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There are many theories as to why some loyalty programs succeed while others either fail or exist on autopilot without generating ongoing customer engagement. The science behind habitual consumer behavior offers insights that loyalty marketers should leverage when designing and implementing loyalty programs.

Successful Loyalty Programs Drive Habit Formation

 
Creating a successful loyalty program isn’t just about offering members cool perks and rewards. It’s about tapping into the behavioral cues, routines, and rewards that will create a habit to drive repeat purchases over and over again.

Amazon Prime is a notable example. With two-day shipping and free returns, Amazon is daring shoppers to make their purchases elsewhere. A habit has been formed to check Amazon first and, as a result, businesses across industries are searching for ways to compete with shoppers who price-compare in-store.

How did this habit form? To start, we must understand that humans are innately lazy and our brains are always looking for ways to conserve energy through shortcuts. Decision-making is not a shortcut, but rather a conscious act that requires a great amount of energy. Enter habits; habits conserve energy. Successful loyalty programs drive habit through frequent member interaction and deliver relevant benefits that produce a pleasurable response. This combination of timeliness and gratification essentially speeds up the habit-formation process by replacing conscious decision-making with an automatic habit.

Customer Cravings are Key to Building Loyalty 

Loyalty marketers are becoming more thoughtful and creative with their program offerings. Take Sephora’s Beauty Insider program, for example. When it first launched, Beauty Insider was a classic, tiered program with benefits that rewarded members based on spend: The more a customer would spend in a year, the higher their tier.

Today, the program has evolved to include a “Rewards Bazaar” where members of all levels can redeem their points for a gift of their choice. Choice taps into the idea of “craving.” As the Rewards Bazaar inventory changes, customers are persuaded to see what’s new; and as we all know, frequent website visitors translate into more sales.

Sephora’s Beauty Insider program is also a great example of how a brand has dealt with the common challenge of how to incorporate novelty into a program design without sacrificing the bottom line. Brands struggle with how to effectively include choice in their program offering. While customers want the freedom to choose rewards that appeal to them, too many choices can be overwhelming and costly for the brand to deliver.

How to Create Customer Cravings

 
It all comes down to knowing your customers, and more specifically, the cravings driving them to choose your brand. Other than simply getting utility from purchasing a new product, what positive response is the customer receiving that creates the urge to engage more deeply with the brand? For example:

  • When customers purchase yoga pants, are they striving for inclusion?
  • When customers purchase a new iPhone, are they craving the recognition of being an early adopter?
  • When customers purchase Nike shoes, are they aspiring to become an athlete?

Lenati recently worked with a high-end electric toothbrush brand whose customer insights work revealed consumers were willing to invest in a top-of-the-line device not because they desired the latest device, but because they craved the satisfaction of knowing they were doing all they could for their oral health. Understanding the reward was largely intangible, the brand was able to augment its program offerings to include complementary benefits that enhanced a customer’s feeling of “completeness.”

Three Key Elements of a Successful Loyalty Program

 
A successful loyalty program has the following elements:

1. Serves a clear objective

To start, brands must be clear on the objective of their programs. Is their goal to acquire new customers? Retain existing customers? Better understand their customers so they can deepen their relationship? A successful loyalty program is one that designs the customer experience to achieve the program goal.

2. Evolves Over Time

Second, a successful program grows and changes with its customers. As consumer behaviors shift, so too must the program. Whether creating an app or offering new rewards, a successful loyalty program continually flexes to deliver ongoing customer value.

3. Easy to Use

Finally, a loyalty program must be easy for customers to use. From seamless sign-up to painless benefit redemption, programs must be effortless to use so that customers keep coming back.

Loyalty Program Goals and Consumer Behavoir

 
Whether customer behaviors have to be modified to have a successful loyalty program depends on the program goals. For example, the following should be considered for the corresponding goals:

  • If the goal of the program is to retain customers, the program design should support behaviors customers are already doing—fairly easy as the habit has already been established. That said, a trap many well-established, retention-oriented programs fall into is becoming stale. To avoid this, programs must constantly evaluate program benefits and offerings to ensure they continue to deliver a relevant and engaging customer and member experience.
  • Conversely, if the goal of the program is customer acquisition, the design must influence consumer behavior—which can be difficult as you’re asking customers to create a new habit. In this sense, the program can offer benefits and rewards that help create a new habit. Recalling our electric toothbrush example, the program could use gamification to offer achievement badges and rewards, delivered at timely intervals, that drive excitement and continued engagement. As a new habit is developed, members are rewarded not only with clean teeth, but with the confidence that their next dentist appointment will be positive.
Lenati has decades of experience building successful loyalty programs for the worlds most valued brands, Lenati’s experts can help you build a framework for fostering behavioral and emotional loyalty to drive deeper engagement with your customers. If you have a question about customer retention and loyalty, contact us today!

The post Using the Science of Habits to Create a Successful Loyalty Program appeared first on Lenati.

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Building Loyalty With Privacy In Mind

When building a loyalty program, it is more important than ever to include considerations around privacy and data security right from the start. New laws around consumer data, in particular the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which governs personal information of individuals in the EU, are causing major headaches for marketers and loyalty managers who are tasked with ensuring “Privacy by Design” in programs involving customer data.

The concept of “Privacy by Design” requires companies to take data privacy into account during the earliest stages of planning the policies and systems around a project like a loyalty program. Companies will also have to take into consideration the lifecycle of the data and take proper steps to ensure a secure flow of personal information.

CrowdTwist, a loyalty and engagement platform company, recently published the research report, “Engaging Consumers in an Age of Increasing Brand Distrust”. The report finds that consumers are skeptical of how brands use their data. Brands can solve pain points associated with consumer data collection and privacy and how by adopting omnichannel loyalty programs brands can rebuild trust through value and relevancy.

While the responsibility of adhering to these new laws falls heavily on the technology side, loyalty marketers need to incorporate “Privacy by Design” into the program strategy phase early on as well, to avoid costly setbacks later in the process. During the initial design phase for an international retail client’s custom global loyalty program, great care was taken to build both the technical back-end and the marketing communication strategy in a way that ensure personal information was collected in the right way and through the right channels. While there may be some reticence to do this type tedious work early, it could save companies countless hours and, potentially, astronomical regulatory fines later.

Driving Consent with Value

In addition to affecting the architecture of a loyalty program, privacy regulation changes also vastly alter the way in which those programs ask users for their consent. For programs that use personal information of members in the EU, the GPDR contains a host of new requirements that include obtaining updated consent from existing members, using explicit and unambiguous language to explain the purpose for collecting specific data, and obtaining new consent should that data be used for any new purposes.

For loyalty marketers, these requirements represent potential points of friction in the loyalty experience. Industry analysts expect loyalty program membership rates to decrease by 30% to 50% as customers ignore or refuse requests to opt back in. To mitigate this risk, marketers not only need to reevaluate the amount and type of data they request from users, they also need to reassess the value they provide in exchange for that data. While brands may lose a sizeable chunk of their members, those that do remain will likely be a company’s most valuable customers. Understanding what drives them and building a program around what they want, and value is key to creating not only an impactful experience, but a sustainable membership program as well.

Moving Forward with Data

Data is at the heart of what powers a compelling, personalized loyalty program but, improperly handled, it can also be liability. Once companies have begun building their program with privacy in mind and properly acquired consent, major pain points still exist in the actual implementation and utilization of the personal information obtained from users.

While marketers may grumble that the new regulations will hurt their membership base, they also provide a significant benefit: The laws are aimed at ensuring the members in a program want to be there. This raises the bar for the value exchange inherent to loyalty programs, and allows the programs that really drive value for their members to stand out and differentiate themselves.
Once companies have the right users and the right data within a loyalty program, they will be charged with developing those users into consistent, advocating, brand-loving customers. You can accomplish this by diving right into the data:

  • What caused them to sign up? Which channels are most effective?
  • What are customers doing once they part of the program?
  • What’s the interaction, purchase process or desired goal of the user like? Are these customer behaviors aligning with organizational KPIs?
  • Where do customers drop off? Are they sticking around for more than the “hook” (the benefit provided at sign-up)?
  • Can we design nudges to address parts of the program with high-churn?
  • Where are we seeing the highest levels of engagement and how do we get more customers there?

The answers to all these questions lie within the data. It’s important to note that most of these metrics are not productivity metrics like Open Rates or Click Thru Rates. These strategic measurements help organizations understand drivers of customer behaviors. The data gives a clear picture of what they like, what they don’t, and how to change it. Marketing now has the fun – yet challenging – job of optimizing the product to give customers the best possible experience.

The post How to Solve Loyalty Pain Points appeared first on Lenati.

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Lenati is looking forward to attending the MarTech Conference from October 1st to the 3rd in Boston. MarTech Conference is designed to help you discover, learn, and connect with others passionate about the challenges of modern marketing. Attendees will leave with best practices and relevant case studies from senior marketers and experts in Marketing Technology.

Kirk Johnson, Partner at Lenati, will be presenting on  “Solving Human Problems: A Case for Martech and Design Thinking,” on Tuesday at 2:30 P.M. in the Management Break-out Session.

This session will walk through real-life applications in design thinking (powerful mindset, repeatable process, specific tools), giving the audience a “hands-on learning” in design thinking (and design doing) style.

Johnson brings nearly 20 years of experience as a consultant and executive helping clients design and improve their digital marketing experience and improve their acquisition and retention efforts.

Attendees will get a deeper understanding of how design thinking can become a driver growth in the “experience economy” and dive into real client case studies.

Lenati will be sharing updates live from the event and will provide a post-event point of view.  If you’re attending MarTech Conference and you’d like to connect with Kirk, send us an  or feel free to reach out on Linkedin.

The post Lenati to Lead MarTech Workshop appeared first on Lenati.

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Picking up from last time, Personalization is very closely related to Retention in that timely Personalization actions can serve to stop Churn. Churn indicates the propensity of customers to cease doing business with a company in a given time period. The success or failure than an individual organization experiences, depend, to a large extent, on the ability of making acceptable decisions on time. So, here’s where we are:

There is three-step method to controlling customer churn:

  1. Churn Detection
  2. Customer Profiling
  3. Retention Plan

Customer churn prediction consists in building a prediction model that ranks the customers from most likely to leave the company to least likely to leave the company, based on past customers’ behavior which relies heavily on whether the customer is satisfied.

Customer Retention Strategies come in four flavors with the customers who are more prone to attrition need to be handled in a more personalized manner, increasing satisfaction and reducing the factors that cause attrition.

  1. Top-down:  Based on managerial level experience from prior actions, action are defined independent of customer profiles.
  2. Bottom-up: Customer profiles are defined prior to defining actions, but requires considerable amount of supervision effort.
  3. Customized: The offers has to be granular enough and the customers are free to choose from the wide set of alternatives.
  4. Similarity-based: Actions are triggered based on customer preferences inferred from customer profiles.

Due to improved access to information, customers are more transient and it is easier and less costly for them to switch between competitors. A deeper understanding of customers has justified the value of focusing on them, because it costs five times more to gain a new customer than to keep an existing one, costing ten times more to get a dissatisfied customer back.

Since net return on investment for retention strategies are generally higher than for acquisition, it is now widely accepted that companies should concentrate their marketing resources on customer retention. This translates into increased revenue for the company because loyal, satisfied customers continue transacting for a relatively longer duration, while ignoring offers from competitors.

In the next post, we will explore the relationship between Customer Lifetime Value and Satisfaction. For now, make sure to follow along with our series on Loyalty and Satisfaction.

The post I Can’t Get No…Satisfaction, Retention, and Churn appeared first on Lenati.

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As we explored in the last post, Quality has an important role in Satisfaction. Quality is not only a moderator of Satisfaction, but it is a direct precursor to Satisfaction. It is simply an evaluation by the consumer of performance excellence. Given this context, Satisfaction can be viewed as the gap between customer expectation and the service delivered by the provider, known as the Confirmation-Disconfirmation Paradigm. So here’s where we’re at now:

Service Quality can be measured using the SERVQUAL Survey which measures five dimensions:

The influence of customer satisfaction on a company is pictured precisely by the success chain of quality management. The growing competition in the market, higher customer demands and globalization forces the business service providers to improve their services much faster. Customer experience and the quality of customer service will be the competitive differentiation within the upcoming years. Satisfied consumers have a better experience. When a business performs a service dependably and accurately (Quality), it increases the perceived customer satisfaction with a business’ performance.

Just as with Loyalty, Personalization is directly tied to Satisfaction. The goal of Personalization is to satisfying each customer as an individual and depends of the usage of personalization to enhance the consumer experience. In service settings, customer satisfaction is often influenced by the quality of the interpersonal interaction between the customer and the contact employee. Below is an example of how personalization of a recommendation system can influence Satisfaction directly.

Personalization is important for companies, making these skills key:

  1. Their reputation which has the strongest effect on consumers’ willingness to start and maintain both interactive communication and personalized relationships
  2. Adequate compensation
  3. Consumer loyalty
  4. Personalized contacts
  5. Recognizing legal considerations
  6. Enabling interactivity of communication
  7. Ensuring adequate consumer satisfaction
  8. Ensuring consumer trust

In the next post, we will explore the relationship between Retention, Churn, and Satisfaction. So check out our blog next Thursday and follow along with our series on Loyalty here.

The post I Can’t Get No…Satisfaction, Quality and Personalization appeared first on Lenati.

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Simply put, Loyalty is important. It is a collection of attitudes aligned with purchase behaviors that favor one business among competing businesses. But it is so much more. Loyalty is comprised of a constellation of concepts, the Customer Ecosystem, that come together to influence a customer, but it also has a huge impact on business outcomes for our clients.

The concepts that make up and define loyalty include: Commitment, Trust, Incentives, and, most importantly, Satisfaction. All of these are moderated by Quality, the ability of a company to perform a service dependably and accurately. The more successful a business’s quality, the higher the overall Trust, Commitment, Incentives, and Satisfaction, of the customer – therefore creating stronger Loyalty. These antecedents, customer outcomes, and business outcomes are all part of the Customer Ecosystem.

Loyalty is a strong driver of business outcomes, providing direct impact on performance. Performance has historically been composed of traditional measures such as sales, share of wallet, profit performance, ROI, and other KPIs. These have been the standard bearers of what drives business decisions, but today, we know better. There is so much more to Loyalty than just business outcomes and understanding this will help to drive not only profits, but also to create a loyal customer base. A satisfied customer is more likely to not only buy more and more often, but to tell friends and family about their positive experiences.

Just as Loyalty is important for businesses, it is just as important for the consumer, affecting both their attitudes and behaviors when it comes to your brand. Behaviors are the easiest to see and measure. At its core, Behavioral Loyalty is the repeated purchases by a consumer favoring one business over another that can provide a similar service. When I consumer is satisfied, they are more likely to engage in behavioral loyalty and are willing to pay more for a similar service if they have a connection to the brand or business. Attitudes are bit more ephemeral.

It is hard to measure cognitions. You can’t just crack open a consumer and weigh attitude, so we must break them down into constituent parts that can be measured using a survey or series of surveys. What we can measure is: Connection to Brand, Behavioral Interdependence (the mutual impact of attitudes and actions in everyday life), Passion (a desire for a brand/business/service), and Intimacy (a connection that is formed through knowledge over time). It is much easier to form these connections, behaviors, and passions in a satisfied customer base. Over time, these attitudes only become stronger as a brand/company develops higher satisfaction with their consumers.

So here’s where we’re at:

We’ll get to rest of this chart as our series on Loyalty continues.

So…why Satisfaction? Why is it so important? There are three major reasons:

  1. No company can survive without appropriate customer satisfaction.
  2. Customer satisfaction is tied directly to profitability.
  3. Customer loyalty is assumed to be a consequence of customer satisfaction.

As we see here in the first of four posts, Loyalty is a complicated issue but necessary in creating a satisfied customer base. There are many drivers of Loyalty, but Satisfaction is the strongest. Not only is Satisfaction a primary driver of Loyalty, it is closely related to the other main components of the Customer Ecosystem. Next, we will explore how Satisfaction impacts the Quality of service and Personalization strategies.

Follow along with our series on Loyalty here and come back next Thursday for part two.

The post I Can’t Get No…Satisfaction and Loyalty appeared first on Lenati.

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We’ve all seen them: uninspiring, black and white reports, positively crammed full of data. If they include a PivotTable or two, consider yourself lucky. These reports usually contain all the information a marketer needs to evaluate the health of their campaign or to validate their assumptions – but why is it so important for them to look good?

As consultants, we tend to be perfectionists. We pore over project deliverables to ensure they are client-ready; creating slide decks that are neat, insightful, and impactful. This amount of scrutiny and review is rarely given to data deliverables like dashboards and spreadsheets. Anything you can do to highlight key metrics that impact decision making will make your analyses more digestible to business owners, as aesthetics and spreadsheet usefulness are almost always intertwined.

Setting aside whether the data is accurate or if the right analyses were done, dashboards and spreadsheets should be polished, professional, and on-par with other deliverables. That will create immediate confidence in the report and be more likely to engage others. In this post, we’ll explain why and how to build an aesthetically interesting report.

Here’s an example of data that needs some design work, do your deliverables look like this?

There are two distinct reasons that someone might want to put more effort into the design and aesthetics of their reports:

First, it simply looks more professional. Adding color and contrast, with restraint, turns a boring report into something that a client will want to look at, increasing the likelihood your message hits home. For example, in a past project, I took reports generated by finance and reformatted them in a way that my client, a marketing manager, found more engaging. Sure, I also augmented it with formulas and calculations, but it was the visual ‘wow’ factor that really differentiated this report from others that she had to review.

Dressing up reports is just like plating a dish nicely – people, perhaps subconsciously, always eat with their eyes first. It’s a low-effort step that has high return on investment.

The second reason to put effort into report and dashboard aesthetics is more utilitarian. Managers and directors are busy. I’ve met a fair few who are genuinely interested in data and more than willing to spend time perusing a report, but they still face time crunches. Most want to ingest key insights as quickly as possible (especially for reports produced in a regular cadence), arming themselves with stats they can quote during their next call. Help them figure out what matters.

Here’s the same deliverable as above, but with design-thinking in mind:

So, how do we increase the attractiveness and usefulness of our spreadsheets? Use your judgment to anticipate the end user’s needs. Ask yourself what purpose each element of the report serves, and whether the person reading it will find it valuable. When creating my own reports and dashboards, these are some of the questions I ask myself:

Is a table really necessary here? Or can we substitute in a chart instead? Adding a color scale might help, but do we use default conditional formatting, ending up with a garish red-yellow-green continuum? Or do we pick and choose what to highlight using custom rules? Is a PivotTable necessary to neatly display essential metrics? Or is a single summary cell enough to highlight the bottom line?

In both cases, you should apply the same design principles you would to your visual deliverables, such as decks or documents. What that looks like within spreadsheets is only slightly different than in a slide deck. Here are some tips and tricks for tackling drab or unfocused reports:

Overall appearance:

  • Use the company’s brand colors within the spreadsheet to unify it with other deliverables.
  • Format elements consistently. For example, if you have a title on each tab in a spreadsheet, make sure it’s in the same cell and is the same size/font/color, etc.
  • Remove gridlines wherever possible to reduce onscreen clutter. Add cell and table borders instead.

Emphasizing insights:

  • Judiciously use color or font to draw attention to key metrics. Consider putting totals at the top of the report to eliminate the need to scroll.
  • Use icons and colors to highlight gains and losses in a more visual way.
  • Choose visualizations that display data in the clearest, most concise way possible.
  • Create a quick summary table if the data warrants it, and only include the fields or aggregations that you know the end user needs.
  • Choose table designs wisely to best display the data. For example, in a long table, alternate row banding creates separation. Or, if some fields are related, group them by color to emphasize that relationship.
  • Remove data that your end user doesn’t need to see or won’t care about from the front-facing report. You can keep this in the underlying data in case they want to dive deeper.

These are only a few of the changes you can quickly implement before sharing a report. By making these changes, your reports will look more professional, and more importantly, become more useful. Your report is already insightful – don’t let your hard work go unread and underutilized because it didn’t engage your end user.

Interested in learning more about Lenati’s Analytics Team? Head to our services page.

The post Black, White, and Unread All Over: The Importance of Creating Visual Impact in Data Deliverables appeared first on Lenati.

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Last week Lenati wrapped up our time in Florida at Loyalty Expo 2018. It was great to connect with clients and industry leaders, here’s a few highlights:

  • On Tuesday Vans and Lenati took the stage to present on Van’s new program, Vans Family. Sharing how Vans’ deep understanding of its own culture and history provided a platform to launch their loyalty program, which has resulted in incredible market demand since launch.
  • Partner at Lenati, Martin Mehalchin took the stage Wednesday to present on personalization and innovation in experiential loyalty. Mehalchin shared insights on the strategic role personalization plays in the modern loyalty marketing context. Exploring how leading companies build responsive, dynamic experiences as part of an integrated strategy to nurture customer loyalty.
  • The most exciting moment of the conference was taking home two awards for Lenati. We were honored to have been presented with the 360 Vendor Gold Award and selected as one of the Loyalty360 Top Ten Agencies.

While Loyalty360 Expo is now all wrapped up, we’re looking forward to CRMC starting tomorrow in Chicago. We’re excited to connect with retailers and learn more about CRM strategies, ideas and challenges.

Most exciting will be the opportunity for Vice President of CRM, Digital, and Marketing Analytics at DSW Julie Roy and myself to share about DSW’s new data-driven loyalty program.

In 2017 DSW announced a new brand mission: We inspire self-expression. We will share the insights and strategy behind key initiatives including the recent relaunch of DSW VIP loyalty program, advanced personalization, and new services and in-store experiences that deepen the customer relationship and give the customer reasons to come to DSW that go beyond shopping.

We’ll be presenting at 10:30 a.m. on Friday June 8th in the grand ballroom, so be sure to stop by to learn more about this innovative program.

Lenati will also have a booth set up in the main hall. Stop by to chat with the team and pick up a copy of Our Guide to Driving Impact with Personalization. We look forward to seeing you there!

The post Looking Forward to CRMC appeared first on Lenati.

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@GirlFromBlupo: Dear Amazon, I bought a toilet seat because I needed one. Necessity, not a desire. I do not collect them. I am not a toilet seat addict. No matter how temptingly you email me, I’m not going to think, oh go on then, just one more toilet seat, I’ll treat myself.

More often than we see good examples of personalization, we see the bad. There are countless examples across social media of customers experiencing companies missing the point when it comes to personalization. Take this Amazon customer for example:

Obviously, this customer bought a toilet seat as a one-time purchase, out of need rather than desire. This is just one example of personalization gone wrong, which explains why so many companies have a difficult time developing and implementing a personalization strategy successfully. It’s the number one inquiry into Gartner and is a key theme at this year’s Loyalty Expo and The CRMC.

But personalization is not a lost cause! Many companies have gotten a firm grasp on the power of personalization and are using it to unlock revenue and add value for customers. The most successful ones understand that personalization is at its core a data problem. Spotify, the market leader in music streaming pays close attention to how their customers use their service, creating data driven personalization.

By collecting data on the songs subscribers listen to, Spotify can plug this data into an algorithm and generate a personalized playlist of new music for the user every week. This feature, called Discover Weekly, drives deeper product usage by solving the challenge of finding new music in a highly personalized fashion.

Discover Weekly allows Spotify to personalize playlists for their listeners.

As customers listen to these playlists and indicate their preferences by skipping some songs and repeating others, the personalization flywheel kicks into full gear and Spotify can improve the playlists week over week. These engagement-based improvements lead customers to be deeply attached to the brand and create a significant churn barrier.

In retail, Vans creates personalization through their Vans Custom program. Customers are given the opportunity to create their own product, customizing style, design, color and material via an online portal on the Vans website. This drives fierce brand loyalty while putting the customer in charge of the personalization, thus avoiding many of the issues we see with traditional personalization approaches.

Vans allows customers to create their own pair of custom Vans.

While there is risk in personalization, there is also much to be gained. Where are you on your road to personalization? Are you just starting out, or do you need to rethink your efforts?

If you’re attending Loyalty Expo be sure to stop into my workshop session “Personalization: Innovation for the Experiential Path to Loyalty” where I’ll expand on this blog post and dive into how to make personalization work for you.

If you’re interested in hearing more from Vans, we will also be speaking on “Leveraging Emotional Loyalty: How Vans Invited Their Fans to Join the Vans Family” with Frank Neumann, Sr. Director of Consumer Lifecycle Management & Loyalty at Vans and Pam Spier, Lenati’s Head of Client Delivery & Success.

Not attending Loyalty Expo? Download our Guide to Driving Impact with Personalization which dive into how you can make personalization work for your brand.

The post Making Marketing Personalization Work for You appeared first on Lenati.

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Lenati’s strategy and customer insights experience pairs with ProKarma’s expertise in technology and digital engineering

BEAVERTON, OR and SEATTLE, WA (April 16, 2018) — ProKarma, a global IT solutions company, today announced a definitive merger agreement with Lenati, a Seattle-based customer experience strategy consultancy.

The integration will further strengthen ProKarma’s position as a market leader in digital transformation, emerging technologies and platforms. Lenati’s expertise spans the overall customer and digital experience, from customer insights and analytics, go-to-market strategy, customer acquisition, channel enablement, through loyalty strategy and retention.

“Integrating and building on our capabilities and services with Lenati will enable ProKarma to deliver increased value to our customers by growing our marketing and sales strategy consulting services,” said Vivek Kumar, president, ProKarma. “Lenati’s team has a deep understanding of how to help clients innovate and build market leadership by using data to dive deep into the customer experience to build effective and engaging experiences.”

“Our team is excited to unite with ProKarma and bring our combined powerful technology and strategy expertise to the market,” said Kris Klein, managing partner, Lenati. “We will be able to offer our clients transformative experiences, human-centered design, analytical rigor and deep technology expertise now delivered on a global platform.”

“Lenati and ProKarma share common ground in terms of our approach to client relationships, as well as our leadership styles,” said Jen Winter, managing partner, Lenati. “Our partnership allows us to leverage our shared expertise together and guide clients as they navigate the digital landscape.”

The merger marks several years of growth for both ProKarma and Lenati. The Carlyle Group became a major investment partner for ProKarma in 2016, enabling continued growth and focus on innovation.

“Combining Lenati’s strategy consulting expertise with ProKarma’s digital transformation excellence creates a more robust, end-to-end service offering for their clients,” said Julius Genachowski, managing director, The Carlyle Group. “We’re excited to play a role in this evolution alongside ProKarma and Lenati.”

About Lenati

Lenati is the premier consultancy helping companies develop innovative and disruptive customer experiences. Working across the customer lifecycle, from acquisition to engagement to retention, Lenati serves as valued advisors and collaborators to the worlds’ most valuable brands.  Lenati strategy drives many well-known successful consumer engagement models, and has been recognized by Forrester for their thought-provoking work. For more information, visit www.lenati.com

About ProKarma

ProKarma is an IT solutions company focused on helping businesses re-engineer themselves through powerful digital platforms, customer engagement and emerging technologies. It fuels its clients’ growth and efficiency through accelerating business activities, enhancing experiences and creating competitive advantages. ProKarma operates in 18 offices across the United States, India, and Argentina and has been ranked as the fastest-growing IT services company in America by Inc. 500.  For more information, visit www.prokarma.com.

About The Carlyle Group
The Carlyle Group (NASDAQ: CG) is a global alternative asset manager with $195 billion of assets under management across 317 investment vehicles as of December 31, 2017. Carlyle’s purpose is to invest wisely and create value on behalf of its investors, many of whom are public pensions. Carlyle invests across four segments – Corporate Private Equity, Real Assets, Global Credit and Investment Solutions – in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, the Middle East, North America and South America. Carlyle has expertise in various industries, including: aerospace, defense & government services, consumer & retail, energy, financial services, healthcare, industrial, real estate, technology & business services, telecommunications & media and transportation. The Carlyle Group employs more than 1,600 people in 31 offices across six continents.

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For more information, contact:

Miz Nakajima

ProKarma

971-317-0739

mnakajima@prokarma.com

The post ProKarma and Lenati Join Forces to Create End-to-End Digital Transformation Company appeared first on Lenati.

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