice cream menu board at Chin Chin Labs (tonka bean with fresh raspberry sauce for me, and caramel with caramel French toast nuggets and Valrhona chocolate sauce for Hannah, in case you are interested.)

We ate so early – like complete nannas at 1745, and it was still light when we were done, so I walked the dogs in Regent’s Park afterwards.

A lie-in was on the agenda on Saturday morning but it turns out that having three small sausage dogs in one’s bed is not conducive to this. Ziggy jumped on my head around 0530, and Maisie followed suit not long after. Their absolute speciality is to tick their tiny trotters into the small of my back like tiny furious donkeys.

I read the papers on my ‘phone, ate my breakfast in bed, and fell asleep again. Bang went most of my morning, the rest of which I spent pottering about sorting and tidying and attacking the seemingly endless washing pile.

Silver sandals: Marks & Spencer’s.
Striped Shirt Dress: The White Company (gifted)

Happily the dogs were being returned to Holly with full honours on Saturday lunchtime, so I persuaded her that we should really take them for a walk, which turned into a three hour leisurely ramble across Hampstead Heath in the glorious sunshine, thanks to the Velcro nature of a small sausage dog pack – everyone wants to stop and talk and pet the Tiny Terrors, and my sister seemingly knowing every other person out on the Heath that afternoon.

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Even though I work from home, there is still something particularly delicious about the idea of a Bank Holiday. Sunday turns into one long idyllic day with none of the usual Sunday night dread. The extra day off feels like the nicest kind of gift.

I can’t say that I usually plan anything particularly note-worthy for Bank Holidays. Not working in an office means there’s no need to string together a cheeky week off, so I tend to treat them as a blessed break from email, and a chance to hunker down and Get Stuff Done.

This past one was a great example – I managed to combine large amounts of endeavour with lots of time with family and friends; really that’s the perfect combination.

Friday afternoon was spent in taking my sister the Royal Free hospital in Hampstead for her monthly MS drug infusion on Friday, and collecting the dogs from her so that she could recover in peace overnight, and then darting around NW1 on errands, from the cobbler to collect my winter boots, now re-heeled, polished and de-scuffed, (although it’s painful shelling out all that cash on things that won’t be worn for months, it’s worth it not to pull out knackered footwear when the seasons change again; I use K&H on Eversholt Street) via ParcelForce & the sorting office to collect missed parcels.

Hannah and Mark were in Kings Cross for meetings so they swung by Camden at the end of the day for restorative tea and chat, and we ended up strolling down the road into Camden Stables Market to eat Mexican by the Regents Canal at Café Chula, and then bickered gently over the nitrogen ice cream menu board at Chin Chin Labs (tonka bean with fresh raspberry sauce for me, and caramel with caramel French toast nuggets and Valrhona chocolate sauce for Hannah, in case you are interested.)

We ate so early – like complete nanas at 545, so it was still light when we were done, so I walked the dogs in Regent’s Park afterwards.

A lie in was on the agenda on Saturday morning, but it turns out that having three small sausage dogs in one’s bed is not conducive to this. Ziggy jumped on my head around 0530, and Maisie followed suit not long after.

I read the papers on my ‘phone, ate my breakfast and fell asleep again. Bang went most of my morning, the rest of which I spent pottering about sorting and tidying and attacking the seemingly endless washing pile. Happily they were being returned to her with full honours on Saturday lunchtime, so I persuaded Holly that we should really take them for a walk, which turned into a three hour leisurely ramble across Hampstead Heath in the glorious sunshine, thanks to the Velcro nature of a small sausage dog pack – everyone wants to stop and talk and pet the Tiny Terrors, and my sister seemingly knowing every other person out on the Heath that afternoon.

I dedicated Saturday night to a terrible movie on Netflix (The Kissing Booth), whilst sorting out five plastic bins of half used beauty products, and cleaning out my bathroom shelves. It was a hugely pleasing exercise, not least because I now know where all my makeup is, and have rediscovered several favourites.

My original plan for the Sunday was a housewarming party (a year after I moved in). But my garden wasn’t anywhere near ready, and I’m still waiting for some furniture to arrive for the flat. So it turned instead into lunch for just Hannah, Mark and I (Rachel dropped out at the last minute) as none of us need an excuse to sit in the sun and eat good food.

I made houmous, an iceberg salad with cashew and chive ranch dressing with toasted hazelnuts, a barley, cucumber and mint pilaf, roasted cherry tomatoes and an aubergine and tomato stew from Nargisse Benkabbou’s new book Casablanca.

Mark drank Miller’s Gin with St Germain and tonic, Hannah had Beefeater’s new strawberry gin with crushed strawberries and tonic, and I had Seedlips and tonic because I was off the alcohol for the day.

Lunch over, we did the washing up, I strapped up the dogs and we all walked through Regent’s Park to put H&M on the train at Great Portland Street.

I’m not sure what I did for the rest of the day but I think it involved the sofa.

And Monday – well, I spent five hours in the garden on Monday, finally getting all my hanging baskets up, and filling my window boxes with nodding tiny violas. My kitchen floor had to be seen to be believed afterwards, as it turned out that Lettice was zooming in and out with her little paws covered in mud.

Chloe came over in the early evening and we planned a Pond swim, Heath walk and a picnic. Sadly the Pond was shut because of the risk of lightening, and then the..

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