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JillyBeanPottery by Jillybe2 - 6M ago

A few months ago I had a conversation on the subject of matching dinnerware with another potter. She told me that her mother had always told her that once she got to a point where she had her own set of matching white dinner plates that she would know that her life was together.

My life has never been together.

The closest I’ve ever come to matching white dinner plates was a cheap big box store bought set of dinnerware I got when I was in college – it had some white, but also lots and lots of green. I’ve never been the most careful of folks, the unkind might even call me a klutz, so my closest to white dinner plates sets didn’t last very long.

Since that time I’ve had any number of randomly collected plates, many of them being seconds or demo plates from classes I’ve taught. My dinnerware today is a wonderfully mismatched collection that makes no sense whatsoever.

When I set out to create what a JillyBean Pottery dinnerware collection looked like I was not inclined, given my history, to strive for matching plates. In fact I absolutely LOVE that this collection can match if someone chooses that route, but also opens up numerous possibilities for mixing it up. All of the colors I’ve chosen beautifully coordinate with each other, so blend in various shades of the same family of colors while others offer the chance to create a contrasting pop of interest.

I hope you find this collection as fun as I do! Start your own collection today by visiting my online shop – you can buy a set or even just a single plate to get going.

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JillyBeanPottery by Jillybe2 - 6M ago

Take a look at this fun little planter! It has ocean blue-green tones covered with bubbly white goodness in waves over the top – a perfect rendition of an ocean-themed planter design wouldn’t you say?

If only that had been the intent!

To be honest I’m not entirely sure what my intent was with this piece other than I love this turquoise glaze and wanted to try the brushing some of my white crawl glaze over it.

Really, a complete and utter experiment!

Sometimes though that is the best way to learn and see how glazes and patterns will interact on a piece. After sitting on this series (Did I mention there are several variations of this combo?) for a few weeks, I’ve finally decided they remind me of the frothy ocean waves. Maybe not my favorite look, but certainly not without some small merit.

Check out some of these experimental pieces for yourself here.

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JillyBeanPottery by Jillybe2 - 6M ago

If there is one thing that plant aficionados are passionate about its the type of pot they use for their plants. Optimal drainage to prevent root rot, breathability of clay to avoid overcooking the plant, feet or no feet and more are all part of what folks contemplate when deciding the best home for their plants.

When talking about clay pots, terra cotta has long been the go-to standard for many people. There is a certain sense in this thinking – the clay is naturally porous to allow the roots to breathe and they are generally easy to find in almost any size. The rustic orange look of this clay body also compliments most plants beautifully letting the plant shine.

In my own work, I’ve experimented with terra cotta at various points over the years. I think that’s just naturally part of the process of learning about my aesthetic as an artist. Terra cotta, as a clay, begs to have bright, bold colors incorporated into the glazing or so I have always thought until recently.

I started a Planter of the Month program a few months ago to allow me a space to focus on unusual and more complex patterns and designs, but when getting ready for this month’s featured pot I thought why not also experiment with the clay body.

This terra cotta planter, created in a clay I haven’t used in three or four years, was just that – an experiment. I decided to create a design and then not add one single drop of glaze to it!

A big departure for me since generally speaking my glazing and texture pairings are a big part of my signature style. And all of this on a clay that just begs for bright, bold colors to complete the look.

I rather like this idea – a twist, if you will, on the traditional terra cotta pot. We’ve all seen them at garden centers and home improvement stores in their round, smooth glory. They are the emoji of planters. Based on the response I’ve gotten on the piece, it would seem that others agree with me about adding a little twist to tradition!

Check out my January Planter of the Month available through the end of the month here. Once it’s gone, it’s gone!

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The lovely folks at California Cactus Center in Pasadena feature a wide range of rare succulents from all over. In addition to being a great resource of knowledge on the care and maintenance of this drought tolerant plants, their nursery features a range of staged plants in both commercial and handmade pots.

Aaree was kind enough to feature one of my planters in her video about how to achieve different looks using the same plant, but different planters and top dressing. Definitely a must watch for some great tips on successfully re-potting your succulents as well!

Inspired to try it yourself? Stop by California Cactus Center to take a look through their selection of pots (including some of my latest designs) or visit my Etsy shop!

Using One Plant To Create Three Different Design Styles! - YouTube
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