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Isabel Eats by Isabel - 7h ago

Tomatillos are very popular in Mexican cuisine, but what is a tomatillo and how do you use it? Read on for the answers and recipes for some of the best ways to use the delicious green fruit!

What is a tomatillo?

A tomatillo is a small round fruit with a green color and papery husk. They’re native to Mexico and are commonly used in Mexican cuisine to make salsas, sauces and more. Other names for the fruit are:

  • Mexican husk tomato
  • jamberry
  • husk cherry
  • Mexican tomato
What’s the difference between a tomato and a tomatillo?

At first glance, tomatillos look very similar to green tomatoes, but they’re actually two very different fruits. Even though the word “tomatillo” literally translates to “little tomato” in English, don’t be fooled. They’re not the same thing.

Like tomatoes, a tomatillo plant is easy to grow, and both are plants in the nightshade family. But that’s where the similarities end.

Tomatoes are sweeter, red in color and don’t have the vibrant tartness that tomatillos have.

What do tomatillos taste like?

Fresh tomatillos have a unique flavor that is tart, bright and almost citrusy. They are mainly eaten cooked, but can also be prepared raw.

When boiled, the tomatillos tend to keep their tart flavor. When roasted, tomatillos become a little sweeter and lose some of their tartness.

Some popular recipes that use tomatillos include:

Bonus points – tomatillos are healthy, too! They have a good amount of dietary fiber, and are also rich in antioxidants, niacin, potassium, and manganese.

Is a tomatillo toxic / poisonous?

There are parts of the plant that are poisonous, including the leaves, husk, and stem. As the fruit ripens, the papery husk (also known as the lantern) will loosen, revealing the fruit inside. The husk will leave behind a sticky residue. Before using them, be sure to scrub the fruit clean.

Some people believe that the unripe fruit is also poisonous. There is some debate over this, so it is probably best to avoid using them until they are fully ripe. The unripe fruit is very sour, so it isn’t something most people will want to eat anyway.

How can you tell if they’re ripe?

To check for ripeness, peel back a little bit of the husk, until you can see the fruit inside. It should be a bright green color and firm to the touch. If you notice any blemishes or soft spots, throw the fruit away.

Also try to get tomatillos that have completely filled their husks. That’s a good sign that they’re fully mature and tend to be a little more flavorful.

Where can I buy tomatillos?

If you can’t find fresh tomatillos in the produce section of the grocery store, look for them at a Mexican food market. If all else fails you can use canned tomatillos, found in the ethnic foods section of most grocery stores.

The canned ones come peeled and cooked, so they’re ready to use. The only thing you’ll need to do first is drain any liquid from the can.

If you want to use canned tomatillos as a substitute for fresh, an 11-ounce can will substitute for a pound of fresh. On average, there are 15-18 small tomatillos in one pound or about 8-10 medium tomatillos in one pound.

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Made with only 5 ingredients, these Cucumber Margaritas are refreshing, light and easy to make! Add in a jalapeno to make it spicy, or serve as is for the ultimate summer cocktail.

Cucumber margaritas are one of my favorite cocktails to enjoy on hot summer days. Made with fresh cucumber juice, lime juice, tequila and triple sec, these margaritas are one of the most refreshing and light cocktails I’ve ever made – even more than my Skinny Margaritas!

The trick to making them taste so fresh is the homemade cucumber juice. To make the juice, peel cucumbers and blend them until they’re completely pureed. Then pour the puree through a fine mesh strainer and into a bowl to remove any excess pulp.

The end result is a cool and naturally healthy juice that will pair well with lime juice and tequila.

Once you’ve got the juice strained and ready to go, it’s time to mix up some cucumber margaritas!

If you’re like me and love cocktails with a little spicy kick, I recommend muddling some fresh jalapeno slices in your glass or pitcher. Just gently press down on the sliced jalapenos a few times with a muddler or the back of a spoon a few times until the jalapeno is very fragrant.

Then add in the fresh cucumber juice, lime juice, tequila and triple sec and stir to combine.

If you like your margaritas on the sweeter side, you can add in some agave nectar or simple syrup to your taste.

More Margarita recipes you’ll love

I hope you love this recipe – be sure to give it a review below! To get more easy Mexican recipes delivered straight to your inbox, sign up for my weekly email newsletter. You can also follow Isabel Eats on Facebook,  Instagram and Pinterest!

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Cucumber Margaritas
Cucumber Margaritas made with only 5 ingredients – cucumbers, lime juice, tequila, triple sec and ice! They're refreshing, light and easy to make.
Course Drinks
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 1 drink
Calories 97kcal
Ingredients
For one drink
  • coarse kosher salt, for rimming glass
  • lime wedges, for rimming glass and garnishing
  • 1/2 medium-large cucumber, peeled
  • 1/2 ounce silver tequila (1 tbsp)
  • 1/2 ounce triple sec (1 tbsp)
  • 1/2 ounce lime juice (1 tbsp)
  • ice cubes
  • *optional* 1 jalapeno pepper, sliced into coins
  • *optional* 1-2 teaspoons agave nectar for some sweetness
For a pitcher of drinks (5 total)
  • coarse kosher salt, for rimming glass
  • lime wedges, for rimming glass and garnishing
  • 2 medium-large cucumbers, peeled
  • 2 1/2 ounces silver tequila (1/4 cup + 1 tbsp)
  • 2 1/2 ounces triple sec (1/4 cup + 1 tbsp)
  • 2 1/2 ounces lime juice, (1/4 cup + 1 tbsp)
  • ice cubes
  • *optional* 1 jalapeno pepper, sliced into coins
  • *optional* 1-2 tablespoons agave nectar for some sweetness
Instructions
  • Prepare the glasses: Pour some coarse kosher salt onto a small plate. Run a lime wedge around the rim of each 8-ounce glass and dip in salt.
  • Make the cucumber juice: Add the peeled and cut cucumbers in a large blender and puree for about 45-60 seconds, until smooth and completely blended. Pour the blended cucumber juice through a fine mesh strainer and into a bowl or measuring cup to separate the pulp from the juice. Use a spoon to stir the pulp mixture around in the strainer to make sure you get as much juice as possible.
  • Muddle the jalapeno (optional): Add 1 or 2 jalapeno slices into a pitcher (or glass). Using a muddler or the back of a spoon, gently press down onto the jalapeno slices a few times until very fragrant.
  • Mix everything together: Add the cucumber juice (1 1/4 cup for a pitcher or 1/4 cup for a single drink), tequila, triple sec and lime juice. Stir to combine and taste. If you prefer your margaritas on the sweeter side, add in some of the optional agave nectar or simple syrup to your liking. Start with a small amount and then add more as necessary.
  • Make it cold: Add in some ice cubes, garnish with a lime wedge and enjoy.
Notes
Nutrition Facts
Cucumber Margaritas
Amount Per Serving (1 drink)
Calories 97
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 1mg 0%
Potassium 101mg 3%
Total Carbohydrates 3g 1%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Sugars 0g
Protein 0g 0%
Vitamin A 2%
Vitamin C 15%
Calcium 1%
Iron 1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutritional information does not include optional sweetener.
Nutrition
Serving: 1drink | Calories: 97kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 0g | Fat: 0g | Saturated Fat: 0g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0g | Trans Fat: 0g | Cholesterol: 0mg | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 101mg | Fiber: 0g | Sugar: 0g | Vitamin A: 2% | Vitamin C: 15% | Calcium: 1% | Iron: 1%

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Everything you need to know about making corn tortillas at home! What you need, step-by-step process from start to finish and how to keep them warm. They’re easy to make and perfect for taco night!

There are a handful of foods that my family eats every single day and corn tortillas are one of them!

Homemade corn tortillas are one of my favorite foods ever. They’re extremely versatile and can be eaten in so many different ways – as a taco, fried or baked to make homemade tortilla chips or as a simple side that’s perfect for soaking up delicious saucy dishes like my chile verde.

They’re way better than store bought tortillas, are healthy (depending on how many you eat, of course) and are a great naturally gluten-free option for those that can’t have flour tortillas.

The first thing you need in order to make corn tortillas at home is masa harina.

Masa harina is a special corn flour made up of just two things – ground up corn and lime. Because the corn is treated and processed differently, corn meal or regular corn flour cannot be substituted for masa harina.

Masa harina can be found in the ethnic food aisle of larger grocery stores or sometimes next to all the other flours in the baking aisle. If you can’t find it in those areas, you may want to take a look at the gluten-free section of your store.

If all else fails and you simply can’t find masa harina in your local area, you can always find it on Amazon. I personally use Bob’s Red Mill masa harina because they’re a reputable brand that I trust, but there are others out there as well. Larger grocery chains sometimes carry MASECA brand and Quaker even has it’s own masa harina.

How to make corn tortillas

Once you’ve got the masa harina, it’s time to make the tortillas.

In a large bowl, mix together masa harina and salt. (photo 1)

Then add olive oil and hot water. (photo 2)

Mix the dough together with a spoon until all the water has been absorbed. (photo 3)

Next, form the dough into a large ball, place it inside the bowl and cover it with a clean kitchen towel or plastic wrap. Let it sit for 20 minutes.

Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces and form each piece into a ball. (photo 4)

Next comes the fun part – flattening the dough! Place a large gallon-size Ziploc bag that’s been cut at the seams over your open tortilla press (here’s the tortilla press that I have and recommend from Amazon). Place a ball of dough on the center of the tortilla press bottom. (photo 5)

Close the tortilla press and flatten the masa harina in between the Ziploc bag using the handle. (photo 6)

Open the tortilla press and gently remove the tortilla from the Ziploc bag by peeling away the bag onto the palm of your hand. (photo 7 & 8)

Cook on a griddle or nonstick skillet that’s been preheated over medium-high heat for 20 seconds, then flip it over and cook the other side for 20 more seconds. This will help seal in the heat. (photo 9)

Flip it over again and cook for about 40 seconds or so, until the tortilla begins to puff up/bubble and beautiful brown marks form. Flip it over one last time and cook for a few more seconds until that side has beautiful brown marks. (photo 10)

That’s it! It may seem like a lot of steps at first, but I promise it’s not difficult at all. And once you taste homemade corn tortillas, you’ll never go back to store bought. The time it takes to make them is so worth it!

Don’t have a tortilla press?

Another option is to flatten the dough balls with a large casserole dish like a clear Pyrex dish. Simply place the ball in between two sheets of parchment paper and press down on the handles of the casserole dish as evenly as possible.

How to keep your tortillas warm

To keep your corn tortillas warm and pliable when serving, place them inside a tortilla warmer like this or wrap them in a clean kitchen towel and place them inside a large gallon-sized Ziploc bag to help them retain heat and moisture.

To this day, tortillas are a staple at my parents house and I always have some when I visit. It’s like a big warm hug from my family.

If you like this recipe, be sure to check out my recipe for Homemade Flour Tortillas.

Looking for some tortilla fillings? Take a look at these recipes:

I hope you love this recipe – be sure to give it a review below! To get more easy Mexican recipes delivered straight to your inbox, sign up for my weekly email newsletter. You can also follow Isabel Eats on Facebook,  Instagram and Pinterest!

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Easy Homemade Corn Tortillas
Everything you need to know about how to make corn tortillas at home! What you need, step-by-step process from start to finish and how to keep them warm. They're easy to make and perfect for taco night!
Course Breads, Sides
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 1 hour 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings 12 Tortillas
Calories 67kcal
Equipment
  • 1 gallon-size Ziploc bag
  • Tortilla press
Ingredients
  • 2 cups masa harina
  • 2/3 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups hot water, plus more if necessary
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil*
Instructions
  • Add 2 cups masa harina and 2/3 teaspoon salt in a large bowl. Mix together with a spoon.
  • Pour 1 1/2 cups hot water and 1 teaspoon olive oil into the bowl and mix together until all the water is absorbed. Using your hands, form the dough into a big ball. The dough should be firm and springy when touched, not dry or super sticky. If the mixture is too dry, add more water in small amounts until the dough is springy and holds together.
  • Place the dough ball in the bowl and cover it with a clean kitchen towel or plastic wrap. Let the dough rest for 20 minutes. This will help ensure that all the water gets absorbed.
  • Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a ball with the palms of your hands and place them in the mixing bowl. Cover the bowl with a clean kitchen towel or plastic wrap to keep the balls moist while you're working.
  • Preheat a griddle or large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat.
  • Open the gallon-sized Ziploc bag and cut the seams on each side so that it makes one large rectangular piece of plastic. Open the tortilla press and lay the plastic inside of it so that it covers the upper and bottom parts of the tortilla press.
  • Place one dough ball in the middle of the tortilla press, close the top and gently press to flatten it out. Open the tortilla press and peel back the Ziploc bag to transfer the tortilla to your hand.
  • Place the flattened tortilla onto the hot skillet and cook for 20 seconds. Flip it over and cook for 20 more seconds to seal in the heat. Flip it over again and cook for about 40 seconds or so, until the tortilla starts to bubble or puff up and beautiful brown marks form. Flip over one last time and cook until beautiful brown marks form.
  • Remove the tortilla and place it in a tortilla warmer or in a clean kitchen towel that's placed inside a large Ziploc bag to keep it warm.
  • Continue cooking the remaining tortillas.
  • Serve immediately or store in a large Ziploc bag in the fridge for up to 10 days.
Notes
If you don’t have a tortilla press, you can use a large casserole dish to flatten the masa dough in between two sheets of parchment paper.
To keep tortillas warm and pliable when serving: Place tortillas inside a tortilla warmer like this or wrap them in a clean kitchen towel and place them inside a large gallon-sized Ziploc bag to help them retain heat and moisture.
Storage: Fresh corn tortillas can be stored in a plastic storage bag in the fridge for up to 10 days.
Reheating: Reheat corn tortillas in a skillet or griddle over high heat until fully warmed through. To reheat in the microwave, wrap corn tortillas in a damp paper towel and place on a plate. Microwave on high in 10-second increments until fully warmed through.
*This recipe was originally posted in 2017 and was updated in April 2019 with a slight recipe change. 1 teaspoon of oil has been added to the original recipe because I find that the tortillas are more pliable and less likely to crack. If you prefer to make this recipe without any oil, you can do that too. Just make sure you keep the tortillas moist and covered at all times when keeping them warm.
Nutrition Facts
Easy Homemade Corn Tortillas
Amount Per Serving (1 tortilla)
Calories 67 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1g 2%
Total Carbohydrates 14g 5%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Protein 1g 2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition
Serving: 1tortilla | Calories: 67kcal | Carbohydrates: 14g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Fiber: 1g

This recipe was originally posted in 2017 and was updated in April 2019 with new photos, helpful tips and a slight recipe change.

The post Easy Homemade Corn Tortillas appeared first on Isabel Eats.

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Isabel Eats by Isabel - 1w ago

A refreshing and flavorful gazpacho recipe made from fresh sun-ripened tomatoes, cucumbers, bell peppers, onions and other simple ingredients. It’s the best chilled soup you’ll eat all summer!

Take a break from turning on the oven and stove this summer, and grab your blender instead. It’s time to whip up a batch of fresh gazpacho!

This is my first summer really making gazpacho, and after making batches upon batches of this stuff, I’m absolutely hooked! This tomato-based soup is served cold (perfect for those hot summer days) and one of those recipes that often tastes better the next day after all the ingredients have had time to meld together.

It’s quick and easy to make, made with fresh produce and requires no “cooking” at all! All you need is a blender and you’re good to go.

What is gazpacho?

Gazpacho is a chilled vegetable soup made from fresh summer ingredients like tomatoes, cucumbers and bell peppers. It’s pureed with a little olive oil to create a light yet creamy texture.

It originated in Andalucía, Spain and has become a popular soup to serve during the hot summer months around the world.

Ingredients in gazpacho

For this recipe, you’ll need:

  • juicy & ripe vegetables like plum/roma tomatoes, a cucumber and a red bell pepper
  • garlic and a sweet yellow onion
  • cilantro
  • olive oil and red wine vinegar
  • coarse kosher salt, black pepper, cumin and cayenne (optional if you don’t want anything spicy)
How to make gazpacho

Once you’ve got all your ingredients together, all you have to do is place everything in a blender and puree it until smooth! (photo 1 & 2)

It’s literally that simple! After pureeing, the waiting game begins.

I recommend letting the soup chill in the fridge for at least 4 hours to really help the flavors come together and develop. After that, serve with some croutons or crusty bread, a drizzle of olive oil, halved cherry tomatoes if you’ve got some fresh ones from the garden and eat up!

Tips for making the best gazpacho

Let it sit in the fridge for at least 4 hours, but preferably overnight. I find that the flavors really meld together once it’s had a chance to sit for that amount of time.

Serve cold. This is crucial.

Drizzle a little olive oil on top when serving. It really adds some creaminess and healthy fats to the soup.

I hope you love this recipe – be sure to give it a review below! To get more easy Mexican recipes delivered straight to your inbox, sign up for my weekly email newsletter. You can also follow Isabel Eats on Facebook,  Instagram and Pinterest!

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Easy Gazpacho Recipe
A refreshing gazpacho recipe made from fresh sun-ripened tomatoes, cucumbers, bell peppers, onions and other simple ingredients. The best summer soup!
Course Soup
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Calories 114kcal
Equipment
  • Blender
Ingredients
  • 2 pounds ripe plum or roma tomatoes, halved, core and seeds removed
  • 1 medium cucumber, peeled and cut into coins
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, stem and core removed
  • 1/2 medium sweet yellow onion, peeled and cut into large chunks
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/4 cup cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)
  • garnishes: croutons, cilantro leaves, olive oil
Instructions
  • Add all ingredients in a large blender or food processor. Puree until completely smooth, about 1-2 minutes depending on the power of your blender. (You may have to do this in two batches if your blender isn't large enough.)
  • Taste and season with more salt if necessary.
  • Transfer to a large glass container, cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or up to overnight to help all the flavors meld together.
  • Serve cold with croutons, cilantro and a drizzle of olive oil.
Notes
Makes about 5 cups total.
Nutrition Facts
Easy Gazpacho Recipe
Amount Per Serving (1 serving)
Calories 114 Calories from Fat 63
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 11%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 5g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 412mg 17%
Potassium 517mg 15%
Total Carbohydrates 11g 4%
Dietary Fiber 4g 16%
Sugars 6g
Protein 2g 4%
Vitamin A 48%
Vitamin C 103%
Calcium 6%
Iron 5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition
Serving: 1serving | Calories: 114kcal | Carbohydrates: 11g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 5g | Trans Fat: 0g | Cholesterol: 0mg | Sodium: 412mg | Potassium: 517mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 6g | Vitamin A: 48% | Vitamin C: 103% | Calcium: 6% | Iron: 5%

The post Easy Gazpacho Recipe appeared first on Isabel Eats.

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Mexican Street Corn (Elotes) is corn on the cob covered in creamy mayo and topped with cilantro, lime juice, Cotija cheese and chipotle chili powder. Grilled, steamed, or boiled, it’s a perfectly easy Mexican summer side dish!  

If there’s a recipe that embodies what a Mexican summer feels like, this Mexican Street Corn is it! You’ve got freshly grilled corn covered in creamy mayonnaise, lime juice for some brightness, Cotija cheese, cilantro and a dash of chipotle chili powder to give everything a little kick.

Serve it up with an ice cold horchata or refreshing Michelada and you’re summer bbq is set!

Why this Mexican Street Corn recipe is so great:
  • The cilantro and lime juice add brightness, the Cotija cheese balances out the creaminess of the mayo and the chipotle chili powder gives it a nice little kick!
  • You can make it inside or outside – pop it on the grill in the summer, or in the winter you can make it by steaming or boiling it.
  • You don’t even need a plate to eat it! Just leave the husks attached and use those as a handle!
Elotes? What’s that?

Elotes is the Spanish name for Mexican Street Corn. In Mexico, they’re sold from carts on the street, hence the term “street corn”. The word “elote” refers to corn in general, whether it’s on or off the cornstalk.

Mexican Street Corn holds a special place in my heart. The smell of it reminds me of my childhood summers walking around my family’s hometown in Mexico. I’d pass by street vendors selling elotes in a cup and couldn’t help but want some.

Next thing you know, I’d be walking through the outdoor market with a cup in hand, happy as a clam. It just doesn’t get much better than that.

How To Make Mexican Street Corn

Preheat the grill to medium-high heat (about 375°F to 400°F. Brush each ear of shucked corn with oil to make sure it doesn’t stick to the grill. (photo 1)

Place the corn onto the grill grates and cook for about 2-3 minutes per side, until all the sides are cooked through and browned in spots. Remove from the grill and transfer to a large plate or baking sheet. (photo 2)

In a small bowl, add mayonnaise and lime juice. Mix together to combine. (photo 3)

Using a brush or butter knife, spread the mayo mixture onto each ear of grilled corn, then sprinkle each ear with the Cotija cheese, cilantro, and chili powder. (photo 4)

Tips for making the best street corn
  • Try using a brush instead of a butter knife to spread the mayo and lime juice mixture onto the corn. It will help evenly cover the surface.
  • To grill the corn with the husk on, just leave the husk undisturbed while it’s on the grill to help the corn steam. Cook for about 10 minutes, turning frequently, until the husks become charred and the corn is tender.
  • If you’re making this for kids (or others) who might have trouble eating off a cob, slice the kernels off the cob into a bowl with a knife. Then mix in all of the remaining ingredients.
Don’t have a grill? No problem!

Though this recipe calls for grilling the corn on the cob, it’s not required. I prefer grilling it because it adds another layer of flavor and a little element of summer that just can’t be replaced, but if you live in an apartment building and have no grill (or maybe it’s the middle of winter and you have a hankering for some Mexican corn), then steamed or boiled corn will also work.

Full instructions on how to steam or boil corn on the cob below in the recipe card.

Variations
  • If you can’t find Cotija cheese, you can use feta or parmesan instead.
  • This elotes recipe calls for cilantro, but if you’re someone who doesn’t like cilantro you can either replace it with fresh parsley or omit it altogether.
  • Consider switching out the chipotle chili powder for a different chili variety, like ancho chili powder or cayenne chili powder.
What to serve with street corn

I hope you love this quick and simple recipe – be sure to give it a review below! To get more easy Mexican recipes delivered straight to your inbox, sign up for my weekly email newsletter. You can also follow Isabel Eats on Facebook,  Instagram and Pinterest!

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Easy Mexican Street Corn (Elotes)
Easy Mexican Street Corn (Elotes) is corn on the cob covered in mayo, lime juice, cilantro, Cotija cheese and chili powder. Grilled, steamed or boiled!
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 4 ears of corn
Calories 195kcal
Ingredients
  • 4 medium ears sweet corn, husks and silk removed
  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1/2 cup crumbled cotija cheese
  • 2 teaspoons chipotle chili powder
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro
Instructions
  • Preheat a grill to medium-high heat (about 375°F-400°F). Using a brush, coat each ear of corn with oil to make sure it doesn't stick to the grill during cooking.
  • Place the corn onto the grill grates, cover and let cook for about 2-3 minutes, until the corn is cooked through and charred in some spots. Turn the cobs and repeat the grilling process until all the sides are cooked and browned. Remove the corn from the grill and transfer to a large plate or baking sheet. (You can also steam or boil the corn if you don't have a grill. See instructions below in the Notes section.)
  • In a small bowl, add mayonnaise and lime juice. Mix together with a spoon.
  • Using a brush or a butter knife, spread the mayonnaise mixture onto each ear of grilled corn. 
  • Sprinkle each ear with 2 tablespoons of Cotija cheese, 1 tablespoon of cilantro and a pinch of chili powder. Taste and season with salt if desired.
Notes
To steam the corn: Add 2-3 inches of water into a large pot and then insert a steamer rack. Make sure the water isn’t touching the rack. Cover and bring the water to a boil. Placed the shucked ears of corn in the steamer rack, cover and steam for about 5-7 minutes, until the corn turns a beautiful golden yellow and is tender but still crisp. Remove from the rack and continue to step 3 of the recipe.
To boil the corn: Fill a large pot or Dutch oven halfway with water. Bring to a boil. Add in the shucked ears of corn, cover and bring to a boil again. Cook for about 5-6 minutes, until the corn turns a beautiful golden yellow and is tender but still crisp. Remove from the pot and continue to step 3 of the recipe.
To grill the corn with the husk on, just leave the husk undisturbed while it’s on the grill to help the corn steam. Cook for about 10 minutes, turning frequently, until the husks become charred and the corn is tender.
Try using a brush instead of a butter knife to spread the mayo and lime juice mixture onto the corn. It will help evenly cover the surface.
If you’re making this for kids (or others) who might have trouble eating off a cob, slice the kernels off the cob into a bowl with a knife. Then mix in all of the remaining ingredients.
Nutrition Facts
Easy Mexican Street Corn (Elotes)
Amount Per Serving (1 elote)
Calories 195 Calories from Fat 81
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 9g 14%
Saturated Fat 4g 20%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 15mg 5%
Sodium 227mg 9%
Potassium 253mg 7%
Total Carbohydrates 24g 8%
Dietary Fiber 3g 12%
Sugars 5g
Protein 7g 14%
Vitamin A 4%
Vitamin C 20%
Calcium 1%
Iron 14%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
*Nutritional information calculated using Light Mayo*
Nutrition
Serving: 1elote | Calories: 195kcal | Carbohydrates: 24g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Trans Fat: 0g | Cholesterol: 15mg | Sodium: 227mg | Potassium: 253mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 4% | Vitamin C: 20% | Calcium: 1% | Iron: 14%

The post Easy Mexican Street Corn (Elotes) appeared first on Isabel Eats.

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Hominy is a key ingredient in many Mexican dishes, but what exactly is it? Why does it look like corn, but have a unique taste and texture? We’re going to give you the facts and show you how to prepare this delicious corn-based food!

What is Hominy?

This unique and delicious food looks like corn, but if you cook with it, you know the taste and texture are unique.

The process of making hominy begins with dried corn. Specifically, field corn, not the sweet corn we usually buy for summer dinners.

  1. The corn is re-hydrated in a food-grade calcium hydroxide solution. This can be lime (the mineral, not the fruit!) or lye, both of which can be found in most grocery stores. While the use of chemicals may sound intimidating, the solution will soften the corn, loosen the outer shells and keep it from sprouting while in storage.
  2. The preparation for it is almost the same as for dried beans. The dried corn needs to soak overnight in the solution.
  3. After soaking, rinse the corn kernels to remove any residual lye and to separate the shell.

This process, called nixtamalization, was first used in Central America more than 3,000 years ago. Many North America and West Indies indigenous people had similar methods of preparing corn.

Before eating it, heat it until it’s cooked and thoroughly warm.

If you don’t have the time to make it (and let’s be honest, most of us don’t, myself included), cans of prepared hominy are available in the most grocery stores located near the other canned vegetables. I used canned hominy nearly 100 percent of the time and the flavor is great!

If you can’t find any local to you, here are a few options to purchase it online:

What is the difference between corn and hominy?

The soaking process is what makes the difference. Hominy is puffed up to three times its original size. It imparts a bit of its nutty flavor to dishes but blends well with almost anything it’s cooked with.

What is hominy corn used for?

Once prepared, hominy corn is a versatile pantry staple.

In many Mexican dishes, it’s ground into a fine powder which is then used to make the traditional masa harina, or corn dough. Because of the soaking process, this form of cornmeal can create a dough that untreated cornmeal can not. This is because hominy has the unique ability to bond when wet.

As a result, it’s often used as a flour to thicken soups and stews or to make tamales. Most commonly, the masa harina made from hominy is used to make authentic Mexican corn tortillas.

Posole is another popular dish for hominy. It’s a combination of meat and hominy in a rich and flavorful broth. Popular posole favorites include Chicken Pozole Verde and Red Posole. Both of these Mexican stews put hominy front and center and highlight its chewy texture.

In Mexico, ground hominy is also commonly mixed with water and milk to make atole, a popular drink during the cold winter months and the holidays. It can be flavored in different ways, such as with chocolate, nuts fruits.

Is hominy good or bad for you?

Unlike traditional corn that can make its way intact through your digestive tract, hominy’s vitamins are readily available for use by your body. Hominy is full of B vitamins and by soaking it, there is added calcium.

While the bad reputation of processed foods may stand in the way of some people enjoying it, in truth, it’s high in fiber and low in calories. Also, it has almost no sugar or fat, and is a surprisingly filling food.

Despite some of the grain being lost in the process, it is still considered a whole grain food. Nutritionally, it is similar to corn.

It is often used by those on low-fat diet as well as those trying to lose weight. Better yet, it also happens to be gluten free. Therefore, it’s a grain that can easily be enjoyed by anyone!

Try this easy to make grain in place of beans or corn. Or try one of the recipes here, sure to make you fall in love with this ancient Mexican food.

The post Hominy – Get the Facts and Learn How to Make It appeared first on Isabel Eats.

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Isabel Eats by Isabel - 3w ago

Masa harina is a staple of Mexican cooking and a required ingredient when making authentic tortillas. The process of making this corn flour is fascinating, and so many delicious things can be made with it!

What is masa harina?

Masa harina is dried corn dough or corn flour. Directly translated, the words mean “dough flour.”

Masa harina starts its life as dried maize corn. The corn is soaked in food-grade calcium hydroxide to make hominy. These puffed-up kernels are then finely grated into corn dough. If you dehydrate the dough, you’ll have a corn-based flour, which is known as masa harina.

You can find both white, yellow and blue masa harina. The difference is that the white masa is made with white corn, the yellow is made with yellow corn and the blue is made with – you guessed it – blue corn. The white and yellow are slightly sweeter and easier to find, but either can be used in recipes calling for it.

Nearly all grocery stores carry at least one brand of masa harina. However, if you have trouble finding it, Hispanic grocery stores will have plenty of choices.

If you can’t find any local to you, here are some links of where to buy some online:

Is cornmeal the same thing as masa?

There are a number of differences between cornmeal and masa. Most importantly, they are not interchangeable in recipes.

Masa is ground maize corn while cornmeal is from yellow corn. Cornmeal is never treated with the soaking solution necessary to make masa.

Because of these differences, the two products end up having different uses. Cornmeal is great for making bread, but it will not stick together to make tortillas. The lime bath the masa is prepared in provides that characteristic. There really is no substitute for the main ingredient for tortillas.

The flavor will also be different if you substitute cornmeal for masa harina in a recipe. If you are using it to thicken soups, it will serve the same purpose, just with a changed flavor. Masa is just sour enough to have a distinctive taste.

Is masa harina healthy?

This corn flour has many health benefits, including the fact that it’s naturally gluten free.

Flour made from corn is also higher in fiber, vitamin A, zinc and iron that wheat flour. The combination of fiber and carbohydrates makes it a bit more filling as well. As a result, it will leave you sated for a longer period of time.

Also, it’s easier to digest and can prevent stomach issues, thanks to the extra fiber.

What is masa harina used for?

Corn tortillas. The most popular use for it is to make tortillas. Just by adding water and salt, like I do in my recipe for Homemade Corn Tortillas, you will have the most delicious and authentic Mexican tortillas. I have a tortilla press that makes the process super easy, but you can use a rolling pin as well.

Gorditas. With your batch of corn tortillas, you can make nearly anything! This Gorditas Recipe is a great place to start. By slicing the tortillas in half, you have lots of space to fill with combinations of meat, veggies, beans and more!

Sopes are another Mexican staple that always needs the perfect tortilla. After cooking the tortilla, but while it’s still hot, roll the sides up slightly to make a lip. Then you can stack your delicious toppings on it without worrying about wearing any of the salsa. Follow my direction here for Mexican Sopes.

Tamale recipes like my Green Chile and Cheese Vegetarian Tamales, need a layer of masa dough spread inside the corn husks before filling.

The dough made of masa harina can also be used to make soups, stews and cornbread.

The post What is Masa Harina? appeared first on Isabel Eats.

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An easy, bright and fresh Black Bean and Corn Salsa recipe that takes only 15 minutes to make! It’s the perfect appetizer for that upcoming party and makes a great side dish. (gluten free, vegetarian, vegan)

Gimme a bowl of salsa and I am one happy gal! My latest obsession has been this Black Bean and Corn Salsa served with thick-cut tortilla chips.

To keep the cook time to a minimum, this recipe uses canned corn and canned black beans. But don’t worry – it doesn’t taste bland or canned at all!

To keep this salsa tasting fresh and bright, everything is mixed with a simple and flavorful dressing made from cilantro, olive oil, honey, lime juice, cumin and salt and pepper.

The dressing really helps the canned corn and black beans pop while providing some lightly sweet and acidic notes that makes this salsa the best!

Plus, I absolutely love how colorful it is!

How to make Black Bean and Corn Salsa

Are you ready for the easiest recipe ever?

Add corn, black beans, diced tomatoes, diced red onions, diced jalapenos, chopped cilantro, lime juice, olive oil, honey, ground cumin, salt and pepper to a large mixing bowl. (photo 1-4)

Mix together and serve.

How easy is that?! Told you it was the easiest recipe ever invented.

I’ve been eating it as a side dish for lunch this past week, but it’s also a great snack and appetizer for parties!

Let’s just say that it’s hearty enough to keep you satisfied while you sip on that Frozen Margarita or White Sangria (wink wink).

Looking for some more ideas on how to eat this salsa?

Recipe pairings for Black Bean and Corn Salsa

I hope you love this recipe as much as I do! To get more easy Mexican recipes delivered straight to your inbox, sign up for my weekly email newsletter. You can also follow Isabel Eats on FacebookInstagram and Pinterest!

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Black Bean and Corn Salsa
An easy, bright and fresh Black Bean and Corn Salsa recipe that takes only 15 minutes to make! It's the perfect appetizer for that upcoming party and makes a great side dish. (gluten free, vegetarian, vegan)
Course Appetizer, Salsa
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 8 servings
Calories 114kcal
Ingredients
  • 1 15-ounce can whole kernel corn, drained and rinsed
  • 1 15-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 4 medium plum tomatoes, diced
  • 1/2 medium red onion, diced
  • 2 jalapenos, diced (seeds removed if you're sensitive to spicy foods)
  • 1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice (about 1 1/2 limes)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
Instructions
  • Add all ingredients to a large mixing bowl.
  • Mix together and serve immediately or cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Notes
Makes about 5 cups total.
This salsa will last in the fridge for up to 10 days.
If you have time, I recommend letting the salsa sit in the fridge for an hour or two to help the flavors and juices really meld together and soak into the corn and beans.
If it’s summertime and you want to take advantage of using fresh corn, feel free to do that as well! You’ll need about 2 cups of freshly cooked corn, which is about 6-8 ears of fresh corn.
Nutrition Facts
Black Bean and Corn Salsa
Amount Per Serving (1 serving)
Calories 114 Calories from Fat 18
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2g 3%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 545mg 23%
Potassium 192mg 5%
Total Carbohydrates 20g 7%
Dietary Fiber 5g 20%
Sugars 5g
Protein 4g 8%
Vitamin A 7%
Vitamin C 26%
Calcium 7%
Iron 3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition
Serving: 1serving | Calories: 114kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 0g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 0g | Cholesterol: 0mg | Sodium: 545mg | Potassium: 192mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 7% | Vitamin C: 26% | Calcium: 7% | Iron: 3%

This post was originally published in April 2016 and was updated in June 2019 with new photographs, tips and cooking techniques.

The post Black Bean and Corn Salsa appeared first on Isabel Eats.

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Isabel Eats by Isabel - 1M ago

Love those fresh and soft flour tortillas from your favorite Mexican restaurant? Now you can make your own at home! These delicious homemade flour tortillas are easy to make, pliable yet sturdy, won’t rip and only require 5 ingredients!

Growing up in a Mexican household, my parents made flour tortillas from scratch every week. But like many kids, I never realized just how lucky I was to have such amazing food all the time until I moved out of the house and had to start cooking for myself.

I needed to learn how to make all my childhood favorites, so one of the first things I asked my mom for when I was out of the house was her flour tortilla recipe!

She first taught me how to make corn tortillas and now I’m happy to say that I’ve mastered the flour version!

Made with only 5 ingredients, these tortillas come together in no time and are perfect for making burritos, tacos, enchiladas and quesadillas and more. They’re soft and pillowy, pliable yet sturdy and make the best soft tacos ever.

This recipe is easy enough to make on your own, but it’s also a great one to make with kids!

How to make flour tortillas

Making flour tortillas from scratch is really simple! All you need is some all-purpose flour (or whole wheat flour if you want to make them whole grain), baking powder, salt, oil and warm water.

First, mix together the dry ingredients in a large bowl – flour, baking powder and water. (photo 1)

Then, add your preferred oil. I used olive oil, but you could also use avocado oil, vegetable oil or lard like is traditionally used. (photo 2)

Add in warm water and mix everything together with a fork until a dough forms. (photos 3-4)

Transfer the dough onto a well-floured work surface and knead for about 5 minutes until the dough is smooth, soft and elastic.

Roll the dough into a ball and let it rest, covered, for about 30 minutes up to 2 hours. (photos 5-6)

Divide the dough into 8 pieces and roll each piece into a ball using the palms of your hands. (photos 7-8)

On a lightly floured surface using a lightly-floured rolling pin, roll each dough ball into an 8 to 10-inch circle. (photos 9-10)

Don’t worry if the tortillas aren’t a perfect circle. Just do the best you can. I promise they’ll taste just as good and nobody will notice!

Preheat a large nonstick skillet or griddle over medium-high heat. Place the rolled tortilla dough in the skillet and cook for about 30-45 seconds, or until small bubbles start to form. Flip the tortilla over and cook for another 30 seconds-45 seconds. (photos 11-12)

The tortillas should have light golden brown spots, but not be completely burned.

I have to warn you about something before you make these – you may become slightly addicted and never be able to eat store-bought flour tortillas again!

I highly recommend making a double batch so you can have leftovers for the whole week.

Tips for making the best homemade flour tortillas

No air bubbles? If your tortillas don’t form any air pockets or bubbles after 45 seconds to 1 minute, try turning up the heat a little a little bit and see if that helps.

I find that the first tortilla is always the hardest to get just right, but once you adjust the heat after seeing what happens, cooking the rest of the tortillas usually goes more smoothly.

Don’t have a rolling pin? That’s okay! You can use a wine bottle or other similar-sized object you have. Just make sure to clean the surface well and dust it in flour.

Use a tortilla warmer to keep the tortillas soft, pliable and warm! A tortilla warmer is one of my top recommend kitchen tools to have if you’re a tortilla lover like me. It’s very inexpensive and makes such a difference. Here’s the exact one that I have.

Don’t have a tortilla warmer? Do this. I recommend wrapping your stack of warm tortillas in a clean kitchen towel and then placing that inside a plastic zip-top bag (like the photo below). That will help keep in some of the heat which will create steam and keep the tortillas pliable.

My husband is a huge fan of eating freshly made flour tortillas just as they are with a little pat of butter and rolled into a little taco. They’re just that good!

Ways to use flour tortillas

Here are some of our other favorite ways to use flour tortillas:

I hope you love this recipe as much as I do! To get more easy Mexican recipes delivered straight to your inbox, sign up for my weekly email newsletter. You can also follow Isabel Eats on FacebookInstagram and Pinterest!

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Easy Flour Tortillas
Easy homemade flour tortillas better than your favorite Mexican restaurant and way better than store-bought! Perfect for burritos, quesadillas and tacos!
Course Side
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
RESTING TIME 30 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes
Servings 8 10-inch tortillas
Calories 140kcal
Ingredients
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour (or whole wheat flour)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons oil (olive oil, avocado oil or canola oil)
  • 3/4 cup warm water
Instructions
Hand Mixing Instructions
  • In a large mixing bowl, add flour, baking powder and salt. Stir with a fork to combine.
  • Add oil and water and stir to combine until a dough forms.
  • Transfer the dough onto a well-floured work surface and knead for about 5 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic. If the dough becomes too sticky to work with during the kneading process, add in a little more flour. The final dough should be tacky, but not so much that it completely sticks to your fingers and hands.
  • Roll the dough into a ball, cover it with a clean kitchen towel and let it rest for 30 minutes (or up to 2 hours).
  • Divide the dough into 8 separate pieces and roll each piece into a ball.
  • On a lightly floured surface, roll each dough ball into an 8 to 10-inch circle. (While you're rolling out each ball, you can place the rolled tortillas on top of a clean kitchen towel or lightly-floured parchment paper.)
  • Heat a large nonstick skillet or griddle over medium-high heat. Place a tortilla on the skillet and cook for 30-45 seconds, or until small bubbles start to form. Flip it over with your hands or a spatula and cook for another 30-45 seconds.
  • Remove from the skillet and place it in a tortilla warmer. If you don't have a tortilla warmer, I recommend wrapping the tortillas in a kitchen towel and then placing them inside a large zip-top plastic bag. Serve immediately.
Stand Mixer Instructions
  • In the bowl of a stand mixer, add flour, baking powder and salt. Mix for a few seconds on low using the dough hook attachment.
  • Turn the mixer on medium speed and while it's running, add the oil and water. Mix for 1 to 2 minutes until a dough forms. You may need to stop the mixer and scrape the sides of the bowl to incorporate all the flour.
  • Lower the speed to low speed and mix for 2 to 3 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic. If the dough is too sticky, add in a little flour until the dough is tacky to the touch, but not sticking to your fingers and hands.
  • Transfer the dough onto a well-floured work surface and knead for about 5 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic. If the dough becomes too sticky to work with during the kneading process, add in a little more flour. The final dough should be tacky, but not so much that it completely sticks to your fingers and hands.
  • Roll the dough into a ball, cover it with a clean kitchen towel and let it rest for 30 minutes (or up to 2 hours).
  • Divide the dough into 8 separate pieces and roll each piece into a ball.
  • On a lightly floured surface, roll each dough ball into an 8 to 10-inch circle. (While you're rolling out each ball, you can place the rolled tortillas on top of a clean kitchen towel or lightly-floured parchment paper.)
  • Heat a large nonstick skillet or griddle over medium-high heat. Place a tortilla on the skillet and cook for 30-45 seconds, or until small bubbles start to form. Flip it over with your hands or a spatula and cook for another 30-45 seconds.
  • Remove from the skillet and place it in a tortilla warmer. If you don't have a tortilla warmer, I recommend wrapping the tortillas in a kitchen towel and then placing them inside a large zip-top plastic bag. Serve immediately.
Notes
Storage: Tortillas can be stored in the fridge in a gallon-sized plastic zip-top bag for 7-10 days.
Freezing instructions: Tortillas can be frozen for 3-4 months for longer storage. To freeze, place a sheet of parchment paper in between each stacked tortilla. Place the stack in a gallon-sized plastic zip-top bag and freeze.
No air bubbles? If your tortillas don’t form any air pockets or bubbles after 45 seconds to 1 minute, try turning up the heat a little a little bit and see if that helps.
Don’t have a rolling pin? That’s okay! You can use a wine bottle or other similar-sized object you have. Just make sure to clean the surface well and dust it in flour.
Nutrition
Serving: 1tortilla | Calories: 140kcal | Carbohydrates: 22g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 0g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Trans Fat: 0g | Cholesterol: 0mg | Sodium: 206mg | Potassium: 0mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 0g | Vitamin A: 0% | Vitamin C: 0% | Calcium: 34% | Iron: 0%

This recipe was published in January 2016 and updated with new photos and helpful tips in June 2019.

The post Easy Flour Tortillas appeared first on Isabel Eats.

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Deliciously caramelized sauteed peppers and onions are a crowd-pleasing side dish for just about any meal! Made with herbs, seasonings and a splash of red wine vinegar. (gluten free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)

Sauteed peppers and onions are the perfect side dish to go with just about every meal. Made from sweet bell peppers, red and yellow onions, a touch of olive oil and flavorful herbs and spices, this quick and easy vegetable recipe will add beautiful colors to you dinner plate.

And don’t even get me started on how healthy and nutritious they are. Just one serving of these veggies is filled with healthy fats, fiber and an impressive amount of vitamin C!

Besides the typical salt and pepper seasoning in most peppers and onions recipes, I’ve added in some red pepper flakes and dried oregano for extra flavor.

The end result isn’t spicy at all, so don’t worry if you’re sensitive to spicy foods. If you prefer a little spice, I recommend doubling the amount of red pepper flakes.

How to make sauteed peppers and onions

Slice 4 bell peppers, 1 red onion and 1 yellow onion into strips. (photo 1)

Add them into a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat along with 2 tablespoons of olive oil. (photo 2)

Add in the salt, black pepper, red pepper flakes and dried oregano. (photo 3)

Stir everything together and cook for 15-17 minutes, until the veggies are softened and caramelized. Add in 1 tablespoon of red wine vinegar, 1 teaspoon of minced garlic and cook for 1 more minute. (photo 4)

Remove from heat and serve.

Tips and Tricks for the best peppers and onions

If the peppers and onions are starting to burn, turn down the heat on your stovetop just a little and adjust from there. We want caramelized peppers and onions, not burned peppers and onions.

If you’re not using a non-stick skillet, you may need to add in a little more olive oil. The veggies shouldn’t really stick to the bottom of the skillet, so add in more olive oil if needed.

Make sure to add in the minced garlic at the end so it doesn’t burn. If you add it in the beginning with all the seasonings, it’ll burn and that’s no bueno!

Ways to use Sauteed Peppers and Onions

Looking for different ways to eat these veggies throughout the week? Here are some of my favorite ideas!

I hope you love this recipe as much as I do! To get more easy Mexican recipes delivered straight to your inbox, sign up for my weekly email newsletter. You can also follow Isabel Eats on FacebookInstagram and Pinterest!

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Sauteed Peppers and Onions
Deliciously caramelized sauteed peppers and onions are a crowd-pleasing side dish for just about any meal! Made with herbs, seasonings and a splash of red wine vinegar. (gluten free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)
Course Side
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 18 minutes
Total Time 28 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Calories 109kcal
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 medium bell peppers, sliced into long strips
  • 1 medium red onion, sliced
  • 1 medium yellow onion, sliced
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic (about 2 cloves)
Instructions
  • Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add in olive oil, sliced bell peppers and sliced red and yellow onions.
  • Add in the salt, red pepper flakes, black pepper and dried oregano.
  • Stir to coat the vegetables with the olive oil and seasonings. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 15-17 minutes until the peppers and onions have softened and started to caramelize.
  • Add in the red wine vinegar and minced garlic. Mix together and cook for 1 more minute. Taste and season with more salt if necessary.
  • Remove the peppers and onions from the heat and serve.
Notes
If the peppers and onions are starting to burn, turn down the heat on your stovetop just a little and adjust from there. We want caramelized peppers and onions, not burned peppers and onions.
If you’re not using a non-stick skillet, you may need to add in a little more olive oil. The veggies shouldn’t really stick to the bottom of the skillet, so add in more olive oil if needed.
Make sure to add in the minced garlic at the end so it doesn’t burn. If you add it in the beginning with all the seasonings, it’ll burn and that’s no bueno!
Nutrition Facts
Sauteed Peppers and Onions
Amount Per Serving (1 /4th of recipe)
Calories 109 Calories from Fat 63
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 11%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 5g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 403mg 17%
Potassium 297mg 8%
Total Carbohydrates 12g 4%
Dietary Fiber 3g 12%
Sugars 5g
Protein 2g 4%
Vitamin A 12%
Vitamin C 223%
Calcium 15%
Iron 4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition
Serving: 1/4th of recipe | Calories: 109kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 5g | Trans Fat: 0g | Cholesterol: 0mg | Sodium: 403mg | Potassium: 297mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 12% | Vitamin C: 223% | Calcium: 15% | Iron: 4%

The post Sauteed Peppers and Onions appeared first on Isabel Eats.

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