Loading...

Follow Just a Girl in this World - A lifestyle website for millennial women on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
Or

Valid


Share This:
“Women Who Work” is a series that celebrates the millennial woman who is breaking barriers for women, excelling in business, contributing to her community and industry in a big way, and setting the example for other women to go out in the world and kick-ass. If you or someone you know fits this description, feel free to reach out for a feature! While you may know her for her funny tweets and online presence, Madalyn Mendoza is killing it in the journalism world as a reporter for MySA. Read below to find out more about Maddy Skye, and our latest “Woman Who Works.” Name:

Madalyn Skye Mendoza

Hometown:

San Antonio

Current City:

San Antonio

Year Born:

1992

Alma Mater:

University of the Incarnate Word

Awards & Recognition:

Dean’s List all four years, graduated Magna Cum Laude

Hobbies:

Traveling, antique shopping, going to museums, trying out new restaurants and bars, going dancing (not well)

Describe your life in a tweet (140 characters):

Weekday go-getter, weekend taco-getter, sometimes a jet-setter

What’s your perfect taco?

This is a tough one. If we’re breaking it down into categories:

Breakfast taco: I’ll go with my true blue, one that I’ve been eating since I was little, which is a bean and cheese with rice.

Street/mini tacos: I need carne asada from my favorite spot, La Imagen.

What woman do you look up to most in media and why?

Oprah has been — and forever will be — my icon. A highlight of my day growing up was watching her show with my mom or grandma. She personifies who I want to be when I speak to people. Her questions are thought-provoking and her approach is sincere. Her life aside from journalism is also inspiring.

Landing an entry-level gig in a newsroom is no easy task. What made you want to go into journalism, and how’d you get your start in reporting?

When I was little, my mom would always ask, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Mind you, I was probably only 3, but that’s the kind of mom I have. She’s headstrong, so she raised us to have our goals set early. I’d list off an array of occupations: doctor, writer, painter, Barbie. These conversations usually happened over dinner, which is a very important time in our family. TVs are off, phone calls aren’t answered. We talk. I credit those childhood dinners for my communication skills. Meeting people, hearing their stories and sharing them (if they want me to) makes my heart pitter patter. I’m also terrifyingly great at sleuthing the internet and being a spy – Harriet the Spy was my favorite movie as a kid, so that may have inspired that. So, a future in journalism was clear early on. I got the ball moving in high school, when I was an anchor for Providence’s Provet TV, the student broadcasting network. As an adult, my “why” was cemented. I knew I had a love for people and a passion keeping my community informed. With those two paired together, I continued sharpening my journalism knowledge at UIW, where I was anchor for UIWTV. I then interned for college life-centered magazines, Spurs blogs and at KSAT 12. After college, I started my “big girl job” on the digital team at KENS 5.

Have you ever had a huge journalism fail? What’d you learn from the situation?

I typically consider well-versed in Spurs-related material. I can usually drop names, stats and championship facts on command. I was humbled at one point when writing about former Spur, David West. I was quickly called out for referring to him as “George West.” I don’t know what led to me calling him that, but I still pause and think about his name before speaking or writing about him. I learned to always, always, always fact-check, even if you feel confident about a subject.

What moment are you proudest of in your career? What would you consider a “lifetime achievement?”

I’ve always been proud of my career in itself, but I think the first story I wrote that created a lasting impact was my coverage of the David Molak story. David was an Alamo Heights High School student, who his family said committed suicide because of bullying. Prior to breaking the story, I didn’t have much experience in writing about subjects of this nature. I was worried I didn’t have what it took and I wanted to cover this with extreme care. My work on this story pushed me past my comfort zone and taught me a new level of reporting, considering I was working with minors and their families during a very tense and confusing time. My story and follow up pieces, as well as national coverage, put more eyes on the issue until it was eventually spearheaded by State Sen. Jose Menéndez. Menendez authored a bill, known as “David’s Law,” which was signed last summer. The law provides temporary injunctions on social media accounts that are bullying or harassing students and requires schools to notify parents on both sides of what’s going on.

I’ve only been in the business for a handful of years, but I think sharing the story and spreading awareness is something I’m proud of.

I usually gauge my success on what my 10-year-old self would think of me. She’d be so proud. At this point in my life, I’d say that’s my “lifetime achievement.” But, there’s more to come, of course.

What advice would you offer to any woman interested in pursuing a career in journalism?

To be stubborn about your goals, flexible about your methods, especially since it’s a tough field. I had no intention of being a writer, my experience was minimal. My only focus was on broadcast journalism, I wanted to be on TV and there was no telling me any different. To my initial dismay, I didn’t land a job in front of a camera. I did, however, make enough connections that helped me earn a position with mySA. As with most life changes, I was completely unsure about my decision and frankly, I didn’t think I was the right fit. Three years later, I’m in love with my job and my career interests are completely different. Moral of the story: don’t X-out other avenues and network as much as possible, even if that means interning for free. The connections you make have the potential of being more valuable than a paycheck.

You’ve got a huge twitter following through both your reporting and your witty/real presence on the site. With 63% of millennials getting their news from social media sites, where do you see the direction of news reporting heading? Do you ever see a point where on-air reporting will be obsolete?

As a millennial myself, I rarely get my news from TV unless it’s something like a State of the Union, an emergency weather event or I’m stuck in a waiting room. I am constantly cued into the news cycle and it’s always through social media. I always promote my stories through Twitter, Facebook and sometimes Instagram. I think that’s where news is heading. I don’t think on-air reporting will be obsolete, but I think the way TV news is disseminated will have to roll with the changes.

I feel like I’m seeing more TV news outlets reaching really far to connect with their audience on social media and it falls flat because it’s not genuine. I’m not saying I’m a social media guru, but I always think about myself as a consumer before I post anything. If I’m getting my news from social media, it’s probably because I’m too busy to watch TV. Being punchy and concise is key. It’s a balancing act of sharing, connecting and being true to your voice, but it’s not rocket science.

Recently,  E! News anchor and veteran,  Catt Sadler left the network after she found she was grossly underpaid compared to her similarly situated male-counterpart. What would you like to see done to ensure the wage gap is bridged for women in news and media?

Speaking about salaries can be considered faux pas, I think that leads to a problem. Most women don’t know where they stand because there’s a big secret about how much who makes. I think a little transparency would go a long way.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 10 years?

In 5 years, I’ll be 30, which is scary to think about. I’ve always wanted to venture outside of San Antonio and force myself out of my comfort zone. I’ve been rethinking that recently. I know this city like the back of my hand and I feel that I have a responsibility. My readers depend on me for a certain niche of news and I take pride in that. So, the plan for 5 years down the road is up in the air. However, I hope that I’m a mom and wife in 10 years. As important as my career is to me, I do eventually want my own family. I’ve also been thinking about law school, owning my own media company, possibly opening a restaurant or going to graduate school to earn a masters degree in history. I’m probably sounding like my 3-year-old self who wanted to be Barbie, an astronaut and still make it home in time for dinner, but I know that I have the willpower to balance it all.

The post Tacos and Twitter: Maddy Skye appeared first on Just a Girl in this World.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A few years ago, I was having a conversation with a male co-worker about relationships and my state of singleness. Okay, if I’m honest, it was one of many conversations I had made this kind man patiently endure on this topic. After listening to me drone on about my horrible affliction for the gazillionth time, he asked with a voice of exasperation, “Amanda, why do you let being single define you so much?”

I remember it like it was yesterday because it struck me deeply and I felt embarrassed.

He was right.

Something clicked and I realized that he didn’t see me as his “single friend Amanda.” He saw me as a smart, funny, interesting woman and he was baffled – and almost angry – that I could not see myself the same way simply because I was single.

But sometimes it’s hard not to fret about our relationship status, isn’t it?

And, on Valentine’s Day, when we are literally getting slapped in the face with heart-shaped balloons, it’s particularly hard to ignore the questions—“Why haven’t I met The One?” “Am I doing something wrong?” “Am I swiping left too much on Bumble?”

So, as I prepared to write this article, I went to the ultimate source for answers— Google.

Whoa! There is a lot of information out there about what you’re doing wrong and what you need to change about yourself to score a relationship: “be more aggressive,” “don’t make the first move,” “wear more skirts,” “don’t be so picky”… does any of this sound familiar?

After reading all the dizzying advice, I started thinking about the tape that runs in the heads of single women. It’s no wonder that women feel a sense of shame and responsibility for their singleness. It’s tough out there, and it’s hard not to look for an explanation as to why you haven’t found the right person.

But, unfortunately, all too often that internal tape turns into negative thoughts and self-blame about not being enough or doing enough to be in a relationship.

I’m not going to attempt to tell you why you are single or offer up a to-do list for how to get a relationship. But, I will ask you this one question: would you do anything differently?

When you look at how you live your life, does it bring you peace and comfort – and maybe even a sense of pride? If it does, then what is it about you that needs to change?

  • If you are open and vulnerable to the idea of love and relationships, don’t change a thing.

  • If you are “putting yourself out there” in a way that honors your authenticity and values, don’t change a thing.

  • If you are waiting for the right fit – even if it means being alone for now, don’t change a thing.

  • If you can accept imperfection in others and yourself, don’t change a thing.

  • If you are pursuing activities that fulfill you, don’t change a thing.

  • If you have relationships that help you to be your best self, don’t change a thing.

  • If you are a source of love and encouragement to others, don’t change a thing.

  • If you take care of yourself mentally, physically and emotionally, don’t change a thing.

Listen, I’m not trying to sugar coat the pain that comes with wanting to share your life with someone and that reality feeling out of reach. It’s okay to be sad about it sometimes, abuse chocolate in times of need, or to cry out “what is taking so long?” But, at the end of this well-deserved venting session, I hope you’ll ask yourself “would I do anything differently?”

If you can say no to that question, I hope you’ll take a moment to marvel at your life; a life that you have worked hard to create; a life that is being lived with intention, strength and character.

And, if you would like to do some things differently, I encourage you to think about what you’re waiting for… Are you afraid that if you get too busy loving your life you’ll miss out on meeting someone? Are you letting your fears and insecurities rule your decision making? If so, maybe it’s time to quit letting your singleness define you.

No one can guarantee you a relationship. However, being able to say “I wouldn’t do anything differently” can help ease the sting of the disappointments and will put you in an emotional space that allows you to be open and ready for the many gifts this life has in store for you.

Yes you may be single.  But, girl, you are so much more. Now go out and live like it.

About the Contributor

Amanda is a trained Life Coach and holds a Master’s Degree in Counseling. As a recovering risk-avoiding scaredy-cat, she is passionate about empowering women to live and love boldly. Amanda shares her inspiration through personal coaching, corporate training, workshops and international retreats. She particularly loves working with women in the areas of dating/relationships, career growth, and overall self-confidencewww.lifecoachamanda.com. You can find her on Facebook or on Instagram @girlgetyourrootsdone

Share This:

The post My Single Valentine appeared first on Just a Girl in this World.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Warsan Shire poems can only be appreciated by the woman who knows her worth, but struggles to demand it, the woman who wants love but loves herself more, and by the woman who refuses to be tamed to fit a particular stereotype. The London native has published three collections, and has worked with Beyonce on Lemonade. According to Alexis Okeowo in the New Yorker, Shire’s work “embodies the kind of shape-shifting, culture-juggling spirit lurking in most people who can’t trace their ancestors to their country’s founding fathers, or whose ancestors look nothing like those fathers. In that limbo, Shire conjures up a new language for belonging and displacement.” Here’s “15 Warsan Shire Poems for the Feminist Heart.”

“It’s not my responsibility to be beautiful, I’m not alive for that purpose. My existence is not about how desirable you find me.”

“Give your daughters difficult names. Give your daughters names that command the full use of the tongue. My name makes you want to tell me the truth. My name doesn’t allow me to trust anyone that cannot pronounce it right.”

“I am a lover without a lover. I am lovely and lonely and I belong deeply to myself.”

“Things my mother didn’t tell me, but should have: Never give any kind of pleasure to a boy you wouldn’t give
yourself.
Kiss like a promise and wait for the other person to break it.
Human beings are not ships; you cannot save them from sinking
if they don’t want to be rescued from the floodwaters.
Loving someone that doesn’t give a damn about you
isn’t sexy; it’s misplaced energy, also known as
self-destruction.
Don’t ever treat anyone like a refugee from a civil war;
they will come back from battle and leave you as wounded
as if you were the one who had been paid
for military service. Forgiveness isn’t putting the weapon down;
it’s learning how to kiss the person pulling the trigger,
not just a quick peek on the cheek, but a full one with tongue.
Let the dead be dead.
They have no answering machines, no phonelines:
if you call them, only the ground will ring.
Never trust a boy who already has a pack of condoms ready
in his coat pocket before he even asks your name.
When the world tries to break your back with it’s weight,
get a stronger spine.
Your father left us because he was ashamed
for not being the one that gave birth to you.
Even oceans misplace their anchors sometimes.
Never “give a man permission.”
You shouldn’t have to. It should be mutual.
Stop treating your body like currency,
don’t pay anyone who doesn’t deserve it.”

“Sometimes your light attracts moths and your warmth attracts parasites, protect your space and energy.”

“My alone feels so good. I’ll only have you if you’re sweeter than my solitude.”

“Document the moments you feel most in love with yourself- what you’re wearing, who you’re around, what you’re doing. Recreate and repeat.”

“For Women Who Are “Difficult” to Love’ You are a horse running alone
and he tries to tame you
compares you to an impossible highway
to a burning house
says you are blinding him
that he could never leave you
forget you
want anything but you
you dizzy him, you are unbearable
every woman before or after you
is doused in your name
you fill his mouth
his teeth ache with memory of taste
his body just a long shadow seeking yours
but you are always too intense
frightening in the way you want him
unashamed and sacrificial
he tells you that no man can live up to the one who
lives in your head
and you tried to change didn’t you?
closed your mouth more
tried to be softer
prettier
less volatile, less awake
but even when sleeping you could feel
him travelling away from you in his dreams
so what did you want to do love
split his head open?
you can’t make homes out of human beings
someone should have already told you that
and if he wants to leave
then let him leave
you are terrifying
and strange and beautiful
something not everyone knows how to love.”

“Make peace with your body, it’s not man made, there are no flaws, there are no mistakes.”

“I fell apart many times. so, what does that say about me besides I live through wars.”

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Share This:

Being 23 is weird. You’re an adult, but not quite. You think you should have things figured out, but you really have no idea what you’re doing. After a really rough 22nd year, my 23rd year was filled with a lot of growth, a lot of learning to let go of bad relationships and recognizing toxic people, and learning that to love, you have to allow yourself to accept it. Here’s “23 Things I Learned in My 23rd Year.”

  1. Let it hurt as badly as possible, then let it heal.
  2. Always believe people’s actions before you believe their words.
  3. It’s okay to leave behind people who are stopping your growth.
  4. At the end of the day, you’re the only person who can 100% care about YOU.
  5. Overthinking only creates problems that aren’t there.
  6. Give your love freely and your trust sparingly.
  7. Surround yourself with people who bring out your magic, not your crazy.
  8. You are 100% in charge of how you feel and think at all times.
  9. People are not black and white. Good people can do bad things and bad people can do good things.
  10. You can’t live your life waiting for the apology, validation, or vindication you never received.
  11. Taking the time to take care of yourself does not make you selfish. It affords you the emotional energy to take care of the people and things you love.
  12. You are worthy of love and happiness. Your past and the things that have shaped you don’t change that.
  13. Don’t be afraid to completely change your whole life.
  14. Pursue the things that terrify you.
  15. Life is too short to be doing shit you hate.
  16. It’s also too short to waste your time on people who don’t lift you up or give as much as you do to them.
  17. Some people are only in your life for a particular season. That’s okay.
  18. Always follow your gut. if something doesn’t feel right it probably isnt.
  19. It’s okay to admit you need help and to accept it.
  20. Very few things are worth destroying your peace over.
  21. Surround yourself with people who care about you and respect you enough to call you out on your bullshit.
  22. The best things come when you are least expecting them.
  23. You’re only 23, it’s okay to not have everything figured out.

The post 23 Things I Learned in My 23rd Year appeared first on Just a Girl in this World.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Share This:

New Year, New Space, New You

Though we don’t necessarily need to wait a whole year to bust out our decluttering and home organization resolutions, there is perhaps no more appropriate time to discuss the liberating effects of a deep clean out session in our homes. Our physical spaces are a very direct response to the intention with which we operate across a variety of spheres in our lives, whether we realize it or not. If this New Year motivates you to work towards a new goal, pushes you to grow or change in a certain area, or inspires you to reset your energy and yourself, your first step needs to be assessing your physical space. Do your surroundings look and feel like they support or distract you from what you want to achieve? With the simple solution of decluttering and organizing, you’re putting a conscious shift of energy and intention into your space, and supporting yourself by creating an environment that brings you joy and supports the style of living that you want. With that said, not all decluttering is created equal! Outlined are some simple ways to make your next decluttering session last you to the next round of new year resolutions, and beyond!

Give yourself time…lots of time.

Treat your decluttering session like a special event, not a chore. Block time on your calendar.  A weekend spent cleaning out and tidying up is a weekend well spent, but if you can’t commit to that much consequent time, plan for uninterrupted periods of time to work through each category of clutter—more on that below…

Set your stage. Have a plan.

Putting some steps in place before getting started will support you throughout the process and will guarantee your chances of pushing through till the end.

  • Prepare your station of outgoing items by having paper or canvas bags emptied, labeled, and handy to start categorizing what needs to come out of your home. For a closet, set a couple bags aside for non-matching hangers (most dry cleaners collect and reuse dry cleaning hangers), clothes for resell, donation, and tailoring. Get in touch with a tailor if you already know you’re going to need something altered to help keep you accountable for getting items dropped off.
  • Figure out where you want to take general categories of discarded items beforehand. Look for local clothing, book, and toy resale stores, nonprofits, churches, or general donation drop off sites. Having these sites in mind can often be a great motivator to help you push through the resistance in getting rid of certain items.
Work by category.

A valuable lesson to be learned from organizing-celebrity Marie Kondo is that the trick to efficient decluttering is to working by category, not by room. It’s hard to realize you have too much of the same thing or unneeded duplicates of an item if they’re scattered throughout your home. Start with the instant gratification category of decluttering: clothes. Working through this section first will get your decluttering process jumpstarted and will help fuel the less glamorous categories of home organization. Next in line are books, papers, miscellaneous items, and finally photos and mementos.

Make a mess.

Nature is a constant balancing act of order and chaos, and the process of decluttering and tidying up is our way of taking part in that. Decluttering is messy, embrace it! Designate your bed or a large floor area your dumping ground when working through each category, and don’t start organizing or putting anything away until you’ve worked through your whole pile! It’s chaos, and it’s essential to the process. Skip out on this, and you’re shortening the effects of a truly tidied and refreshed space.

Follow Through.

Discarded items have a mysterious way of sneaking back into your wardrobe, back into your junk drawer, and back into your mental clutter if you don’t get them out as soon as you’re done cleaning out. Once you’ve resolved to release an item, commit to it. Get it out of your house. Follow your plan. The sooner these pieces have made their way to a consignment store, donation drop off, recycling center, etc., the better.  

Pay Attention.

Decluterring isn’t about making a marathon of getting rid of things; in fact, many intense discarding sessions lose their effect after a short period of time because of one simple factor. People that don’t pay attention to themselves in the process of discarding and organizing end up shopping needlessly to fill the apparent void left by their intense clean out session. Decluttering is not necessarily about stepping into a totally minimalist lifestyle; it is about being happy and satisfied with what you have. In order to accomplish this, you have to show up for yourself in the process of decluttering. Pay attention to how you feel throughout the process—acknowledge the fear you feel around letting go of certain things, of not having enough, of not having what you need in the future, of losing a memory. That fear is inevitable and uncomfortable, but acknowledging it and moving past it is a very real thing, and it’s crucial for the cleansing, long term effects of decluttering and tidying up.

About the Author | Website, Facebook

For founder Karen Vilches, organizing has always been a great source of happiness and an intuitive skill. She received her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from the University of Texas at San Antonio, with a focus on Latin American Colonial painting and sculpture. Karen relocated to Austin in 2012 to begin a career in textile sales, where she was first introduced to the design community in Austin. After learning more about small business management, consulting services, and professional organization, she officially founded Urban Order in 2016, and hopes to help Austin tidy up, one happy home at a time!
 
Karen enjoys working one-on-one with women who feel overwhelmed, unexcited, and burdened by too much “stuff” and a lack of organization in a specific area (or areas) in their home or office spaces. She focuses on thoughtfully decluttering their problem areas, then resetting these spaces with simple, customized storage solutions to make them look beautiful, feel functional, and support harmonious living.

The post 6 Expert Tips to Declutter and Organize Your Space appeared first on Just a Girl in this World.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Share This:
“Women Who Work” is a series that celebrates the millennial woman who is breaking barriers for women, excelling in business, contributing to her community and industry in a big way, and setting the example for other women to go out in the world and kick-ass. If you or someone you know fits this description, feel free to reach out for a feature!

Amanda Nelson is not a woman to be messed with. Although she didn’t have the privilege of growing up in the South, Amanda’s every bit of the strong, opinionated, well-dressed, slightly foul-mouthed-yet-still-polished woman you’d expect to find below the Mason-Dixon. Learn more about this bad ass fashionista and business owner in our latest “Woman Who Works.”

Name:

Amanda Nelson

Hometown:

Buffalo, New York

Current City:

Austin, Texas

Year Born:

1990

Alma Mater:

Penn State/ Art Institute

Business:

Whistle & Wild,LLC

Awards & Recognition:

Been in multiple magazines in the DC/ Northern Virginia/ Baltimore Maryland as well as news segments, which I thought was pretty cool!

Hobbies:

Photographing models for W&W, painting, singing, eating tacos & brisket

What is the funniest thing that has happened to you recently?

I sent an email to a zoo asking if my husband can interact with the primates there. I haven’t laughed so hard since I don’t know when. (the answer was no)

If you could go back in time and meet any notable woman in history, who would it be? Why?

Lady Godiva, look her up. She is a straight bad ass. Her husband was not very nice to the townspeople and taxed them to death…she hated that he did this and wanted him to lift the debt. He challenged her and said if you ride through town on horseback, naked, then I will. & Guess what she did next….rode through the town with only her hair to cover her. #GOALS

You’ve been involved in the fashion industry for years. What was the first moment you realized that fashion was something you wanted to pursue for life?

I remember in 9th grade I was leaving for school in the morning and I took this long piece of sheer fabric from my house that I think was meant for a curtain valence and styled it as a scarf. My mom looked at me and said “you’ve always done interesting things like that” & I just knew.

What made you want to start your own online boutique? Was there anything that was harder than you expected about the whole process?

I wanted to make my own choices and use my style and influence on the brand. & YEAH! Taxes are hard and DC laws suck when it comes to registering to a biz, home selling permits, etc. oyeee.

You went from a 9-5 type job to starting your own business. What was the scariest part of that leap?

The scariest part was coming up with a name. I didn’t care if people were going to like Whistle & Wild or not, still don’t. It’s about me and my customers. It’s a way for me to express my creativity and to use it as an outlet. The name had to be catchy and just right.

What advice would you offer to other women looking to quit their “day jobs” and pursue their dreams full time?

Research! They would really have to have a solid business plan. It’s all fun and games until everything falls apart. A solid and proper business plan will take you far.

You recently made a big move from Washington D.C. to Austin, TX. Has the move affected the way you shop pieces for customers? How different are style in the North from the heart of Texas?

The move was more “on brand” for W&W so it was easy on the customers, and I would be lying if I said it didn’t affect the way I buy for my customers. The styles in DC are far more polished, stiff and rigid compared to the styles you’ll see on the site and the gram. But I like that it wasn’t “typical” or “expected”.

Women are now the dominant force in small business ownership and succeeding in industries that were once taboo for women. What more do you think we can do to increase the number of female-owned small businesses?

Seminars, Mentoring, Internships, and anything else to get the word out to these young women. They may not even know they want to be an entrepreneur but with a little nudge and push from someone successful …who knows, you may find the next Oprah that way!

Where do you see yourself, and whistle and wild in the next five years?

Girllllll, Five years is a lonnnnnng time who knows. If you were to tell me last year that I would be living in Austin (my dream city) I would have never believed you. But I will say this; Whistle & Wild will not slow down, the sky is the limit and this girl is not stopping any time soon. I’m looking for more partnerships, more collaborations, more everything. 2018. The year of more for W&W .

Connect with Whistle & Wild:

Website | Facebook | Instagram

The post Whistle While You Wild: Amanda Nelson appeared first on Just a Girl in this World.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Share This:

While some New Years Resolutions are admirable like “lose 10 pounds” or “save money” are admirable, they very rarely ever last through the new year. This is mainly because we are trying to give ourselves a quick fix versus focusing on the things really making you unhappy or holding us back. Here are “12 New Years Resolutions Worth Having” that will force you to do just that.

Practice gratitude

Make an effort to wake up grateful for everything and anything you have. Say, “thank you” more. Let your friends and family know how much you care about them. Your life may not be perfect, but taking time to be grateful for the little things can have a huge affect on your mental health and relationships.

Learn something new everyday

Even if it’s something as small as reading an article on something you find interesting or reading a whole book on a subject, push yourself to learn new things and expand your view of the world.

Go to a place you’ve never been

Whether it’s a city in your state or a country all the way on the other side of the world take the time to grow this year by making yourself uncomfortable and experiencing new things. As Ibn Battuta once said, “Traveling – it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller.”

Be more mindful

Unplug and take the time to notice and appreciate the little things. Being more mindful allows you to live in the now and take things day by day and moment by moment.

Have more control over your thoughts

Your intentions and thoughts become actions, so think wisely. Make a concerted efforts to redirect your negative thoughts into positive ones and see how much your life changes.

Surround yourself with people who elevate you

Let go of all the people who dull your shine, poison your spirit, or bring you drama. Cancel your subscription to their issues and surround yourself with people who inspire you, uplift you, and encourage you to pursue good habits and your goals.

Take care of your body

This year focus less on a number on the scale and focus on taking care of your body. Get lots of sleep, drink plenty of water, eat veggies, but really focus on your body and listening to it’s needs. Stop buying into the idea that you have to hustle 24/7 and take time to take care of yourself.

Break a bad habit

Whether you need to stop smoking or actually starting to answer text messages, now is the time. Stop waiting for tomorrow to break unhealthy habits.

Less T.V., more books

The average American watches more than 4 hours of TV each day (or 28 hours/week, or 2 months of nonstop TV-watching per year). In a 65-year life, that person will have spent 9 years glued to the tube. While some T.V. can be educational, that’s time you could be spending being transported to new worlds, learning new things, or bettering yourself.

The post 12 New Years Resolutions Worth Having appeared first on Just a Girl in this World.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

2017 may go down as the worst year well, EVER, but overall women scored some pretty big wins in 2017 from politics to the big screen. Here’s “10 Times Women Dominated in 2017” picked from Glamour’s yearly highlights. We may not always feel like it, but we are heard, the work we are doing matters, and we are changing the world for future generations of women.

World Women’s March

The day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, an estimated 3.2 to 5.2 million people in 600 cities nationwide take part in the Women’s March, making it likely the largest single-day protest in U.S. history and the ultimate display of smashing the patriarchy.

Semper-She

Three women enlist as the Marines’ first female infantrymen. Oorah!

Nevertheless, she persisted

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) is silenced by a Senate vote for reading from a letter written by Coretta Scott King criticizing then–Attorney General nominee Jeff Sessions’ record on civil rights; explaining the vote, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says, “She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted,” which women adopt as a rallying cry.

Uber Girl Power

Susan Fowler, a former engineer at Uber, publishes a 3,000-word blog post exposing the hostile culture for women at the ride-share company; four months later, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick resigns and the company announces that it has fired 20 employees as part of a wide-ranging harassment investigation.

She’s Got Wings

An all-female flight crew circumnavigates the globe on Air India, becoming the first to do so on a passenger plane (the engineers, ground staff, and air traffic controllers are all women, too); in July, the airline names pilot Anny Divya, 30, commander of a Boeing 777 (the youngest female ever!).

Miracle

The U.S. women’s national hockey team announces plans to boycott the world championship after its members are unable to secure fair pay from USA Hockey; within weeks, the team negotiates a raise and wins its eighth world title.

Represent

Kim Reynolds, a Republican, becomes the first female governor of Iowa; just six states are led by women.

What, like it’s hard?

Nancy Abu-Bonsrah signs on as Johns Hopkins Hospital’s first black female neurosurgeon; there are only 219 board-certified female neurosurgeons in the U.S.

Wonder Women

In a historically low-earning summer for Hollywood, Wonder Woman brings in a record $100.5 million in its opening weekend; the film, directed by Patty Jenkins, goes on to earn more than $821 million worldwide. Ka-pow! Er, ka-ching!

#MeToo, No More

After a New York Times story written by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey reveals decades of sexual harassment by Hollywood mega-producer Harvey Weinstein, the board of his company fires him. Actresses Ashley Judd, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Angelina Jolie are among those who come forward. The scandal ultimately prompts a powerful outpouring of women revealing instances of sexual harassment and assault, using the hashtag #metoo.

Share This:

The post 10 Times Women Dominated in 2017 appeared first on Just a Girl in this World.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Ted Talk Tuesday is a motivational series for women that hi-lights Ted Talk speeches that inspire, drive, and foster female growth. Check-in weekly to see our feature talk,  and forward us any suggestions for future talk via our “Contact” page in the menu.  About the Ted Talk:

Gutsy girls skateboard, climb trees, clamber around, fall down, scrape their knees, get right back up — and grow up to be brave women. Learn how to spark a little productive risk-taking and raise confident girls with stories and advice from firefighter, paraglider and all-around adventurer Caroline Paul.

To raise brave girls, encourage adventure | Caroline Paul - YouTube
This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by their editors on their home page.

About the Speaker:

Caroline Paul · Author

Brimming with insights gained on her picaresque journey from firefighter to best-selling author, Caroline Paul’s “The Gutsy Girl: Escapades for Your Life of Epic Adventure” is a revolutionary guide for raising brave young women.

Images and bio are from the Ted Talk website.
Share This:

The post Ted Talk Tuesday: To Raise Brave Girls, Encourage Adventure appeared first on Just a Girl in this World.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
One brutal fact all strong women find in life? Most men say they want a strong woman, until they get one.

They love that you’re strong until it means they can’t walk all over you.

They love that you’re independent until they realize it means you don’t need them.

They love that you’re ambitious until it takes time away from them or they realize you’re more successful than them.

They love that you’re intelligent until they realize that means you have your own opinions.

If you’re a strong, independent, ambitious, and intelligent woman you’ve seen the same scenario over and over again. You meet a guy, and said guy praises you for all the above qualities. Things are great until he pulls away from you, either from his own securities or because you’re just “too much.” It ends, and they move on to someone that’s a little bit easier to handle than you. You’re left wondering, “Will I ever find a man who is not only on my level, but willing to accept I’m on his (or higher)?

As a woman who’s tired of being a good woman to men who aren’t ready, I’m tired of feeling like I have to hold back everything I have to offer because I’m “too much.” I shouldn’t have to water down my ambition, my accomplishments, or what I want in life because it makes someone uncomfortable. In a world that told us we could be anything and little girls, we’ve found what they really mean is “not too much of anything.” That’s the thing with strong women though, we don’t half-ass anything. We don’t half-ass our friendships, we don’t half-ass our dreams, and we don’t half-ass our relationships, and we shouldn’t have to. Yet, it constantly feels like we need to in order to find love.

Daisy Buchanan hit the nail on the head when she said, “I hope she’ll be a fool- that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.” Intelligent women need and want someone who is going to help them grow and learn new things, and supposedly most men do too- until you disagree with them or they think that you’re smarter than them in any way. Then they’re asking and telling you, “why do you always have to argue?” or “you’re not as smart as you think you are.” The lesson learned after they’re done trying to break you down is, “if I had just kept my mouth shut, none of this would have happened.” So, we either buckle or we say “goodbye” because we know our opinions and thoughts matter.

I can’t reassure myself or you and say, “don’t worry, we’ll find someone who can handle all that we are someday,” because I don’t ever know if we will. There are countless great women throughout history who never did get married or had children who lived incredibly fulfilling and successful lives (Oprah, Shonda Rhimes, or Harper Lee to name a few). There are tons of great women who do find love. I think that’s one of the most magical things about being a strong woman who can rely on herself though. We don’t need anyone to complete us, and we can see our worth enough not to compromise ourselves for the sake of having a warm body in bed next to us every night. If someone comes along who can help us grow and will support us in everything we do? Great. If not, at least we have it within us to build fulfilling lives on our own. So, Most men say they want a strong woman, until they get one, but all strong women know their worth enough not to compromise it for someone who can’t fully appreciate them.

Do you feel this way? What are some ways you think we can combat these types of feelings as strong women? Let us know in the comments!
Share This:

The post Men Say They Want a Strong Woman, Until They Get One appeared first on Just a Girl in this World.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free year
Free Preview