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Biopic:A biographical film of the life of a famous personality or historical figure. (فلم جو کسی ایک زندگی کی داستان بیان کرے)

Blockbuster: Impactful film with huge financial success.
(پراثر فلم جو انتہائی منافع بخش ہو)

Caricature: A character appearing ridiculously out of proportion because of one physical, psychological or moral trait that has been grossly or broadly exaggerated. (تضحیکی خاکہ)  

Coogan’s Law: Landmark legislation in the late 1930s designed to protect a child actor’s earnings, by depositing some of the minor’s earnings in court-administered trust funds
(وہ قانون جس کے تحت کمسن اداکاروں کی آمدنی کورٹ کے کھاتے میں جمع ہو اور اِن کے سنِ بلوغت کو پہنچنے پر دستیاب ہو)  
Censorship: The process of determining what can or cannot be viewed by the public or depicted by the motion picture industry.
(قابلِ اعتراض مواد کی کانٹ چھانٹ)

Credits: This term refers to the text appearing on screen – composed of a list of technical personnel, cast, and production crew of a film; specifically, it refers to the list of names and functions of persons and corporations contributing and responsible for the artistic or intellectual content of a film, 
(فلم کی تکمیل سے جُڑےتمام اداکار،گلوکار،موسیقار،یا ٹکنکل افراد سے متعلق تفصیلات جو فلم کی ابتدا میں پردے پر دکھائی جاتی ہیں)

Documentary: Film depicting actual events or portraying personalities. (دستاویزی فلم)

Dubbing: Translation of film from one language to another either putting a new sound track or by providing subtext running in lower screen. (فلم کی ایک زبان سے دوسری زبان میں منتقلی کا عمل)

Footage: Any length, portion or sequence of film (either shot or to be shot) measured in feet; 
(فلم کے کسی حصے کی طوالت جو فٹ میں ناپی جائے)

Feature Film: Any film that exceeds 60 minutes and focuses on one topic.
(سات منٹوں سے زائد طویل فلم جو کسی ایک موضوع پر ہو)

Potboiler: A film (or even novel) filled with violence.
(پر تشدد مناظر پر مبنی فلم)

Premier: The first official public screening of a movie, marking the kick-off, opening or opening night.
(فلم کا افتتاحی شو)

Remake: Refers to a later production (of a previous film), with different credits, script, and cast; a redone.
(پرانی فلموں کی نئی اسکرپٹ یا اداکاروں کے ساتھ فلم سازی)

Startlet: A child actor.
(کمسن اداکار)

Stunt: A stunt performer that takes the place of an actor when the scene calls for a dangerous or risky action (car crash, fight, window jump, etc.).
(اداکار کی جگہ پرپرخطر کردار نبھانے والا کرتب باز)  

Tagline: A memorable line or phrase about a film.
(فلم سے متعلق یادگاری جملہ)

Talkies: Films with a soundtrack, made after 1927 when this was technically possible.
(با آواز فلمیں، جو1927 کی بعد بننی شروع ہوئیں).

Villain: A character in a book, play, film, etc. who harms other people.
(کھل نایک)

Voiceover: Refers to recorded dialogue, usually narration, that comes from an unseen, off-screen voice,
(فلم میں غائب مبصر کی آواز).

Whodunit: Detective or mystery film. (کوئی جرائم کی تفتیش پر مبنی فلم).

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‘Mumma! So many children in my class have pets at home. I wish we could have one too’, Shona complained.

By Sheeshu Hee

Shona came back from school very upset.
‘What’s the matter dear?’ his mother asked. ‘You don’t seem your usual cheerful self.’
‘Mumma! So many children in my class have pets at home. I wish we could have one too’, Shona complained. ‘Roshan has a dog and a cat, and Leha has fish in an aquarium. Today, Rena brought a tortoise to school. I also want a pet Mumma. Please!’
Shona’s mother handed Shona his glass of milk and said, ‘It’s expensive to keep a pet, dear. We can’t afford it.’
Shona kept silent. He knew his mother was right. His father worked very hard as a gardener, and it was with great difficulty that the family managed their finances.
‘But wait! I’ve got a great idea!’ Shona’s mother suddenly exclaimed. She rushed into the kitchen and came out with a loaf of bread and a handful of peanuts. ‘Come dear, let’s go up to the terrace!’, she said.
When they got to the terrace, Shona’s mother laid out bits of bread and the peanuts on a plate. She filled a bowl with water and placed it nearby. ‘Now, let’s sit here and watch,’ she said excitedly.
In just a few minutes, a pair of pigeons flew in. They went straight for the bread and began to munch hungrily. After they departed, it was the turn of a team of mynahs. Then came a pack of bright green parrots, who were followed by a majestic-looking raven. Soon, the bread was over!
Shortly afterwards, a family of bushy-tailed squirrels leapt out from a nearby tree and raced down to where the peanuts were. They looked like the chipmunks that Shona had seen in a story-book!
Shona and his mother watched the birds and squirrels eating with great delight. ‘How sweet they are Mumma!’ Shona cried out. ‘How innocent they look!’
‘And so well-mannered too!’ Shona’s mother added. ‘They don’t fight over food like we humans sometimes do!’
‘Mumma, how did they know there was food here?’ Shona asked his mother.
‘God has fixed where every creature will have its food, dear, and God directs everyone to exactly that place,’ Shona’s mother answered.
‘Mumma, could we please lay out food every day here for the birds and squirrels?’ Shona requested.
‘Oh, that’s such a wonderful idea!’ Shona’s mother beamed. ‘We may not be able to afford to keep a pet at home but we can certainly keep some food on the terrace every day for visiting birds and squirrels. We can even put out our left-over food here, instead of throwing it into the bin. The creatures who’ll come by to eat can be our pets, and we can enjoy watching them! Who knows, if we’re lucky, we’ll even have monkeys, bandicoots and many kinds of insects stopping by for a meal once in a while! That way, we’ll have not just one pet but many, many different kinds of pets!’
‘Oh, that would be wonderful Mumma! Thank you so much!’ Shona exclaimed as he wrapped his arms around his mother and gave her a tight hug. 

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Reha was really very sad. It’s not nice to be cheated, is it?

“Give full measure, and cause no loss to others. Weigh with correct scales: do not defraud people of what is rightfully theirs; and do not spread corruption in the land.”
(Quran 26: 181-183)

By Sheesha

Reha had been saving up her pocket-money for several months. She wanted to welcome in the new year in a new way—by giving things to a charitable hospital that they might find useful. The hospital catered to many poor people. 
When the first day of the new year arrived, Reha went to a shop near her home with a list of the things that she wanted to buy for the hospital. Reha explained to the shopkeeper, Mr. Tiz, that these things were a donation for the hospital and asked if he could give her a good discount.
‘I’ll charge you less than half the actual price’, Mr. Tiz said to her’ as he scribbled out a bill—which came to just about all the money that Reha had.
When Reha got home, her father was surprised to see her weighed down with the things she had bought. She excitedly told him what it was about.
‘That’s so sweet of you!’ Reha’s father beamed. ‘Tell me, how much did you pay for all this, dear?’
‘Three  thousand rupees, Papa. Mr. Tiz said he’d charged me half the actual price when I told him that it was a donation for the hospital,’ Reha excitedly answered. ‘That’s so kind of him!’
‘No, no, my dear,’ said  Reha’s father, closely inspecting the things that Reha had laid out on the table. ‘Far from giving you a discount, he’s actually overcharged you! Even without a discount, it shouldn’t have cost you more than half of what you paid!’
‘Really Papa?’ exclaimed Reha, taken aback.
‘Yes, yes, child,’ Reha’s father continued. ‘And then, Mr. Tiz has given you some very poor quality things. Oh, this is really awful!’
Reha was really very sad. It’s not nice to be cheated, is it?
Later that day, Reha and her father went to the hospital and gave them the things that Reha had bought.
The director of the hospital was very touched. ‘Such a wonderful way to bring in the new year!’ he told Reha. Turning to Reha’s father, he said ‘You have such a wonderful daughter! She’s got a lovely heart!’
*
That wasn’t the end of the story. Reha’s father was very sad about what Mr. Tiz, the shopkeeper, had done. When he got back from the hospital, he sent a message through his phone to all the other residents of the locality, telling them what had happened. When they read the message, they were so upset that they stopped going to Mr. Tiz’s shop to buy things.
You can imagine what that did to Mr. Tiz! Soon, with no customers, his losses were far more than the money he had made by cheating Reha. He realised his mistake and was very remorseful. He put up a big board outside his shop, announcing:
“I’m really sorry for what I did. I promise never to cheat anyone again. Thank you Reha for teaching me that dishonesty doesn’t pay.”

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The Discover Yourself Workshop was held In Abbas Khan P.U. College, Bengaluru on the 5,6 & 8th January, in Mysore on the 12,13 & 14th January and in Mumbai on the 18th & 19th January 2018 at the Rizvi College of Arts, Science & Commerce, Mumbai.
Some of the participants share their experiences about the Workshop.

DYS Workshop in Abbas khan College, Bangalore

DYS Workshop in Abbas khan College, Bangalore

DYS Workshop in Mumbai

DYS Workshop in Mysore

  • The workshop provides valuable keys and guides to clear the mind, and heart from unwanted waste and to be a good human being.
  • Since I have studies some psychology, I knew a bit about myself. But the workshop gave me a platform to rediscover again ‘ME’ from an Islamic perspective.
  • Thanks a lot for bringing my life from darkness to light. May Allah almighty show the path of righteousness.
  • It really changed my life. I was hating some friends, I forgave them and hugged them and cried a lot. Now, I feel responsible and obey my parents and sisters.
  • A new perspective to see life, to be non-judgmental and more of positivity towards life.
  • My life before the workshop was entirely different. This workshop has changed my point of view. It has helped me to discover myself and submit to the Reality. This workshop is life changing.
  • My whole thought process changed. Things that seemed extremely difficult to handle now seem to be easy. An eye opener for every Muslim.
  • I got a clear path to connect to Almighty Allah.
  • Actually, I do not have words to explain, how this workshop has changed me, so I keep attending it whenever it is in Mumbai. It helped me in really discovering myself.
  • I was in the box and now I feel free from the trap of Satan.

NADIRA: I was short tempered, complaining, worrying about the past or the future. This is my fifth time, I am attending the workshop. Yes, the workshop has helped me to say ‘IT’s OK’ or ‘Let it Be’., because of which I do not get angry very soon. I have learnt to be in the present, stop blaming others, learnt to keep my word and have learnt to be a good listener. I learnt to forgive others who have wronged me. The benefits I got in my participation is happiness and peace within me. My family members are wondering how I have changed so much. After attending this workshop. I feel good.

KAVIYA: Before the workshop, I lacked confidence in life and was not able to control my mind. But after this valuable workshop, I got my confidence back, I got to know all my abilities and also came to know who am I? Even my family members were surprised by seeing the changes in me. I felt after attending this workshop, “what lies behind us, and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us”.

MARY: This workshop is very interesting. My life is completely changed. It changed my behavior, my speaking skills and everything in my life. I used to get angry when my mom used to scold me, but now I am avoiding my anger. I will never forget what I learned in this workshop.

DR JABEEN: I was learning Quran, for the last ten years and this workshop helped me to open my mind and showed me how to live Islam as a way of life. This is the second time I am attending the workshop. First time itself, I had found a marvelous change in me and was working every day on the shortcomings, the struggle was on. This workshop helped getting a deeper insight into the things happening in and around like a jigsaw puzzle and the pieces falling into its place. The process was all within, but changed everything. Alhamdulillah!!

SHABRIN: Before, I was not able to describe who I am? And today I can say I am responsible and accountable. I was living in the past and was wasting my present, now, I know how to utilize the present and make my future. I changed my bad habits and now I can treat every human being as a human being not like an object.

NAJMA: Before the workshop, my life was difficult to live and sadness was there in my life. I had forgotten all my responsibilities towards others. After the workshop, my life is changing and I am now responsible and forgiving to everyone in my life. Now my life has become a true life to live with happiness and joy, helping others and loving each other, because we all are human beings.

QURATH: Before the workshop, I was unable to judge myself, that where I am going wrong? But feeling good on the third day that” what I could not recognize for 17 years, I recognized in just two days.” My mother is my only family, she was really happy that I apologized for my mistakes for the first time in really a good manner. It was very useful for me. Thank you so much sir. Now I am happy with what I am! And what I have!

NAUREEN: It helped me to know what actually Islam is? I was unaware of the internal beauty of Islam. Now, after attending this workshop, I literally feel haapy to be a Muslim. As a Muslim I was only aware of the external five pillars and after getting to know so many things I will implement them in my daily life to have inner peace. Thank you for conducting the workshop and bringing awareness about different concepts of Islam.

SARFARAZ: My life before the workshop was full of worries and tension. After attending the workshop, I felt free from worries because of the many tools learned in the workshop. I stopped judging others.

SHAREEF: It is rejuvenating. Felt the change in my life right away after attending for the first time, which was recharged after the second time. It helps to keep attending this workshop periodically.

KAMRAN: This is the second workshop. I am grateful to Allah that I had an opportunity to attend the first session initially. Having attended it, I realized that the past was pinning me down. From the perspective, Dr Sadath Sir he taught us, I was able to let go of a lot of things and focus on things that matter. It is very much needed, should have more workshops often including at the Masjid level.

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Cardinal Vincent Nichols and two leading Muslim clerics joined together recently to launch a new Muslim Certificate in Religious Studies at St Mary’s University, a Catholic institution in Twickenham in Britain. The new certificate will aim to support the religious literacy of teachers and enhance the contribution that religion can make to the formation of British values as referenced in the Professional Standards for Qualified Teacher Status. It will primarily be aimed at those teaching religious education in Muslim schools and will support a cohesive approach to teaching in line with the National Curriculum and contemporary teaching practices. Imams Sheikh Ibrahim Mogra and Sayed Razawi have been in discussions to develop the concept and the University is now working in consultation with academics from universities across the UK to develop the programme in more detail. The certificate will complement the University’s Catholic Certificate in Religious Studies.
St Mary’s has a long and distinguished history as a Catholic institution for the education of teachers. It was founded in 1850 by the Catholic Poor Schools Committee.

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Morocco’s Mohammed V, wearing white robes, walking with the country’s Grand Vizier Si Mohammed El Mokri after he placed a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior at the Arc De Triomphe during a visit to Paris, France around July 4, 1930. (AP Photo)

King Mohammed V of Morocco was honoured posthumously recently for protecting his country’s 250,000 Jews during World War II. Kivunim: The Institute for World Jewish Studies presented the first Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.-Rabbi Abraham Heschel Award to the king’s granddaughter, Princess Lalla Hasna of Morocco, at B’nai Jeshurun synagogue in New York City. It was part of a three-day conference to mark the group’s 10th anniversary. The program ended with a joint concert of Jewish and Arabic music. During World War II, King Mohammed V kept the lives and property of the country’s Jews under his protection and did not subject them to the discriminatory laws set down by the pro-Nazi Vichy government in France; Morocco was then under French rule. Later, in response to anti-Jewish rhetoric in the wake of the creation of the State of Israel, Mohammed V warned Muslims not to hurt Moroccan Jews, reminding them that Jews had always been protected in Morocco. Andre Azoulay, counselor to Morocco’s King Mohammed VI, said in a statement read on behalf of the country’s current king, Mohammed VI: “Today, we need, more than ever, to ponder the lessons and relevance of this part of history in order to stand up more forcefully to the deadly aberrations of those who are hijacking our cultures, our faiths and our civilizations. We are living at a time and in a world in which the collective imagination of our societies is too often impaired, not to say poisoned, by regression and archaism. By capitalizing on the depth and resilience of the legacy left by my revered grandfather His Majesty Mohammed V, we can, together, set out to recover the lost expanses of reason and mutual respect which have vanished from many parts of the world.”

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Almost 60 years ago, Fuad Sahin looked at Canada and the principles it stood for and decided it was the place he wanted to live. That faith in his adoptive country has been a continuous thread for Sahin, who emigrated to Canada in 1958 and moved to Niagara in 1966. That faith was repaid in kind as 2018 dawned, with Sahin being named a member of the Order of Canada by Gov. Gen. Julie Payette. He earned his place in the prestigious Order of Canada, for his work within the Muslim community, as well as being the founder of the International Development and Relief Foundation. Sahin is one of the 125 appointments made to the Order by Payette on Dec. 29. Established in 1967, the Order of Canada, the country’s highest civilian honours, recognizes outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation. Sahin said he is grateful for the reception he received when he arrived in the country in the late 1950s. He said Canada recognized human rights and was accepting of his religion. “They were so wonderful, they recognized my religion, my needs, they offered me all the facilities I needed to practise my religion and that was wonderful, and the amount of respect they showed me was unbelievable,” he said. “I’m very grateful.” His work to help develop the Muslim community in Canada includes organizing various Muslim associations, building the first Niagara mosque in Niagara Falls in 1984, and continuing to educate future generations of Muslims. Currently, he is the imam of the Islamic Society of Niagara Peninsula. While he began his time in Canada as an interning resident in Kingston, Sahin has since become a known advocate for his religion. “I was invited to speak to different churches and schools and associations, to tell them what Islam is,” he said.

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The Saxon Academy of Sciences in Leipzig, Germany has launched a digital platform to document millions of books and manuscripts from the Arab and wider Muslim world. The platform named “The Arab Library” was launched recently, providing researchers and academics access to rare and original historical texts. The project is scheduled to run until 2036, with the possibility of its work being extended if demand exists. A budget of €7.5 million ($9 million), funded by the German federal government and local authorities in various states, was allocated to the initiative, which is being supervised by Dr Freena Kalim, a professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at Leipzig University. “This project is a huge tool to help scientists and researchers in the field of Arabic studies and Islamic sciences,” Kalim said in a statement. “Arab literature has been inherited for about 1,400 years, and the culture of books in the Arab-Islamic civilization is rich, vibrant, diverse and unlike any other.” The collection features literature, religious texts, encyclopedias, dictionaries, news briefings and books on poetry, travel and nature. Most of the library derives from the period between the 12th and 19th centuries, one that was classified as a phase of decline of the Arab-Islamic culture after its ‘golden age’ in Andalusia.

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Founded by ​a team of six with a larger concern for society​ (alumni of Azim Premji University​/Montesorri​​)​, the Gubbachi Learning Community works to bridge the learning competencies of children of migrant labourers in Bangalore.

Joseph Deyone

Manikamalai

Nomita Sikand

Preethy

Rizwan Ahmed

Somya

By Nigar

I must confess I wasn’t ever half as excited about setting off to school when I was a child as I was on visiting the Gubbachi Learning Community on a sunny morning recently, along with a friend! It is tucked away in ​Kodathi​, a peri-urban pocket in South-East Bangalore. The area has high levels of construction activity and is dotted with many migrant labour communities.
As you step inside the Gubbachi Learning Centre, located near the Kodathi Government School, the first feeling you get is of fun and freedom for the children. There is a vast open space, ​plenty of ​shrubs, ​wild grass, ​many trees with birds chirping around and the blue sky up above you, unhindered by any tall buildings! The centre, housed in a​ little building, has brought love and learning into the lives of many children of migrant construction workers and their families.

Chirpy Enthusiastic Team
Gubbachi Learning Community is a bridge school founded by ​a team of six ​who had completed their Masters in Education, Development or Women Studies and were​ aiming to translate their learnings into practice by working with​in​ Government schools. Their interest in education and a larger concern for society brought together Joseph Deyone Jacobi,​ Manimakalai Raja​, ​Nomita Sikand, Preethy Rao Patel​, Rizwan Ahmed,​ and​ ​Somya Suri.​​ This chirpy enthusiastic team reminded me of the ​spirit of the ​five Enid Blyton kids who embark on an adventure to solve a mystery on Treasure Island!​ ​
It is estimated that there are around one lakh out-of-school children in Bangalore. A major portion of this population is children of migrant labour.
“In October 2015, six of us got together to start our first bridge learning centre at the Kodathi Government School, off Sarjapur Road. ​With ​our learning of what constitutes inclusive education and why it is important; and our experience from practise​, we were eager to hit the ground. ​We felt that this mix of experience, framework and ​commitment​, would help us work through challenges as we moved along. ​ With an MOU with the Karnataka Education Department, we admitted ​51 children and their younger siblings from neighbouring construction sites—all ‘out of school’ at the time,” says Somya. These children are, typically, first generation learners.

Multitude of Reasons
“At Gubbachi, the first question we had was why are children out of school? And during the survey, before we started our centre, we realized that out of a multitude of reasons, there were these three reasons which were immediate in the child’s experience. Firstly, children need to stay back at home to take care of their younger siblings. Secondly, ​negative experiences during previous schooling stint. Thirdly, fear of parents of their children getting abducted on the way to school,” Somya continues.
“As an intervention, we had to address these issues in order to bring children to the centre. The first step was to start a preschool centre, for the younger siblings of the school going children, adjacent to the main class room so that older children are at peace to engage in learning,” say Nomita and Preethy.

Teaching Methods of Alternate Schools
“The curriculum at Gubbachi is designed to evolve, and strives at keeping the child’s interest, psychology and cultural background as priority. Best practices of the Nali-Kali curriculum​ ​(​multi-grade-multi-level classroom (or ungraded), learning paced for the child, and following a trajectory of learning), followed by government schools;​ and teaching methods of alternate schools are adopted and improvised to suit the requirement of these children. Also, a lot of thought goes into understanding the psychology of the children, given the troubled and deprived background they come from.
The core guiding principle of Gubbachi (every child is unique and is valued) makes this process of evolving the curriculum continuous. Gubbachi has a programme for children when they join the centre. It has mainly three parts: expressing oneself, introduction to numeracy and building vocabulary and phonemic awareness.
Children are given opportunities to communicate with adults and peers around them in a non-threatening way. For example, they are asked to sketch whatever they like for an hour. Once done with their sketching, they sit in a circle and share what they have drawn with the facilitator and peers. Not judging the children for the drawing gives them a feeling of being accepted as they are, their expressions”, explains Joseph Deyone Jacobi on the Gubbachi blog.
Identifying out-of-school children of migrant labourers and enrolling them in Gubbachi required detailed fieldwork, reflects Rizwan. Today, ​another 110 children study in two Gub​b​achi learning centres, gaining access to skills such as Kannada, Maths and English in a fun-filled, caring environment and ​are ​being prepared for hopefully joining regular schools after a while.
‘Gubbachi’ means sparrow in Kannada, and truly every kid in the Gubbachi Learning Community is a precious sparrow! Visiting Gubbachi can be a great experience for you, just as it was for me! There’s much wisdom you can gain from the kids! You might even find yourself climbing trees with them, plucking tamarind​​ off the branches or flying colourful kites! You can learn a lot from the children and staff at the centre, a place of great joy, as I discovered the other day!
(Please see this beautiful video on the Gubbachi Learning Community: https://youtu.be/rm4y4_1awdc)
Website: https:// gubbachilearningcommunity.org/
Facebook: https://www. facebook.com/Gubbachi- Learning-Community- 1246046055409068/
Email: info.gubbachi@gmail.com
Postal Address: ​Gubbachi – Bridge Learning Centre , GHPS-Kodathi, Kodathi-Sulikunte Road, Kodathi, Off Sarjapur Road, Bengaluru. Contact: Somya +91 99160 44543 / Rizwan +91 98454 55357.

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