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Kidney disease is a chronic disease spreading at an alarming rate. Statistics show that it is increasing every year at a rate of six to eight percent. Chronic kidney disease is a chronic and progressive disease. The most challenging part of this disease is to have it diagnosed in time to seek a professional advice.

It may take years for the damage to become noticeable. It also known as a silent killer. Chronic kidney disease goes through several stages, with the final stage being end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), also referred as end-stage renal failure (ESRD).

The main cause of this disease is type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Having both can cause a serious damage to the kidneys. The damage to the nephrons is slow and in the early stages does not cause any symptoms.

In some cases, it could be sudden, occurring due to an infection, injury or toxin ingestion.

When the nephrons are damaged, they lose their effectiveness as blood filters and the body is no longer able to get rid of waste products, toxins and water on its own. This starts to build up in the blood.

The buildup of water and waste products called uremia and it causes swelling in hands and feet and fatigue. Untreated uremia could cause loss of mental function, seizure or even coma or death.

Improper kidney function can also cause several other problems. For instance, not regulate blood pressure or essential metabolites and nutrients in the body.

One of the most common consequences of kidney damage is cardiovascular disease. In fact, eventually, most people with kidney damage die because of heart disease. Kidney damage causes fluid to build up in the lining around the heart causing pericardial disease, which is also a common consequence of diabetes.

Because kidney disease does not have symptoms in the early stages, it is important to get annual checkups. A urine test is often the first method that spots the signs of kidney damage, by detecting excess protein in the urine.

If caught early, kidney disease is very treatable. Treatment can help to stop the disease from progressing and causing further damage to your kidneys.

The use of natural remedies in cases of kidney damage can be very effective. Herbs and nutrients have shown to both treat the cause of kidney damage and even reverse kidney damage. When combined with the correct diet and lifestyle changes, the use of natural remedies means that kidney damage does not have to be progressive.

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Gout can have many different factors and here are a few different reasons:

  • An elevated serum urate concentration
  • Recurrent attacks of acute arthritis in which Monosodium Urate (MSU) crystals are in synovial fluid
  • Aggregates of MSU crystals (tophi) deposited in & around joints leading to deformity & crippling
  • Renal disease involving glomerular, tubular, interstitial tissue & blood vessels or kidney failure
  • Uric acid nephrolithiasis or kidney stones

Gout: Who are affected?

Typically, gout patients are about 95% men, 5% women.

  • Gout is nine times more common in men than in women
  • It predominantly attacks males after puberty, with a peak age of 75. In women, gout attacks usually occur after menopause.

Gout: What are the causes?

When the level of uric acid increases, due to the inability of kidneys to pass it off to bladder, it starts accumulating in the blood in different parts of body like joints, knees, etc. This excess amount of uric acid forms tiny thin crystals in different parts of body especially in the joints, ankles, etc.

  • Obesity, excessive weight gain (especially in youth),
  • Moderate to heavy alcohol intake
  • High blood pressure
  • Unhealthy eating habit, especially junk food
  • High protein-rich food
  • Fructose in corn syrup found in soft drinks
  • Abnormal kidney function.
  • Nose or throat disease
  • Heredity or genetic causes
  • People who does not wear comfortable shoes and in improper way suffer from gouts. In patients at risk of developing gout, certain conditions can precipitate acute attacks of gout. These conditions include:
  • Dehydration
  • Injury to the joint
  • Fever
  • Recent surgery
  • Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics (hydrochlorothiazide [Dyazide]), low-dose aspirin, niacin, cyclosporine, tuberculosis medications (pyrazinamide and ethambutol), and others can cause elevated uric acid levels in the blood and lead to gout.
  • Certain diseases lead to excessive production of uric acid in the body. Examples of these diseases include leukemia, lymphomas, and hemoglobin disorders.

Gout: What are the symptoms?

  • Severe pain in joints, knees, toe, etc. followed by warmth, swelling, reddish discoloration, and marked tenderness.
  • Gout generally, attacks patient late night or early morning.
  • The small joint at the base of the big toe is the most common site of an acute gout attack of arthritis (podagra)
  • Tenderness can be intense so that even a blanket touching the skin over the affected joint can be unbearable.
  • Patients can develop fever with the acute gout attacks.
  • These painful attacks usually subside in hours to days, with or without medication. In rare instances, an attack can last for weeks.
  • Most patients with gout will experience repeated attacks of arthritis over the years.
  • Other symptoms include, loss of appetite and sleep, also suffer from kidney stone. In acute cases, kidney sometimes completely fails.

Gout: How to diagnose?

  • The most reliable test for gout is finding uric acid crystals in a sample of the joint fluid obtained by joint aspiration (arthrocentesis).

X-rays can sometimes be helpful and may show tophi-crystal deposits and bone damage because of repeated bouts of inflammation. X-rays can also be helpful for monitoring the effects of chronic gout on the joints.

Gout: What are the treatments?

There are two key concepts essential to treating gout. First, it is critical to stop the acute inflammation of joints affected by gouty arthritis. Second, it is important to address the long-term management of the disease in order to prevent future gouty arthritis attacks and shrink gouty tophi crystal deposits in the tissues. The treatment of an acute attack of gouty arthritis involves measures and medications that reduce inflammation. Preventing future acute gout attacks is equally as important as treating the acute arthritis. Prevention of acute gout involves maintaining adequate fluid intake, weight reduction, dietary changes, reduction in alcohol consumption, and medications to lower the uric acid level in the blood (reduce hyperuricemia).

Gout: How can it be prevented?

  • Prevention of gout includes maintaining adequate fluid intake and reducing alcohol consumption. Alcohol has two major effects that worsen gout by impeding (slowing down) the excretion of uric acid from the kidneys as well as by causing dehydration, both of which contribute to the precipitation of uric acid crystals in the joints • Additional prevention methods include weight reduction and dietary changes.
  • Weight reduction can be helpful in lowering the risk of recurrent attacks of gout. This is best accomplished by reducing dietary fat and calorie intake, combined with a regular aerobic exercise program.
  • Medical treatment includes pain relievers such as Tylenol, anti-inflammatory medicines, and other medicines specific for gout medications.

Gout: How can diet help?

Dietary changes can help reduce uric acid levels in the blood. Meat or seafood consumption increases the risk of gout attacks; while dairy food consumption seemed to reduce the risk. Balance diet is very important to keep a healthy body

. • Patient suffering from gout should survive on orange juice for a week. During this period, orange juice diluted in water 2-3 times a day is suggested.

  • Once this period is over, patient should slowly start having other fruits like apple, banana, etc.
  • Once patient start showing improvement, he/she should be given proper balanced diet rich in green vegetables, fruits, whole wheat grain, etc.
  • Junk foods, protein-rich food like mutton, egg, etc. should be avoided.
  • Purine-rich foods should be avoided. Examples of foods rich in purines include shellfish and organ meats such as liver, brains, kidneys, and sweetbreads.
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High blood pressure is one of the most common health problems in the developed world. It’s also one of the most mysterious. In fact, it is often called the silent killer for its ability to strike people dead (in the most extreme cases) without showing any previous symptoms at all. But more often than not, people suffering from high blood pressure exhibit subtle symptoms of it but they often disregard them as something not serious. For this reason they may fail to see a doctor who would have easily diagnosed the condition with the most basic checkup.

It is therefore a good idea to pay attention to any signs of high blood pressure and to take them seriously. But how does one determine that they indeed are suffering from elevated blood pressure? What are the symptoms to look out for?

1. Headaches

Headaches can be an indication of high blood pressure but because they can also be due to many other things such as stress or anxiety many people don’t take them seriously, even if headaches sometimes become extremely painful.

Most of the early warning signs of high blood pressure, such as headaches, can be easily related to the condition: think of the old headache commercials on TV showing a head between a vice… that’s high blood pressure!

2. Fatigue, dizziness or confusion

How could hypertension cause these symptoms? Again, think of the physiology. If you rise quickly and your blood vessels are narrowed (a common feature of high blood pressure) you may not get sufficient blood to your brain, hence the dizziness. Confusion has related causes.

3. Blurred vision

A related symptom, which may often give you an earlier tip-off than blurred vision is sensitivity or tenderness of the eyes to touch. This happens because high blood pressure also increases the pressure within the eyes. This can make them sensitive to touch and, at a later stage, slight distortion of the eyeball due to pressure can actually affect your vision.

4. Noise or buzzing in the ears

This is caused by internal pressure in the ears in a similar way as that which causes vision disturbances.

5. Chest pain and/or nosebleeds

These final symptoms are obvious and alarming. You should consider them advanced warning signs that your blood pressure may be seriously elevated.

All of these symptoms can have many different causes, not just hypertension, and many of them are harmless, but it’s always better to be safe than sorry. This is especially true if you begin to notice more than just one or two. The more symptoms you have the stronger the picture that starts to emerge.

Even if you have just one vague symptom or an inner suspicion that you may have high blood pressure it makes good sense to at least get your blood pressure checked. And remember that it’s true that most instances of high blood pressure show no symptoms at all. This is another reason for regular checkups. If left untreated hypertension can lead to other more serious health problems and even sudden death in extreme cases.

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Eating what is in season is more affordable and supports healthy digestion. This will result in better sleep, mental clarity, calmness, and robust immune system.

Ayurveda acknowledges that nature’s harvest provides and antidote to the dominant qualities of each season.

Understanding the qualities of each season can help you reduce any adverse health effects. Ayurveda divide seasons into three categories instead of four. Vata, Pitta and Kapha.

Vata Season (Air and Space): This season is associated with late fall and early winter. The weather turns cold, windy and earth becomes dry. This will effect respiration, circulation, muscular action, chewing, blinking etc. you also need to watch out for dry skin, irregular digestion and unpredictable energy depletion.

Suggested Diet:

  • Emphasize on Sweet, Sour and Salty
  • Eat fresh, warm and well-cooked meals
  • Drink many warming liquids to prevent dehydration. This can include hot herbal teas
  • Eat Avocados, bananas, root vegetables, milk, ghee, fresh yogurt, eggs, nuts, seeds and lean meats
  • Favor additions like squeeze of lemon or lime juice, a splash of vinegar, a cheese slice or sour cream
  • Green grapes, oranges, pineapple and grapefruit are also helpful
  • Salt stimulates the appetite and digestion. It is a good idea to use sea salt or natural mineral salt over the common table salt.

Minimize:

  • Minimize Pungent, Bitter and Astringent
  • Chilies, radishes, turnips, raw onions
  • Kale, bitter melon, burdock roots, eggplant and chocolate
  • Keep your internal fire kindled. Eat warm, moist foods like, stews, soups and avoid salads and cold snacks.

Kapha Season (Water and Earth): This season extends from winter days to early spring.

Suggested Diet:

  • Here we switch to Pungent, Bitter and Astringent
  • Use spices like turmeric, garlic, cinnamon, cumin, cardamom, ginger
  • Apples, Cherries, lemons, peaches, pears, cranberries
  • Artichoke, asparagus, beets, bitter melon, cabbage, carrots, celery, eggplant, kale, lettuce etc.

Minimize:

  • Minimize sweet, sour and salty
  • Avoid bananas, cantaloupe, coconut, grapes, grapefruit, kiwi, oranges, papaya, watermelon etc.
  • Avoid zucchini, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, avocado, cucumber

Pitta Season (Fire and Water):  This season extends from spring to autumn. This dosa is pacified with astringent, bitter and sweet tastes while salty, sour and pungent tastes aggravate it. When you understand such tastes, you can make better food choices.

Suggested Diet:

  • Try to have a combination of carbohydrate-rich, grounding, cooling and fresh foods.
  • Prefer having cool foods over hot or warm foods.
  • Light and nourishing foods should be preferred over heavy or dense foods.
  • Have dry food items over liquid.
  • Fresh juices and other mild drinks are more preferable over caffeine based or alcohol based drinks.
  • Focus on sweet foods such as fresh yogurt, ghee, root vegetables, squashes etc.
  • Bitter tasting foods such as dark chocolate, Jerusalem artichokes, bitter melon and spices such as turmeric, saffron, neem leaves and cumin should be consumed.
  • Astringent foods are preferable, given that these can curb the tendency of the pitta to absorb excess fluid and sweat, prevent diarrhea, avoid bleeding disorders, tone tissues and curb pitta from spreading.

Minimize:

  • Avoid having too much sugary sweet foods or refined sugar. Try to eat foods that are naturally sweet.
  • Minimize pungent foods such as raw onions, turnips, radishes, chilies and particularly spices of a heating nature, as excessive pungent taste can lead to inflammation, dizziness, bleeding etc.
  • Avoid sour foods such as grapefruit, pineapple, green grapes, sour cream, hard cheeses etc that can disturb the blood, cause burning sensations in heart, lead to pus in wounds etc.
  • Avoid having too salty foods as these can disturb the balance of blood, aggravate the skin, raise heat and more.

In Ayurveda, a year is divided into 3 seasons depending on the doshas or the elemental forces that are predominant. Kapha, Pitta, and Vata are the 3 doshas that display the 5 elements in varied amounts:

  • Earth
  • Water
  • Fire
  • Air
  • Space

Once the doshas are balanced, a condition that is known as “Sattva”, one can enjoy optimal health. According to Ayurveda, the ancient Indian medical treatise, an imbalance of any element or in any particular area, can be corrected by application of the opposite. It always recommends a counterbalancing approach in life in order to prevent any imbalance – such as balancing warmth with cold and vice versa. Ayurveda has a sloka (writing) that mentions “A Food is a Medicine When Consumed Properly”. When foods that are suited uniquely to individual psychology are consumed, and a lifestyle based on sattva is supported, digestion is improved and there is full benefit for health.

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Kidney patients often have to deal with water retention, causing swelling or puffiness of the tissue especially in legs, arms or under the eyes.

A quick test to see if you have water retention is to press the affected area for a few seconds and see if the skin retains a dimple. Other symptoms may include:

  • Shortness of breath (especially when lying down)
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Chest pain

These conditions may require immediate attention. In many cases, your doctor may prescribe you a diuretic, also known as water pills.

As our body is made-up of almost 80 percentage of water, kidneys play an important role in the health of our body.

The kidneys and the adrenal glands are responsible for cleansing the blood, produce needed hormones, and regulate blood pressure and mineral balance.

If left untreated, edema can cause:

  • Stiffness
  • Increased risk of skin ulcers
  • Painful swelling
  • Risk of infection
  • Decreased blood circulation
  • High blood pressure

If you are healthy, it may be possible to try home remedies to address edema however, if you are a kidney patient, it is not a good idea to try things that may cause more damage to the kidneys then offering any good. It is essential to consultant a professional to address this issue.

At Kundan Kidney Care Centre we can help you understand the cause and remedy for edema.

We offer safe and natural treatment for kidney disease. Please contact us via phone or email to ask questions about your kidney health.

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If you have ever had a kidney stone you know the experience can be extremely unpleasant.  Did you know that over the course of lifetime, one in ten people will have a kidney stone?

If your doctor suspects you have a kidney stone, you may be asked to have diagnostic tests done.

  1. Blood Testing: Too much calcium or uric acid in your blood could be of concern. Blood test may also help monitor the health of your kidneys.
  2. Urine Testing: A 24 Hour urine collection test may reveal that you are exreting too many stone forming minerals.
  3. Ultra-sound Scanning: Imaging tests may show kidney stones in your urinary tract.
  4. Passed Stones Analysis: Your passed stone may reveal the makeup of your kidney stones.

Prevention of kidney stones may include a combination of lifestyle changes and medication.

Drink Fluid: People with the history of kidney stones are recommended to drink about 2.5 liters of water per day. If you live in a hot dry climate and sweat a lot then you may need to drink even more water so that you produce enough urine. A light and clear urine indicate that you are drinking enough water.

Oxalate-Rich Foods: Your doctor may ask you to prevent oxalate rich foods. Cutting oxalate rich food may sound logical but this  may not be smart for an overall health perspective. Eat and drink calcium and oxalate rich foods together during a meal. Doing so, they are more likely to bind in the stomach and intestines before they kidneys begin processing.

Diet Selection: Reduce the amount of salt and choose non-animal protein sources. Consider using a salt substitute such as herbs or spices.

Manage underlying Medical Problems: Some medical conditions like obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes can raise your risk for kidney stones.

Treatment may be required if the diet and drinking water does not work. Consult us for further information. There are herbal and safer ways to address this problem.

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Patients with kidney disease need to be careful about their food choices to avoid excess wastes and fluid from building up. With the progression of the disease, the dietary needs may vary. The intent of doing this is to

• reduce the workload of kidneys
• preserve the kidney function that is left

It will be important for you to understand how to eat well and how to get the right amount of protein, minerals to maintain a healthy weight and manage your fluid balance.

The goal is to delay the onset for the need of dialysis, minimizing failing kidney symptoms such as uremia and maintaining an optimal health.

General Diet Guidelines:

1. Protein: Protein needs for a kidney patient in not requiring dialysis would be less than those having dialysis. In the early stages of CKD, the kidneys are still able to work however, need to work much harder to remove all the waste. Consuming food rich in protein may lead to overworked kidneys causing more damage to the kidneys.
Eating less Protein helps to preserve kidney function and prevent additional damage to the kidneys.

To calculate the recommended intake of protein, you can multiple your weight with 0.8gms/kilogram.

e.g. A person weighing 52 kg will require 52 x 0.8 = 42gms of protein/day

2. Potassium: It is important to check your blood report to see if your potassium is beyond the range. An optimal potassium range is 3.5 – 5.0 mg/dl
if the reading shows high potassium, avoid the following food items:

• wholegrain cereals, bread and biscuits
• fruits and vegetables from the high potassium group e.g. banana
• canned fruits and vegetable, juices, milk, wine
• nuts, seeds

3. Sodium: The main source of sodium is salt. This should be avoided regardless of the kidney disease. Salt is found in almost all the packaged and processed foods.

Salt makes to feel thirsty which will result in drinking more fluid. Sodium restriction in kidney disease helps to maintain normal fluid balance.

4. Phosphorus: With the lack of kidney function, blood phosphate level may also rise. When it begins to build up in the blood, calcium is drawn from the bone. This may lead to joint pain, eye irritation, itchiness and hardening blood vessels.

Here is a list of food rich in phosphorus:

• dairy products
• dark sodas
• nuts and peanut butter
• beer
• legumes
• organ meats

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Your doctor may suggest different tests bases on your stage of kidney disease. These tests can help you measure the kidney function and also to see if the treatment you are receiving is effective. Below is an overview of some of the most common tests your doctor may request for you. It is possible that your Nephrologist may suggest more or less blood and urine tests.

Serum Creatinine: The purpose of this test is to determine how much creatinine is in the bloodstream. This test is performed throughout the early and later stages of chronic kidney disease. The normal range for this test is .8 to 1.4 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl)

GFR (Glomerular Filtration Rate): The purpose of this test is to determine how much kidney function a  person has. The normal range for this test is 90+ with little or no protein or albumin in urine. This test is a calculation based on your creatinine level, age, race, gender and a few other factors.

Microalbumin: The purpose of this test is to detect a protein called albumin in the urine that may indicate kidney damage. There should be almost no albumin present in the urine. This test is done to detect early stage of chronic kidney disease for people with diabetes and hypertension.

BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen): This blood test is suggested to detect elevated level of waste in the bloodstream. This can confirm the early sign of reduced kidney function. The normal range for this test is 7 to 20 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl)

Hb (Hemoglobin): This blood test will determine the amount of hemoglobin in red blood cells and screen for anemia. The normal range in adult for Hb is 12 to 18. This test is done throughout the early and later stages of Chronic Kidney Disease.

Blood Electrolytes (Sodium, Potassium, Calcium, Phosphorus): This blood test help measure the levels of electrolytes in the body that help move nutrients and waste in and out of the cells. The normal ranges are as follow:

  • Sodium              – 135 – 145mEq/L
  • Potassium         – 3.5 – 5.0mEq/L
  • Calcium             – 8.5 – 10.5mg/DL
  • Phosphorus      – 3.5 – 4.5mg/DL

Blood Electrolyte test are critical in determining the renal diet for the patient.

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Potassium is necessary even in kidney disease. Moreover, you need not run down the hills if a certain food has high potassium levels. Eating a well balanced diet full of fruits and vegetables is essential when you have any kidney disease. The natural kidney disease treatment along with right intake of potassium will help in curing this life threatening problem.

What Is Potassium?

Potassium is a mineral that helps keep the right mix of fluids in your body. It also helps in proper functioning of nerves, muscles, and heart. Most people get enough potassium from the foods they eat.

How Does Chronic Kidney Disease Affect Potassium Levels?

Healthy kidneys help in maintaining the right balance in your blood. One such is potassium. If you have been suffering from chronic kidney disease, it becomes difficult for the kidneys to control the amount of potassium in your blood. You may get too much potassium which becomes harmful.

In some cases, other medicines may make your body get rid of too much potassium. If this happens, you may need to take a potassium supplement.

Kidney Disease and High Level of Potassium

People suffering from chronic kidney disease are at a higher risk of suffering from hyperkalemia. CKD patients with the highest risk include those with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, advanced CKD, transplant recipients, and patients taking renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors.

Hyperkalemia is also prevalent amongst those who have undergone kidney transplantation or those who have received immunosuppressive therapy with calcineurin inhibitors.

How Can You Manage Your Potassium Levels?

Learn how much potassium does certain food contains. Then keep a check how much potassium you are taking in through your diet.

With the help of your dietitian or doctor, plan a diet in which you take the right amount of potassium. There is no diet that is right for everyone. Your diet will be based on how well your kidneys are working and whether you are on dialysis.

With the change in your disease, your diet may also undergo change. See your doctor for regular testing. Testing helps you know when you need to change diet. Changing your diet can be hard. You may have to give up many foods you like. But it is very important to make the recommended changes. They will help you stay healthy for as long as possible.

What Foods and Products Have Potassium?

You can keep a track record of potassium in your diet if you know which food has high or low content of potassium:

Foods Low in Potassium:

• Blueberries and raspberries
• White or brown rice, spaghetti, and macaroni
• Cucumbers, radishes, and hummus

Foods High in Potassium:

• Apricots, oranges, prunes, and bananas
• Broccoli, spinach, and potatoes
• Milk and yogurt

While undergoing kidney disease treatment, keep track of your nutrient levels. A natural kidney disease treatment comprises natural herbs that are free from any sort of chemicals, steroids and metals. This natural kidney cure can help you reduce creatinine and urea.

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Chronic Kidney Disease has a major impact on the health of populations across the globe. The progression of CKD independently exerts synergistic deleterious effects on the other parts of human body. For instance, patients with CKD are more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than to develop renal failure. The herbal remedies for kidney failure is the most preferred medical treatment that provides long lasting results without any side effects.

It is, in fact, very difficult to separate these chronic diseases, because one is a complication of the other in many situations. The development and progression of CKD are closely linked with hypertension and dyslipidemia, both causes of renal failure. Diabetic nephropathy is arguably the leading cause of renal failure. CKD, hypertension and diabetes mellitus altogether are responsible for causing CVD that includes coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke and peripheral arterial disease.

Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease

Oxidative stress is a state of imbalance between free radical production and its degradation by antioxidant systems with increased accumulation of radicals. During the metabolism of oxygen, 90% of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation occurs in mitochondria. In this process, some electrons passing the electron transport chain may leak from the main path and can directly reduce oxygen molecules to the superoxide anion.

Mechanisms That Lead to Increased Oxidative Stress in CKD

Different mechanisms could explain the increased oxidative stress in CKD. They are:

Uremia-Related Factors – The resting serum levels of superoxide anion is higher in HD Patients than in healthy ones. From the studies, it has been concluded that antioxidant enzymes are altered as renal function declines and are profoundly impaired in patients with uremia.

Role of Inflammation in CKD – CKD is considered to be a low grade inflammatory process in itself. Chronic inflammation can lead to increased oxidative stress in advanced renal disease with malnutrition and autonomic dysfunction being the factors related to the increased inflammatory rate.

Clinical Effect of Oxidative Stress in CKD

The important consequence of oxidative stress in CKD is endothelial dysfunction and the progression of other complications like atherosclerosis, anaemia, and amyloidosis.

Amyloidosis – The presence of oxidative stress directly modifies the function of proteins through the formation of oxidized amino acids. In the patients suffering from long term kidney problems, oxidative stress promotes amyloidosis due to protein denaturation.

Anemia – Serum of patients suffering from kidney disease have higher levels of MDA in erythrocytes and a severe deficiency in vitamin content, which may shorten the lifespan of erythrocytes in CKD. Thus making the person anemic.

CKD patients are affected by multiple diseases such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. They all are associated with oxidative stress. The presence of CKD further enhances the oxidative stress independently from the underlying conditions. Hemodialysis is also the leading factor for the oxidative stress.

Put an end to the problem of CKD and oxidative stress by taking herbal remedies for kidney problems. The treatment is done through carefully chosen products which are free from chemicals, steroids and metals. Treat your kidney problem with herbs!

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