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I have been obsessed with fitness for a long time. It’s been so long, I barely remember when I was a beginner!

My obsession with lifting weights started around 12-13 years old. I’m pretty sure I was the only kid in my high school who had a weight bench in their bedroom. I didn’t even want it in the garage, it had to be right next to my bed. I even contemplated taking my bed out for extra space to train, but that’s a story for another time.

During those years, I used to read Flex Magazine, Muscle and Fitness, Muscle Mag, Muscular Development, etc. cover to cover.  I gained a ton of useful training and nutrition advice, however, most of it wasn’t the information I needed at the time. The magazines do a great job putting out content that people WANT, not always what they need. I knew a lot about how the best bodybuilders in the world ate and trained, but not much about how a 100 pound teenager should.

The truth is, no one ever wants to admit they are a beginner at something. It’s human nature. We all want to skip the beginning stages and jump straight into the deep end. It’s exactly what I did.

It was many years down the road before I realized I needed to take a step back and focus on the basics. It doesn’t matter how advanced you are, revisiting some basic principles is always a good idea.  There is so much information I wish I knew when I first started. With the right advice, I could have saved a lot of time and energy. With this in mind, I posed the question to my Instagram (@huntfitness).

What are some things you wished you knew when you first started lifting weights?

Huge credit to everyone who answered, you inspired this article! Sit back, relax, and enjoy as I unpack the 11 things every beginner lifter should know.

#1: Have a plan, don’t just wing it.

This is one I actually got right. I was always big on planning out my workout programs. Looking back, it makes sense. I like to have a plan with everything that I do. Now, my “programs” were more a list of exercises than a well-constructed periodized set up, but that is topic for another time.

At the very least, everyone should have a plan when they enter the gym. Know what muscle group and exercises you are going to do each day, for the specific amount of sets and reps. This not only helps you stay organized, it also saves you time.

In addition, I highly recommend getting a training journal and keeping track of everything you do. I personally use an old school composition notebook. Write down the exercises, the sets, reps, weights, how you feel, what time you are in the gym, how long the workout took, etc. The more information you put down, the better. This is a great piece of advice for everyone, not just beginners.

Once you have a plan, it’s important to stick to it. Progress comes when you can move in one direction for a long time. Don’t be in a rush to start something new every couple weeks. A program needs time to work.

Bonus Tip: As a beginner, your program does not need to be super intricate. More complicated does not mean better. Find a program that you can stick to long term. The “best” program on paper won’t be effective if it’s not something you can realistically be consistent with.

#2: Progress doesn’t happen overnight, long term consistency is key.

I have watched so many lifters come and go over the years. The truth is, it’s pretty easy to go to the gym and eat correctly for a few days or even weeks. However, true progress occurs when you can buckle down and stick with this for the long haul.

I push consistency so hard because all big time achievements can be broken down into small manageable steps. Waking up and eating a breakfast that moves you closer to your goal is a step in the right direction. Going to the gym is another positive step. Do this day in and day out for years, and you will be where you want to be.

It’s hard to sell consistency in a world filled with instant gratification. I get it, I really do. However, after working with thousands of clients, consistency is one of the only things all success stories have in common.

Making big time change takes time, probably longer than you think.

Bonus Tip: There are a ton of benefits to flexible dieting, that’s why I was on the forefront promoting it back in the day. However, too much flexibility is just as bad as not enough. When it comes to nutrition, you want to control as much as you can. Instead of starting each day with a blank slate of macros, plan out at least 80% of what you are going to eat ahead of time and only leave 10-20% for flexibility. This practice will dramatically increase your ability to consistently hit your daily calorie and macronutrient targets.

#3: Progress comes in peaks and valleys, it’s not always linear.

This is a big one. If progress was linear, everyone would be extremely strong and jacked. Unfortunately, that’s just not the case.

Progress is very motivating. It’s easy to keep pushing forward when everything is going well. The real story is told once progress stalls. The ability to trust the process and continue working when things are not going well is a huge factor in success. Everyone will go through a period of time when progress slows down, it’s natural. When progress slows down, buckle down harder on the basics. Make sure you are doing all of the little things right before looking at outside solutions.

Bonus Tip: Focus on the process more than the outcome. Learn to love the day to day routine of going to the gym, preparing your meals, going to bed on time, etc. We can control our actions, we can’t always control the outcomes.  If you do all of the little things right, eventually it will result in progress.

#4: The warm-up needs to be part of the workout.

The warm up process might be the most overlooked aspect in fitness. Think about it, how many people do you see walk into the gym and immediately start their workout? Too many! You know the type of person I’m talking about. They walk in, do a couple arm circles, maybe a couple arm swings and boom – load up 135lbs or even 225lbs to the bar.

As you can guess, this is not the best way to handle business. I know, partly because I did it for years. Skipping the warm up is one of the many mistakes I made as a novice lifter. I was young, weak and didn’t know any better. It wasn’t until I started looking at optimizing my entire routine did I start paying attention to what I needed to accomplish in order to properly warm up.

Warming up is definitely not “sexy” but it’s a very important part of the workout process. It has the ability to either enhance or diminish your ability to optimally perform the workouts.

Bonus Tip: You don’t need to follow some movement guru’s 45 minute warm-up protocol before every training session. Time is a big reason why people skip the warm-up. If you only have an hour to train, we can’t spend more than half of it warming up. Walk into the gym and do a 3-5 minute general warm-up. Get on a treadmill, exercise bike, or jump rope. Get the heart rate up, increase body temperature, etc. After that, pick 2-3 action item movements that get you ready to perform the workout for the day. These will be specific to everyone. As you advance, get stronger, and/or have more time to train, your warm-up can become more intricate.

#5: Make it a point to learn proper technique first.

Of course using proper technique will increase the likelihood of staying injury free, but it’s also the best way to get as strong as possible. Lifting is a skill, and the better you get at performing the skill, the more weight you can lift.

It’s not uncommon for some of my clients to hit new personal records within the first couple weeks of us working together. Is it because of some special programming secret I implemented? No, I simply provided a few set-up and technique adjustments that buttoned up a few areas they were leaking performance. Technique can make a huge difference.

Bonus Tip: It’s hard to learn proper technique from a text book or online article. Not everyone fits into what’s considered “textbook” form. Part of improving technique is finding out what technique is right for you and your individual biomechanics.

#6: Learn the difference between sore, hurt, and injured.

Don’t ignore aches, pains, and injuries as that is never a good idea. However, it’s important to learn the difference between sore, hurt, and injured. Look, training is not always comfortable. There will be times when you are sore, even beyond normal DOMS. Little tweaks and strains happen. The harder you train, the more things are going to hurt. Be smart, take rest days, work around issues, etc. but there is always something you can do. Don’t let a little soreness be the reason why you miss a bunch of time in the gym. All it takes is one little issue to pop up and it’s enough to take people out of the gym for weeks or even months. Don’t let that happen. Look for solutions, not excuses.

I want to reiterate, I am all for being conservative with pain. For the most part, we can always change to a different exercise and work around stuff. But, I don’t think the mental aspect of training gets talked about enough. You don’t have to pound your head against a wall to see progress but you absolutely need to push yourself beyond what is comfortable. To achieve great things in the gym (and in life) there needs to be periods where we go beyond comfort. There are times when you may be “hurting”, but you need to push through to make progress.

Bonus Tip: With all that being said, if you think you are injured get it checked out by a medical professional. It’s better to be safe than sorry. Just don’t let them talk you out of squatting and deadlifting…

#7: Focus on progressing compound movements.

This is not a slight against isolation exercises. I love some machines and cable movements, however, all exercises are not created equal. 3 sets of 10 on a leg extension is not the same as 3 sets of 10 on a squat.

Compound exercises have a few advantages. The biggest advantage is simply they can be loaded more effectively. Essentially, since you can lift more weight with compound movements, it’s easier to build in weekly progressions and create progressive overload.

Secondly, they provide efficiency. A squat or a deadlift is going to incorporate and strengthen multiple muscles at the same time. A program built around squats, deadlifts, rows, presses, etc. will not need as much exercise variety, which brings me to my next point.

A common problem people have with training is just doing too many exercises. You need to stick with an exercise long enough to progress it. Don’t try to create “muscle confusion” before focusing on basic progressions. Actually aim to get better and stronger at a movement before changing it. A lot can be gained from just becoming better and more consistent with the basics. You don’t need to be fancy to get strong.

Don’t try to reinvent the wheel. Focus on basic compound movements that have been proven to be effective over the last hundred years before you go adding in some random exercise you saw a goofball on YouTube doing.

Bonus Tip: Progressive overload – lifting heavier weights, doing more reps with the same weight, etc. is essential for long term muscle growth. We want the training we are doing in the gym to be progressive. We have to force the body to make adaptations, it doesn’t want to get bigger and stronger for no reason.

#8: Learn the basics of nutrition – energy balance, macros, etc.

This is the biggest thing I wish I understood in more detail when I first got into fitness. Nutrition can be very confusing because people generally fall into “camps”. It almost takes on the same type of following as religion or politics.

The truth is, a good diet doesn’t need a name. Many of the “named diets” are based on arbitrary rules that don’t move the needle. The problem then becomes focusing on the minute details while missing the big picture. The best diet is going to be the one built around you, your specific goals, and lifestyle. Every diet can work as long as it meets the general requirements below.

Energy balance is key. If you want to build muscle and lose fat, it all comes down to a simple equation I’m sure you have heard before. Calories in vs Calories out.

Are there other factors in play? Yes, however calories in vs. calories out is the most important aspect of changing your body composition. If anyone says otherwise, they are not talking with any scientific grounding.

In order to build muscle, you need to eat more calories than your body needs to maintain. This is a caloric surplus.

In order to lose fat, you need to eat less calories than your body needs to maintain. This is a caloric deficit.

Bonus Tip: While it’s true there are no magic foods, and you can eat anything you want during a fat loss phase, there are some foods that are more problematic. Foods that are highly palatable make it hard to stay within your calorie and macro guidelines for the day. By highly palatable foods, I’m referring to high calorie/low nutrient dense foods that taste amazing. Everyone has their own personal favorites.  Foods like candy, cookies, donuts, chips, pizza, pasta, alcohol, etc. There is nothing inherently wrong with these foods, however, it’s just easy to overconsume them. When dieting, it makes sense to limit how often you consume known trouble foods. 

#9: Supplements are supplements

I love supplements, but I wasted so much money during my teenage years buying worthless crap. The truth is, very few supplements do what the lable claims. Even the supplements that have some research behind them tend to be hit or miss.

As cliché as it is, focus on your nutrition and use supplements to help fill the gaps.

You know what I find funny. A lot of fitness personalities are quick to jump on someone like Brittany Dawn, and they should, what she did scamming people was horrible. But on the flip side, these same people are alright with promoting worthless cleanses, detoxes, sweat creams, etc.  I see so many fitness “influencers” promote supplements the scientific community has shown to be ineffective. It’s sad.

Supplements absolutely work, but not all of them.

Bonus Tip: Stick to the basics that have the most evidence behind them.

Protein Powder to help reach daily protein goals.

Creatine Monohydrate to help build muscle and gain strength.

A well dosed pre workout to help with gym performance.

Fish Oil to make up for a lack of Omega 3s in the diet.

Vitamin D3 to make up for a lack of Vitamin D.

You could add a multivitamin, maybe some magnesium in certain cases, but that’s about it.

#10: Don’t let fitness take over your life.

Fitness should enhance your life, not take away from it. During my high school years, I let fitness take over my life. My day revolved around training and meal times. I had no flexibility. I ate six prepared meals at exactly 2.5 hour intervals. I didn’t have a social life. I didn’t allow anything to get in the way of me eating the foods I wanted to eat and training at the precise time I wanted to train.

There was a time when I trained three times per day. I used to go to the gym before school, after school, and finish the day in my home gym. It was excessive and unnecessary. Although I enjoyed it, I didn’t have time to do anything else.

It caused so much unneeded stress that I burned out for a brief period in time. Once I was able to create more flexibility and put things in perspective, not only was it easier to follow, I actually got better results.

Bonus Tip: This one is simple, keep things in perspective. More is not always better.

#11: You don’t need a coach, but finding a good one will really fast track your progress.

Reading this right now, you have a huge advantage. You can literally work with some of the best coaches in the world. Imagine that. You have access to some of the best, most knowledgeable, most accomplished coaches of all time. All you have to do is send an email.

Nothing will fast track your progress more than working with a coach. When I first got into lifting weights, I didn’t have access to the best coaches. So, in my case I’m glad I learned things the hard way. Shit, I was able to create a career out of it. But, I’m obsessed with this. I mean literally obsessed. I have studied fitness every single day for the last 15 years. That is not an exaggeration. For most people, they would be much better off just finding someone who can lay out the blueprint for them.

Bonus Tip: Coaching is about more than just knowledge. Most people feel like they know what to do. That may even be you. However, in that case, why haven’t you done it? It’s ok to admit you need help with accountability to stick to a plan. At the end of the day, results are results. It doesn’t matter how you get them.

Connect with Kyle: 

Instagram: @huntfitness

YouTube: @HuntFitnessTV

The Previous 10 Absolute Strength Episodes:

Episode 192: The Macro Barista Alex Moe Talks Coffee, Macros, and Positivity

Episode 193: Jason Loewy Founder of My Macros+ on the Future of AI Coaching 

Episode 194: How to Improve Sleep, Recovery, and Performance with Elite Sleep Coach Nick Littlehales

Episode 195:2x All American Wrestler and Pro MMA Fighter Kyle Crutchmer 

Episode 196: My 3 Favorite Supplement Ingredients, Strength vs. Bodybuilding Genetics, and Choking on the Platform

Episode 197: My New Book Deal, Training Based on Body Type, Training For a Bench Only Meet, and My Greatest Challenge

Episode 198: Carolina Panthers Strength and Conditioning Coach Joe Kenn

Episode 199: What the Supplement Industry Doesn’t Want You to Know

Episode 200: The Kyle Hunt Interview

Episode 201: A Talk with 50 Cent’s Strength Coach Jay Cardiello

The post 11 Things Every Beginner Lifter Needs to Know – Ep 202 appeared first on Hunt Fitness.

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It’s 2019. The new year is the perfect time to pick up a new habit, or better yet, work on becoming a better version of yourself. New year, new you. Amirite? 

Aside from starting a new workout program, reading is one of the more popular habits people want to start during this time of year. The problem is, where do you start? We live in the information age. There is no barrier of entry to put out information. We are bombarded with content left and right. Deciding who to listen to is hard enough. There are millions of books out there, my goal is to provide you with a list to get you started in the right direction. 

Over the past five years, I have made it a point to read, on average, a book per week. I feel this not only keeps my mind sharp but also keeps me ahead of the game. If you spend 3.5-7 hours per week working on self-improvement and studying your profession, you’re much more likely to be successful.

I like to separate the books I read into two categories. Category one is training/nutrition and category two is personal development/business. Those are the topics I’m interested in and chances are, if you made it onto this website, you are interested in those topics as well. As you will see below, that’s how the list is organized. 

At the end of the day, books are a great value. Even if you only get one piece of quality information out of a book, it’s well worth the small investment.

It’s important to note, don’t just read the books to see how many you can get under your belt. Thats a mistake I made in the past. Really focus on learning and more importantly implementing what you read. Take notes. Highlight. Read pages over again. Don’t even be afraid to read a great book a second time, a year or two later. If you have already read one or more of the books I listed below, I suggest going back in and taking a second look. This time you will be reading the book with all of the new knowledge you have gained in the time since you first read it. 

Bookmark this page, I plan to update it each year, adding one book of value. So, next year the title will be changed to “20 Books You Should Read in 2020”. Enjoy!

*All of the titles are clickable. 

Fitness / Nutrition 1. Becoming a Supple Leopard

Kelly Starrett is a big time trend setter in the fitness industry. If you see anyone using a lacrosse ball for soft tissue work, stretching with bands, or even using the word “mobility” in a conversation, chances are it can be traced back to Kelly. This is the best book for mobility and soft tissue work I know of. (If you know of a better one, let me know!) 

Becoming a Supple Leopard is a valuable book to have on your shelf if you are a coach, athlete, or anyone who takes their training seriously. You can read it straight through to get the full understanding of how everything is related, or, you can just use it as a reference and browse the different sections as needed.

If you are looking for more mobility information, or it presented in a follow along format, check out the Daily MWOD subscription at  https://www.mobilitywod.com/

2. Jim Wendler’s 5/3/1 Books

Jim has written 4 or 5 books now and they are all great. 5/3/1 Forever is his most recent and is filled with different programming options. My favorite is still the second edition to the original 5/3/1 book. 

What makes these books so great is not even the programs. The true value comes in Jim’s simple and effective approach to explaining things. 

It’s wild this even has to be said, but sometimes what people need is less information. Sometimes you just need to simplify things to make progress. I think that is one of the key reasons why the 5/3/1 program became so popular when it came out 10 years ago. It gave people a basic plan to follow with structure they could understood. 

After being a big fan of Jim’s for so long, it’s still crazy to me I had the opportunity to sit down with him for two podcasts. Here is a short clip from our first episode. 

Why We Train feat. Jim Wendler - YouTube
3. Triphasic Training

Although Triphasic Training is more geared toward sports performance, there is information in here that can benefit anyone in the weight room. 

Cal Dietz is the strength and conditioning coach at the University of Minnesota, where he has worked with 1,000s of athletes fine tuning his system. 

This book provides a lot of quality information in an easy to understand way. There is no other book I know of that talks about tempo work in as much detail as Triphasic Training. The entire system is about breaking down athletic movements into their three components – eccentric, isometric, and concentric. If you want to learn how and why to implement isometric/paused work, along with various other methods on how to maximize strength, speed, and power, this is the book.

I took a ton of notes the first time I read this book.

  4. The Muscle and Strength Pyramids – Nutrition and Training

This is technically a two book set. If I could only recommend one training and one nutrition book for you to read, it would most likely be these. 

Eric and the crew did a great job putting a ton of well rounded, evidence-based recommendations in these books. They also distilled and clearly explained everything without including much, if any “fluff”. 

With all of the information available today, it’s easy to overthink things and start to put an emphasis on stuff that doesn’t really matter. Not everything we do in the gym and in the kitchen deserves the same amount of attention. These books do a good job pointing out what’s important, and what’s not. Also, the second editions just came out with new/updated info. 

5. Never Let Go

Flat out, I love this book. I have read it multiple times and each time, I take something different from it. 

In my opinion, as a coach it’s important to be well rounded. You need to read the science/evidence based material but you also need to read stuff from the non science crowd as well. There is a benefit to not always sticking 100% to what the research says. Even the researchers will tell you, some material is just not heavily studied yet.

We have a group of individuals in the fitness industry who speak like they are veteran researchers and/or strength coaches without ever stepping foot in a lab or coaching more than a handful of people. There really is no substitute for experience. It almost takes an abundance of experience to truly respect the value of it. 

Never Let Go is more than a training book.  It’s a book filled with stories from decades in the strength world. As the cover says, it’s a philosophy of lifting, living, and learning. 

6. The New Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding

This book is on the list purely out of nostalgia. I must have flipped through this book 1,000 times in my teen years and I am not even exaggerating. I still remember the day I bought it. I picked up this 700+ page tome at a Walden Books Store in the Arnot Mall in Big Flats, New York. As a side note, remember when Walden Books was in every mall?

The pictures and stories are incredible. This is an old school book. Don’t read this expecting to learn any science or new training/nutrition information. Almost everything is outdated but you should read this book for inspiration, not so much information. If you don’t get fired up to train after looking at all of the black and white pictures of the old school bodybuilders, this lifting weights thing might not be for you. 

However, if you want to do some crazy high volume lifting, check out the double split (a.m/p.m) 6 day per week “Advanced Bodybuilding” routine.

Also worth reading from Arnold, The Education of a Bodybuilder

7. Sleep by Nick Littlehales

Sleep. It’s one thing that does not get enough attention in the fitness space. Typically people just say the blanket statements like get 7-8 hours per night without really breaking it down and explaining why. 

This is a great book, written by an elite sports sleep coach (yes, that’s a real thing). In the book, Nick goes over what you need to do in order to get better sleep. If you are serious about your performance, dialing in your sleep is a must. 

This was a fun read that was easy to understand and follow along. This is another book I took a ton of notes on. 

8. Scientific Principles of Strength Training

This is probably the most in depth and well-rounded book on powerlifting programming there is. If you are a powerlifter and want to learn more about programming variables – specificity, volume, intensity, fatigue management, variation, etc. this is the book. 

However, this is a 371 page gauntlet. It’s not a quick read if you want to understand everything. When I said it’s in depth, I meant it. 

Overall, this is not a difficult read. It’s long, but not difficult.  This is one book where you undoubtedly will want to take notes and read more than once. The second time you read it, you will probably take more out of it.  

9. Discipline Equals Freedom Field Manual

Ok, this book is probably the most unique on the fitness/nutrition list, that’s why I saved it for last. 

The training information is basically CrossFit style programming. The workouts are actually pretty cool the way he sets them up if you are into that style of training. 

However, this book did not make the list based on Jocko’s training or nutrition recommendations. Discipline Equals Freedom made the list based on the first part of the book titled, “Thoughts”. This section will figuratively punch you in the face. Be ready. Discipline might be the single biggest factor of success. Success in the gym. Success at school. Success in business Success in life.

There is no shortcut. There is no hack. There’s only one way, so get after it.

Personal Development / Business 10. The Last Safe Investment

If you listen to my podcast, you know I bring this book up a lot. In terms of personal development, this is by far my favorite. If I had to pick just one book from the personal development list for you to read, it’s this one.

If you want to get ahead and enjoy a life of prosperity, you must invest in the last safe investment: yourself, and your own skills, value to others, relationships, and overall happiness. 

In this day and age, we can accomplish anything. We have the ability to learn, create, and build like never before. The only thing holding us back is ourselves. 

This book is all about discarding traditional advice and focusing on ways to build true wealth based on things that matter to you. Invest in yourself, buy books, learn new skills, meet new people, spend money on experiences, and hire the best coaches. Spend money to create a better you and everything else will fall in line. 

Also worth reading from Michael Ellsberg, Education of Millionaires

11. How to Win Friends and Influence People

It doesn’t matter what you do for a living, improving your ability to build relationships is going to make you more successful. 

I have this book on audio and I make it a point to listen to it at least once per year. Every time I hear it, I am reminded of something I either forgot or have been slacking on. This is a classic. It’s an old book, first written in 1936. Some of the content is outdated but most of it is timeless. 

12. Living with a Seal

This book doesn’t really have a category but it’s a great book so I had to include it. The book is written by entrepreneur Jesse Itzler. He is a unique dude that will try almost anything. His entire life has been about bold moves and being risky. So, when he felt himself getting comfortable, he decided to hire an unconventional “trainer” to live with him for a month. The guy he hired was a former Navy Seal, who is now widely known as one of the worlds most bad ass people. 

What’s crazy is at the time, no one really knew who this Navy Seal was (the cover photo is not actually him). He didn’t have much notoriety. In fact, his name isn’t even mentioned in the book. So, who was the former Navy Seal Jesse hired to train him for a month? None other than David Goggins.

13. The One Thing

I debated between The One Thing and Essentialism. They are both great books, but decided to go with this one simply because I enjoyed reading it more.

There is a big difference between just being busy and being productive. We always want more – more productivity, more attention, more friends, more work, but sometimes what we need is less. 

We need fewer distractions. The barrage of emails, texts, calls, social media notifications, etc. distract us from our most important work. We are so “busy” that we can’t even be productive. 

This book will help you cut through the clutter, be more efficient, and focus on what’s most important.

14. The War of Art 

This is not to be confused with the Art of War lol. 

The War of Art is another book I have on audio. A quick side note, I actually don’t listen to a lot of audio books. For the most part, I like to actually read my books and save audio content for..

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Listen on iTunes Listen on Stitcher Listen on Google Play

In this episode, I answer common training and nutrition questions. The questions I go over on the show – How to increase bench press arch. Training priorities to focus on. Nutrition priorities to focus on. How to prioritize conditioning or Metcons while on a strength program. Should you avoid “trigger” foods while dieting? Training around injuries. Cheat Meals vs. Refeeds. My real thoughts on the Vertical Diet

Hire Kyle as your coach: https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/services/

 

Connect with Kyle: 

Instagram: @huntfitness

YouTube: @HuntFitnessTV

DesignCrowd: Absolute Strength listeners receive up to $100 off their design project at https://www.designcrowd.com/strength or enter promo code STRENGTH

Take your mobility to the next level with a Mobility Wod Subscription

DISCOUNT CODE: “Kyle15” at http://bit.ly/MWODkyle

*Or just get 10 days FREE to try it out.

The Previous 10 Absolute Strength Episodes:

Episode 131: Don’t Underestimate Yourself and Overestimate the Competition

Episode 132: Discussing Training with 93kg Powerlifter and Natural Pro Bodybuilder Brian Minor

Episode 133: The “OG” Giant Killer IFBB Pro David Henry

Episode 134: Dr. Mike Israetel on BJJ, Wrestling, and MMA 

Episode 135: Catching Up and Telling Stories with Jordan Syatt

Episode 136: Dr. Andy Galpin on Understanding and Implementing Research 

Episode 137: Ryan Fischer on his Crazy Rise to Success 

Episode 138: Eat, Sleep, Mate, Defend with the Creator of 5/3/1 Jim Wendler

Episode 139: Conditioning for Strength Athlete with Alex Viada 

Episode 140: Facts and Fallacies of Cutting Weight with Dr. Mike Israetel 

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In this episode, I sit down with Derek Charlebois. Derek is the founder/formulator of PR Breaker Supplements. We talk about a wide range of topics that go beyond the basic X’s and O’s of training. Sit back, relax and enjoy!

Hire Kyle as your coach: https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/services/

Connect with Derek: 

https://www.prbreaker.com/

Instagram: @derekcharlebois

Connect with Kyle: 

https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/

Instagram: @huntfitness

YouTube: @HuntFitnessTV

Get Strong Now with the Absolute Strength Powerlifting Program:

https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/absolute-strength/

The Previous 10 Absolute Strength Episodes:

Episode 117: A Talk on Success with Entrepreneur Noah Kagan 

Episode 118: Buffalo Bills Linebacker Lorenzo Alexander

Episode 119: Dr. Shawn Baker on the All Meat Carnivore Diet

Episode 120: Bryce Meredith 3x All American Wrestler from Wyoming

Episode 121: Fat Loss Diet Hacks – Protein, Fiber, and Intermittent Fasting 

Episode 122: Intermittent Fasting, Dealing with a Slow Metabolism, and the Info I Wish I Knew When I Started

Episode 123: Jason Khalipa on Winning the CrossFit Games and Living with an AMRAP Mentality 

Episode 124: Stan Efferding on the Vertical Diet

Episode 125: 83kg USAPL/IPA Powerlifter Charlie Dickson

Episode 126: Former UFC Fighter Kyle Kingsbury

Who do you want to see in an upcoming Absolute Strength Podcast episode? Or better yet, do you have a question or topic you want to be covered on the show? 

Sign up for the newsletter below!

Or shoot me an email –> KyleHuntFitness@gmail.com

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In this episode, I sit down with Stan Efferding and go over the components in his Vertical Diet. Stan is really well known in the bodybuilding, powerlifting and even strongman world. Stan is one of the rare people in history, who have managed to become a pro bodybuilder while hitting world record powerlifting numbers. Now he helps Worlds Strongest Man competitors Brian Shawn and Thor with their nutrition. Sit back, relax and enjoy!

Hire Kyle as your coach: https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/services/

 

Connect with Stan: 

https://thekooler.com/

Instagram:@StanEfferding

Connect with Kyle: 

Instagram: @huntfitness

YouTube: @HuntFitnessTV

Get Strong Now with the Absolute Strength Powerlifting Program:

https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/absolute-strength/

The Previous 10 Absolute Strength Episodes:

Episode 114: A Talk on Mental Health with Ian McCarthy

Episode 115: Going All In with Nutrition Coach Jason Phillips

Episode 116: How to Improve Performance with Technology 

Episode 117: A Talk on Success with Entrepreneur Noah Kagan 

Episode 118: Buffalo Bills Linebacker Lorenzo Alexander

Episode 119: Dr. Shawn Baker on the All Meat Carnivore Diet

Episode 120: Bryce Meredith 3x All American Wrestler from Wyoming

Episode 121: Fat Loss Diet Hacks – Protein, Fiber, and Intermittent Fasting 

Episode 122: Intermittent Fasting, Dealing with a Slow Metabolism, and the Info I Wish I Knew When I Started

Episode 123: Jason Khalipa on Winning the CrossFit Games and Living with an AMRAP Mentality 

Who do you want to see in an upcoming Absolute Strength Podcast episode? Or better yet, do you have a question or topic you want to be covered on the show? 

Sign up for the newsletter below!

Or shoot me an email –> KyleHuntFitness@gmail.com

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Listen to the show here: 
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In this episode, I sit down with CrossFit Games athlete Marcus Filly. Marcus is a 6x CrossFit Games competitor, owner of Revival Strength and creator of Functional Bodybuilding. Sit back, relax and enjoy.

Hire Kyle as your coach: https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/services/

  

Connect with Marcus: 

https://revival-strength.com/

Instagram: @MarcusFilly

Connect with Kyle: 

Instagram: @huntfitness

YouTube: @HuntFitnessTV

Get Strong Now with the Absolute Strength Powerlifting Program:

https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/absolute-strength/

Absolute Strength is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health-conscious people like weightlifters get lower rates on their life insurance. To see if you qualify, get your free quote today at healthiq.com/absolutestrength or mention the promo code ABSOLUTE STRENGTH when you talk to a Health IQ agent.

 

The Previous 10 Absolute Strength Episodes:

Episode 102: Matt Gary on Game Day Powerlifting Coaching and Attempt Selection 

Episode 103: Training to Dominate on the Mat with Dustin Myers

Episode 104: Discipline Equals Freedom + Q&A

Episode 105: Matt Wenning on Unique Powerlifting Techniques, Meet Prep, Sleep, and Warming Up

Episode 106: Alyssa Rose on Living the Life of a Bikini Competitor 

Episode 107: USAPL Powerlifter Collin Whitney

Episode 108: Strength and Conditioning Coach Ron McKeefery 

Episode 109: Building 7 Figure Fitness Companies with Vince Del Monte

Episode 110: Winning the Game of Life with Luka Hocevar

Episode 111: How to Create a Name in the Fitness Industry with Matt McLeod

Who do you want to see in an upcoming Absolute Strength Podcast episode? Or better yet, do you have a question or topic you want to be covered on the show? 

Sign up for the newsletter below!

Or shoot me an email –> KyleHuntFitness@gmail.com

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Listen to the show here: 
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In this episode, I sit down with Alyssa Logrande. We had a fascinating discussion about overcoming adversity, dealing with bad fitness coaches, the struggles of a first-time bikini competitor, how to pick up girls on Instagram and more!

Hire Kyle as your coach: https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/services/

  

Connect with Alyssa: 

Instagram: @AlyssaRose_Fit

YouTube: @AlyssaRoseLogrande

Connect with Kyle: 

Instagram: @huntfitness

YouTube: @HuntFitnessTV

Get Strong Now with the Absolute Strength Powerlifting Program:

https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/absolute-strength/

Absolute Strength is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health-conscious people like weightlifters get lower rates on their life insurance. To see if you qualify, get your free quote today at healthiq.com/absolutestrength or mention the promo code ABSOLUTE STRENGTH when you talk to a Health IQ agent.

The Previous 10 Absolute Strength Episodes:

Episode 96: How to Make 2018 the Best Year Ever

Episode 97: Bulk Up Fast with Alain Gonzalez

Episode 98: Bodybuilding Prep Coach Cliff Wilson

Episode 99: Jesse Norris The Powerlifting Phenom

Episode 100: Stefi Cohen on Becoming the Strongest Women Alive

Episode 101: Bigger Leaner Stronger with Mike Matthews

Episode 102: Matt Gary on Game Day Powerlifting Coaching and Attempt Selection 

Episode 103: Training to Dominate on the Mat with Dustin Myers

Episode 104: Discipline Equals Freedom + Q&A

Episode 105: Matt Wenning on Unique Powerlifting Techniques, Meet Prep, Sleep, and Warming Up

Who do you want to see in an upcoming Absolute Strength Podcast episode? Or better yet, do you have a question or topic you want to be covered on the show? 

Sign up for the newsletter below!

Or shoot me an email –> KyleHuntFitness@gmail.com

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Listen to the show here: 
Listen on iTunes Listen on Stitcher Listen on Google Play

In this episode, I talk about the book “Discipline Equals Freedom” and answer 4 big nutrition/training questions.

Sit back, relax and enjoy!

Questions: 

1- What are some of the best protein, carb and fat sources?

2- How often do you need to de-load?

3- Can you build muscle and lose fat at the same time?

4- Do I recommend mass gainers?

Hire Kyle as your coach: https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/services/

 

Connect with Kyle: 

Instagram: @huntfitness

YouTube: @HuntFitnessTV

Get Strong Now with the Absolute Strength Powerlifting Program:

https://www.kylehuntfitness.com/absolute-strength/

Absolute Strength is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health-conscious people like weightlifters get lower rates on their life insurance. To see if you qualify, get your free quote today at healthiq.com/absolutestrength or mention the promo code ABSOLUTE STRENGTH when you talk to a Health IQ agent.

The Previous 10 Absolute Strength Episodes:

Episode 94: Craig Ballantyne on the Perfect Day Formula

Episode 95: Bret “Glute Guy” Contreras on the Science of Building Muscle and Strength

Episode 96: How to Make 2018 the Best Year Ever

Episode 97: Bulk Up Fast with Alain Gonzalez

Episode 98: Bodybuilding Prep Coach Cliff Wilson

Episode 99: Jesse Norris The Powerlifting Phenom

Episode 100: Stefi Cohen on Becoming the Strongest Women Alive

Episode 101: Bigger Leaner Stronger with Mike Matthews

Episode 102: Matt Gary on Game Day Powerlifting Coaching and Attempt Selection 

Episode 103: Training to Dominate on the Mat with Dustin Myers

Who do you want to see in an upcoming Absolute Strength Podcast episode? Or better yet, do you have a question or topic you want to be covered on the show? 

Sign up for the newsletter below!

Or shoot me an email –> KyleHuntFitness@gmail.com

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