Loading...

Struggling to catch bass on highly fished water? Lately, there has been a tremendous amount of fishing pressure on Sand Hollow. Reports say there can be anywhere of 30 bass boats on a weekend. This is crazy high for a lake where you can literally run-around the entire lake on foot in only an hour. I’ve heard of people feeling frustrated about not being able to catch fish. Here’s some tips on what to use when the water gets highly fished and the bass are feeling pressured. I was able to go out from my paddle board on Sand Hollow, and caught a dozen in only a few hours of fishing with the stuff here in this post. Enjoy!

Maps, Techniques, Seasonal Patterns, and  everything  for Bass Fishing Sand Hollow Click Here to View Book Contents Highly Fished Water – Sand Hollow Largemouth Bass Report

Bass can be tough to catch when baits are being hucked at them all the time. This report on Sand Hollow outlines the baits, the techniques, where, and how you can catch fish even when the fishing pressure seems insurmountable. You should be able to use these same techniques to get bites even when those around you aren’t catching much. Hopefully, you can find some useful stuff in here for highly fished water to keep you “Kraken” bass!

Highly Fished Water – Best Baits

On my recent outing at the lately highly fished water of Sand Hollow, I found two main baits to catch bass. I tried a few other things, but these presentations out worked the rest. The description of these baits is below which includes the color, the size of the hooks and weights, and the rod and reel set ups to use them. These are solid baits, and have produced on other lakes as well when conditions are tough. Give them a try!

Megabass Dot Crawler

The Ayu Megabass Dot Crawler produced a few nice bass for me. This bait works well in highly pressured water, because of it’s natural color and unique action in the water. It’s a bait not very many people use, because they can be hard to find unless you shop online. At Sand Hollow, the Dot Crawler worked well texas rigged with a 3/16 oz tungsten bullet weight and a 3/0 gamakatsu offset worm hook. This set up seemed best on a medium heavy bait casting rod and reel set up with 10 lbs fluorocarbon line. Fish the dot crawler by slowly dragging it along the bottom. Pay close attention to your line, so you don’t miss those bites from those highly pressured fish. The bites can often be a lot more subtle on highly fished waters.

Roboworm Nedworm

The 3″ Roboworm Nedworm is an incredibly natural bait that will catch bass in highly fished water. This bait works well for me in Sand Hollow. Hands down it out fishes a lot of other baits in crystal clear water. The key is to use a good spinning rod and reel set up, so you can get some distance out of your casts. The Robo Nedworm worked the best on the 1/10 oz Z-man ned rig jig head. This super light jig head let the bait fall super slowly, and stands the bait up on it’s head. I saw a bass literally swim over and eat this thing in front of my eyes. Definitely, an amazing bait to produce bass on highly fished waters.

The Roboworm Nedworm with a 1/10 oz z-man ned rig crushed several bass on the highly fished water on Sand Hollow.

Locating Bass on Highly Fished Water

The key to success is to find areas tucked away and not obvious to most anglers. Here’s a map of where I found the fish on my Paddle Board on Sand Hollow. Plus, some tips to help you locate similar spots on highly fished water.

Unlock Premium Content!

Sign up now and get free access to all the maps of the areas I fish!

I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Powered by Optin Lock


  Highly Fished Water – Video

Here’s a super short video of these techniques in action. This should give you a better idea of how these baits work, and how to fish them to catch bass. Don’t forget to hit the like button, and subscribe to the YouTube channel while you are viewing. This will keep you informed of any new video’s to help you get “Kraken” bass!

 

Catch Bass on Highly Fished Water - Fishing Report Sand Hollow - YouTube

 

Highly Fished Water – Thoughts

It’s easy to get caught up in “Dock Talk.” Don’t let what other people say discourage you from going out fishing. Mix it up. Use smaller baits, and you will never know what you can find. I caught a dozen bass in only a few hours of fishing with these techniques. The key is to not get stuck throwing the same things because they worked in the past. Bass are always moving and changing to their environment, and we should learn to adapt and change like they do in order to catch more of them.

Don’t let yourself get discouraged by what you hear. Even highly fished water can still produce plenty of fish if you keep mixing it up.

Hopefully, you found these tips beneficial. The links in here are affiliate links were you can pick up baits, rod’s, reels, line, and anything else I use to “Krak” bass on this trip. KrakenBass.com receives a small percentage of the sales through these links. I only use links to baits, and gear I personally trust and know work. The links are here to be helpful for you, and not for the small amount made on the sale of the products. Check out my products page for other stuff help you in your quest for bass: Krakenbass Products. I hope these things can help keep you “kraken” some bass like they have for me. Thanks for your support!

As Always,

Stay Stoked!!

The post Catch Bass on Highly Fished Water – Fishing Report Sand Hollow appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This is a Lake Powell fishing report on how we caught 197 largemouth and smallmouth bass in a few days. Included in this report are the details of the best baits for Lake Powell fishing this time of year, the conditions we experienced, and what to look for to help you know where to catch bass on Lake Powell. In addition, at the end of the post you can find a video of some of these details demonstrated in action. The goal of this report is to help you create some memories for yourself “Kraken” bass on Lake Powell.




Lake Powell Fishing Report

This Lake Powell Fishing report outlines all the things we used, and noticed to help us catch 197 largemouth and smallmouth bass. This was an incredible trip. On Lake Powell with my dad we learned a lot of new things to use to catch more fish. Some of the things outlined here might not be new to you, but they were new to me. Plus, we were able to catch on film some of the action to give you better idea of what to do on the water at Lake Powell fishing. My mission is to help you create more memories fishing with your friends and families by giving you the tools and information you need to catch a stoking boat load of bass! Enjoy the post!

Lake Powell Fishing Report – Conditions

This Lake Powell Fishing report transpired the first weekend of April on the 5th – 7th. We traveled up the San Juan river, and camped on the beach for two nights. Here are what the conditions were like for us on this trip.

Weather

Air Temperature High in the Upper 70’s. Partly Cloudy Skies.

Water Temperature

55 – 60 degrees. The water temperature varied wildly throughout the lake. The warmer water areas seemed to hold more fish.

Wind

0 – 12 MPH. Over the course of the trip we had predominately calm water. Marked with occasional breezes around 12 mph.

For this Lake Powell fishing report conditions were prime . The fish were just moving in shallow, and we “Kraked” em! 197 fish were caught and released on this trip.


  Lake Powell Fishing Report – Best Spots for Bass

Knowing where to find the fish is the first main ingredient for being able to catch them. The warmer water holds the fish shallower than some of the other spots in the early spring.  Another thing that helped us to locate bass was finding the lightly stained water where the bass seemed to be concentrated. The majority of Lake Powell is crystal clear. The stained water can be found in the backs of the main river channels, and the canyons that have running water this time of year. The stained water warms up a little faster, and concentrates the fish. Secondary points always seem to have a bass or two to catch on them as well. The gradual 45 degree rock chunk banks along with the warm and stained water, was the secret recipe for finding bass.

Lake Powell Fishing Report – Best Baits & Techniques

It took a while to get the baits dialed in on this trip with the conditions we were experiencing. After usuing and trying several different things, the following three techniques and baits seemed to outperform all the others. Below is a description of these baits and techniques, and how we used them at different times to “Krak” those bass!

Neko Rig

The Yamamoto 5″ Neko Fat Worm in Green Pumpkin was the all-around best bait for catching fish on Lake Powell. The Yamamoto Neko Fat Worm worked best Neko Rigged with a small 1/16 oz nail weight with a wacky o-ring, and a 1/0 gamakatsu drop shot hook. Put the hook through the o-ring in the middle of the bait, and slip the nail in the head of the bait, and you are set! Check out my old post on how to fish the neko rig for more details: Neko Rigging

The key reason this technique works so well is it enables you to fish effectively in both shallow and deep water. The bass were spread from 3 feet to 15 feet, and fishing the neko rig allows you to cover that huge spectrum of water effectively. One other little thing to spice up your neko worm is add a small tip of Chartreuse Spike It to color the tail of the bait. This seems to help get a few more bites.

The best bait on this Lake Powell fishing report hands down was the neko rig. This illustrations shows exactly how to set it up for catching bass.

Float n’ Fly

The ultimate Float n’ Fly set up for producing fish on Lake Powell was a small line through thill slip float, with a line tie bobber stop, and a grey ghost 1/16 oz phat fly. This is a finesse technique, so a solid spinning rod and reel combo is perfect for throwing this rig. Spool your reel up with light 8 – 10 lbs braided line with about 20 – 25 feet light 6 lbs 100% flourcarbon leader. This will give you the casting distance you need to get this bait out there.

I’ve been experimenting with the float n’ fly technique for several years, and finally feel like I have it dialed in for catching bass. This technique worked well for catching smallmouth and largemouth bass on our Lake Powell excursion. The Float n’ Fly actually caught one of the biggest bass of the trip. It’s an extremely fun way to fish. Make sure to check it out in action in the video below. [/one_half]

One of the Best Baits on my Lake Powell Fishing Report is the Float and Fly. As illustrated here in this picture, the float and fly is a great way to catch bass on Lake Powell.

Megabass Jerkbait

The Megabass Vision 110 is awesome for Lake Powell fishing for Largemouth and Smallmouth bass. This bait is especially effective because it enables you to cover water faster, than the other baits mentioned above. The Megabass Vision 110 and the Vision 110 Plus worked equally as effective. The best colors are tennesse shad  in the clear water, but when the water is a little stained the table rock shad jerkbait seems to work better. The vision 110 is at it’s prime when the wind starts blowing. A jerkbait tends to bring the bass out of the cover. Several strikes we had were right by the boat, and they were super exciting.

Throw your jerkbait on a stiffer medium heavy action rod to give it some nice rips.  Spool up with 8 – 10 lbs Flourcarbon on a high speed baitcasting reel  for casting distance and stealth so those bass don’t detect your line. The majority of your strikes occur while letting the jerkbait rest. 5 seconds in between rips seemed to work best on this trip. Here’s the link to check out how I like to fish a jerkbait: Jerkbait Bass Fishing. The exact bait used in that video and post was the one that worked dynamite at Lake Powell.

The Megabass Vision 110 & 110+1 were excellent on this Lake Powell fishing report.

Lake Powell Fishing Report – Video Catching Bass

Here is some footage of these baits and techniques in action on Lake Powell fishing. Hopefully, it will give you a better perspective of where to fish, and what to use at Lake Powell to have 100 bass days like we did on the water.

Lake Powell Fishing Report - Best Baits Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass - YouTube

 

Lake Powell Fishing Report – Additional Tips & Thoughts

Lake Powell bass fishing has always been good to me over the years. I’ve been going every spring for over 20 years with my dad. One thing I noticed was three key pieces for finding and catching bass. The first was stained water held more quality sized, and numbers of fish. The second piece to finding fish was finding warmer water. Even a few degrees warmer made a difference. Also, the north banks which face south fostered more numbers of fish. Northern shorelines warm up the fastest because they see the most sunlight, and appeared to hold more fish since this spring has been cooler than normal.

Lake Powell Fishing Stokes my face off! This is a nice largemouth bass who fell victim to the baits described in this post.

Hopefully, these insights from my Lake Powell fishing report will help you catch some bass! The links in here are affiliate links were you can pick up baits, rod’s, reels, line, and anything else I use to “Krak” bass on Lake Powell. KrakenBass.com receives a small percentage of the sales through these links. I only use links to baits, and gear I personally trust and know work. The links are here to be helpful for you, and not for the small amount made on the sale of the products. Check out my products page for other stuff help you in your quest for bass: Krakenbass Products. I hope these things can help keep you “kraken” some bass like they have for me.

As Always,

Stay Stoked!!

The post Lake Powell Fishing Report – Best Baits for Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

One of the most frustrating things as an angler, is learning how to catch cruising bass you see in the water. Most anglers will tell you if you see a bass, it can’t be caught. This isn’t always the case. There are some key things you can do to get those cruisers to bite. This post will provide you some essential tips to get those fish you detect to chomp. There is nothing more exciting than watching a cruising bass suck down your bait. Hopefully, you can experience that same excitement for yourself by applying these tactics.




How to Catch Cruising Bass in Clear Water

Nothing gets the heart pumping like seeing a bass slurp up your bait. The problem is how difficult it can be to catch those cruising bass you notice. A rule of thumb to remember is if you can see a bass, they can see you. It can be incredibly frustrating to see a fish sitting somewhere on a spawning bed, behind a bush, or cruising around without even getting so much as a sniff on your bait. Learning why bass are cruising, what baits to use, and what to do to entice strikes from the bass you see will help you “Krak” those fosj. Get yourself stoked to read this post to help you catch more of those clear water cruising bass.

My personal best smallmouth of 5.05 lbs was caught after seeing him cruising by the boat in shallow water.

Why Bass Start Cruising

Bass will cruise around and be visible for a variety of reasons. You tend to see them cruising around more in the early spring because they are getting ready for the spawn. Bass will often cruise near shallow flats, and secondary points looking for potential good areas to spawn. Other times you will see them close to a spawning bed cruising around waiting for a female. Sometimes they may just be out looking for a meal sitting off a point, or tucked under a bush. Another reason you could spot a bass is because you probably spooked them out. Bass are curious creatures. Oftentimes, they will swim out of their ambush spots to come take a look at what all the commotion is about.

Identifying why you can see the bass in the water is a critical aspect of knowing the likely hood of getting them to bite. Those bass who are out for a cruise in the early spring warming up and looking for a spawning bed, often will take a bait. Also, those fish guarding a nest or sitting close by an ambush point are quite keen to lash out at your lure. Lastly, the bass you’ve spooked out of the cover is definitely the least likely to take your bait. Still though, you can try a few things to increase your odds of catching him.

Best Baits to Catch Cruising Bass

Here are two solid bait set ups which seem to work especially well in clear water to catch cruising bass. The first is a finesse drop shot set up with 100% flourcarbon line. Don’t use anything over 8 lbs. test for your line. Line size is critical especially if you are seeing fish. You don’t want them to spook from identifying your line in the water. The bait of choice on this drop shot set up is a green pumpkin pepper jackall 4.8 flickshake worm. The other epic bait to catch cruising bass is a megabass spark shad swimbait. Line size also plays a role in your set up for fishing a swimbait. 8 lbs. 100% flourocarbon will help you catch those bass you see with the spark shad swimbait.

The 4.8 Jackall Flickshake Worm on a drop shot rig is a great bait to catch cruising bass in clear water.

Jackall Flick Shake Worm

The green pumpkin pepper 4.8 Jackall Flick Shake Worm is a lethal bait to catch those cruising bass you see. On one of my recent trips in the early spring this bait produced. I’ve seen several bass and thrown this flick shake in front of them resulting into stokedness. The key to this bait is to fish it on a drop shot rig with light 100% flourcarbon 6lbs test. Use small hooks and light weights to create as little disturbance as possible to the natural presentation of this bait.

Flick Shake Worm Set-Up

Green Pumpkin Pepper 4.8 Jackall Flick Shake Worm
1/8 oz Tungsten Drop Shot Weight
Gamakatsu Size 1 Drop Shot/Split Shot Hook
Spinning Rod & Reel Set Up


One of the best lures for catching cruising bass is the Megabass Spark Shad. It has an incredible natural profile and action to get those bass you see to bite.

Megabass Spark Shad

The Real 4.8 Megabass Spark Shad is an awesome swimbait to catch cruising bass. It has an incredibly natural profile and action to get those bass to bite. The Spark shad works well in those areas where you’ve seen fish, but the wind keeps you from fishing the drop shot effectively. Cast out past those cruisers, and swim that swimbait by them. I’ve seen a few of them suck it down. Light line is key too for this bait to be effective. Use 100% 8lbs flourcarbon fishing line on your baitcasting rod and reel, and prepare to get stoked.

Megabass Spark Shad Set Up

Real 4.8 Megabass Spark Shad
1/4 oz. Gamakatsu Swimbait Jig Head


What To Do When You See Cruising Bass

It is super exciting when you see a bass cruising around in the water. The best thing to do is take a deep breath to calm yourself, and then take note of the bass’s body language. There are 4 different styles of cruising bass you might spot. Knowing what type of behavior is going on with the bass you see will help you know how you can get them to bite. Here is a description of those 4 different styles of cruising bass you will come across, and the likelihood of you catching them.

One more thing to keep in mind before you identify the different body languages with the bass you see cruising. Don’t forget to take note of the spots where you see fish. You can usually find a pattern as to what areas they like to hold in, and start targeting those types of places. Whether it’s a certain type of brush, grass, or even different types of banks. When you see a bass consider yourself lucky, because it should give you a huge clue as to where to find them.

The Booker

The booker is the bass you see “Booking” out of cover, or swimming really fast as if it had been spooked. This type of bass can be extremely hard to catch. One good trick is to take note of his location as to where he came from, and get out of the area. After about 20 minutes, go back in the spot on stealth mode. The bass will typically move back into his home, and then you can cast around with one of the baits mentioned above. Watch your line close for the stoking bite!

The Cruiser

The “cruiser” bass is the bass you see swimming steadily along just out cruising at a slow speed. You can tell a cruiser because they aren’t in any hurry to get anywhere. When you see a cruiser bass your percentages for a bite are pretty good. The key is to target your cast way out in front of the direction the bass is heading. Dangle your bait in the spot he is going, and watch your line and bait for the epicness of a strike.

The Sitter

The “sitter” bass is the fish just chilling in one spot. They could be sitting in some cover, or chilling at the bottom of a fanned out nest. Sitters are often high percentage bass to catch. The key to catching the sitter is to not cast directly on top of them. Cast past them, and drag your bait right to where they are sitting. If they don’t bite immediately, pull away from the area and come back. He will still be there, and with a bass’s pee sized brain he won’t remember you from before. Especially, if he doesn’t see you coming the second time.

The Protector

Bass are ambush predators, and the “protector” bass usually will guard is feeding areas, or he may be guarding some babies or eggs on a nest. The protector is the easiest of all bass to catch once you’ve spotted them. Just cast you little drop shot bait as mentioned before past them, and drag it into thier layer. Then get stoked to fight that bass you caught!

This 4lbs. Smallmouth bass was caught cruising a shallow sand flat. Made a cast out past him to where he was heading, and he swam down and sucked the bait right up!

How To Entice Strikes & Catch Cruising Bass

Their are a couple things to help you entice strikes from cruising bass. First, don’t make a ton of commotion or make sudden movements. Bass are kings at noticing movement. They can see it with their eyes, and feel it in the water. Second, cast past the bass and bring your bait toward them. Too many times I’ve seen people cast right at the fish, and the splash of the bait on the water spooks the fish off. Third, if at first you don’t succeed try try again. Leaving the area and coming back later is a solid way to help the bass settle down, and be more prone to strike your bait. Sitting in one spot, and milking the area were you saw fish can help you dial in how the bass want the bait presented.

Both of these bass were seen before they were caught. Casting past the bass and not at the bass enabled me to catch this 2 lbs. and 4 lbs. smallmouth.

Catch Cruising Bass In Clear Water Video

Here’s a clip of me out fishing on Lake Mohave catching some giant Smallmouth bass you could see out cruising. Many of the hook ups weren’t caught on film, but hopefully this video will still you give you a taste of the things mentioned here in this post.

How to Catch Cruising Bass - Clear Water Smallmouth Bass - YouTube

Thank you for your support! Please subscribe to my Youtube channel, and my blog to get notifited of any new posts via email. My goal is to help you spend more time catching fish, and less time wondering what to do. Being outdoors with my family has been one of the greatest blessings of my life. It has given me some rock solid memories, and deepened my relationships.

The links in here are affiliate links were you can pick up baits, rod’s, reels, line, and anything else I use to “Krak” those cruising bass. KrakenBass.com receives a small percentage of the sales through these links. I only use links to baits, and gear I personally trust and know work. The links are here to be helpful for you, and not for the small amount made on the sale of the products. I hope these things can help you “krak” some bass like they have for me.

As Always,

Stay Stoked!!

The post How to Catch Cruising Bass – Clear Water Smallmouth Bass Tactics appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Here are five essential kayak bass fishing tips and tricks to help you catch more fish. Kayak fishing has really grown in popularity, and hopefully these tricks and tips can help you out on the water. This post was written by a tournament kayak angler Nate from virginia. If you dig his article don’t forget to check out  his website Nate Catches Fish.  Enjoy the post!





 

5 Essential Kayak Bass Fishing Tips

Kayak fishing is something a lot of anglers overlook. Anglers often would rather be in a fast bass boat or a boat with tons of room for tackle. Yet, with bass boats becoming more and more expensive one of the best ways to get on the water is a kayak. Kayaking is not only fun, but gives you exercise and gets you closer to the fish than you will ever be in a boat. This post will discuss 5 tips that will help you catch more fish on a kayak. If you’re just getting into the sport or even if you have been for a long time, this article should be able to help you in some way!
 
 

Kayak Bass Fishing Tip #1 : Use Stealth

Stealth is something people don’t always think about. In reality, stealth can make or break your fishing day. One of the downsides of kayak fishing is the plastic hull of your kayak. If you drop a bait in the kayak or hit your paddle on the side, you will make a loud noise through the water scaring away fish. One of the best ways to prevent this is traction pads on the floor of your kayak. Something like Seadek or Harmony Traction pads will keep the noise down when you’re in the kayak. It also keeps the kayak from becoming slippery when it gets wet. This can also prevent you from slipping when you stand up which is another huge plus. Another trick to keep yourself stealthy in the water is to use a push pole when you’re in shallow water. This will eliminate the noise of your splashing paddle, so the fish won’t hear you coming.

Stealth is key trick for Kayak bass fishing. The quieter you can be the greater advantage you have of tricking a big bass into biting.


 
  Kayak Bass Fishing Tip #2 : Use An Anchor

One of the biggest headaches when kayak fishing is battling the wind. Having some sort of anchor system will help you fight less with your kayak, and wrestle more with the fish of a lifetime. Anchoring allows you to stay on spots the wind would keep you from fishing. A great anchor for a kayak is the Anchor Wizard. What makes the Anchor Wizard great is the winch for raising and lowering your anchor without having to deal with rope or lifting the anchor manually. Another great anchoring device is the Power Pole Micro Anchor. This pole style anchor allows you to secure your kayak from moving in shallow water.  Which is great for fishing beds or shallow flats. The Power Pole is a great anchoring option if you can afford it.

Anchoring is an essential Kayak Bass Fishing tip. A solid Anchor system will keep you from drifting out of your honey holes if the wind picks up.

Kayak Bass Fishing Tip #3 : Keep Things Organized

Being organized is something that anglers often completely forget about when it comes to catching fish. Organization will increase your fishing ability by making things easier to focus on catching fish.

Having a good tackle management system is key. Using a kayak krate such as the YakAttack BlackPak or the new Wilderness Systems Kayak Krate will greatly improve your organization. Having all your tackle somewhere it can be labeled and easy to get to makes your life a whole lot easier. Especially, when you’re looking for a specific bait to get those key bites.

Kayak Bass Fishing Organization is huge for a small space. Plus, it will help reduce nightmares when fighting a big ole “Kraken” bass!


  Kayak Bass Fishing Tip #4 : Use Electronics

Another key kayak bass fishin tip is to use electronics. Using Electronic depth or fish finders will help in all types of bass fishing, and extraordinarily when you are kayak fishing. Having a depth finder of some sort is something you can not go without.  Without a doubt using electronics has contributed to a few of my tournament wins because of the  knowledge a depth finder can provide you.

You don’t need anything specific or super expensive just something that can tell you the depth, water temperature, and show you fish. This will help you adapt to change the way you fish in different conditions. Also, having a depth finder with mapping capabilities allows you to mark way-points where you caught fish, or even see potential spots those lunkers could be hiding. Electronics are not something you need if you are first starting fishing. Although, if you plan to become serious about kayak fishing you shouldn’t think twice about picking up a nice depth finder unit.

Using Electronics when Kayak Bass Fishing well help you identify productive water to catch more fish.


  Kayak Bass Fishing Tip #5 : Be Safe!

Being safe is an important kayak bass fishing tip that shouldn”t be over looked. You probably saw this and thought to yourself ‘How does being safe help me catch more fish?’. Safety eliminates worry from injury or possibly even worse out on the water. Plus, safety allows you to be focused on the fish that we all love targeting. Wearing a Coast Guard certified life vest at all times helps keep you safe if you were to fall out or flip your kayak. Another great way to stay safe is to have a highly visible flag, so other boaters in bigger boats can see you and take caution when passing you.

The final kayak bass fishing tip on safety is to make sure you have a small first aid kit at all times. This will help if you were to cut yourself badly, get a hook in you, or if you need any other bodily repair to keep prevent ending your day on the water. Staying safe is one of the most important parts to catching fish because if you take all the necessary precautions, you won’t worry if something bad was to happen.

Safety is a major Kayak Bass Fishing tip. It will provide you with less stress, to help you concentrate on fishing.

Concluding Thoughts

Hopefully, these five essential kayak bass fishing tips will help you become a better kayak angler, or even convinced you to give kayak angling a try! Kayak angling is my favorite way to get on the water, and is something that can be fun for the whole family. Kayak bass fishing puts you in places others can’t go,  and gives you a new appreciation for fishing! I want to say thank you to KrakenBass.com for letting me write this article for you to enjoy. Stay safe out on the water and go catch some fish!

-Nate

You can follow Nate at the following places below if you dug this article on 5 Essential Kayak Bass Fishing Tips. Make sure to leave him a comment below to let him know what you think.

As Always,

Stay Stoked!

Follow Nate Catches Fish Website:

https://natecatchesfish.wordpress.com/

YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOqIc-FXc-ilESzo9iFwQBA

Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/natecatchesfish/




The post Kayak Bass Fishing Tips – 5 Essential Tricks For Catching Fish appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Undoubtedly, learning how and when to use a jerkbait bass fishing can be crucial to your success as an angler. Almost every year a professional angler ends up winning some tournament with a jerkbait tied on to the end of one of their rods. Yet, catching a bass on a jerkbait can be quite a challenge. Here’s the things I’ve learned to use a jerkbait succesfully when bass fishing. This post contains the best jerkbaits, when to use them, and some video to help you see what to do to catch bass on a jerkbait. Read on to soak in the stoke!




When to Use a Jerkbait Bass Fishing

The jerkbait is considered one of the most lethal baits in bass fishing. It also has a reputation for catching beastly bass. Here are a few key determining factors to help you identify prime time for fishing a jerkbait. When any, or all of these conditions exist, give the jerkbait a rip for bass fishing.

Cold Water

The natural suspending action of a jerkbait imitates bait fish dying off in cold water. Although a jerkbait will catch bass all year, oftentimes the colder water will make it a better choice for getting bites than some of your other techniques. When water temperatures are around 50 – 60 degrees a jerkbait is often a great option.

When Bass are Shallow

The max you can get a good jerkbait to go is 12 – 15 feet. This can be a problem if the bass are hanging deeper than 20 feet. Especially, if the water is cold. They are just not as apt to swim up and eat from those depths because of the bass’s slow metabolism. The jerkbait ideally is the most effective when bass are shallower in cold water sitting in about 5 – 12 feet of water.

Clearer Water

The jerkbait is a visual clear water feeding bait. This is why it works so well on smallmouth. In dirty water the bass are unable to see the dying movements as well. A jerkbait seems to perform better in stained to clear water conditions. Many jerkbaits come with rattles to help attract attention in those dirtier water conditions, but often when things are too dingy you are probably better off with a bladed bait of some kind.

Jerkbait Bass Fishing is best when you have cold water, shallow bass, and stained to clear visibility.

How to Use a Jerkbait Bass Fishing

Jerkbait bass fishing can be a ton of fun. It’s a quick ripping and reeling technique that can often produce some violent strikes. Here are a few key things to consider to make sure you are fishing this bait effectively.

Semi-Slack Line

It’s important the jerkbait sits completely at rest after you have ripped it a few times through the water. The natural suspending dying action of the bait not moving is what triggers that easy meal response in a bass. Make sure your line is slack on the top of the water when the bait is on the pause. Ripping a jekrbait on a semi-slack line will provide the bait awesome action. Plus, it will provide your jerkbait that imperative pause when you are through jerking it around.

Vary your Rips

You can rip a jerkbait in two different ways. The first way is just a quick rip out to the side of your body. The other popular way is to point your rod at the bait, and rip your rod tip down. I’ve noticed the majority of professional anglers use the later because it is a little easier on your body. Varying the number of rips, and how you jerk the bait will help you dial in to what the bass like.

Why Bass Like Jerkbaits

An important concept to understand to improve your bass fishing overall is why bass like jerkbaits. Oftentimes, a bass will strike a jerkbait at two different points. A lot of strikes will occur on the pause as the bait is suspended. The bait just appeals as an easy meal sitting their out in the open not moving. The other strikes will come when you quickly rip the bait away from the bass after the jerkabait has been suspending. This immitates a baitfish fleeing from a bass, and will trigger them to lunge out and grab it before it gets away.

Here is a break down of what happens when observing bass behavior with fishing jerkbaits. The initial rips get the bass’s attention. Next, when the bait sits still the bass will typically swim closer to examine it. Oftentimes, when the bass is examining the bait and it starts jerking away a bass instinctively reacts to eat it. Wallah! You’ve just kraked a bass on a jerkbait!

My personal best largemouth bass was caught at Lake Powell on a jerkbait. It was 26″ long and weighed in around 8lbs. For sure I’m on the jerkbait train for bass fishing. Give em a rip!

Jerkbait bass fishing often a bass will hit the bait even when it is half their size! Jerkbaits get bass stoked!

The Best Jerkbait Bass Fishing

There are 100’s of jerkbaits out on the market for bass fishing. The one that works the best is the megabass vision 110. The action of it out of the package can’t be beat. The other important key is the colors of this bait. In my opinion they are un-matched by any other jerkbait manufacturer. Color is crucial with a visual bait like a jerkbait. The megabass vision 110 is an expensive jerkbait, but it works. Just start jerkbait fishing with the megabass vision 110 and you won’t go wrong.

The best jerkbait for bass fishing is the megabass vision 110. The colors on this bait are the best!

How to Use a Jerkbait Bass Fishing Video

Here is some video action of me out fishing a jerkbait. Unfortunately, I goofed up the camera angle in this clip. A lot of the action is kind of cropped out because of using the narrow camera angle. I should of been using the super view feature on my go-pro. Still though, it turned out well enough to where you can learn a lot and see how to fish a jerkbait. This was filmed at a time when all the above factors where in play which made the jerkbait a solid option on the water.

Bass Fishing Jerkbaits - When, where, how & what to use to catch fish. - YouTube

Hopefully, you enjoyed this post. More importantly I hope this information will help you catch more bass! My mission is to weed through the jungle to bring you the best stuff for bass fishing. Don’t forget to subscribe to the blog for updates on fishing tips to elevate your game, and trip reports to see these techniques in action.

As Always,

Stay Stoked!

Here’s the bait selection chart to help you know what type of bait you should throw in every type of situation

 
  Bait Selection Chart

This Chart will help you select the right lures and baits for every situation to catch largemouth and smallmouth bass. This chart helps you take into account 6 factors that can contribute to picking the right bait. Weather, Water Temp, Water Clarity, Depth,Type of Cover, and the seasons. Snag a copy to print out and keep in your boat or tackle bag when times get tough. This will help you catch more bass.

Purchase

Bonus Package

Snag the bait selection chart and get my 4 video softplastic rigging & fishing tutorials for a third of the cost. Knowing how to use these softplastic set ups is key for catching bass with this chart.


Purchase Bonus Package


The post How and When to use a Jerkbait Bass Fishing appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Here are 5 of the best softplastic swimbaits for bass fishing. There are so many softplastic swimbaits out on the market. It makes things tough to know what to use. After several years of trial and error, the following swimbaits have seemed to consistently outperform all the others. Hopefully, this information on softplastic swimbaits will help eliminate some confusion for you. In addition, there are several tips and video of each of these baits in action to help you become a better swimbait fisherman.  Enjoy the post!




Best Softplastic Swimbaits

Softplastic swimbaits can be one of the best lures to use for bass fishing. They help you cover a lot of water, and best of all bass crush them. Unfortunately, all swimbaits are not created equal. Almost every fishing brand out there has a swimbait of one kind or another. Fortunately, I’ve done some time on the water, and boiled things down to 5 of the best softplastic swimbaits that will consistently catch you fish all year long. Feel free to leave a comment below if you disagree with any on the list below. I’m always open to try new things. Plus, don’t forget to check out the video at the bottom of the post to see the proof of why these are the best softplasatic swimbaits in action. Soak in the stoke!

One of the best softplastic swimbaits is this Keitech Easy Shiner

  Keitech Easy Shiner

One of the all time best softplastic swimbaits is the Keitech Easy Shiner. This swimbait is awesome because the tail will will wobble perfectly without barely any movement on the retrieve. Plus, the thin body is a perfect baitfish imitator. The best way to fish this swimbait is with a 1/8 oz darter jig head on a light spinning rod. You can cast it a mile, and the darter jig head helps keep the bait horizontal as you retrieve it through the water. Prepare to get bites with this awesome softplastic swimbait.

Best Set-Up for the Keitech Easy Shiner

4″ Inch Ayu Keitech Easy Shiner
1/8 oz Gamakatsu Darter Jig Head
7′ Medium Heavy Spinning Rod and Size 30 Reel


The Basstrix Paddle Tail is another one of the best soft plastic swimbaits to have in your fishing arsenal.

  Basstrix Paddle Tail

The Basstrix Paddle Tail Swimbait is another one of the best softplastic swimbaits on the market. It’s action is incredibly unique compared to other swimbaits. The entire body wobbles as the tail kicks. This extra vibration in the water from the basstrix swimbait body wobble helps draw some serious strikes. The basstrix needs to be retrieved a little faster than other swimbaits to get the right action, but it still crushes bass. Plus, the hollow body helps enable some cool rigging options to keep the bait weedless. Definitely a must in your swimbait arsenal.

Best Set-Up for the Basstrix Paddle Tail

5″ Ayu Basstrix Paddle Tail Swimbait
1/4 oz Gamakatsu Swimbait Jig Head
Baitcasting 7″ Medium Heavy Rod & Baitcasting Reel


The Jackall Rhythm Wave is one of the best softplastic swimbaits around. It has an incredible action in the water.

  Jackall Rhythm Wave

The Jackall Rhythm Wave is one of the best softplastic swimbaits because of it’s perfect finesse presentation. The Rhythm wave’s tail will kick on the slowest of retrieve’s. Plus, the body has a good rocking action as well to give it a little more presence in the water. Another cool feature about the bait are the scale imitation body style stripes through the bait. This helps give it a natural baitfish appearance in the water. The bass choke this bait down with stoke.

Best Set-Up for the Rhythm Wave

3.8″ Prism Shad Jackall Rhythm Wave
1/8 oz Gamakatsu Darter Jig Head
7′ Medium Heavy Spinning Rod and Size 30 Reel


The Megabass Spark shad is one of the best softplastic swimbaits for bass fishing

  Megabass Spark Shad

One of the best softplastic swimbaits around is the megabass spark shad. It swims incredibly straight, and the body style is a perfect representation of a small fish with the extra front fins. The tail will kick easily on a slow retrieve, and it comes in some awesome natural colors. The only downside to the bait is the eyes will fall off, but it doesn’t detract the bass from chomping it down. The holes in the top of the bait also help make sure you get the bait rigged up perfectly straight every time. The spark shad get’s those bass “Kraken.”

Best Set Up for the Megabass Spark Shad

4″ Real Megabass Spark Shad
3/8 oz Megabass Body Balance Jig Head
Baitcasting 7″ Medium Heavy Rod & Baitcasting Reel


All around the Keitech Swing Impact Fat is one of the best Softplastic Swimbaits.

  Keitech Fat Swing Impact

The Keitech Fat Swing Impact has always been one of the best softplastic swimbaits around. The action on this swimbait is incredible. The body kick, and the tail wag is perfect at the slowest of speeds. It works amazing as a trailer on a spinnerbait, or a swim jig. Traditionally, this bait is used a lot on umbrella rigs too. Yet, it still crushes sitting straight on a lead jig head slowly retrieved through the water. This is a bass killer all season long.

Best Set Up for the Keitech Swing Impact Fat

4.8″ Ayu Keitech Fat Swing Impact
1/4 oz Dirty Jigs Bluegill Swimbait Head
Baitcasting 7″ Medium Heavy Rod & Baitcasting Reel


Best Softplastic Swimbaits Video

Here’s some footage of these 5 best softplastic swimbaits being used in one morning of fishing. Each of these swimbaits produced some decent bass. Hopefully, you can also pick a up a few tips on how to fish a swimbait in this clip as well. The swimbait is hands down one of my favorite ways to catch bass. Get amped to see how well these swimbaits work. Enjoy the vid!

5 Best Softplastic Swimbaits - YouTube

Hopefully, this video and information will help you level up your game to catch more bass on softplastic swimbaits. Don’t forget to subscribe to the blog, and follow @Krakenbass on all the main social media accounts to keep you up to speed with new posts and information to help you catch more fish. I’d love to hear in the comments below some of your favorite softplastic swimbaits. There is something magic about these baits that really get those bass “Kraken!”

As Always,

Stay Stoked!

The post The 5 Best Softplastic Swimbaits for Bass Fishing appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Finally, I feel like I can share with you the hands down best swim jig bass fishing. It has taken me a few years to get this swim jig technique on point. In the fall as the water temperatures have been dropping, swimming a jig has been solid for me to keep the bass bites hot! This post lists exactly all the little things to do to get bites, and the gear to use for swimming a jig to catch bass. In addition, there is some video footage to help you see how lethal a technique swimming a jig can be. Hopefully, this info will help keep you “Kraken” Bass. Enjoy!




The Best Swim Jig Bass Fishing

Finding the best swim jig bass fishing has been a little bit of a struggle for me. I’ve experimented with this technique for the last few years, and have never felt like it has produced results like I’ve heard it should. This summer and fall was different. I feel like I worked some things out and have found a solid jig and trailer that has worked at several different lakes and ponds I’ve visited this year. My goal here is to help you avoid the frustration with all the jigs and info out on the market for fishing a swim jig. Here is the right one that has worked consistently for me. In addition, in this post you will learn all the little modification’s which make a big difference for getting bass to eat your swim jig.

The Best Swim Jig

Hands down the V&M pulse swim jig is my favorite. This jig comes in some of the best colors, and swims perfectly true every time out of the package. The two colors that work best for me are summer craw, and watermelon bluegill. These jigs get eaten. Especially, if you pair them with the right soft plastic trailer, and do a few other minor modifications.

There are two small modifications to make with the V&M pulse swim jig out of the package which have seemed to make a big difference. The first is to trim the skirt, so it ends right at the back of the hook. The second modification is to trim down the weed guard. You want your weed guard sitting, so it sticks up only a little bit above the hook point along with thinning out some of the weed guard strands.

The first modification of trimming the skirt length will allow your trailer to have more action on the jig, and the shorter skirt creates a smaller profile to get more bites. The second modification of trimming out the weed guard will help you hook up on more fish, but still keep the bait weedless. The swim jig with this modification will still go through grass and other pieces of cover sweetly.

The best swim jig bass fishing modifications to help you hook more fish, and get more bites!

The Best Swim Jig Bass Fishing Trailer

The Keitech 3.8 Fat Swing Impact is an amazing soft plastic trailer for the V&M swim jig. I’ve experimented with a lot of trailers, and the tail kick plus the body shake on this swimbait makes a swim jig look even more incredible in the water. I use two main colors of the Keitech swimbait paired with my two favorite swim jig colors. For the summer craw color swim jig, use an AYU color swimbait. With the watermelon bluegill  color swim jig, the smallmouth magic swimbait color crushes. These are the color pairings which have worked well for me.

Another small modification to these keitech swimbaits for your swim jig trailer will also make a impact. Dip just a small tip of the swimbait tail in a little chartreuse dye. The added color will add a little life to you swim jig trailer and draws more strikes. Use either the spike it chartreuse marking pen, or dip a portion of the tail in the spike it chartreuse garlic dye. These coloring options work great to get the extra stoke flowing for your swim jig trailers.

The best swim jig bass fishing trailer is a Keitech Swing impact fat with a little bit of Spike It added on the tip of the tail.

The Best Swim Jig Bass Fishing Set Up

The best swim jig bass fishing set up is a solid baitcasting rod and reel. Use a stout medium heavy 7 foot rod to get good casting distance. This type of rod will also give you some meat to hook up those bass in cover. Spooling up your baitcasting reel with 12lbs flourocarbon will also make a difference. 12 lbs flourocarbon line is heavy enough for tough jobs, but also subtle enough to keep the bass from noticing your line. The lews speed spool reel for swimming jigs is what I’ve been using. I find it casts well and has solid retrieve speed to keep the bait kicking nicely.

All around this is the best swim jig bass fishing rod and reel set up. This set up will provide good distance out of your casts and the right speed on the retrieve. Plus, it has some real hook setting power!

The Best Swim Jig Bass Fishing Situations

I’ve found the most successful time for swimming a jig is late summer through the late fall when bass tend to key in more on baitfish. Another key component to knowing when to use a swim jig is identifying the main forage in the body of water you are fishing. If the the bass are keying in on bluegill or other small panfish for forage, the swim jig can be lethal.

A swim jig will also work sweetly when bass are relating to grass. A swim jig goes through grass incredibly well without gunking up to help you get more bites. Plus, a swim jig is a great technique to cover a lot of water to find fish. You can fish a swim jig pretty quickly to identify the key areas bass my be relating too. Check out my bait selection chart to help you identify the best bait to use in every situation: Bait Selection Chart

The Best Swim Jig Bass Fishing Video

Here’s a compilation of several clips of action fishing this exact swim jig set up. This video is taken from footage from a few different lakes, and ponds to give you a good idea of how to fish this bait. Make sure to click the thumbs up button, and subscribe to the KrakenBass YouTube channel to help keep you stoked on bass fishing.

The Best Bass Fishing Swim Jig - YouTube

The Best Swim Jig Bass Fishing Box

To even make things simpler for you I’m offering you a swim jig box. All these baits are hand modified by myself. Ready for you to tie on and use. Here is what is included this Swim Jig kit to help you get going in the right direction if you don’t want to hassle with all these little details outlined in this post.

Best Swim Jig Bass Fishing Kit. Includes, 4 jigs, and 8 trailers hand modified and ready to roll out of the box!

Swim Jig Kit

Price: $47.99

Please allow 10 – 14 days for shipping and packaging due to individual custom modifications for each order.

    • V&M Swim Jigs (4) – Colors Summer Craw (2) & Watermelon Bluegill (2)
    • Keitech 3.8 Fat Swimbaits (8) – Colors AYU (4) & Smallmouth Magic (4)
    • Swim jig sizes one in each color – 3/8 oz (2) , & 1/2 oz (2)
    • Swim Jigs Individually Trimmed and Modified
    • Swimbaits Individually Colored and Paired with Swim Jigs

Purchase Below Through Pay Pal:





One important note about this post. The links in here are affiliate links were you can pick up baits, rod’s, reels, line, and anything else I used to “Krak” some bass on a swim jig. KrakenBass.com receives a small percentage of the sales through these links. I only use links to baits, and gear I personally trust and know work. The links are here to be helpful for you, and not for the small amount made on the sale of the products. I hope these things can help you “krak” some bass like they have for me. Good luck in your jig swimming!

As always,

Stay Stoked!

The post The Best Swim Jig Bass Fishing – Hands Down! appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Gunlock Reservoir fishing for Largemouth bass was a successful endeavor. Even though the majority of the bass were small, the action was fast and a lot of fun. Enjoy this full post to see a map of the spots that produced fish, what baits and techniques worked best, and other important details to help you when fishing Gunlock Reservoir. Read on and soak in the stoke!




Gunlock Reservoir Fishing – Largemouth Bass

This trip report on Gunlock in southern Utah accounted for about a dozen bass caught in only 2 hours of fishing before dark. Gunlock Reservoir fishing has always been good to me, until they poisoned the lake a few years ago to eliminate the smallmouth bass that were illegally planted. One of my all-time favorite days of fishing was found on this body of water throwing frogs around (Check out the old trip report here: Gunlock Reservoir Fishing). This recent trip didn’t disappoint either. Since the lake has been re-stocked there is an abundance of small bass which were fun to catch. Here are some useful tips on what worked for me, and what I saw on my excursion.

Included in this post are the conditions of the day on the lake, and details of the baits that caught bass. In addition, there is some video footage of the action, and a general overview of my observations on Gunlock Reservoir. Hopefully, you can take these things and use them in your own bass fishing adventures to help you get “Kraken Bass”!

Gunlock Reservoir Fishing Conditions

Here are the conditions out bass fishing on my Airhead SUP on a weeknight evening on October 3rd, 2017 from 5:30 – 8:00 pm.

Water Temperature

67 degrees.

Water Clarity

Stained. Visibility only about 4 feet.

Weather

Air Temperature in the 80’s. Bright Sunny Skies

Wind

0-3 mph. Flat Calm all evening.

Gunlock Reservoir Fishing conditions were ideal for catching bass on topwater on my Airhead SUP.

Gunlock Reservoir Fishing Baits

I switched out a few things while fishing Gunlock. The following two baits worked the best. Here are the best baits, and how I fished them. Hopefully, they can also help you get bites from these Gunlock Reservoir largemouth bass. One important note about this post.  The links in here are affiliate links were you can pick up baits, rod’s, reels, line, and anything else I used to “Krak” some bass on this trip. KrakenBass.com receives a small percentage of the sales through these links. I only use links to baits, and gear I personally trust and know work. The links are here to be helpful for you, and not for the small amount made on the sale of the products. I hope these things can help you “krak” some bass like they have for me.

Iobee Frog

The Jackall Iobee Frog was a bite getter while on Gunlock Reservoir fishing. I used the bluegill color tied up on a stout baitcasting rod and reel. The key to this bait was to walk it slowly through the flooded cover. A lot of small bass would hit this bait, and not get hooked. The Iobee Frog has to be eaten by a decent sized bass for it to hook up well. Thus, it was a good screening bait to up-size your catches out at Gunlock.

Keitech Sexy Impact

The Keitech Sexy Impact hands down caught more fish than anything. This bait is perfect for those rat sized bass to slurp down, and it hooks them up really well. I fished this bait texas rigged weighthless with a 2/0 owner twist lock hook. This weightless texas rig set up was ideal for pulling the bait through the flooded brush and cover at gunlock. The key was to cast it out, let it fall, and then give it a couple light twitches. You really had to pay attention to your line, so you don’t miss the bites. The Keitech proved to be a great bait to throw behind the frog if a couple missed eating it.

Gunlock Reservoir Fishing was a ton of fun catching several rat sized largemouth bass like this one on the Keitech Sexy Impact

Gunlock Reservoir Fishing Spots

On this trip I used my Airhead SUP to get out and catch a few bass. The paddle board enabled me to get right into the thick cover, and catch the bass at Gunlock. Here is a map of the area where I found all my fish. They were really stacked up in this place. To view the map, if you can’t already, just subscribe to the blog in the form below to unlock this premium content. This way you will also get notified of any new baits, techniques, or trips to your email. Hopefully, this area will help you catch a few bass as well.

Unlock Premium Content!

Sign up now and get free access to all the maps of the areas I fish!

I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Powered by Optin Lock

Gunlock Reservoir Fishing Video

Here’s some footage of me “Kraken” bass out at Gunlock Reservoir on this trip. I had a blast catching them. Once I found the right area, it seemed like cast after cast produced a bass. Check it out, and subscribe to my YouTube channel as well. Sometimes it’s nice to get a visual on how to fish to help you in your endeavours chasing bass. I would love to hear your comments about the video.

Gunlock Reservoir Fishing - Southern Utah Largemouth Bass - YouTube

 

Gunlock Reservoir Fishing Report

Overall, I was quite surprised at what I caught at Gunlock Reservoir fishing. This lake was just  re-stocked a couple years ago with largemouth bass. It looks like the first wave of bass spawned successfully. The fish seemed like yearling bass that I was catching in these shallow flooded brush areas. The future looks bright for Gunlock Reservoir fishing for largemouth bass. This lake can produce trophy bass, like in the past, with the abundance of forage and cover for these fish.

Thank you for your support. If you haven’t yet, subscribe to the blog and share it with your friends! I believe there is plenty of fish for all of us, and getting outside with friends and family is one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself. Nothing cures the blues like a good day of bass fishing. Hopefully, this info will help you with your time on the water to keep you “Kraken” bass!

As Always,

Stay Stoked!

Additional Kraken Bass Products

Check out my informational products page to help you catch more bass.The products on this page include my Sand Hollow Guide eBook, Bait Selection Charts, and some Tutorial Soft Plastic Rigging Videos. These products have been created to elevate your fishing game of things I’d wished I had known before starting out. Hopefully, some of this stuff can help you in your bass quest.

Check it out at the following link: Kraken Bass Products

The post Gunlock Reservoir Fishing – Largemouth Bass appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Idaho bass fishing Weston Creek Reservoir was a fun fishing adventure on my Airhead SUP. I took one of my friends out with me on the trip, and we only caught a few fish. We did end up catching a beast bass to throw into the mix which made things fun. This post includes some video of the action, a map of the areas we fished, and the baits that seemed to work the best. Make sure to check out all the details of this trip, so you can know a little more about fishing Weston Creek Reservoir. Enjoy the stoke to hopefully help you in your own Idaho bass fishing adventures!





Idaho Bass Fishing – Weston Creek Reservoir

Weston Creek Reservoir is a beautiful little spot just 15 minutes outside of Malad, Idaho. They have some good regulations on bass fishing.  They shut the place down for a portion of the year, and also have a slot limit to help keep the spawning mature largemouth from being harvested. Their efforts have paid off because we saw some good bass and caught one with some good sized shoulders. There was also some signs limiting boat access. You might want to check it out the reg’s online before you go crazy heading out here. We also saw perch in the water as we paddled around the lake. Although, the fishing wasn’t fast and furious. Here are the juicy details of what we found Idaho bass fishing Weston Creek Reservoir.

This was our best largemouth of the day. Good times for sure our Idaho bass fishing Weston Creek Reservoir

Weston Creek Reservoir Fishing Conditions

Here are the conditions we faced Idaho bass fishing Weston Creek Reservoir. This trip transpired on September 29th from 8am – 12pm. Weather was a little bit chilly and windy as you can see in the info below. We were on the hills of a cold-front.

Water Temperature

55 degrees.

Air Temperature

It was cold. 40 degrees when we started, and warmed up to the high 60’s.

Weather

Bright Sunny Skies

Wind

0 – 15 mph. Started off calm, then the wind picked up and blew us off the water.

Water Visibility

Crystal Clear. Viability Down to about 12 feet.

Idaho Bass Fishing Map – Weston Creek Reservoir

Below is a map of the best spots we fished, and what we found along the way. Click on the different markers to get details of each area. We fished along in my Airhead SUP paddle boards to access these areas. Just subscribe in the form below, and the map with all the stoke juice will be yours to enjoy! In addition, you will get notified of new posts via your email to keep you in the loop of more good spots to try and techniques to use.

Unlock Premium Content!

Sign up now and get free access to all the maps of the areas I fish!

I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Powered by Optin Lock

Best Baits Idaho Bass Fishing Weston Creek Reservoir

My friend and I tried a few different baits on the trip, but only caught bass on three of the many things we tried. Here is what we used, and how we used them to help you in your Weston Creek Reservoir expedition. One important note about this post, is the links in here are affiliate links were you can pick up baits, rod’s, reels, line, and anything else I used to “Krak” some bass on this trip. KrakenBass.com receives a small percentage of the sales through these links. I only use links to baits, and gear I personally trust and know work. The links are here to be helpful for you, and not for the small amount made on the sale of the products. I hope these things can help you “krak” some bass like they have for me.

Flick Shake Worm

The Jackall 4.8 Flick Shake Worm in watermelon pepper is what I caught all my bass on in Weston Creek Reservoir. I threw this little worm on a spinning rod and reel on a drop shot rig. My drop shot rig for the flick shake had a size 1 drop shot hook, and a 1/8 oz drop shot weight. This light drop shot set up was perfect for keeping the bait up out of the grass along the bottom. Check out the action in the video below of how this set up caught the biggest bass of the day.

Keitech Swimbait

The Keitech 4.8 Ayu Swimbait caught a solid bass for my friend that ultimately got off. We through this swimbait on a 1/4 oz green pumpkin jig head. The key was to cast it out, let it fall a little bit, and slowly wind it along. My friend’s big bite came on the initial fall of the swimbait.

Yamamoto Senko

The 5″ Yamamoto Baby Bass Senko also produced a bass for us. We set the bait up texas rigged weightless on a 5/0 gamakatsu offset hook. The weightless senko worked great in fishing the shallow grass. It didn’t get caught up in the grass often, and plus it got bit. We would throw it out, and let it set on the bottom, and just slowly crawl it along in the grass.

Idaho bass fishing Weston Creek Reservoir produced this solid 4.5 lbs. Largemouth Bass. He fell victim to the drop shot rig.

Video Idaho Bass Fishing Weston Creek Reservoir

Here’s a clip of some of the action of this trip on film. It was a slow grind, but at least we got the best part on camera. Hopefully, you can pick up a few things to help you in your bass fishing the next time you head out on the water.

Idaho Bass Fishing - Weston Creek Reservoir - YouTube

 

Conclusion

Overall, I felt like Weston Creek Reservoir has some good big bass potential. Still though, you had to really work for them. We didn’t see a ton of fish as we paddled around exploring the place on our Airhead SUP’s. This place is definitely worth trying for a big bite, but I wouldn’t take your kids here. They would probably get bored unless you threw out a trout rod. We caught a trout on our adventure, and saw several bank fisherman catching a few trout as well.

Thanks for reading and following my adventures. I really hope I can help you get out more to spend time outside with your friends and family. It truly helps create some amazing memories that last a lifetime. Don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get informed of new posts. Also, check out my YouTube Channel and subscribe there. Looking forward to continuing to provide good honest content to help you in your bass fishing. Keep Kraken!

As Always,

Stay Stoked!

The post Idaho Bass Fishing – Weston Creek Reservoir Adventure appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Boise Idaho bass fishing ponds at Esther Simplot Park was a lot of fun on a fall rainy morning. I ran around and fished from several different spots along the bank and fished several different ponds along Esther Simplot Park. Here’s everything I discovered while catching about a half dozen bass in only a few hours of fishing. This post includes a map, the baits and techniques, the conditions, and more to help get you Kraken Bass out of some of these same ponds in Boise Idaho.





Boise Idaho Bass Fishing Ponds – Esther Simplot Park

Esther Simplot Park is a beautiful urban spot right in the middle of Boise Idaho with easy access to several different ponds. Each of the ponds are a little different, but there are bass to be “Kraked” in some of them. I made an exploratory trip for only a couple of hours during my time in Boise for work, and was pleasantly surprised by what I was able to find. I was able to catch about a half dozen bass in a few hours, and a couple of them were pretty beefy. It took me a while to find the best spots and baits. Hopefully, you can take what I learned and get right on them if you are in the Boise Area.

Listed below are the conditions I experienced on my trip, and a map of what I discovered in the areas I fished. Plus, a description of the baits and techniques that produced fish for me. Enjoy the post, and make a trip out here. It’s a fun spot for the kids with plenty of swings, playgrounds, and water beaches to keep them happy while you try and catch a few bass.

Conditions – Boise Idaho Bass Fishing Ponds

Here are what the conditions where like for me on my quick trip fishing the ponds around Esther Simplot Park in Boise. I only had a few hours from 7am – 9:30am before I had to get on the road for work on a Thursday morning on September 21st.

Weather

Cloudy, With a Little Rain. Air Temperature in the mid 50’s.

Water Temperature

Around 62 Degrees.

Wind

0 – 5 MPH. Pretty calm with an occasional breeze all morning.

Water Clarity

Varied from Pond to Pond, but generally stained visibility only about 5 feet.

Best Baits – Boise Idaho Bass Fishing Ponds

The majority of my time was spent moving around looking, and hoping to find some bass. I found the following two baits and techinques to be very effective. These two baits produced all of the fish for me on this bass fishing pond trip. These baits worked well to help me move around and fish effectively.

Jackall Cover Craw

The 3″ Jackall Cover Craw in Green Pumpkin Pepper was a solid fish catcher for me on this trip. There is a lot of vegetation in some of the ponds, and the cover craw glided perfectly through the grass without gunking up. The key was to let it fall all the way to the bottom, and slowly pull the cover craw along. The cover craw worked best for me on a spinning rod and reel set up, and Texas rigged weightless with a 2/0 owner twist lock hook. The spinning gear really helped get distance for casting this bait. Plus, the bass seemed to enjoy eating the cover craw too!

Pulse Swim Jig

The V&M Watermelon Bluegill 3/8 oz. Swim Jig also caught a few bass. I rigged the jig up with a 3.8 smallmouth magic swing impact fat swimbait as a trailer to help give it some action and more bulk. This bait was perfect for going through the vegetation, and covering a lot of water to find fish. The key was to just let it fall to the bottom, slowly reel the jig, and rip it through the grass when you felt the jig getting bogged down. This swim jig worked well on a good baitcasting rod and reel to get good distance for your casts. The pulse swim jig caught the biggest bass of the day too!

The Jackall Cover Craw produced this awesome bass in Boise Idaho bass fishing ponds at Esther Simplot Park

Spots – Boise Idaho Bass Fishing Ponds

Here is where I fished at the different ponds around Esther Simplot Park. All my fishing consisted of walking the banks looking for signs of life. The map below has markers outlining what transpired in all these areas. The red marks are the spots I saw, or caught some bass. The blue marks are areas that produced nothing for me. Click on the marks to get more details about each section. Just subscribe in the form below to get notified of new posts via email, and the map with all the stoke juice will be yours to enjoy!

Unlock Premium Content!

Sign up now and get free access to all the maps of the areas I fish!

I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Powered by Optin Lock

Insights and Additional Details – Boise Idaho Bass Fishing Ponds

It was a cool dark overcast morning in the fall, but the fishing proved to be really quite good. The bass proved to be stoking in size. I heard these ponds had some bass from one of the local workers at Sportsman’s warehouse. Also, one of the guys I was working with in Idaho said he had seen bass in the area. Oftentimes finding a good area to fish is just a matter of asking around. With those two witness’s, I decided to check it out and combed the banks with my swim jig.

The first area under the bridges looked so good. It had a ton of grass and vegetation. Alas, it produced no bass. I spent way to much time in the area, so I got moving. My method for moving was to burn the banks with casts from my swim jig. I was stoked when I finally hooked up along the edge of a beach in Quinns Pond on a bass. Still I kept moving, because the guy at Sportsman’s told me the north corner ponds where the best for bass.

I got to the Cascade Creek Pond, and decided to slow down with the Jackall Cover Craw. On my first cast, after dragging the bait along the edge of the vegetation, my line jumped and went heavy. After setting the hook, a solid bass that erupted out of the water.  The cascade creek  area was good, and a little while later I pulled out another beast from the same spot on a swim jig. I saw a lot more signs of bass in this pond than any of the others. There were several small bass and plenty of little bluegills swimming around. I wound up catching another 4 little bass on the cover craw in the Cascade Creek Pond.

Here’s the biggest guy of the trip in Boise Idaho Bass Fishing Ponds. He slammed the swim jig along the edge of the bank.

One more little side note, the links above and below in this post are affiliate links were you can pick up baits, rod’s, reels, line, and anything else I used to “Krak” some bass pond fishing in Boise. KrakenBass.com receives a small percentage of the sales through these links. I only use links to baits, and gear I personally trust and know work. The links are here to be helpful for you, and not for the small amount made on the sale of the products. I hope these products can help you “krak” some bass, like they have for me.

Hopefully, you found this Boise Idaho pond bass fishing at Esther Simplot Park trip helpful in your quests to “Krak” bass! Don’t forget to subscribe to the blog, and follow me on the KrakenBass Social Media Accounts.

As Always,

Stay Stoked!

The post Boise Idaho Bass Fishing Ponds – Esther Simplot Park appeared first on Kraken Bass.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview