Loading...

Follow Traditional Taekwondo Perth on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Helping Beginners Learn the Forebalance - YouTube


So if you all haven't already noticed, I've been going through my old YouTube videos in recent posts. It's great to be able to re-use content whilst the school is closed, but more so - I like it that I can annotate the visual content with additional information that sometimes is just lacking.

Today, I happened on this video I shared a year and a half ago. It's titled Helping Beginners Learn the Forebalance. And it's got everything I hate about useless martial art videos. You have this instructor (that's me btw) talking about how to do technique without ever explaining the why behind what he says. Or the value of what he's really doing. Or why the pink-belter - what is up with that anyway - why is he learning this over 'happy slapping'.

And if you ask me, I really can't see why anyone would be plodding through this super long stance reminiscent of hard style bull**** and totally divorced from the more 'tactical' stuff you'd see in the UFC.

Again this is the issue - the video doesn't show the context of this technique. That I still have it on YouTube at all is a testimony of my unsurprising inability to market this channel, and the tolerance of the video's 35 viewers who didn't give it a thumbs down.

But here's the rub ... I use this stance and linear motion over and over again in sparring. Yes, in actual sparring, with an actual non-compliant opponent. No, not only with our SuperLight randori. Yes ... to actually drive myself forward and gap close. That is to cross the distance and use close quarter striking tools. Yes, most people would think I'd prefer to stay back and use longer reaching flippity flippity kicks. Oh, he can do both. :-)

On a scale of 1 to 10, this is one of the harder techniques to figure out. It requires precision timing, and combative nous. Done right, the opponent will be hard pressed to tell what's coming his way, and will be left wondering how he got hit from that distance. Literally, it took me 6 months to figure out how to do this even after it was used on me.

So yeah, I didn't get that across on the video. I succeeded in boring the stuffing out of my viewers, and didn't deliver any sizzle. Well, hey, don't blame me ... I am after all a *traditional* instructor! LOL.

Thank you for visiting us on our blog.

Here's to a great 2019. This is my 36th year as a martial artist, and I am so excited to share JDK's insights with everyone interested in what we get up to. In the next few days, I travel to meet two Taekwondo friends of mine - Ørjan Nilsen who's the author of Traditional Taekwondo Ramblings, and Founder of the FB group The Study of Taekwondo, and then there's Roy Rolstadt, a very adept instructor who looks so suspiciously like JDK but is a very well trained member of and a credit to NTN. 

Looking forward to meeting more practitioners around the world. 

Best,

Colin
--
[ Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our Traditional Taekwondo Blog's FB page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here

    Come play with us ...

  • Make basic blocks part of an indispensable close quarter toolkit!
  • Breathe life into your line drill.
  • Integrate easy throws into a hard style syllabus.
  • Endow simple kicks with (more) stopping power.
  • Tap into martial philosophy & etiquette to get you into the zone.
  • Taekwondo pattern applications show the form is not there to limit you!
  • We welcome all styles, all ranks, and especially welcome open-minded practitioners.
  • Happy to also ditch training and just hang out.

  • We are located in Perth, Western Australia. But if you can't make it to us ...
    Travel itinerary for our black belts in 2019 include but not limited to:
    USA, Melbourne, Singapore, Manila, and Norway. Please inquire.

    To avoid embarrassment, please do not inquire about certification through JDK.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Teaching Wrist Locks to Hard Stylists 101 - YouTube
Wrist Locks to Hard Stylists 101

Wrist locks are great techniques to teach hard stylists who hold out for a future where their skills 'soften' to look like Aikido demonstrations you see on YouTube. Aikidoka are renown for their graceful and effortless demonstrations between Tori and Uke. Uke are the opponents who perform the initial 'attack.' The tori are the technicians who deflect said attack to redirect the opponent. The resultant disruption of center of gravity creates beautiful and balletic takedowns.

Hard stylists might like the 'effortless' and 'graceful' transactions because much of hard style training is sweaty, tiring, and frankly, unglamourous. As hard stylists age, many yearn for their lost youth, a return to old school training (which they will lead), a worry of when they'd need to schedule their hip replacement surgery, and then a belief a paradigm shift will occur in their skill to allow them look like O Sensei.

Few stop to consider that Aikido demonstrations are simply choreographed two-man drills. The uke is putting their arm out. The tori holds on to their arm. The uke jumps, somersaults, and performs an amazing breakfall.

Aikido is not without merit. But perhaps you should pause and consider some suggested prerequisites before you think handlocks are the next skill you need to learn.

Prerequisites to Wrist Locks to Hard Stylists 101:
  1. Bypass lead arm guard and trapping of arm
  2. Limb destruction, joint attacks, and control
  3. Stand up clinch tactics
  4. Defence against wrist grabs, arm grabs, and lapel grabs, etc. 
  5. Breakfalls and rolls
  6. Takedowns 
  7. Standard over-the-shoulder, hip, and leg reaping throws
  8. Defence against regular takedowns and throws
  9. Shoulder locks
  10. A solid discussion on what good (read 'tactical') bunkai and applications training looks like. 
Wrist locks are an important part to round off training, a considered part of self defence training, weapons training and defence, and as a good subset of combative skills. Don't lose heart. Keep working at it! :-)

--
[ Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our Traditional Taekwondo Blog's FB page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here

    Come play with us ...

  • Make basic blocks part of an indispensable close quarter toolkit!
  • Breathe life into your line drill.
  • Integrate easy throws into a hard style syllabus.
  • Endow simple kicks with (more) stopping power.
  • Tap into martial philosophy & etiquette to get you into the zone.
  • Taekwondo pattern applications show the form is not there to limit you!
  • We welcome all styles, all ranks, and especially welcome open-minded practitioners.
  • Happy to also ditch training and just hang out.

  • We are located in Perth, Western Australia. But if you can't make it to us ...
    Travel itinerary for our black belts in 2019 include but not limited to:
    USA, Melbourne, Singapore, Manila, and Norway. Please inquire.

    To avoid embarrassment, please do not inquire about certification through JDK.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Clearing Lead Hand Guard with Knifehand - YouTube

I saw an argument on FB recently questioning the validity of the knife hand tactic as a striking tool. The argument was about the relevance of a knife hand comparing it to the ease of a punch or even a slap. Aside from the fist formation at the end of your arm, much of the initial post discussion I thought was coloured because the idea of 'pressure point' was brought up to direct the knife hand chamber as a limb destruction move. So yeah, after that mention of a term with questionable links to kyusho, apparently even plausible ways of coverage, deflection, and counter striking lose credibility.

A punch or a slap is of course a very valid strike. But when upclose and when you can't really windup ... hey, I'll be happy to still have the various 'traditional' tools I can draw from. In my toolkit, these techniques are not single use. I can use many of them to control, to trap, to deflect, counter strike, yadda, yadda, yadda, etc. A hard style troller might see the proffered video as an edict. Or as a prescription to then measure my worth as an instructor.

And that is why I often say my videos - however detailed or however long - are shown without the context of training. You see only what I can show in a few minutes. You never see how we train it, or how it'll be deployed. And I can confidently tell you, what you see in the video only guides us. And this is one of the main reasons why JDK seems to grow or come up with material so readily - it is that we do not hold our techniques or drills to a fixed standard. We do not pigeon hole techniques.

Back to this video. Like the theme of 'context' above, often many people simply see the 'end bit' of a technique. How you hold your hand. Which part of the foot strikes the targets. It's the 'Hollywood' effect. Many people don't see the stance, the internal kinematics, the flight path of the technique, the mental calibration or the delivery of power.

This knife hand technique for instance is so versatile because each point of its flight path allows you to do different things. You can bypass lead guard, or deflect an oncoming strike. You can control the arm as you gap close. And perhaps if you're dealing with that drunk uncle at Christmas time ... you can decide to segue to do a takedown instead of impacting the side of his neck. You can also do these very effectively from a flinch reaction, without needing to draw your fist back. Without appearing to be aggressive. Without telegraphing to mouth breathers that you're attempting a counter.

Another big lesson I have been trying to convey through my blog and lessons - is that these are fundamental skills which are NOT BUNKAI. Every karate ka, their mother, and their dog ... all they want is to see some esoteric demonstration of prowess tied into their kata. My big lesson is that the kata is not there to teach you anything. Kata can be many things ... it is a framework. It is a summary. It is a learning opportunity.

It isn't Karate101. You should have skills and ability WAY BEFORE you ever do your kata. In fact your existence shouldn't be tied to how much you know of any one kata. The depth we plunge into patterns as instructors of the martial arts is however way different. When we dissect the pattern, we dissect it with the experience we have of reducing conflict, of deescalating violence, of seeking escape from threat, of the need to transmit the knowledge, and of survival of our legacy.

To see this video in YouTube check out https://youtu.be/r_cws-T11R8

Keep training!
--
[ Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our Traditional Taekwondo Blog's FB page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here

    Come play with us ...

  • Make basic blocks part of an indispensable close quarter toolkit!
  • Breathe life into your line drill.
  • Integrate easy throws into a hard style syllabus.
  • Endow simple kicks with (more) stopping power.
  • Tap into martial philosophy & etiquette to get you into the zone.
  • Taekwondo pattern applications show the form is not there to limit you!
  • We welcome all styles, all ranks, and especially welcome open-minded practitioners.
  • Happy to also ditch training and just hang out.

  • We are located in Perth, Western Australia. But if you can't make it to us ...
    Travel itinerary for our black belts in 2019 include but not limited to:
    USA, Melbourne, Singapore, Manila, and Norway. Please inquire.

    To avoid embarrassment, please do not inquire about certification through JDK.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Stop Someone from Throwing You - YouTube


The above shows a video setting up a shoulder throw, and in the second part, the defence against the throw by manipulating hip placement and therefore changing the proximity between attacker and 'defender'.

I was never formally trained in this skill.

Yep, I never received training from my first martial art nor taekwondo on how to stop a throw from being executed. I was taught how to effect the throw, and how to breakfall. The throw we learned possibly wasn't covered in such detail - no wonder we always seem to resort to muscling through it. But we didn't ever think it was an option to disrupt the throw except for maybe trying to pull away with the body or pushing forward with the arms.

Let that admission sink in while you look at what is otherwise a fairly detailed video on how the throw and the defence works, and how simple both are. It really is fairly simple.

Amongst various ideas JDK presents - one key aspect of our training is this ... if we teach a technique, we should at minimum include at least one defence to that technique. JDK's approach typically extrapolates from this to then include various tactics that work 'either side.' These mitigate or disrupt the attacker, and then plug back into standard tactical responses. In this instance, when we introduce the hip throw at Dosan, we should eventually teach the defence to those throws; and we eventually see this as we look at the first initial open palm tension press from Yulgok.

To be clear, the tension press is an excellent rank appropriate time for such a tactic to occur in our syllabus. But also to be clear, once a person learns this skill, it really ceases to be Yulgok's tension press anymore. You can shove the opponent's hip using your hand, your own hip, a knee, or forearm. It is more than one technique.

I guess at one point you might ask - who taught you this and how can you identify this as Taekwondo? Well, if you want to know, a couple of very clever and highly trained Bujinkan associates of mine were keen for me to understand the structural balance of a body. These friends performed and showed us several very funky takedowns over many years - both unarmed and with weapons. They never did say, hey, do this with only this technique or only our sequence. It was never about limiting it to any one thing. So as I assimilate the concept to manipulate the skeletal structure, this was like a 'gift' from one system to another; no strings attached.

When that happened, I then make sense of it within the framework of Taekwondo. This means I plug it back into the traditional forms structure, then include it as part of our skillset to be taught and to be drilled, and then cook up some clickbait title for a blog post. If you really want to know, ours is like a 'painting by numbers' approach - and is totally different to how it was initially shared with me.

My hope is you appreciate my candor to see the essence of hardstyle training. That indeed we can learn skills that help round our own skillset, and help grow our art. When you can see it this way and if you agree that it doesn't rob us of what makes us who we are, send me a message to say hi.

Cheers,

Colin

More information on my Bujinkan friends ...

Bujinkan Shibu Agoge Group (25/3 Forward Road East Victoria Park) aspires to provide the best opportunity for its students and the community to train as both students and teachers so we can embody an ageless philosophy of theory and practice of the Martial Arts. We wish to do no harm, cause no harm and live in harmony. Treat others as you would like to be treated with tolerance, respect and a good heart. Walk through life with an immovable heart, be true to yourself, be honest with yourself and give more back to the Community then the Community gives you.
Dojo Cho Andrew Netes

--
[ Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our Traditional Taekwondo Blog's FB page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here

    Come play with us ...

  • Make basic blocks part of an indispensable close quarter toolkit!
  • Breathe life into your line drill.
  • Integrate easy throws into a hard style syllabus.
  • Endow simple kicks with (more) stopping power.
  • Tap into martial philosophy & etiquette to get you into the zone.
  • Taekwondo pattern applications show the form is not there to limit you!
  • We welcome all styles, all ranks, and especially welcome open-minded practitioners.
  • Happy to also ditch training and just hang out.

  • We are located in Perth, Western Australia. But if you can't make it to us ...
    Travel itinerary for our black belts in 2019 include but not limited to:
    USA, Melbourne, Singapore, Manila, and Norway. Please inquire.

    To avoid embarrassment, please do not inquire about certification through JDK.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Using Taekwondo's Down Block as Limb Destruction - YouTube


Limb Destruction works a treat. It's easy to learn. You're not risking breaking your fingers on the hard corners of his skull. And most people can generate a good amount of force without needing to train too hard for it.

I had a former golden gloves boxer come to my school about a dozen years ago, saying he wanted to learn 'something useful,' and how he's not seen anything worthy from other traditional martial art schools he's visited. So I decided to show him how basic blocks could be leveraged against a grabbing or striking arm. Almost immediately he started to flinch from the pain shooting up his arms. Then he turned beet red and started sweating. Like he was going for some super spicey ramen challenge. Well, he did ask for it.

Our conversation following talked about the difficulty of teaching an absolute beginner how to punch. Not just throwing a balled up hand in the air. But using a punch as a tactical weapon in a real situation. And yes, we both agreed that it'd take about at least a half year to make an adequate weapon that would function well combatively.

The blocks smacking against his arm though ... lol ... could be used almost immediately. Someone grabs you, you destroy their wrist. You numb their forearm. You render their bicep or tricep non-responsive. You hyperflex their elbow. AND you don't have to think too hard to get the job done. You just smash a part of the opponent's body between your two arms.

In the video above, I'm setting up a defence against one step which uses not just one but two downblocks. The first one insinuates my arm inside the attacking limb and uses an underhook to then hold the arm still. The second down block or hardan markgi then is dropped on top of the attacking limb. You can strike to the back of the hand all the way up to the tricep or shoulder, if the angle and perspective permits.

If you haven't figured it out yet, limb destruction isn't limited to this one technique. Anytime you have your two arms being directed away from each other, this is an opportunity to perform limb destruction. You have your opponent's arm sticking away from his body and is close to yours, or better still is placed across your chest? This is an example of what I think are 'non-techniques' within our traditional forms. It's only your awareness that drives this, don't you think? If you think of Taekwondo as only jabs and roundhouse kicks, you'll be wanting to step back and flick out that lead leg. If however, an opponent has an arm laid out across your body, and you spin those hips and happen to hyperflex his elbow or shoulder ... where is that located in the form? Or does anyone really care?

The truth is that these fundamental skills are endemic or should be assumed present throughout the forms. I say this because there is just so much that 40 moves can really communicate.

Keep training hard!

Colin
--
Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our Traditional Taekwondo Blog's FB page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here

    Come play with us ...
  • Make basic blocks part of an indispensable close quarter toolkit!
  • Breathe life into your line drill.
  • Integrate easy throws into a hard style syllabus.
  • Endow simple kicks with (more) stopping power.
  • Tap into martial philosophy & etiquette to get you into the zone.
  • Taekwondo pattern applications show the form is not there to limit you!
  • We welcome all styles, all ranks, and especially welcome open-minded practitioners.
  • Happy to also ditch training and just hang out.

  • We are located in Perth, Western Australia. But if you can't make it to us ...
    Travel itinerary for our black belts in 2019 include but not limited to:
    USA, Melbourne, Singapore, Manila, and Norway. Please inquire.
    To avoid embarrassment, please do not inquire about certification through JDK.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Dear Parent

Thank you for enrolling your child into our Taekwondo dojang here in Perth, and for taking the time to write that extensive email highlighting Little Johnny's social and emotional needs.

There seems to be a misunderstanding regarding your role in the martial art training your son receives. As Principal of Joong Do Kwan, please allow me to address some of these issues:

  1. After an appropriate period of deliberation, I have decided to communicate to you that you are not in charge, and in fact I am. 
  2. You have your one child, own a few alternative parenting publications, and have watched Monkey Magic. I have 35 years in the martial arts world, written articles, been quoted in several publications, officiated for numerous martial art events, led seminars internationally, maintain a network amongst an international cadre of instructors, and hold a postgraduate Master's degree qualification professionally. Additionally, my black belts are competent, and well-respected in this region. I myself have two older, well-adjusted children. Yes, I would say that qualifies me to make decisions in my own school. 
  3. The buck stops with me on who gets to lead classes, what students do, and what level of intensity they do it at. If it seems like I've taken cues from our various chats, this is pure coincidence. 
  4. As instructors, we see kids 'go completely feral' ... mostly due to poor parenting. So when your child is in our dojang, and we want them to understand how things work in our school and perhaps in the real world, don't be a backseat driver. We are attempting to correct your errors after all. You want to help? Go through our training, and get ranked. If by chance you make it past the other coloured belt kids you might then be able to complain yet again comment about training. 
  5. I understand how you or your child may think I am intimidating - perhaps it's because I've spent the better part of 35 years training to hurt highly-skilled individuals. Saying that, if your child misbehaves in my program no one will hurt him. But I do reserve the right to tell him off, maybe isolate him from the other children for their safety, or to dole out push-ups or similar physically-beneficial exercise as punishment. No, this will not result in psychological scarring. And yes, he will be better for the experience. 
  6. If you need to keep your child away from training, keep him away for the right reasons. Your child is tired? Have him sleep earlier. Has an upcoming exam? Start studying sooner. Or has had a tough day? Perhaps take him off his vegan or gluten free diet? In fact, I don't believe anything short of a medical certificate excuses him from Taekwondo practice. Have commitment in developing his character, he will appreciate this in time.
  7. I know you want your child to learn some discipline and self-confidence from us. But it's hard for him to do so if you distract the entire class by taking your sweet time to leave. Even worse when you and the other parents whinge about your first world problems: your travel plans, the cost of sending kids to private school, the Porsche Cayenne you're buying for when he gets his Ps, the leavers parties he has to attend, or however else you jostle for social clout. 
  8. Don't get me wrong, you have made some valid points that may improve our school and the services we offer to our members. At this moment, however we do not have the luxury to be all things to all people. If you want patches, go enrol Little Johnny in the Scouts. If you want better hydration, go get him a larger drink bottle. If you need to complain any more and participate any less, go latch on to another chardonnay-sipping 'parent's group'. If you want something less taxing for Little Johnny, try the Chess Club. 
If I have not addressed your original concerns or if you have found this letter offensive in any way, please feel free to escalate the matter by filling in this Hurt Feelings Report form.

However, if you think you are best served by another martial art organisation which might better pander to your parenting needs, feel free to make the move. I am eager to support whichever McDojo you choose in their efforts to water down martial art training, provide a cheap and ill-trained alternative to child care, and delude you and your child by handing out meaningless belt ranks to support subscription revenue and 3 year contracts.

Sincerely,

Colin Wee
Principal

--
[ Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our Traditional Taekwondo Blog's FB page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Yul-guk Front Kick Teaser - YouTube

What is that music? And yeah, I see a front kick. But what does that have to do with Yulgok?

You can practice a front kick all day on a heavy bag and be very happy with yourself. In fact, you  could juice up that heavy bag with any strike. It's relaxing not to think. But your problem is your opponent is a thinking individual. He's not going to be coming at you 'just like this' or 'weighted on his back leg, throwing a beautiful side kick'.

He's going to swear. He's going to attack. He's going to counter. And he cares less about the forms you've learned.

So when I visit Yulgok- where early on we spin to the right, perform a middle block, then throw a back leg front kick - this is not just a kick to land on a heavy bag. I see it as an opportunity for my students to gear up against a thinking opponent.

In this video, I perform a cross handed grab onto the opponent's lead arm. He will want to either counter my control and mount some attack, or pull back. Here he pulls back, yanking his arm out of my grip. This prompts me to follow his pulling motion back in, trap the lead arm and slam a forearm strike to his neck.

Whilst unloading into this head-high target, I grab onto something. In the video I grab onto the lapel, but it could be the hair or the neck. I pull him towards me. Or I can tip him forwards to bend over. Then I deliver the back leg front kick ala Yulgok.

Which I know is a sequence that doesn't look at all like the form ...

... but the form was never meant to be applied onto a bag ...

... just like how Beijing Opera Music was never meant to be enjoyed by the masses.

:-)

Keep training.

Colin
--
[ Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our FaceBook page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Sidekick Three Versions Discussion - YouTube


Sidekick. Side Snap Kick. And Side Thrust Kick.

I usually refrain from talking about 'angles' or prescriptive guidelines for techniques. I've had this long held belief that banging on about angles and measures makes for a short-sighted practitioner. In fact my preference is to teach utility to the student, and for that utility to then guide the framework of their form. Basically ... make it work and then finesse it later.

Also, a 'how to' or 'what is' video like this opens me up to criticism from every person who has an opinion of how things ought to be. Then it's a tug of war between whom isn't ready to concede, or whom is in a larger organisation, or whom has more time at the keyboard, or whom has submitted a better kickpic photo.

Anyway ... here's me throwing out a few side kicks so we could clarify these techniques for grading. Beyond that however, we use these side kick techniques through different taekwondo applications to defend against attacks, to strip the opponent's cover, as takedowns, as strikes, and as counters. As we apply the side kick against a dynamic opponent, the kick itself varies, and thus these labels and their prescribed angles become only the preamble to something more.

What I would like to say about the sidekick:
  • It is the most photographed technique
  • People love to use it to kick that heavy bag to make it fly
  • A sidekick to make that heavy bag move is not the best way to apply this kick
  • But it is the best way to get photographed with it in the air ... 

To ramp up striking power, the insight I have from using a strike post is to make sure that you are transmitting mass at the point of impact to deliver power into a target. It requires a knowledge of form to support the strike, of body dynamics in order to engage the entire body, and of kinetic chaining. Kinetic chaining is to link as much of your body structure, and to use that movement in order to support the end strike.

If you time it right, the entire body generates movement and acceleration to strike the target all at once. It makes the strike 'pop' on the target. If you don't time it right, you dissipate this movement across time and space. While that bag looks like it moved a great distance - what really happened is you only succeeded in pushing it, rather than deliver maximum power into the striking area.

Never Back Down 2 ! Hardest Kick ! - YouTube


Michael Jae White hit it on the head when he asked whether you wanted to push your opponent or finish your opponent. It's all about time and space, isn't it? You need to deliver the power stroke when you want to deliver it. Not just to hold it there, or push through the target.

Related Links


--
[ Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our FaceBook page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Bassai Takedown, and Counter to Counter - YouTube

Have you ever wanted to be more than yourself?

You know ... just better. Or stronger. Faster. Cooler.

When I first started martial arts it wasn't because I had a grand scheme. I had no idea what I was in for. All I knew was what I saw from the television. That individuals who were trained in these martial arts were capable of amazing feats. They were brave, and unlike what you get from superheroes out of the MCU these days, martial artists were real. And there were places I could go to which'll step me closer to what I wanted to learn.

Fast forward several years.

I continued my practice and my journey, I gained some tremendous skills. I was young, fit and athletic. And the techniques I was capable of were fast, strong, and impressive. There were people who looked up to me because it seemed as I was ahead of the curve, I was making less mistakes than they were. At a stretch, my abilities even made me seem infallible.

There came a time however, when I decided to give it all up. Not really to quit martial arts. But I came to the realization that I needed to stop using the same yardstick to guide my progress. I needed to break down the flimsy walls I myself created to prop up my own ego. I needed to challenge the assumptions justifying my concept of reality.

Sounds a bit dramatic, doesn't it?

But that is how JDK and our brand of Traditional Taekwondo really started.

I wanted to immerse myself in our system to find out what it really offered. I was willing to put in the time ... to risk ... EVERYTHING. ANd I wasn't afraid of embarrassment or ridicule.

Now, 35 years after I began my journey, I write this blog to share this story as a life lesson. When I first started, I wanted to grow in strength. In confidence. And of course ability. As I continued on this path, it seemed my expertise required me to increase speed, strength, and ability. However, there are limits to how far we can push human limits. To not realise such physical limitations is a delusion.

Yet, nearing my 50th birthday I am able to see continued improvement in my own abilities. Despite injuries, and not training myself as hard as I used to do when younger ... in spite of age .... I feel I am a far better martial artist today than I was when I was a young black belt.

And yes, it relates to what you see from this video. A dingy private garage dojang. Practitioners having fun. Playing with technique. Working at it playfully, in fact. Sharing of an unscripted training session. And then the knowledge that this video was uploaded on YouTube to showcase our approach to a well known pattern.

It was no coincidence JDK has taken quantum leaps. But it's not because we did more pushups. Nor was it because we only showed things which are shiny and slick. It's because we had no problem making mistakes. We do play around with concepts. We explore. We really learn from each other. We don't mind giving it a go.

If something doesn't work, we rework it. Or it falls to the wayside. And we work on something new. Then as we make new discoveries, we might return to rework the old understanding. There is nothing less serious about our approach. We deliberate. We have diligence. We are disciplined. Failure is a lesson by another name!

Ready to come ride the  or the 'do' of  Joong Do Kwan?

--
[ Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our FaceBook page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Dosan The Spearhand Counter against Counter - YouTube


Hey, your Taekwondo looks different.

I get that a lot. Our training is compared to Wing Chun. Our technique interpretation seems to emulate Goju type bunkai.

It's no secret, I often say that a 'style' isn't artistic flamboyance. It's training methodology. It's a school's approach to dealing with threat and risk. Thus, my style is labelled 'Taekwondo' and we do have legacy Taekwondo patterns. But it is also how we interpret our syllabus, how we assess risk, how we prepare our members, how we train, and of course what are our goals for training.

So when a person says we "look Wing Chun" or "move like an Okinawan," it's probably because there's similarities in the various tactics we use or in our perspective of training. Really, it's not like I want to look like a specific something. Nor am I trying to say some other martial art is better than mine so I follow their lead. Of course, you can take it as a compliment to the relevance of the other style. I'm good like that.

Actually, to be honest, the videos I've shared extensively from our training sessions are unlike anything you've seen from Taekwondo. There are very few high kicks, for instance. No trick ninja kicks. No K-pop dancing. No manic drills. And no aerial hijinks.

But more so, yeah ... I would say there's the fact that the techniques we share on YouTube themselves look nothing like the patterns!

What I know from many years of sharing these precious few moments is that they hardly show the context of our pattern practice. And, yeah, you don't get all the drills, the prerequisite buildup of skills, the complementary tactics that may make that video work, and my gosh, because all of these videos are done unscripted, whatever I say is said on the spur of the moment. Often I'll come back and would prompt myself to include issues or tips I want to share from a specific video. And then this tidbit is not associated with the video because, hey, it's not like I have unlimited time. I'm married with kids, don't you know?

For instance, check out the video from 6:25 onwards. This should be the takeaway from the video, rather than the tactical value of the spearhand. Don't get me wrong, I think this lesson is not bad. The video shows technique, shows what to do whilst dealing with a dynamic opponent. But it doesn't include other associated lessons varying the position of the spearhand in relation to the opponent. What happens if my spearhand is over his left shoulder? Or over his right?

This quick tappity tap exchange sure looks impressive. But it is the bane of Hollywood on martial arts training. I can move my hands fast! Wow. I can do cool-looking hand locks. I can do amazing kicks. There's a trend in Hollywood or throughout gyms across the US or social media, and we should then follow it! Right.

There's always benefit to some training. Yes, any training. But going Hollywood will not lead you to the essence of a hard-style system. A hard style system is about putting down the opponent with tactics that make sense to your bag of skills. It's about mitigating the threat. Destroying their structure. Your training should be blitzing out doable tactics. It's a recipe - like baking a cake - so most of your students may have a fighting chance of serving up something palatable.

This is the context of our pattern training - we preserve the pattern but we are not simply trying to visually emulate the pattern. We want to get to the mind of the architect of the pattern. Those guys who came before us who wanted our system to be relevant to all students. It is certainly not to preserve a 'look'.

Colin Wee
--
[ Traditional Taekwondo Perth | Testimonials | YouTube | Subscribe | Sitemap ]
Please support us by liking our FaceBook page click here
How does one get a mention on Traditional Taekwondo Perth? click here
Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview