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Huge thanks to our friend Russell Laviolette (IG: @paroykos) for writing up the following bit of Mugen history! 

==

The Mugen S1 seat, coveted by Mugen aficionados, was likely designed for the NSX in the early 1990s. Manufactured by Esqueleto of Japan, the S1 would find its way into various Mugen race cars.

pic 1: 2 versions of the S1. Photo credit Project onethirty Carlos and Matthew Yu

Most don't know though that at least three versions of the seat exist, increasing the character of this piece even further. The first version (seen on the right side of pic 1 above) are what most are familiar with. Weighing in at 5.6kg the seat utilizes 5 harness holes to allow for the use of a (you guessed it!) 5-point harness. The characteristic three-tone seat utilizes multiple fabrics including suede.

The backing of the seat is constructed of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP). These seats are NOT FIA approved. That doesn't mean they're unsafe. Mugen only used the seats for competition inside of Japan and FIA compliance was unnecessary.

pic 2: version 2. Photo credit Charlie7

pic 3: version 2. Photo credit Mugen Power Japan

The second version (pic 1-left, pic 2, pic 3) was specific for N1-spec EK9s. It was similarly styled in terms of the harness design, but featured a two-tone seat cover. You'll notice though that the waist area differs to more firmly hold a wider-hipped driver (aka they're wider than standard S1s). The seat back, like the "base model" S1 was constructed of FRP.

Last, and rarest of all, is the JTCC-spec S1 found in the Mugen NSX race machine (pics 4, 5, and 6).

pic 4: version 3. Photo credit Jorge Nuñez and Chad Castelo

pic 5: version 3. Photo credit Jorge Nuñez and Chad Castelo 

pic 6: version 3. Photo credit Jorge Nuñez and Chad Castelo 

The bucket design is similar to that of the N1 seat excluding the harness hole between the legs and construction material (see below). Conversely, the seat cover is more akin to that used on the standard S1. The most notable difference though is the bucket construction material. Despite the weight savings of FRP, Mugen instead opted for carbon Kevlar, adding much needed strength for intense race situations. These seats are seldom seen except for in a few of the most well-built NSXs in the world (and some old JDM catalogs).

*Note: I have intentionally not mentioned the later S1R seat as it differs significantly from the earlier examples previously mentioned.

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Huge thanks to our friend Russell Laviolette (IG: @paroykos) for writing up the following bit of Mugen history! The M7 is truly a unique wheel and we love seeing the passion and time that Russell and others put into restoring and preserving these wheels.

==

"THE SUPER WHEEL!"

The Mugen M7 has come to be regarded by many as one of the most important and well designed wheels in SpoCom history. But it wasn't always so. Its popularity has increased ten-fold in recent years and prices have followed. Initially designed for the NSX chassis the wheel ranges in diameters from 15" to 17" and widths between 6.5" to 9". The smaller sizes suited the expanding Civic lineup as well as larger Honda platforms like the Integra and Legend. The wheel consists of a billet aluminum face cut in the bowels of some of the earliest CNC machines and assembled using unorthodox aluminum 12pt flange bolts (M6x20). The barrels are spun aluminum and bare a specification decal similar to those seen on late MR-5s. In addition a very unique Mugen decal is present, likely indicating a production sequence. One other bit of information is present on the rear lip of the barrel in the form of a two digit number. Besides this no other markings indicate the mysterious history of this wheel or its date of manufacture. Some sources speculate that Enkei likely lent a strong arm in the production process, but recent research has indicated otherwise. M-Tec (Mugen) has informed me (via another source) that, similar to the MR-5, the M7 was produced by Fortran. Despite this it's possible that even Fortran used another manufacturer as this kind of outsourcing is common in Japanese wheel production. Fortran would discontinue operations by the mid 90's which may explain the short, but plentiful, production run of the M7. Practically the wheel has little usage in competitive circumstances due to its increased weight, but is a beautiful cruising wheel on nearly any Golden Era Honda chassis. I anticipate the wheel's popularity will continue to grow in coming years and further solidify itself as one of the quintessential wheels for any Mugen collector.

*Notice the details of the prototype wheel pictured. It is missing the distinct Mugen emblem on the spoke and likely has a different finish than production versions. 

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If you've ever been to one of our Dyno Day events, you may have met Kojima San. He travels out every year from Mugen HQ in Tokyo to visit with us, talk to attendees about their cars, and share news from Mugen. So when this year Dyno Day landed on Kojima San's birthday, we knew we had to celebrate in style. We were also unveiling the Mugen Civic RR Advanced Concept (shipped all the way out from Tokyo) and it made for a great opportunity to commission a cake creation as one-of-a-kind, unique and masterfully constructed as the RR.

We looked to Michael Kinjerski, a legend when it comes to Honda cakes (See some of his other Honda cakes here). His son Dustin is a long time friend of King's too.

Here are the photos and the notes Michael shared with us:

==

This is the total construction of the Mugen Civic RR Advanced Concept car from baking the cake to prep work to sculpting and decorating, leading to the finished product. You've seen the finished product, now you'll see what it takes to put this cake together.

Baking the cake using Betty Crocker Super Moist:



Wrap after baking then put into the freezer:



Prep the cake board:







Cut out a foam board template to 1/12 scale of the car:







Utilize template to begin stacking the cake:



Layering the cake with frosting against the foamboard template until the car shape is covered completely in buttercream frosting:









Templates to the exact size are made for all 4 sides:

Templates are pinned to all sides and outlined:

Mugen Civic starting to take shape:











The finished product! This cake took about 5 hrs to decorate not including the baking and other prep work. We even added a "Happy Birthday" message in Japanese to Kojimo San. I 'm honored and humbled to do this project and based on the reaction it was well received. Thank you so much for the opportunity!









Kojima San being surprised with the cake at Dyno Day!:


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Huge thanks to our friend Russell Laviolette (IG: @paroykos) for writing up the following bit of Mugen history! 

==

The Mugen S1 seat, coveted by Mugen aficionados, was likely designed for the NSX in the early 1990s. Manufactured by Esqueleto of Japan, the S1 would find its way into various Mugen race cars.

pic 1: 2 versions of the S1. Photo credit Project onethirty Carlos and Matthew Yu

Most don't know though that at least three versions of the seat exist, increasing the character of this piece even further. The first version (seen on the right side of pic 1 above) are what most are familiar with. Weighing in at 5.6kg the seat utilizes 5 harness holes to allow for the use of a (you guessed it!) 5-point harness. The characteristic three-tone seat utilizes multiple fabrics including suede.

The backing of the seat is constructed of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP). These seats are NOT FIA approved. That doesn't mean they're unsafe. Mugen only used the seats for competition inside of Japan and FIA compliance was unnecessary.

pic 2: version 2. Photo credit Charlie7

pic 3: version 2. Photo credit Mugen Power Japan

The second version (pic 1-left, pic 2, pic 3) was specific for N1-spec EK9s. It was similarly styled in terms of the harness design, but featured a two-tone seat cover. You'll notice though that the waist area differs to more firmly hold a wider-hipped driver (aka they're wider than standard S1s). The seat back, like the "base model" S1 was constructed of FRP.

Last, and rarest of all, is the JTCC-spec S1 found in the Mugen NSX race machine (pics 4, 5, and 6).

pic 4: version 3. Photo credit Jorge Nuñez and Chad Castelo

pic 5: version 3. Photo credit Jorge Nuñez and Chad Castelo 

pic 6: version 3. Photo credit Jorge Nuñez and Chad Castelo 

The bucket design is similar to that of the N1 seat excluding the harness hole between the legs and construction material (see below). Conversely, the seat cover is more akin to that used on the standard S1. The most notable difference though is the bucket construction material. Despite the weight savings of FRP, Mugen instead opted for carbon Kevlar, adding much needed strength for intense race situations. These seats are seldom seen except for in a few of the most well-built NSXs in the world (and some old JDM catalogs).

*Note: I have intentionally not mentioned the later S1R seat as it differs significantly from the earlier examples previously mentioned.

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