Loading...

Cooked in classic Japanese seasonings, Simmered Bamboo Shoots is a simple and elegant dish to enjoy during springtime when fresh bamboo shoots are in season.  Crunchy and savory, they make a great side dish or accompaniment for drinks.

Bamboo shoots, or takenoko in Japanese, are a commonly used vegetable in Japanese cuisine. With a nutty and slightly sweet flavor, the tender shoots can be prepared in many different ways. Today I’ll show you how to make popular Simmered Bamboo Shoots called Takenoko no Tosani (たけのこの土佐煮).

Simple & Delicious Simmered Bamboo Shoots

This traditional Japanese side dish is relatively easy to make. Here, bamboo shoots are cooked in a pot of flavorful liquid seasoned with everyday Japanese condiments.  Since the dish is usually served at room temperature, you can make it ahead of time and store in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Serve it as a side dish to your main Japanese meal, or serve it as a snack to your alcoholic drinks.  Slightly salty and intensely flavorful, you’d be surprised how well it goes down with sake.

What’s Tosani? 土佐煮 

When katsuobushi, or dried bonito flakes, is added to soy sauce base simmered dish (nimono), the dish is called Tosani. The name of the cooking style came from Tosa, a former province of Japan, currently known as Kochi prefecture, located in Southwestern Shikoku island. This region is famous for its top-notch Katsuo (bonito), hence their katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes) are delicious. Simmered dishes that are cooked with smokey katsuobushi are appreciated for their deep-umami and complex flavors.

Ingredients that Go Well with Tosani

Very often bamboo shoots (takenoko in Japanese) are used to make Tosani as bamboo shoots alone are rather plain. The neutral flavor makes it easy to soak up all the flavors it’s paired with. There are few other vegetables that are also frequently cooked in Tosani-style. Here are some of them:

  • Konnyaku (Konjac)
  • Satsumaimo (Japanese sweet potatoes)
  • Fuki (Butterbur)
  • Gobo (burdock root)

Where to Buy & How to Prepare Bamboo Shoots

Bamboo shoots are in season in spring between March through May. Keep an eye out when you visit Japanese or Asian grocery stores, you might be lucky to score some fresh bamboos shoots to make delicious Tosani. They can be hard to find when they are not in season or if they are not a common ingredient at where you are.

Most of the Japanese and Asian grocery stores sell pre-boiled and vacuumed packed bamboo shoot like the picture shown below. Do not use the canned variety to make Tosani.

The bamboo shoots are already boiled, so you can quickly heat up and enjoy right away.

When you use only half of the shoots (as in this recipe), you can save the leftover in an airtight container.  Make sure to soak the bamboo shoots in cold water all the time and change the water every day to keep it fresh until you are ready to use. They can last up to two weeks when they are properly refrigerated.

You can rinse off the gritty white substance in the bamboo shoot, but they are edible. If they don’t bother you, there’s no need to rinse it off.

What to Do with Leftover Bamboo Shoots?

The mild flavor and tender-crisp texture of bamboo shoots make it an excellent addition to bulk out your stir fries, soups, salads or as a delicious topping to your noodle dishes. Aside from adding dimension to various dishes, bamboo shoots are also high in nutrients and low in calorie. Here are some recipes you can make with the leftover bamboo shoots.

Don’t want to miss a recipe? Sign up for the FREE Just One Cookbook newsletter delivered to your inbox! And stay in touch with me on FacebookPinterest, and Instagram for all the latest updates.

Simmered Bamboo Shoots

  • ½ boiled bamboo shoot ((227 g, 8 oz))
  • ¾ cup katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes) ((8 g))
Seasonings
  • 2 Tbsp sake
  • 2 Tbsp mirin
  • 1 Tbsp granulated sugar
  • 2 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 ½ cup water ((350 ml) (you can use dashi too))
  1. Gather all the ingredients.
  2. Combine all the seasoning ingredients (2 Tbsp sake, 2 Tbsp mirin, 1 Tbsp granulated sugar, 2 Tbsp soy sauce, and 1 ½ cup water) in a saucepan.
  3. Cut the bamboo shoots: cut the top 2-inch section into wedges. Then thinly slice the bottom section into quarter rounds, ¼ inch thickness.
  4. Add the bamboo shoots in the seasonings in the saucepan. Place the otoshibuta (drop lid) on top, and bring to a simmer over medium heat.
  5. Once the sauce is reduced to one third, remove the otoshibuta.
  6. [Optional] In a frying pan without oil, heat up katsuobushi until it gets dry and fragrant. Let cool a little bit and break the katsuobushi into fine pieces with hands.
  7. Sprinkle Katsuobushi over the bamboo shoots and mix. Turn off the heat and serve at room temperature in a bowl. If you can find kinome leaves (I cannot get it here), garnish over the bamboo shoots. To get the fragrance going, quickly press the leaves between your hands like clapping motion. You can keep tosani in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook.  All images and content on this site are copyright protected.  Please do not use my images without my permission.  If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe in your own words and link to this post as the original source.  Thank you.

The post Simmered Bamboo Shoots (Tosani)たけのこの土佐煮 appeared first on Just One Cookbook.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Japanese cooking requires thinly sliced meat for many recipes. Here’s how to slice meat thinly for delicious Japanese dishes like Sukiyaki, Okonomiyaki, and Gyudon!

Majority of Japanese recipes require thinly sliced meat of beef and pork.  The slices are about 1/8 inch or even thinner.  You can find packages of thinly-sliced meat like below at Japanese grocery store. 

However, if you don’t have an access to thinly sliced meat, you can prepare it at your own home by following these simple instructions.

Watch How to Slice Meat Thinly
How to Slice Meat Thinly - Tea Time with Nami (Ep 6) - YouTube

Japanese cooking requires thinly sliced meat for many recipes. Here’s how to slice meat thinly for delicious Japanese dishes like Sukiyaki, Okonomiyaki, and Gyudon!

Recipes with Thinly Sliced Meat Thinly Sliced Beef Thinly Sliced Pork Loin Thinly Sliced Pork Belly

Don’t want to miss a recipe? Sign up for the FREE Just One Cookbook newsletter delivered to your inbox! And stay in touch on Facebook, Google+, Pinterest, and Instagram for all the latest updates. Thank you so much for reading, and till next time!

How to Slice Meat Thinly

  • premium-quality meat ((tenderloin, top sirloin, strip loin, rib eye, pork loin or any cut of meat that is slightly more lean and a bit more firm).)
  1. Put the meat in single layer in a large freezer bag.

  2. Remove the air from bag and close tightly.
  3. Put on a metal tray (so that heat transfers faster) and freeze the meat for 1.5 to 2 hours, depending on the size of the meat and how fatty it is.

  4. Take the meat out from the freezer. Each meat shown here is 1 pound and I had to freeze for 1.5 hour.

  5. The meat is ready if the knife goes through smoothly and it is just firm enough for you to slice thinly. If the meat is too soft and you have trouble slicing, put it back into the freezer so it’s more firm.

  6. Slice against the grain using a gentle sawing motion. When you look at the beef, you will see the fibers of the meat are going in one direction. You need to cut across in the other direction to ensure the tenderness.
  7. Here is the thinly-sliced meat.
  8. You can wrap the meat in plastic wrap, put in a freezer bag, and store it in the freezer.

Equipment you will need: 

  • A very sharp knife (A dull knife will not slice nicely)
  • A metal tray
  • A large freezer bag

 

Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe in your own words and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

Editor’s Note: The post was originally published on September 21, 2013. The post has been updated with video and new images.

The post How To Slice Meat Thinly appeared first on Just One Cookbook.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When you visit Zion or Bryce Canyon National Park, there are other interesting spots to check out in Southwest Utah and Arizona worthy of a stop.  Here are some of our recommendations of things to do around Kanab, Utah.

Our family took a trip to Utah and Arizona during children’s spring break to visit the National Parks and other nearby wonders.  It’s been a dream of Nami’s to visit Zion and Bryce Canyon National Park for a long time.  In case you’re not aware, Nami’s dream job when she first came to the US was to be US National Park ranger.  You can read about it in our Yosemite National Park Travel Guide post.

For this travel series, we’ll share the following posts.

  1. Zion National Park Travel Guide
  2. Bryce Canyon National Park Travel Guide
  3. Lower Antelope Canyon Travel Guide
  4. The Wave Lottery, Glen Canyon Dam, Eating, and other Activities

This is the last post in our Southern Utah and Arizona travel series.  We hope you’ve enjoyed the trip with us so far.  Besides the national parks and Lower Antelope Canyon, we also visited some other fascinating points of interest in the area nearby (less than 1 hr drive) Kanab, Utah.  If you have extra time while visiting the national parks, consider stopping by one of these locations.
The Wave Lottery

Besides images from Antelopes Canyon, the other iconic images from this area you’ve probably seen before is from The Wave.  What is The Wave?  It’s an area where the Navajo Sandstone has been naturally eroded by water and wind over time sculping unbelievable U shaped geological formations.

Licensed from Adobe Stock Photo.

The Wave from the sky on Google Map

Due to its popularity with hikers and photographers, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) doesn’t want it to be destroyed by visitors so there is a limit of 20 visitors allowed per day.  10 applicants are accepted online up to 4 months in advance and 10 are accepted the day before in-person at the Bureau of Land Management office in Kanab.

Bureau of Land Management Kanab Visitor Center

Our Airbnb was in Kanab and located only 5 min away from the BLM office so Nami and I decided to try for the lottery one of the mornings on the trip.  Who knows, we might just get lucky!
The lottery process is pretty straightforward:
  1. Get to the BLM office before 9 AM.
  2. Fill out the application form with your information.
  3. When the waiting room opens up, everyone enters the room and you turn in your form and receive a number.
  4. Instructions will be given and then balls are drawn from a bingo wheel for winners.
  5. Numbers are called until the 10 person slots for the next day are filled.
  6. Keep in mind if there are only 2 spots left, and let’s say your group has 4 people and your number was drawn.  You have to decided which 2 of the four will get to hike.  It’s by person count and not group count.

Our number didn’t get called but it was a good experience for us to understand how the process works for the next time.  There were over 100 people competing for the 10 person spots the day we were there.  For more detailed information on the process to get a permit for The Wave and FAQ, click here.  If you visit The Wave without a permit and get caught, there is a hefty fine.

Wire Pass

Even though we didn’t win The Wave lottery, there are still plenty of places to visit and sceneries to enjoy.  One of the trails we hiked during our trip called Wire Pass actually shared the same trailhead as The Wave.  The trail itself is easy to hike and there are 2 slots canyons on the trail for the visitors to explore.

8 miles of dirt road from the Hwy to Wire Pass trailhead.

The trail visitors hike on is actually the riverbed.

After enjoying the unique sandstone scenery for about 1 mile, you will see the entrance to the first slot canyon.

The Wire Pass slot canyon offer similar landscape to Antelope Canyon.

When you research about the Wire Pass trail online, you will read about the 8 feet drop on the trail.  You can see the drop in the image below and that’s where we stopped as our children weren’t quite ready to tackle it.  You can get around the drop by taking a path to the right of the slot canyon.  There is definitely a bit of regret since there are more dramatic slot canyon sceneries after the drop and you can see them here.

If you look at the imagery below, we stopped at the white x.

Click to enlarge map.

Page, Arizona

Speaking of slot canyons, besides the Lower and Upper Antelope Canyons there are a few other stops in Page including:

  1. Horseshoe Bend
  2. Glen Canyon Dam
Horseshoe Bend

Horseshoe Bend Observation area is only 10 min drive from Lower Antelope Canyon.  Unfortunately, we actually didn’t make it to Horseshoe Bend due to our hectic travel schedule.  If you do have some free time, try to make it to this iconic spot around sunset.  What you see is one of the Colorado River turns downstream from Glen Canyon Dam.  For FAQ and more info about Horseshoe Bend, read them here.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Light and airy chiffon cakes are one of my favorite desserts to make.  Baking a chiffon cake may seem daunting to some, but it’s totally worth it once you master the basics of this favorite Japanese pastry. Here are some tips and techniques for making the perfect chiffon cake.  Troubleshooting included!

What’s Chiffon Cake?

It is pronounced as SHE-fon cake.  Made with simple ingredients such as oil, eggs, sugar, flour, and flavorings, a chiffon cake is a light cake with spongy texture. Unlike other types of sponge cakes that use chemical/artificial leavener such as baking soda and baking powder, chiffon cakes are leavened mostly from the meringue (stiffly beaten egg whites). They are baked in a tall pan with at least four inches deep and must be cooled upside down to retain their height.

Is Chiffon Cake The Same as Angel Food Cake?

You might be more familiar with Angel Food Cake as they are commonly sold in grocery stores.  The only difference between these two cakes is that Angel Food Cake uses no egg yolks and no fat, but chiffon cake includes them.

What Makes a Perfect Chiffon Cake and How to Achieve It?

Here are the characteristics of a perfect chiffon cake:

  • It rises tall and straight to the top of the chiffon cake pan without caving into itself.
  • No big holes or air pockets all around
  • The texture of the sponge is light, fine, airy, fluffy, and bouncy.
  • The sponge is very moist, and usually not overly sweet (especially if you are making a Japanese chiffon cake recipe).

In order to make a perfect chiffon cake, there are a few important factors.  So let’s go over them.

1. Make perfect meringue (beaten egg whites) 

This is the most important factor, so I’ll cover this topic in a separate section below.

2. Use the right chiffon cake pan.

Make sure you use the right chiffon cake pan. The best types are the aluminum pan with a removable base. Make sure the pan is NOT non-stick. Do not grease the mold because the cake needs to cling to the sides and center of the pan for support as it rises. Otherwise, it will collapse.  You can buy a 7-inch round angel cake pan with removable base on Amazon or a 17-cm aluminum Japanese chiffon cake pan on Nihon Ichiban or Amazon.

3. Let cool upside down.

The cake must be cooled upside down in its pan so that it stretches downward instead of collapsing. Stick the cake pan on a tall heavy bottle and let cool for 3-4 hours before removing the cake pan. If you use an angel food cake pan, invert the cake pan on a cooling rack.

3 Tips to Make Perfect Meringue (Beaten Egg Whites)

The key to the successful chiffon cake is the meringue – beaten egg whites. There is no clear and easy way to show how much beating is enough, except for your own trials and errors. I could only give you a few tips that may help you succeed.

1. Chill egg whites (What?!)

I know, it’s a total opposite of what you learned in American recipes. I’ve seen most of the American recipes use room temperature egg whites to make meringue. However, almost all (99%) Japanese chiffon cake recipes require cold, well-refrigerated, or sometimes half-frozen egg whites, to make meringue without cream of tartar. Chilled egg whites will make very fine and smooth meringue with small and strong air bubbles inside. They remain strong even in the oven, and help the batter rise higher and fluffier. If you are not from the US, which method do you use?

2. Whisk until egg whites fold over

There is always discussion on how much you should beat the egg whites.  From my experience, it’s best to stop when you lift the whisk, the tip of egg whites go straight up and then fold over.  It’s stiff enough to stand up, yet the tip is soft that it folds over, like taking a bow.

Then switch from the hand-held electric mixer (or stand mixer) to a balloon whisk, and thoroughly mix the sides and center of egg whites a few times to get to the same consistency throughout.

3. Mix in thoroughly with the whisk

I used to use a silicone spatula to fold beaten egg whites into the egg yolk mixture so that you won’t deflate the egg whites, which would result in a dry and dense cake. However, I have read several instructions and youtube videos that a balloon whisk is actually a better choice to incorporate egg whites into the batter. After a few trials, I am convinced that the whisk is the best way to fold in egg whites.

When you fold in egg whites, you might be afraid of breaking the air bubbles and may not mix the batter thoroughly.  I felt the same way and always thought I mixed enough. However, when the egg whites are not mixed in with the mixture thoroughly, they would end up separated in the oven.  As a result, it creates big air pockets/holes inside the batter while being baked.

Fold carefully and slowly so you would not deflate the egg whites. Fold in one-third of the egg whites first to lighten the batter, and then fold in another 1/3.  Then transfer the mixed batter into the egg whites to fold the rest of egg whites.

Convert 17-cm (7″) Cake Pan to 20-cm (8″) Cake Pan

Since 17-cm chiffon cake pan is the most common size for chiffon cakes in Japan, I usually bake with a 17-cm Japanese chiffon cake pan. It’s a decent-size cake for Japanese standard, but it looks “tiny” next to typical American cakes.

All my chiffon cake recipes on Just One Cookbook use a 17-cm chiffon cake pan. I also have a 20-cm (8″) cake pan, so I have converted the measurement from 17 cm to 20 cm.

17-cm chiffon cake pan

  • 3 large eggs
  • 85 g (measure ½ cup and remove 1 Tbsp) granulated sugar
  • 40 ml (3 Tbsp) vegetable oil
  • 60 ml (¼ cup) water/milk/citrus juice
  • 75 g (⅔ cup) cake flour (Make sure to measure correctly; See my tutorial video.)
  • 4 g (1 tsp) baking powder

Bake at 340 ºF (170 ºC) for 30-35 minutes.

20-cm chiffon cake pan

  • 5 large eggs
  • 133 g (⅔ cup) granulated sugar
  • 60 ml (¼ cup) vegetable oil
  • 95 ml (⅓ cup + 1 ½ Tbsp) water/milk/citrus juice
  • 120 g (1 cup) cake flour (Make sure to measure correctly; See my tutorial video.)
  • 5 g (1 ¼ tsp) baking powder

Bake at 340 ºF (170 ºC) for 35-40 minutes.

What Went Wrong? Troubleshooting Chiffon Cakes 1. My chiffon cake did not rise properly. My chiffon cake sank/deflated after I took it out of the oven.

Get chiffon cake pan: Please use an aluminum, 2-piece tube chiffon cake pan.  You cannot use a non-stick pan to make chiffon cake as the wall is too slippery for the batter to cling to the sides and center of the chiffon cake pan in order to rise higher.

Do not grease: For the same reason, you do not need to grease the cake pan.

Invert the cake pan to let cool: If you didn’t use the chiffon cake pan, you can’t do this step.  It’s very important to invert the chiffon cake pan while letting it cool so the cake will not collapse and it will continue to stay tall with the help of gravity.

Beat egg whites correctly: Under-beating egg whites will cause the cake structure to collapse, while over-beating can cause the mixture to break down when you fold it into the batter, creating a heavy batter. Therefore, always keep an eye out for the egg whites as they thicken. A safe way to do is whip your egg whites on medium speed. And it’s ok to stop frequently to check as you get close to the stiff peak stage.

Check oven temperature: When the oven temperature is too low, the cake will not rise to its optimum height. It’s also possible that your oven setting doesn’t display the actual oven temperature. Get an oven thermometer to place it in the oven and test the actual oven temperature at 4 corners and center.  My oven has some hot spot in one corner so I know I need to avoid placing my cake there.

Increase baking time: If you did everything right, maybe the baking time was not enough.

2. My cake got burnt on the top.

Use aluminum foil: Your oven may be a bit too small for this cake pan. You need at least some space between the cake pan top and the oven.  To fix this problem, you can cover the cake with an aluminum foil over the top to prevent further browning once the cake reaches a nice golden color.

3. My cake has big holes (air pockets). 

Mix thoroughly: When you don’t fold the egg whites and batter thoroughly, the cake batter is not consistent.  The meringue parts have too much air bubbles than the other parts, which results in large pockets and other parts of the batter cannot sustain the structure. Make sure you mix everything thoroughly without destroying the bubbles.

Beat egg whites correctly: When egg whites are under beaten, the small air bubbles cannot sustain as the temperature goes up. As a result, small air bubbles turn into one bigger hole.

Prevent air pockets: The air pockets may be created when you pour the batter into the chiffon cake pan. Make sure to pour the cake batter all at once in one location.  Also, run the wooden skewer in the batter a few times and gently tap the chiffon cake pan against the kitchen counter to get rid of large air bubbles that are trapped in the cake batter.

4. My cake has white streaks.

Mix thoroughly: Those white streaks are meringue (egg whites).  It happened when you didn’t incorporate meringue into the batter thoroughly, so the egg whites appeared as white streaks.

FAQs Q: Can I use all-purpose flour instead of cake flour?

A: If you have enjoyed chiffon cakes in Japan and know how airy, fluffy and soft the chiffon cakes are, you have to bake yours with cake flour to achieve the same texture.  You would know the difference immediately if you make it with all-purpose flour.  All-purpose flour has a higher protein content, which develops more gluten and results in a tougher cake.

The substitution or the easiest workaround for cake flour is to mix all-purpose flour with cornstarch. To make 1 cup cake flour, simply take out 2 Tbsp from 1 cup all-purpose flour and replace it with 2 Tbsp cornstarch. However, in my opinion, store-bought cake flour would give a better result as it has been sifted finely with the machine.

Q: Do we need to add baking powder?

A: In general, baking powder is not necessary as chiffon cake relies on the egg whites to rise. Baking powder is just a backup. However, chiffon cake recipe includes oil and egg yolks (fats) and baking powder to counteract and helps the cake rise.

Q: Can I use melted butter instead of vegetable oil?

A: No, to get a light, airy, soft texture, it has to be vegetable oil or canola oil. Please don’t substitute with butter.

Q: Can I bake in a regular cake pan or bundt pan?

A: I highly recommend getting an aluminum tubed pan that allows the cake to rise taller. Avoid non-stick pan and never grease the pan because the cake will not be able to cling and rise as high. If your chiffon cake pan is not the same size as mine, I always recommend doubling the recipe (instead of trying to divide an egg by weight).  Use the leftover batter to make a small cake in a regular ramekin or smaller cake pan (it won’t be a proper chiffon cake though).

Q: When does the cake taste best?

A: It’s best half day to whole day after baking.

Q: How long does the cake last?

A: Wrap the cake in a plastic wrap and you can keep at room temperature for about 4-5 days.  Depends on the ingredients, it might be better to keep in the refrigerator.  You can wrap the individual or whole cake in the freezer, but some flavors will be lost.  Defrost naturally and enjoy.

JOC Chiffon Cake Recipes

I hope this tutorial guide will help you in your chiffon cake adventures. If you baked a chiffon cake and you’re still having troubles, please ask in the comments below. I’ll be happy to help.

Don’t want to miss a recipe? Sign up for the FREE Just One Cookbook newsletter delivered to your inbox! And stay in touch with me on FacebookPinterest, and Instagram for all the latest updates.

The post How to Make the Perfect Chiffon Cake appeared first on Just One Cookbook.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Super airy and fluffy, this Souffle Pancake (スフレパンケーキ) is like eating cottony clouds, but even better with homemade whipped cream and fresh berries!

Japanese take pancakes to new heights.  Think cottony clouds of heaven that melt in your mouth!  Have you seen Japanese Souffle Pancakes (スフレパンケーキ) on social media or maybe even tasted when you visited Japan?  They are fluffy, airy, delicate pancakes that probably look too fancy for a weekday breakfast, but impossible to resist making on the weekend.

These pillowy, soft pancakes are a must-try.  You can’t miss the fizzy, bubbly sound from the souffle pancakes when you cut them open to enjoy!

Watch How to Make Japanese Souffle Pancake
FLUFFY Souffle Pancake ふわふわスフレパンケーキの作り方 - YouTube

Super airy and fluffy, this Souffle Pancake (スフレパンケーキ) is like eating cottony clouds, but even better with homemade whipped cream and fresh berries!

Kiln-baked Green Tea Souffle Pancakes at Hoshino Coffee

Recent Pancake Craze in Japan

Pancakes are the comfort food.  The happiest comfort food.  I’m sure you have many joyful memories of waking up on a Saturday, looking up at a stack of pancakes on your plate.  And now as an adult, you are probably like me, always searching and trying different pancake recipes, happily eating your way on a journey to find the perfect pancake.

In Japan, even the simplest of comfort foods like a pancake are taken very seriously.  In recent years, Japan pastry shops and cafes have been in a race to make the fluffiest, softest pancake.  And by 2016, the pancake craze in Japan was in full swing with pancake shops opening all over the country competing for the best Souffle Pancakes. Here are some of the most famous:

  • Kiln-baked Souffle Pancakes (窯焼きスフレパンケーキ) at Hoshino Coffee (picture above)
  • Miracle Pancakes (奇跡のパンケーキ) at Flippers
  • Happy Pancake (幸せのパンケーキ) at A Happy Pancake

These pancake shop did not exist when I was growing up.  If they did, I would have been there on every special occasion and birthday!  I’m making up for lost time by creating these souffle pancakes every weekend chance I get.

What are Souffle Pancakes?

The ingredients for Souffle Pancakes are similar to regular pancakes, so what makes them different?  What makes souffle pancakes so pillowy soft and delicious?

Souffle Pancakes are all about the eggs. Egg yolks and egg whites are separated, and the whites are beaten to make meringue.  Just like how you would make savory/sweet souffles or chiffon cakes.  The egg whites are beaten until stiff peaks form, and then are folded gently and carefully into the rest of the batter.  The souffle pancakes are extra fluffy because the air bubbles hold their shape inside the pancake batter.  As a result, the pancakes are super airy, like souffle.  When you cut the pancakes, you can even hear the sound of air bubbles escaping!

Enjoy these souffle pancakes the same way you do with standard flapjacks, with fresh whipped cream, some fruits, syrups, and toppings like chocolate chips and nuts.

5 Important Tips to Make Souffle Pancakes

Here are some of my personal tips that helped me achieve the perfect souffle pancakes.

1. Beat the egg whites (meringue) correctly.

To be honest, making meringue requires a lot of practice. Some trials and errors are just part of the process, but I promise it does get easy once you have more experience and understand what it takes to reach the right consistency.

We’re looking for stiff peak, where you lift up your whisk and the egg whites go straight up firmly, but the tip of egg whites bend over like a taking a bow.  If you over-beat egg whites, they will break into pieces.  If you under-beat, egg whites don’t have enough air bubbles and the pancakes won’t be fluffy.

2. Preheat the pan on the lowest setting for a longer time.

Even heating on the frying pan is crucial for the pancakes to cook through all at once. You want to preheat the pan at the lowest heat to help prevent hot spots (meaning some part of the pan is low heat, some part is too hot). This way you have a full control over the cooking time and the final result.

3. Pile up the batter vertically (high).

The key to make lofty pancakes is to add a new pile over the batter on the pan after it starts to form.

4. Cook slow, covered with lid, on low heat.

Unlike regular pancakes, you will need to cook these thick & fluffy Japanese pancakes for a much longer time. If you use higher heat, the pancakes may look done, but the inside will be too raw. Therefore, steady slow cooking over low heat is necessary. To lock in the heat and moisture inside the pan, cover with a lid.

5. Add water to create a little bit of steam.

I’ve tried without adding water before and the difference can be subtle. But since it doesn’t take much to add water, I include this step in my recipe.  Just drop 1 tablespoon of water to empty spaces in the frying pan to add moisture in the pan.

To make two or more servings, you will need multiple frying pans on the stove, or an electric griddle with a lid like this.  These souffle pancakes definitely require extra time and effort, but I promise after that first bite, you will know it was all worth it.  Give this unforgettable souffle pancake recipe a try on the next special occasion!

Don’t want to miss a recipe? Sign up for the FREE Just One Cookbook newsletter delivered to your inbox! And stay in touch with me on FacebookPinterest, and Instagram for all the latest updates.

Souffle Pancake

  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 ½ Tbsp whole milk ((22 g))
  • ¼ tsp vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup cake flour ((30-34 g))
  • ½ tsp baking powder ((2 g))
  • 2 Tbsp granulated sugar ((25 g))
  • 1 Tbsp neutral flavor oil (vegetable, canola, etc)
  • 2 Tbsp water ((for steaming))
Fresh Whipped Cream (optional)
  • ½ cup heavy cream or heavy whipping cream ((120 ml))
  • 1 ½ Tbsp granulated sugar ((20 g))
Toppings
  • 1 Tbsp confectioners’ sugar/powder sugar
  • Fresh berries
  • maple syrup
  1. Gather all the ingredients. You will also need a non-stick frying pan (large enough to cook 3 pancakes at the same time) with a lid. How many inches pan? May be it’s good to mention the minimum size?
  2. Separate egg whites and egg yolks into two different bowls. Put the bowl with egg whites in the freezer for 15 minutes.
  3. In the meantime, add milk and vanilla to the egg yolks and whisk until thick and frothy.
  4. Sift the cake flour and baking powder into the bowl.
  5. Whisk to combine thoroughly (but do not over-mix). Set aside.
  6. After 15 minutes, take out the bowl with egg whites from the freezer. The egg whites should be half frozen. Now start beating egg whites.
  7. When the egg whites turn frothy and pale white, gradually add in sugar. Continue to whip the egg whites.
  8. The egg whites will become glossier and firmer. Stop beating when you lift up the hand mixer and the egg whites stand right up with soft peaks slightly bending over.
  9. Heat the large non-stick frying pan to 300 ºF (150 ºC) over the lowest heat. Brush with cooking oil and lightly remove any visible oil (otherwise the pancakes will have spotty pattern). Keep the heat on while you combine egg whites and egg yolk mixture.
  10. Take 1/3 of egg whites and add into the egg yolk mixture. Whisk together (don’t worry too much about breaking air bubbles at this step).
  11. Next, take half of the egg whites and add to the egg yolk mixture. Gently fold in without breaking the air bubbles in the egg whites.
  12. Now transfer the egg yolk mixture into egg whites. Carefully fold in two mixtures together without breaking the air bubbles. Make sure to gently mix the batter thoroughly!
  13. Remember each pancake gets roughly 4 scoops of batter, so that’s total of 12 scoops for 3 pancakes. Now, scoop the batter and place on the frying pan. My recommendation is to use a small ladle (or a serving spoon that’s bigger than regular spoon) and make a tall pancake. Next, stack one more scoop to the first pancake. Then move on to the next two pancakes giving each 2 small scoops.
  14. By the time all 3 pancakes have 2 scoops, the surface of batter is slightly dry already, so you can stack one more scoop on top, keeping it up high. In the bowl, you should still have roughly 3 scoops left (if you have slightly more, that’s okay).
  15. Set timer for 6-7 minutes, add 1 Tbsp water in 3 empty spaces inside the pan and cover with the lid. Water keeps the pancake moist. Please note: the suggested time is just a guideline and it’s based on the stove and frying pan that I’m using.
  16. After 2 minutes passed, open the lid, and add one more scoop for each pancake (or more scoops if you have more batter). Make sure to stack high, not wide. If the water has evaporated, add a little bit more. Cover with lid and cook.
  17. After 6-7 minutes passed, using the offset spatula, lift the pancake VERY GENTLY. If you feel the pancake is stuck, don’t touch until they firm up a little. If you force it, the pancake will crack in the middle. When the pancake is ready, you can easily move the pancake.
  18. Here is another set of images to show the process. Slightly pull the pancake to create an empty space and gently flip over with “rolling over” motion.

  19. Add water in empty spaces and set timer for 4 to 5 minutes to cook the other side on the lowest heat.
  20. Once they are nicely browned, transfer the pancakes to your serving plates. 

  21. Place fresh cream on the pancakes and top with berries. Dust the pancake with confectioners’ sugar and drizzle with maple syrup. Enjoy!

Fresh Whipped Cream
  1. Prepare ice bath by putting ice cubes and water in a large bowl and placing a clean and dry mixing bowl over.  Add heavy cream and sugar to keep cool.

  2. Whisk on high speed until medium to firm peaks form (should not be runny, but soft and fluffy firm whipped cream). Keep it chilled until you’re ready to serve the pancakes.

Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. Please do not copy this recipe and images without my permission. If you want to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe and link to this post as the original source.

The post Japanese Souffle Pancake スフレパンケーキ appeared first on Just One Cookbook.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Airy, bouncy, and lightly sweet, Orange Chiffon Cake is an elegant pastry with a warm, citrusy aroma from orange zest and a hint of cardamom.  This soft and moist chiffon cake is served with a dusting of confectioners’ sugar and topped with ribbons of orange peel.

With abundant navel oranges in the kitchen, I knew exactly what I wanted to make – Orange Chiffon Cake (オレンジシフォンケーキ). My daughter loves chiffon cake, and many JOC readers have specifically requested this recipe for a long time. To make it extra special and wow-worthy, I sneaked in a pinch of cardamom for a charming flavor.

Navel Oranges + Cardamom Flavor

I fell in love with cardamom when my Indian neighbor, who became my very good friend, made Chai every time our kids had a playdate at her house (I shared her recipe here). The cardamom pods smelled so inviting and delicious. It was a new spice that I had never seen or tasted in Japan.

When I was looking for a unique flavor that would complement orange, cardamom came to mind. I don’t remember exactly what dish I had tried, but it must have been a dessert that immediately caught my tastebuds off guard with the combination. Like clove, but more subtle, cardamom pairs beautifully with citrus flavors, adding a warmth and depth that makes this chiffon cake so memorable.

Ingredients for Orange Chiffon Cake

I love making chiffon cakes as the ingredients are so simple. Eggs, sugar, and flour, these are the ingredients we usually have in the pantry, right? For the flavoring, you can literally work with anything you can think of – black teas, coffee, spices, seasonal fruits, or a more unique Japanese flavors like matcha or black sesame. It is probably one of the most versatile cakes to make at home.

Another reason I like about chiffon cake is it’s never too sweet.  If you’re familiar with Japanese (or Asian) sweets, they are in general not overly sweet or laden with sugar, so you can enjoy the baked treats and not feel bogged down.

Navel Oranges: What’s your favorite kind of orange?  I love navel oranges as they are sweet and juicy, which I used to make this chiffon cake. You can also use cara cara oranges since they are in season right now.

Cardamom: This highly aromatic spice adds a hint of pine-like fragrance and delicate yet spicy flavor to the chiffon cake. Although you can do without cardamom for the recipe, I’d recommend giving it a try. You should be able to find cardamom in the spice aisle at any major grocery stores or specialty spice shops. If you’re not sure what else to do with it after baking the chiffon cake, use cardamom just like you would with cinnamon. Try a pinch of the spice with your cold brew coffee, baked goods, curries or roast meats. It can be a game-changer.

Neutral Oil: Use canola or vegetable oil; please do not use olive oil or other kinds of oil.

Cake Flour: I’ll talk more about it in details below. If you are making a chiffon cake, use cake flour, not all-purpose flour. At least you can make homemade cake flour with all-purpose flour and cornstarch (See Notes in the Recipe below).

Eggs: I use large eggs for all my recipes on the blog as they are the standard size in American recipes.

My Favorite: Super-Fine Unbleached Cake Flour from Bob’s Red Mill®

This post was sponsored by Bob’s Red Mill®. I couldn’t be any more thrilled when I get to work with Bob’s Red Mill® to develop this Orange Chiffon Cake recipe. When comes to baking and breakfast products, I highly recommend Bob’s Red Mill®. Have you tried any of their flours or other products before?  What I genuinely admire about the company is that they use honest ingredients and methods for all their wide range of products, which I think it’s important for the consumers.

As an employee-owned company, Bob’s Red Mill® uses high-quality whole grains to satisfy all vegan, paleo, and gluten-free friendly cooking and baking needs. From almond flour, cake mixes, coconut flour to various grains, it offers the largest lines of organic, whole grain foods in the country. You can be assured that all of its products are certified Kosher and made with ingredients grown from non-GMO seeds. If you’re curious, you can go to the website and learn more about the founder, Bob Moore and his mission too.

To achieve the perfect light texture for the chiffon cake, I used Super-Fine Unbleached Cake Flour from Bob’s Red Mill®. Because it is sifted to a very fine texture, the cake flour is fantastic for all sorts of cakes  – especially delicate ones like chiffon cakes. You should be able to find the cake flour at any major grocery stores. Alternatively, you can also buy it on Amazon.

First Time Making Chiffon Cake?

I’ve shared some helpful tips on How to Make the Perfect Chiffon Cake – Tips & Troubleshoot. Take a look before you start making your first chiffon cake.

I also want to go over some kitchen tools that I use in this recipe. I know some of you have never baked or rarely bake, but would love to try making this Orange Chiffon Cake.

Chiffon Cake Pan: It’s important to get a chiffon cake pan to make a chiffon cake to maintain the height structure and airiness.  Aluminum material works best, and make sure it doesn’t come with non-stick coating. Why?  Because the batter needs to cling to the wall of the cake pan and climb up tall with the help of beaten egg whites. A nonstick pan is slippery and the batter will slide down and flop. You can get this 7-inch angel food cake pan on Amazon or Japanese chiffon cake pan on Nihon Ichiban (ship internationally).

Zester 1: This zester features several sharp holes at the tip of the tool which works brilliantly in zesting off any citrus fruits. There is also another larger hole that allows you to peel off long curly strips for garnishes.  With the two different features, you can create zest in different textures.

Zester 2: Microplane is a versatile tool to have in every kitchen. You can get very fine zest and triple amount from any citrus fruits.  It is particularly useful for baking when you need the citrus flavors to be dispersed into the batter.  Aside from zesting, you can also use it to grate cheese and ginger.

Hand Mixer: I still use a stand mixer (even though it doesn’t show up in my recipe videos/photos), but this hand mixer has been pretty handy and helpful for our filming (easy to show you the process).  It takes a little longer than a more powerful stand mixer, but it still does a great job. So if you don’t want to spend too much money on the equipment you don’t use often and don’t want to lose your arm from whipping egg whites with a whisk, I strongly recommend this hand mixer.

Other Delicious Chiffon Cake Flavors

Chiffon cakes are a very popular sweet in Japan. Not only it’s cleverly designed to feed a crowd on many occasions, it also keeps so well that you could serve it for breakfast or afternoon tea for the whole week. So far I have the following flavors of chiffon cakes:

Have you tried any other interesting chiffons cake you’d like to make at home? Let me know in the comments below. Maybe I’ll be able to share the recipe next time.

Don’t want to miss a recipe? Sign up for the FREE Just One Cookbook newsletter delivered to your inbox! And stay in touch with me on FacebookPinterest, and Instagram for all the latest updates.

Orange Chiffon Cake

  • 3 large eggs ((separated))
  • 10 pods cardamom ((you’ll need ½ tsp ground cardamom))
  • 3-4 oranges ((I used navel oranges))
  • 85 g granulated sugar ((85 g = 3 oz or measure ½ cup and remove 1 Tbsp) (separated))
  • 3 Tbsp neutral flavor oil (vegetable, canola, etc) ((3 Tbsp = 40 ml))
  • 75 g cake flour ((75 g = 2.6 oz = 2/3 cup) (See Notes for homemade cake flour recipe))
  • 1 tsp baking powder ((1 tsp = 4g))
  • 1 Tbsp confectioners’ sugar/powder sugar ((for dusting) (optional))
  1. Gather all the ingredients. Preheat the oven to 340 ºF (170 ºC).
  2. Separate 3 eggs to yolks and whites. Keep the egg yolks in a medium bowl, and egg whites in a large bowl. Freeze the large bowl with egg whites for 15 minutes so that the bowl and egg whites are very cold (it’s okay that they are partially frozen when you beat the egg whites). NOTE: In Japan, cream of tartar is not typically used to whip egg whites. We always use cold egg whites to make smooth, fine-texture meringue.

  3. Crush the cardamom pods and remove the shell. Grind the seeds till fine powder. You will need ½ tsp finely ground cardamom.
  4. Zest the oranges (I use 3-4 navel oranges). As I mentioned in the blog post, I use 2 types of zesters for more texture and flavors. Reserve some of the zest strips for cake decoration.

  5. Cut the oranges in half and juice until you get 4 Tbsp (60 ml) of fresh orange juice.
  6. In the bowl with egg yolks, add roughly 1/3 of granulated sugar and whisk until creamy pale yellow.

  7. Add 3 Tbsp (40 ml) vegetable/canola oil, ½ tsp ground cardamom, and orange zest from 3-4 oranges and whisk well.
  8. Add 4 Tbsp (60 ml) juice from oranges to the egg mixture and whisk well.
  9. Sift 75 g (2.6 oz) cake flour and 1 tsp baking powder into the egg mixture. Whisk until incorporated and make sure there are no lumps.
  10. Take out the bowl with egg whites from the freezer. Whip the egg whites until opaque, foamy, and bubbly.
  11. Gradually add the rest of sugar in small increments while whisking.
  12. Continue to whisk until stiff peaks form.

  13. To check on stiff peaks, pull up your whisk and see if you can see strong “peak” that stays still without bending down.

  14. Using a whisk, whisk in 1/3 of the egg whites in the batter until the mixture is homogeneous.
  15. Fold in another 1/3 of the egg whites into the batter. This time, fold in gently without breaking the air bubbles.
  16. Now transfer the batter into the egg whites. Gently fold in egg whites into the batter. Make sure thoroughly mix WITHOUT breaking the air bubbles.
  17. Pour the batter into the ungreased 17 cm (7”) chiffon cake pan in the same location to prevent more bubbles from forming. 

  18. To remove or prevent air pockets, run a skewer through the batter and then drop the pan gently on a counter holding the center tube and wall of cake pan together (so air won’t go into the bottom of the batter).
  19. Bake at 340 ºF (170 ºC) for 30-35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean and the top of the cake springs back when gently pressed. If the top gets burn too quickly (maybe heat source is too close), cover the top loosely with aluminum foil.
  20. As soon as you take out the cake pan from the oven, drop it on the counter to shock the cake so it stops shrinking. The cake must be cooled upside down in its pan so that it stretches downward instead of collapsing. Stick the cake pan on a tall heavy bottle. If you use an angel food cake pan, invert the cake pan on a cooling rack.
  21. To remove the cake pan, run a thin sharp knife or thin offset spatula around both the inner and outer edges of the cake.
  22. Remove the cake from the pan and run the knife on the bottom. Move onto a serving plate or cake stand. Dust confectioners’ sugar/powder sugar on top, if you like. Enjoy!

All-Purpose Flour vs. Cake Flour:

All-purpose flour and cake flour do not perform the same. Cake flour is more delicate, and if you use all-purpose flour instead of cake flour, the texture will be dense and tough. 

 

Homemade Cake Flour:

To make 1 cup cake flour, take one level cup of all-purpose flour, remove 2 Tbsp, and then add 2 Tbsp of corn starch back in. Be sure to sift the flour 3-4 times to distribute the cornstarch well.

 

Tips for beating egg whites:

  1. Make sure your beaters and mixing bowl are clean and dry. A speck of oil or egg yolk on either one can minimize the volume of the beaten egg whites.
  2. Avoid plastic bowls as even clean ones may hold oily residue that can affect the beating quality of the egg whites.
  3. Use a bowl that’s wide enough to keep the beaters from being buried in the egg whites.
  4. Do not over-beat or under-beat egg whites – your cake may fall. Egg whites should be stiff but not dry.

 

Equipment you will need: 17 cm (7″) chiffon cake pan

Make sure you use the right chiffon cake pan. The best types are the aluminum pan with a removable base. Make sure it is NOT non-stick. Do not grease the mold because the cake needs to cling to the sides and center of the pan for support as it rises or it will collapse.  You can buy a 7-inch round angel cake pan with a removable base on Amazon or a 17-cm aluminum Japanese chiffon cake pan on Nihon Ichiban or 

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Nami shares video footage from her family trip to Lower Antelope Canyon in her new YouTube series Tea Time with Nami.

This is my 5th episode on my new series on our YouTube channelTea Time with Nami.  If you missed my first two episodes, you can click here.

In Tea Time with Nami series, I’ll be talking about all kinds of topics beyond my recipes.  I’d like to take this opportunity to answer some of the questions you have and connect with JOC readers and viewers outside of making delicious Japanese dishes.

Watch Lower Antelope Canyon Video Tour
Lower Antelope Canyon Video Tour - Tea Time with Nami (Ep5) - YouTube

Join us on Lower Antelope Canyon video tour as we travel through the narrow passageway carved into the sandstone by wind and water.

To watch this episode, please click here and you can also read our Lower Antelope Canyon – The Photo Tour.  Thank you for your support!

The post Lower Antelope Canyon Highlights – Tea Time with Nami (Ep 5) appeared first on Just One Cookbook.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Join us on Lower Antelope Canyon photo tour as we travel through the narrow passageway carved into the sandstone by wind and water.

Our family took a trip to Utah and Arizona during children’s spring break to visit the National Parks and other nearby wonders.  It’s been a dream of Nami’s to visit Zion and Bryce Canyon National Park for a long time.  In case you’re not aware, Nami’s dream job when she first came to the US was to be US National Park ranger.  You can read about it in our Yosemite National Park Travel Guide post.

For this travel series, we’ll share the following posts.

  1. Zion National Park Travel Guide
  2. Bryce Canyon National Park Travel Guide
  3. Lower Antelope Canyon Travel Guide
  4. The Wave Lottery, Glen Canyon Dam, Eating, and other Activities

Ready to go explore mind-boggling landscapes with us?  Let’s go!

Watch Lower Antelope Canyon Video Tour
Lower Antelope Canyon Video Tour - Tea Time with Nami (Ep5) - YouTube

Join us on Lower Antelope Canyon photo tour as we travel through the narrow passageway carved into the sandstone by wind and water.

Getting to Lower Antelope Canyon

You’ve most likely seen images of Antelope Canyon before.  Its popular scenery had been used for Windows desktop wallpaper and login screen.  Did you ever wonder where these beautiful canyons are located?  Both Upper and Lower Antelope Canyon are located near Page, Arizona.  From our Airbnb in Kanab, Utah, it was about 1.5-hour drive east.  If you drive from Las Vegas or Phoenix, it’s about a 4.5 hours drive.

Lower Antelope Canyon – Quick Tips

Both Upper and Lower Canyon are on private Navajo Land; they are not places where you can visit by yourself.  There are only 2 tour companies that operate Lower Antelope Canyon.  Both tour offices (Ken’s Tour/Dixie Ellis Tour) are located right at the canyon.  For Upper Antelope Canyon, the vendors like Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours are off highway 98.  They have trucks that will bring visitors to Upper Antelope Canyon.

Here are some tips for Lower Antelope Canyon:

  1. The Canyon is not wheelchair accessible.  In order to tour, visitors would need to climb down steep metal stairs.
  2. It is very crowded.  For our time slot at 11 am, the tour was at least 50-60 people.  They divide the folks into groups of 10-15 visitors per tour guide and each tour guide then leads his or her group into the canyon.
  3. Even though the floor is not paved, it’s sandy and pretty easy to walk with regular shoes.
  4. The Lower Antelope Canyon is a V-shape slot canyon with wider openings at the top and narrow walkways.  The Upper Antelope Canyon is A-shape with wider walkways.  Most photographers choose Upper Antelope Canyon for the unique light beam shots as it shines down through the crack onto the canyon floor.
  5. No bags of any kind (including camera bags) allowed in the canyon except purses and hydration packs like Camelbak.
  6. If you want to learn about the canyon during your visit, walk close to your tour guide otherwise it’s hard to hear him/her.  If you want to capture good photos, stay in the back of the group so you’ll have time to capture shots when the rest of your group clear from the path.
Why we chose Lower Antelope Canyon?

We chose lower antelope canyon over upper antelope primarily because of cost, $40 vs $63/$74.  A friend had been to both and recommended visiting just 1 as they are quite similar for casual “sightseers”.

Most photographers choose Upper Antelope Canyon for the unique beam shots but those Photographers’ tours are quite expensive at $150+ per person.

Lower Antelope Canyon Photo Tour

The canyons are below ground so when you arrive on location, you can’t actually see the feature itself.  Besides the ticket booth, there’s a small gift shop, gallery, and snack bar in the main building.

Visitors wait in the waiting room until the tour time.  Once it’s time, you are assigned a tour guide as you head out the door.

Tour group walking towards Lower Antelope Canyon.

While walking towards the slot canyon, you can see interesting patterns on the sandstone carved by wind and other natural forces over the millions of years.

The tour was backed up when we arrived at the slot canyon, we waited for about 10 min before descending the stairs.

Steps leading into the slot canyon is quite steep.

There is no barrier between visitors and the sand rock walls, you can get right up to the walls to touch them and see the details up close.

Due to its popularity and crowd size, it’s very difficult to get shots of the canyon without people inside.

The Lion.

The tour is 1 hour of casually strolling through the canyon with pauses in between when it gets backed up.  The views of the canyon are incredible throughout the entire tour.

PRO TIP: If you want some great photos from the canyon, ask the guide to take some of the pictures for you.  They do the tour 5-6 times a day so they’re aware of all the best photo ops.

Lower Antelope Canyon is pretty narrow most of the way, but it does opens up at certain points.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Crispy on the bite, yet delicately soft, this pan-fried Teriyaki Tofu is incredibly flavorful! Enjoy this Japanese dish as an appetizer, or even as the main dish accompanied with rice and a few of your favorite sides. It’s a dynamic recipe for anyone to try, with easy options to turn the dish into vegan or gluten-free!

There are so many delicious ways to enjoy tofu in Japanese cooking. We stir-fry, simmer, deep-fry, or steam tofu.  We even eat it as Cold Tofu in the summer. One of the most popular tofu dishes you may already know is Agedashi Tofu, which is tender creamy tofu bites in a crunchy deep fried shell soaked in dashi broth.

Today, I’m sharing another fried tofu recipe with this pan-fried Teriyaki Tofu (照り焼き豆腐).  This is the game-changer recipe to make for that person in your family who is so certain they do not like tofu. It looks elegant – but it is surprisingly easy to create – with a crispy, crunch on the outside to sell it at first bite, and a melt-in-your-mouth smoothness to make it memorable.  This pan-fried Teriyaki Tofu is incredibly flavorful, and fun to serve as an appetizer, side dish, or even the main dish.

Easy 3-step Teriyaki Tofu

First time cooking tofu at home? Here are 3 easy steps to make delicious teriyaki tofu:

Step 1: Drain tofu well and slice

The first thing you want to do is open the tofu package and start draining the tofu.  If you drain for 15 minutes, it’s plenty.  Cut the tofu into half inch slices.

Step 2: Coat with potato starch and pan-fry

Prepare a tray/dish with potato starch.  If you don’t have potato starch, you can use cornstarch.

Heat the oil over medium heat, and start dredging tofu in potato starch.  Shake off any excess starch and place the tofu in the frying pan.  Be patient as you pan-fry the tofu. Try not to keep flipping the tofu.  Wait until one side is firmed up and nicely seared before you flip it around to cook on the other side.

Step 3: Add homemade teriyaki sauce and coat the tofu

Once all sides of the tofu are evenly browned and crisp, pour in the teriyaki sauce. You should hear some nice sizzles from the hot frying pan.  The moisture in the sauce will evaporate as the sauce thickens.  Gently coat the tofu with the sauce, and sprinkle katsuobushi over for an extra umami boost!  To serve, garnish the tofu with green onion and red pickled ginger.

Delicious Variations for Japanese Pan-Fried Tofu

When this pan-fried teriyaki tofu becomes part of your regular rotation, you will probably want to try it with different types of sauces.  Here are my quick and easy variations that my family loves!

1. Homemade Ponzu

Okay, if you are not into homemade ponzu, you can purchase it too (but you will be surprised how easy and SUPER delicious homemade ponzu is, trust me).  Instead of teriyaki sauce, use ponzu sauce and sprinkle grated daikon and green onion.  Sprinkle shichimi togarashi (Japanese seven spice) for a kick.

2. Tonkatsu Sauce

Give this tofu dish a street food vibe reminding you of delicious okonomiyaki or takoyaki. Season with tonkatsu sauce and sprinkle aonori (green nori), zigzag some Japanese mayo, and garnish with green onion and red pickled ginger. Kids love it!

3. Sesame-Soy Dipping Sauce

This is another versatile sauce that goes with a wide variety of Asian finger foods or appetizers. Whisk together soy sauce, rice vinegar, a pinch of sugar or honey, sesame oil, chopped green onions, chopped garlic and toasted sesame seeds, you’d have a marvelous sauce for the pan-fried tofu. Feel free to add in some fresh chopped chili peppers if you like.

4. Garlic-Chili Sauce

If you like things spicy, you can smother the pan-fried tofu with a quick homemade garlic-chili sauce. It’s as easy as chopping up some garlic and mixing it with Sriracha sauce or sweet chili sauce, soy sauce, rice vinegar, honey/ sugar and a generous squeeze of lime juice.  This version will really kick-start your palate.

Make It Vegetarian, Vegan or Gluten-Free

For those of you who are vegetarian and vegan, all you need to do is to omit the last ingredient – katsuobushi or dried bonito flakes. Super easy conversion.

If you are gluten-free, simply swap soy sauce with gluten free soy sauce.

Don’t want to miss a recipe? Sign up for the FREE Just One Cookbook newsletter delivered to your inbox! And stay in touch with me on FacebookPinterest, and Instagram for all the latest updates.

Teriyaki Tofu

  • 14 oz medium firm tofu ((396 g))
  • ¼-⅓ cup potato/corn starch ((Roughly 60 g or more))
  • 1-2 neutral flavor oil (vegetable, canola, etc)
  • 1-2 packs katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes) ((3-6 g, as much as you like))
  • 1 green onion/scallion
  • Pickled red ginger ((Kizami Shoga) (to garnish))
Homemade Teriyaki Sauce:
  • 2 Tbsp sake
  • 2 Tbsp mirin
  • 2 Tbsp soy sauce ((Use GF soy sauce for GF))
  1. Gather all the ingredients.

  2. [30 Minutes Before Cooking ] Wrap the tofu with paper towel and place it between two baking sheets or plates. Then put a heavy object on top in order to press and drain water from tofu for 20-30 minutes.  Discard the water.  Alternatively, you can wrap the tofu with paper towel and microwave it for 2-3 minutes.

  3. To make teriyaki sauce, combine 2 Tbsp sake, 2 Tbsp mirin, and 2 Tbsp soy sauce in a measuring cup or small bowl.

  4. Cut Tofu into small square pieces. The thickness should be about ½ inches.

  5. Chop green onion.  In a non-stick frying pan, heat 1-2 Tbsp oil on medium to medium high heat.

  6. When the oil is hot, put potato or cornstarch in a tray or bowl.  Coat the tofu with the starch. 

  7. Shake off excess starch and gently place tofu pieces in the pan. Cook the tofu until the bottom side is crispy and golden brown.  Flip and cook the other side.

  8. When both sides are nicely brown, pour in the Teriyaki Sauce.

  9. Flip tofu and shake the pan to evenly coat the sauce over the tofu.  Sprinkle katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes) before turning off the heat.

  10. Serve the tofu on the plate and garnish with green onions and pickled red ginger. Serve immediately.

Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe in your own words and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

Editor’s Note: The post was originally published on March 28, 2011.  The images and content have been updated in May 2018.

The post Teriyaki Tofu 照り焼き豆腐 appeared first on Just One Cookbook.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Nami shares video footage from her family trip to Bryce Canyon National Park in her new YouTube series Tea Time with Nami.

This is my 4th episode on my new series on our YouTube channelTea Time with Nami.  If you missed my first two episodes, you can click here.

In Tea Time with Nami series, I’ll be talking about all kinds of topics beyond my recipes.  I’d like to take this opportunity to answer some of the questions you have and connect with JOC readers and viewers outside of making delicious Japanese dishes.

Bryce Canyon National Park Highlights
Bryce Canyon National Park (Utah) Travel Highlights - Tea Time with Nami (Ep4) - YouTube

Join us on Bryce Canyon National Park Travel Guide as we took in the awe-inspiring views of Bryce Canyon Amphitheater, hiked the switchbacks on Navajo Loop Trail, and gazed at the towering hoodoos.

To watch this episode, please click here and you can also read our Bryce Canyon National Park Travel Guide.  Thank you for your support!

The post Bryce Canyon National Park Highlights – Tea Time with Nami (Ep 4) appeared first on Just One Cookbook.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview