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Dogs require vaccinations, just like people. It’s one of the best ways to protect their health. In general, dog vaccinations are designated as either “core” or “non-core.” Most dogs do not need all the available vaccines so It’s important to talk to your vet about their lifestyle and environment to determine which ones are right for your dog.

I know vaccinations can be a hot topic, but please only rely on fact-based research and veterinary professionals. A good resource for pet owners wanting more information is the AAHA website.

What you should know about dog vaccinations

Getting your dog vaccinated is one of the most important things you can do for them. It protects them from many dangerous, and potentially fatal diseases. As mentioned above, they are split in to two groups.

Core vaccines

Core vaccinations are recommended for all dogs. There are 4 main core vaccines.

  • Canine Parvovirus
  • Canine Distemper
  • Hepatitis
  • Rabies

Rabies in particular is an important vaccine because this disease can end up being fatal for dogs. It can also be spread to humans through the dog’s saliva. In the United States, a dog is legally required to have a rabies vaccine. You can check your state’s specific rabies guidelines here.

Canine Parvovirus is very contagious and life-threatening for pets. It’s one of the most common infectious diseases in dogs. It is spread through direct contact and contaminated surfaces, such as food bowls, collars, or leashes.

Canine distemper is a potentially fatal virus often found in the respiratory system. Sometimes found in dogs that come from shelters or rescue centers, it is spread through contact with bodily secretions or through the air.

Hepatitis is caused by the canine adenovirus. It’s also one of the causes of kennel cough. It is spread by coming in contact with respiratory secretions or contaminated feces or urine.  

Non-core vaccines

Non-core vaccines are not mandatory, but they may be recommended by your vet if they feel the dog is at risk for contracting the disease. These vaccines include the following:

  • Bordetella
  • Canine influenza
  • Canine parainfluenza
  • Leptospirosis
  • Lyme Disease

There are others available as well so it’s worth discussing them with your vet. As I said before, not all dogs need all vaccinations. They may determine that your dog is not likely to be exposed to some of these diseases. But that’s a choice you and your vet need to make together.  

Dog vaccinations are safe in general, but there can be a few dogs that have some side effects. However, serious reactions are quite rare. The most common things to watch for are vomiting and hives. We experienced some of this with Norman. Although there are more serious side effects like facial swelling or difficulty breathing. If you notice either of these reactions, take your dog to the vet immediately.

Dog vaccinations timetable

How often should you take your pet to receive a vaccine? That depends on your dog’s age. For example, puppies need a vaccine at least 2-3 times per year. Adult dogs typically require boosters, but the frequency depends on the particular vaccine. The core vaccines usually are effective for about 3 years. The non-core vaccines may require annual visits. Your vet should help you stay update on any required booster shots. Below is a graphic from Vetted Pet Care that you can use as a guide.

Final thoughts on dog vaccinations

If you have worries about vaccinations, talk to your vet. After all, their goals are the same as yours – keeping your pet happy and healthy. If you’re concerned about giving them too many vaccinations at once, ask about delaying any that are not immediately necessary. Develop a trusting relationship with your vet and be sure to voice any concerns. Together you can help your dog avoid serious diseases and live a long, care free life!

The post Dog Vaccinations: What You Need to Know appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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Hot spots are so frustrating!

They are also uncomfortable, and often painful for your pup. Proper care and maintenance is necessary to help your dog avoid these itchy spots. The good news is there are things you can do to help prevent them. We will discuss some of those here in this article.

Hot spots: What are they anyway?

Basically it is an inflamed area of the skin that will often be red, moist, or even oozing. As you can imagine, hot spots can be pretty stressful for your dog. They often can’t stop licking the area and that can cause irritation and even more pain. When you find a hot spot on your dog, it needs to be treated immediately. Otherwise the affected area can spread very quickly.

What causes hot spots on dogs?

Just about anything that leads to itchiness can be a source of hot spots on dogs. If you start to notice them, you’ll want to be aware of what your dog has eaten, as it could be related to a food allergy. Or if they have been outside a lot recently, it could be an insect bite. There are also other causes such as fleas, mites, and allergies to trees, weeds, or grass.

Bacterial infections on the skin can also cause hot spots. As soon as the infection settles in, the moist oozing appearance will generally appear, and the infection will be accompanied by an odor. That’s when most dog owners identify this issue, but ideally you should take your pet to the vet as soon as you see any sign of irritation just to be safe.

Can you prevent hot spots?

Yes you can! Preventing hot spots does take a lot of work of course. But you can do it! Here’s a list of a few things that should help avoid these pesky spots.

  • Regular flea and tick preventative
  • Keeping your dogs clean and dry
  • Proper grooming of your dog’s coat
  • Avoiding any known allergens (food or environmental)
  • Keeping your dog active and free from boredom or stress

It’s nearly impossible to completely avoid hot spots on dogs, but if you can follow this list as much as possible you will have a good chance of steering clear any major outbreaks.

Treating hot spots

The first thing you will need to do is clean the infected area. You’ll want to dry it out as much as possible before administering any medication. You can use something like coconut oil or lotion to help soothe it initially. Then an ointment like Neosporin will help it start to heal. And then I’d suggest using one of these topicals.

A vet might actually shave the area to help dry it out and more easily apply a topical medication. Unfortunately, your dog may need to be in the cone of shame for a few days to let the area heal. It’s really nothing to be ashamed of; Norman wears his all the time!

Dealing with hot spots is frustrating for both you and your dog. But we’re in this together! Just do your best to help your pup avoid any triggers and be diligent with treatment if you do see them pop up. If you’re able to determine what caused the flare up in the first place, you can take the steps necessary to keep your dog away from them. And hopefully away from the vet as well!


The post Hot spots on dogs: Prevention and Treatment appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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I hope everyone is staying warm. I don’t know about you, but I’m ready for spring time and warmer weather. Although with that comes more allergens. So is the cycle of allergy life.

Update on Norman

A couple of weeks ago Norman had a reaction to who knows what. I was at the dining room table helping my daughter with a puzzle when Norman trots in there with super red skin, sores, and flakes on his back. You turn your back for just a couple minutes and he sneaks off to rub and scratch!

There is a large window in that room and the light hit Norman just right so I snapped a picture of it. It probably made it look even more dramatic. Anyway, I posted this picture of Norman on our Instagram and Facebook pages (pic below). Some of you may have seen it. Well let me know tell you, people definitely had some opinions about it.

Granted, most of the comments were very supportive. Many were curious, some expressed their sympathy, and others offered treatment suggestions for his skin. I’m very appreciative of these and I like that we can have an open dialogue about our dogs. I’ve received many great ideas from our readers.

However…there were a few comments that were not so helpful. Some were directed (negatively) towards our vet. And one person even scolded me for neglecting Norman. I found that one partly shocking and partly hilarious, but mostly just plain rude and definitely uninformed. In fact, several of our Itchy Frenchie pals responded in my defense! Thank you.

Moving Forward

Everyone is entitled to their opinion of course, but I think it would be best if we continued to be supportive of each other. A lot of us are doing everything we can to help our dogs and it does no good to tell someone how much you disapprove of their efforts based on a picture.

Like I said, there were some very helpful comments. The nice people at Dermapaw even offered to send Norman some samples to try! If you’re looking for a topical treatment for their skin or paws, it is worth a try. The texture is a bit like Carmex chapstick. And it softens as you scoop it so it’s very easy to rub in.

That’s about all for now. I have been thinking about trying to cook some meals for Norman and see how he does with that. I’ve been researching a little bit, plus taking in to account what he’s allergic to. I’ll give some more information once I get going with that.

Oh, and our vet mentioned something about an allergy shot called RESPIT. It is regionally-specific immunotherapy that you can get without allergy testing. The formulas vary based on your geographical area. It is available as an injection or a spray. It sounds intriguing, but I definitely need some more information about it. You can check it out for yourself here.

And here’s the pic I posted that got such a reaction.

The post Itchy Frenchie Update: February 2019 appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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It is not uncommon for your dog to have the itches; and we see them manifest in many ways. Often, we see dogs licking their paws. In other cases, they may roll on the ground, crawl on their bellies, or do the booty scoot. However they presents themselves, this guide will help you manage the pain and discomfort in your itchy dog.

Causes of Itch in Dogs

It is important for pet owners to know that itching is not a disease nor a symptom of a disease. Instead, it is a result of the process of a disease in dogs. This knowledge helps in understanding how to approach the treatment—as treatment has to be directed to the cause of the potential disease instead of relieving the dog of its pain.

If you notice that your dog is obsessively scratching its body, you may suspect issues with fleas. Even though this is a common assumption, fleas are only one of the many possible causes of skin irritation and itches. Nevertheless, dogs should be on a regular tick and flea preventative plans.

The most common causes of itching in dogs include:

  • Infections
  • Skin disease
  • External parasites
  • Allergies
  • Skin cancer (less common)

Even though many skin diseases only start to itch when the dog develops serious yeast or bacterial infections, itching is always a source of great discomfort to dogs.

Dog Allergies

Dogs are exposed to allergens through one of the following ways:

  • Ingestion
  • Inhalation
  • Topical exposure

These may result in inflammation of the cells carrying chemicals in the skin of the dog. A dog may show signs of allergies, like itching, when the immune system begins to recognize everyday substances (allergens) as dangerous. The veterinarian identifies the causative agent of the allergies, and make effort to block the allergic reactions.  

Diagnosing an Itchy Dog

It requires experience and expertise to effectively and accurately diagnose an itchy dog. A veterinarian begins by taking a detailed medical and chronological history of the dog:

  • What have you noticed?
  • When was the first time you noticed it?
  • How has it progressed?
  • Are other pets visibly affected?
  • Are you affected?

After that, the veterinarian performs a thorough physical examination on the dog by focusing on— but not limited to— the skin. This examination may uncover several illnesses that may affecting your dog.

Natural Remedies for Itchy Dogs

Before spending your money on drugs, you may want to consider the following natural remedies for your dog’s itchy skin:

CBD Oil: CBD, or Cannabidiol, is a natural substance found in the hemp plant. It’s becoming more commonly used as a treatment in dogs for things like anxiety, pain, loss of appetite, even skin and coat health. You can get more information on our CBD blog post here.

Olive Oil: Beyond many people’s delight as a good cooking oil, olive oil is a great source of antioxidants and vitamins E & K. These vitamins replenish the dog’s skin and fur coat. A teaspoon per 20 pounds per body weight is sufficient in treating the itches.

Apple Cider Vinegar: This has many benefits for humans, as well as for dogs. If your dog has itchy paws, by soaking the paws in a 50/50 solution of apple cider vinegar, the itch can be relieved in less than 10 minutes. To prepare the 50/50 solution, mix the apple cider vinegar with the same quantity of water. You can put it in a spray bottle and use it on your dogs skin. Check out more ways to use apple cider vinegar to help your dog.

Yogurt: You can also try giving your dog plain yogurt, free from any added sweetners. This contains active bacteria that can have probiiotic benefits that are good for your dog’s digestive system. As a result, the immune system of the dog is boosted which helps in stopping skin infections.

You can find even more natural remedies, as well as other food and medical options in this post on our blog page.

Prescription Medication for Itchy Dogs

These medications can be quite effective in the battle against the itch. You will need a prescription from your vet, and you should talk to them about the dosage and potential side effects. None of these medications eliminate your dog’s allergies. Instead they basically trick the dog’s body into thinking they don’t need to itch.

I know some people are strictly against certain medications, but I feel like they have all have their place. Especially if you can only use them for short periods when your dog’s allergies are at their most severe. Once they are manageable again, then maybe you can back off the medication.

I won’t go into great detail but here is a list of the most common allergy fighting medications for your itchy dog.

Atopica

Atopica, or cyclosporine, has been around for a while. In short, it prevents the release of histamines that would cause your dog to itch. It is an immunosuppressant and it does have side effects. Namely digestive issues like vomiting or diarrhea. You should not give Atopica to puppies under 6 months of age.

Temaril-P

This drug is a mix of antihistamine and corticosteroid. One reduces the itch, the other reduces inflammation. Some of the side effects are the same as with Atopica. In addition to those, your dog could experience drowsiness, weakness, or tremors. Once you start this medication, be sure to follow the direction of your vet. It can be harmful to suddenly stop taking it. The dosage should be decreased gradually.

Apoquel

Apoquel is a bit newer, gaining FDA approval in 2013. I have mentioned it numerous times on this site. This one might be the most controversial of the bunch. It is definitely effective against the itch that is accompanied with atopic dermatitis. However, longer term use can suppress the immune system and it can make your dog more susceptible to other types of infections. If you type Apoquel in to the search bar at the top corner of this site, you will find many articles that discuss it in one way or another.

Cytopoint

The newest option (approval in 2016) is a little bit different, and may have the most potential. It’s a biologic treatment that contains engineered antibodies that block the itch signaling proteins from reaching the brain. Cytopoint is given as an injection by your vet. It usually starts working within a day, and can last about 4-6 weeks. Some may even see it last up to 8 weeks. It’s probably the safest option at this point, as there is no evidence yet of it suppressing the immune system. So that’s encouraging. Although we won’t really know about any long term effects for some time.

I hope this guide provides you some direction and comfort. You should know that there are many of us dealing with a variety of situations that affect our dogs. If you have any questions or comments, please let me know. I’d love to hear from you and hopefully share your itchy dog success stories!

The post A Basic Guide to an Itchy Dog appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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Happy New Year! I hope everyone had a great holiday season over the past few weeks. I really enjoy December, but January…not as much. It’s always a little difficult getting back into the swing of our normal routines. And it just feels like a bit of a let down after all the festivities. Sorry January fans!

Update on Norman

We were able to take some time off work and be at home with Norman most days. Although, for most of the time everyone is this house was under the weather. But we are a couple months into changing Norman’s food based on his allergy test results. And I do think it is having a positive impact. However, he definitely still has his itches.

We actually ran out of Apoquel several weeks ago and we didn’t refill it when he got his last Cytopoint shot. I wanted to see what his response would be while off the pill. It really hasn’t been too much different for the most part. He still wants to rub his face on the carpet, but that’s nothing new. As long as his cone is on, he’s fairly calm.

His belly actually looks pretty good, but he will still scoot on his tail until it’s bloody. Here’s a picture I took last week.

The thing I’m more concerned about at the moment is Norman has been vomiting a bit lately. And I’m not really sure what it is. It doesn’t look like food. In fact, and this is disgusting, it almost looks like feces. I don’t think he’s eating it when he’s outside. He literally only goes out in the yard to go to the bathroom and he comes back to the door with 30 seconds.

I have wondered if it has anything to do with taking him off Apoquel so abruptly. I think I need to pick up some more to have on hand anyway. But I’ll talk to the vet about the vomiting and see what she thinks. I’ll keep you all updated. Until next time!

The post Itchy Frenchie Update: January 2019 appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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It is uncomfortable to watch a dog itch and scratch madly in response to an unknown allergy. It is even more uncomfortable when you can’t seem to give them any comfort. You may not want to use prescription medication for one reason or another, but it can provide great relief for your pet. However, it’s important to know how it might effect your dog. Let’s discuss some of the side effects of Apoquel.

The primary symptoms of allergies are itching and obsessive scratching, of course. However, those could lead to secondary skin problems like irritation, redness, swelling, and hot spots on dogs. Many pet owners have resulted in using drugs developed for humans in treating these problems—such drugs as Zyrtec and Benadryl. However, these are not FDA approved drugs for the treatment of these problems in dogs.

Apoquel is an FDA approved drug for the management of intense itching in dogs. Made up of Oclacitinib, a selective JAK-1 inhibitor, Apoquel provides instant relief from itching. It is an allergy medicine for dogs and it is capable of providing relief from itching in dogs within 4 hours. More astonishingly, it stops canine itching in less than 24 hours of administration of the drug. In addition, unlike other medications, it controls pruritus within the first 48 hours. 

Side Effects of Apoquel for Dogs

We have seen big pharmaceutical companies come up with breakthrough products only to hear that there are issues with the drug. Recently, Apoquel has been garnering controversies because of its reported side effects. Its immunosuppressive properties can increase the dog’s vulnerability to infection. This includes neoplastic health and demodicosis infections conditions.

Other potential side effects of dogs taking Apoquel include:

  • Lethargy
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Appetite loss
  • Decreased globulins
  • Decreased leukocytes
  • An increase of lipase and cholesterol
  • New cutaneous or subcutaneous lumps

Some dogs also experienced pneumonia, skin and ear infections, bloodied diarrhea, histiocytomas, and UTIs

In extreme cases, it is discovered that dogs developed polydipsia and an increase in appetite and aggression.

Side effects of Apoquel can often disappear on their own. In addition, they resemble the effects that would normally appear after a dog takes drugs containing steroids. Steroids are generally classified as anti-inflammatory drugs, and they help in treating mild inflammatory diseases in dogs.

Recently, there have been reports of cancer in dogs after taking the drug. According to an article on the DogsNaturally Website, this vet discovered a mass in her dog’s abdomen when she started giving it Apoquel. It was later discovered from clinical trials that the drug causes abdominal tumors. Further research studies have shown that the drug lowers red and white blood cell count. It also affects certain types of lymph nodes and lymphatic tissue as well as bone marrow.

So What Should You Do?

Look, we still give Norman Apoquel because it has been the only thing that allows him to have a halfway normal life. And that’s on top of the Cytopoint. But these are serious side effects for a drug acclaimed for treating skin allergies (atopic dermatitis) in dogs. Even though it may be cringe worthy to watch a dog agonize in pain as it scratches its body in pain, one may still have to consider the side effects of the drug. 

We all want our pets to be happy and healthy. My advice – Don’t listen to other pet owners tell you what you should or shouldn’t give your dog. Talk to your vet. Understand the risks and decide what is best for your situation.

The post Side Effects of Apoquel appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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As you may remember, last month we used the Affordable Allergy Test to try and figure out what Norman might be allergic to. Or at least what his intolerances are. If you’d like to read that post first, you can check it out here.

As I mentioned before, the test was super easy and we received the results back in less than a week! (And yes, I realize it’s taken about a month for me to post this follow up). Below are his allergy testing results. The first two pages are food related intolerances and the last page is environmental. The most severe are in red (Level 3) and they get less severe as it goes to yellow and green.

As it turns out, the food we had been feeding Norman actually contained quite a few of the ingredients listed in Levels 2 and 3. So that’s not good. I was surprised though how few proteins are on the list. But we changed his food immediately to something with very few ingredients on the list (Canidae Limited Ingredient Bison). It’s almost impossible to find a food with zero intolerances, but we made sure it didn’t have any Level 2 or Level 3 ingredients.


So he’s been on it for about 3 weeks now, and he does actually seem a bit less itchy. Although, at the time we switched he also started some medication for some infections so it has been hard to tell which is helping. He’s off those meds now so hopefully we can find out if the food switch is doing any good.

I’m not expecting the new food to cure all the itching. But it would be amazing if we could take him off Apoquel, or even reduce the dosage. So if you want to give allergy testing a try, I would definitely recommend it. Here’s a link to the Affordable Allergy Test.

The post Norman’s Allergy Testing Results appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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What is that smell? You know the one. When your pup smells like Fritos corn chips. Yep, that my friends, is yeast. And your favorite deodorizing spray isn’t going to cut it this time. A yeast infection in dogs can be frustrating. And without treatment, it can linger. For this, you will need to attack it from both sides, inside and out.

What Causes a Yeast Infection in Dogs?

A yeast overgrowth is typically the result of an under active immune system. When a dog’s immune system is in balance, there is actually a normal, healthy amount of yeast present. But there are things that can cause an overgrowth in yeast. A weakened immune system, certain medical conditions, and reactions to medications can all cause skin and ear infections.

Antibiotics can be particularly troublesome for when high levels of yeast are present. Dogs with allergies often develop secondary infections (don’t we know it!), and vets typically prescribe these medications to combat them. However, antibiotics can actually kill of the good bacteria along with the bad, making the situation even worse.

How to Spot a Yeast Infection in Dogs

As mentioned already, that corn chip smell is a clear indication of a yeast infection. It’s quite unpleasant. But it’s not the only sign. Uncontrollable itchiness is also evidence of a yeast issue. Especially in the ears and paws. I’m sure we’ve all seen this, they won’t be able to leave them alone. They may also do a lot of butt scooting on the carpet.

Some other signs that your dog has a yeast infection of the skin include:

  • Chewing or licking infected areas
  • Redness or inflamed skin
  • Head shaking (with ear infections)
  • Greasy, crusty, or scaly skin
  • Oily hair

The only definitive way to confirm a yeast infection in dogs is by going to the vet for a skin swab. Be sure you inform the vet of the symptoms you are noticing at home so they can help address the primary issues. Then you can develop a plan to tackle the underlying issues.

Address the Diet

One of the best things you can do for your dog that is battling a yeast infection is address their diet. This is something we have dealt with for a while and we recently used 5 Strands Affordable Allergy Test to help identify what Norman’s food and environmental intolerances might be. I’ll be posting about the results very soon, but you can check out the original post here.

One thing you can do is try to avoid sugars in your dog’s food as much as possible. This essentially means reducing their intake of carbohydrates. Yeast feeds off sugar, and carbs break down into sugar. So if you can find a dog food that is low in carbs, you may be able to avoid some of the yeast overgrowth and reduce the chance of an infection.

Aside from the regular white sugar you may be thinking of, there are many other sources that you will want to be aware of. Where possible try to eliminate things like potatoes, corn, wheat, rice, soy, honey, and high fructose corn syrup. It’s not easy to avoid these things, as many of them are even in high quality foods. But just being aware of these carbs is a good start.

Dog food companies do not typically list the amount of carbohydrates in their foods, so if you want to know how to calculate it yourself, check out the Food Allergies page on our website. It’s actually pretty easy to figure out.

In addition, you can also try adding in anti-fungal foods, such as garlic or oregano. As long as your pup isn’t allergic to them, these can be beneficial in reducing a yeast infection in dogs. 

Clean Up Your Pup

The next step in your yeast fight is to disinfect the areas where the yeast is most common. The vet can give you a medicated cream to apply to the infected area, but it needs to be properly cleaned first. Otherwise, you’re probably just making the problem worse by creating extra layers of dead yeast.

If the ears are the problem, I would suggest using some witch hazel and cotton balls to clean out the ear canals. You can buy them at any drug store. Make sure you remove as much of the debris as possible. And NEVER use Q-Tips on your dog’s ears.

If the main problem is the paws, you can make a quick at-home anti-fungal dip. For frenchies, you can probably just use the sink for this. If your dog is a larger breed, you might need to find a large plastic storage bin, or a wide bucket. Mix the following ingredients and then simply pat the paws dry. No need to rinse it off. And you can do this as often as needed.

  • 1 gallon of water
  • 1 cup of hydrogen peroxide
  • 1-3 cups of white vinegar

For more wide spread cases that are affecting your dog’s body, you can address it with a cooling, anti-itch shampoo and an easy homemade anti-fungal rinse a couple time a week. For the shampoo, we are using a tea tree and aloe blend that smells really nice. We have gone away from recommending shampoos with oatmeal. It can actually give a boost to yeast growth on your dog’s skin.

After shampooing, use this formula below for the rinse. Be sure to avoid your dog’s eyes and ears. Just pour it over the body from the neck down and rub it in to all the problem areas. Again, there is no need to rinse off the solution. Just pat dry and be on your way.

  • 1 gallon of water
  • 1 cup of vinegar or lemon juice
Good Luck!

Treating a yeast infection in dogs takes a lot of time and effort. You have to be consistent in order to stay ahead of it. So if you notice any of the symptoms mentioned here, I hope this guide will help you get it under control. And please don’t wait too long to see a vet if you feel like it is getting out of hand. They can help you get a jump start on treatment!

The post Yeast Infection in Dogs appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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The time has come!

Not too long ago, we were talking to our vet about Norman’s ongoing itchy situation. Most of what he’s been treated for up to this point are common environmental allergens. But this time she mentioned that if all the medication isn’t helping, it is more likely food related. So how do we find out? There are a few different options, but dog allergy testing is often expensive and can take weeks to complete.

Blood tests, intradermal skin test, food elimination trial…sigh

So at this point you’re probably expecting me to tell you that there’s a better, faster, more affordable way to get your dog’s allergy test results, right? Well…There is! And you don’t even have to go to the vet.

So we are doing it. 5 Strands Affordable Testing offers an easy and yes, affordable at-home test that measures both food and environmental substances that may cause intolerances in our dogs. And ours arrived yesterday!

The Dog Allergy Testing Kit

It works by using your pup’s hair samples. When you receive the kit, fill out the form, take a few hair samples, and mail them back in the envelope. Everything you need is provided, and you can get the results in about a week or so via email. That’s about as easy as it gets!

Even better, they test for over 200 food ingredients and over 100 environmental items. You can see the list of everything they test for right on their website. Here is the list of food ingredients: https://affordableallergytest.com/pet-food-ingredients-tested/

So if you’re looking into dog allergy testing, this is a good place to start. If you follow Itchy Frenchie on Instagram, you may have seen us take Norman’s samples last night. We mailed them in this morning so be sure to check the blog in the coming weeks. We will be posting his results and discussing the test a little more.

I can’t wait to see what it shows! It really was as easy has combing out some of his hair and putting it in a bag. Once we have the results, hopefully we can find a food that better suits his intolerances and he can get some relief. In the meantime, go check out the dog allergy testing kits and the 5 Strands Affordable Testing website.

https://affordableallergytest.com/

The post Dog Allergy Testing: 5 Strands Affordable Testing appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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We are getting to my favorite time of year. The days are beginning to get a little shorter, the oppressive heat starts to wane, and it’s football (and chili!) season. It also seems to be a little bit better for Norman and his allergies.

Update on Norman

In our last update, Norman was in a bit of a rough patch with his skin infections and seborrhea. His skin was so red and sensitive, and it was extremely itchy to the touch. He completed his antibiotics and seemed to be feeling, and looking, much better. He also received his Cytopoint shot which definitely helped.

When we went back for his check up he was feeling pretty good. Here’s a picture of Norman getting weighed at the vet. He seems pretty proud of himself!

The only issue he was having during the checkup was on his tail. Over the last week, he had really been rubbing it on the carpet to the point of making it bleed a few times. This isn’t necessarily uncommon for him, but we usually are able to clean it up and get back to normal. Well this time it got infected.

It was pretty gross. There’s a picture of it below. When it wasn’t red or bloody, it had some puss like goo inside it, and it was getting crusty. The vet gave us some medicated pads to use on it and they have really helped a lot.

Right now, he seems to be doing fine. One of his paws has a little swelling, I think due to some excessive licking. Go figure. He’s needed to wear the cone most evenings.

Well until next time. I hope all your itchy pups are feeling better!

Here’s that tail.

The post Itchy Frenchie Update: August 2018 appeared first on Itchy Frenchie.

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