Loading...

Follow International Culinary Center Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

On March 9th, the International Culinary Center held the second Pastryland Bake Sale benefiting Hot Bread Kitchen. More than 350 dessert lovers attended to taste exclusive pastries from 19 of New York City’s best pastry chefs, all while raising $5,350 for Hot Bread Kitchen, a non-profit organization providing culinary training to low-income women in NYC. The afternoon, which featured unique artisanal treats and re-imagined classics, showcased the talents and limitless imaginations of pastry chefs. Alumni of ICC’s Professional Pastry Arts program donated some of the day’s favorites including Tyler Atwell’s (Lafayette Grand Café & Bakery) Chocolate Ring Ding, Anna Bolz’s (Per Se) Toasted Coconut Layer Cake, Lindsey Farr’s (Restaurant Marc Forgione) Snicker’s Donut, Charlotte Neuville’s (Charlotte Neuville Cakes + Confections) Miniature Cake Tasting, and Shaun Velez’s (Café Boulud) Mini Pistachio Gateaux. Even our very own Stephen Collucci, ICC Pastry Chef Instructor, got in on the fun with a Chocolate Dipped Fluffernutter cookie!

The event would not have been possible without the support of our Partner, Callebaut®, who not only generously donated the chocolate for all 19 chefs, but also unveiled the new RB1 ruby couveture in limited-edition desserts to consumers for the first time ever in New York City. A selected group of pastry chefs and chocolatiers rose to the occasion and crafted original sweets featuring the rosy color tones and fruity flavor of ruby cacao. The Ruby Velvet Choux from Monica Ng of Great Performances, Ruby Bon Bons from Christopher Curtin’s Eclat Chocolates, Mexican Ruby Scribble Cookie from Fany Gerson of La Newyorkina, Ruby Snack Bar from Dimitriy Shurygin of The Key Patisserie offered attendees a beautiful visual.

Gold Sponsor, Beurremont Butter, as well as Nielsen-Massey Vanilla provided our contributing pastry chefs with product to use in their sweet creations. This came in handy for bakery specialties like the PB+J Kouign Amann by Rory Macdonald of Patisserie Chanson, Baklava Croissant by Scott Cioe of Bien Cuit, and Sprezzatura Sourdough by Daniel Alvarez of Daily Provisions.

Specialty beverages provided by Joe’s Coffee and Rishi Tea & Botanicals, as well as Evian and Badoit, were available for purchase. In addition, guests were treated to a free Gold Egg Cream shot featuring a housemade Callebaut® Gold Chocolate syrup with milk, topped with Badoit sparkling water dispensed from giant gold chocolate eggs!

Finally, a day of pastry fun wouldn’t be complete without an Instagram-friendly moment, or two! ICC’s Dean of Pastry Arts, Jacques Torres and Guest Master Pastry Chef, Ron Ben-Israel surprised attendees with a photo op at our 8 foot piped royal icing wall (which used a total of 110 pounds of royal icing).

We would like to thank all of the chefs, restaurants and bakeries who participated (see full list below), as well as our partners and sponsors who made this afternoon possible (see the full list here). A special thank you to everyone who came to Pastryland this year and gave back to the NYC food community in the sweetest way! Check out the weekend’s sweet treats below!

Exclusive Pastryland Desserts

All 19 Desserts Pictured

Chef Dmitriy Shurygin | The Key Patisserie | Ruby Snack Bar

Chef Lindsey Farr | Restaurant Marc Forgione | Snickers Donut

Chef Scott Cioe | Bien Cuit | Baklava Croissant

Chef Daniel Alvarez | Union Square Cafe and Daily Provisions | Chocolate Hazelnut Tart

Chef Jin Capobianco | The River Cafe | Hazelnut Mocha Opera

Chef Rory Macdonald | Patisserie Chanson + Dessert Bar | PB+J Kouign Amann

Chef Stephen Collucci | International Culinary Center | Chocolate Dipped Fluffernutter

Chef Jeffrey Wurtz | Aureole | Dorayaki with Sweet Red Bean and Chocolate Sesame

The Bakers of Hot Bread Kitchen | Hot Bread Kitchen | Chocolate Babka

Chef Tyler Atwell | Lafayette Grand Café & Bakery | Chocolate Ring Ding

Chef Lindsey Bittner | Leonelli Restaurants | Cacao Nib Butter Cookies

Monica Ng | Great Performances | Ruby Velvet Choux

Chef Anna Bolz | Per Se | Coconut Layer Cake

Chef Charlotte Neuville | Charlotte Neuville Cakes + Confections | Mini Cake Tasting

Chef Fany Gerson | La Newyorkina | Ruby Scribble Cookies

Chef Shaun Velez | Café Boulud | Mini Pistachio Gateux with vanilla buttercream and raspberry pate de fruit

Chef Joe Murphy | Counter Hospitality | Meyer Lemon Madelienes

Chef Daniel Alvarez | Union Square Café and Daily Provisions | Sprezzatura Sourdough

Chef Christopher Curtin | Éclat Chocolate | Ruby Bonbons

Chef Julie Elkind | Bâtard | Pate a Choux filled with Caramel Chocolate Ganache and Tropical Fruit Compote

The post New York City’s Top Pastry Chefs Give Back At Pastryland appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

All chefs get their start somewhere. This spring, meet your future employer and amp up your networking skills! ICC’s Career Fairs, held twice a year, allow current students & alumni to meet some of the most well-known restaurants and restaurant groups in NYC, coming specifically to ICC to meet YOU. From fine dining to fast casual, catering, bakeries and more, there is something for everyone and every career path!

Tuesday, March 19th | 3:00pm-4:30pm International Culinary Center
28 Crosby St | New York, NY 10013 *Open to ICC Students & Alumni ONLY* Email jobs@culinarycenter.com with inquiries

Below is the full list of employers, but be sure to visit the ICC Community page at my.internationalculinary.com for more information and for any updates to the employer list.

Acquolina Catering
B&B Hospitality/Del Posto
Blue Bird
Blue Hill
Breads Bakery
Celestine
Choc O Pain French Bakery and Café
Convene
Crafted Hospitality
Dinex Group
Eataly
Great Performances
High Street on Hudson
Hillstone Restaurant Group
Hire Society
James Beard Foundation
JP Morgan
Loring Place
Made Nice
Major Food Group
Restaurant Marc Forgione/American Cut Steakhouse
Martha & Marley Spoon
Matterhorn Group
Mercer Kitchen
Noho Hospitality/The Dutch
Padoca Bakery
Park Ave Winter
Patina
Quality Branded
Soho House
Starr Restaurants
The Culinistas
Vice Media

The post 2019 Spring Career Fair appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Since the early 1980’s, Women’s History Month marks a time to recognize, honor and celebrate the achievements of women around the world throughout the month of March. There are so many prevalent women in the world of food to thank for shaping the culinary and hospitality industry as we know it today. To acknowledge the importance of this month—not just as Women’s History Month, but also as the 35th Anniversary of the school’s founding and our annual Founder’s Day celebrations—we are proud to pay tribute to the life and legacy of our Founder, Dorothy Cann Hamilton. The everlasting effect she has had on both the school and the food industry can still be felt today. Below, learn about the legacy of Dorothy and use her spirit as your guiding light as you begin your new career.

In 1984 across America and the world, everything was changing. Astronauts Bruce McCandless II and Robert L. Stewart made the first untethered space walk, while Steve Jobs sold the first Apple Macintosh computer to the public back on Earth. President Ronald Reagan defeated Walter F. Mondale with 59% of the popular vote, and as many of the achievements of men were being widely recognized, a culinary revolution was beginning on the corner of Broadway and Grand street. This would later give way to culinary giants & thought leaders like Bobby Flay, Dan Barber, Christina Tosi and so many more.

Since 1984, thousands of chefs, culinary & pastry professionals, sommeliers and industry leaders have received their education at the International Culinary Center, founded as The French Culinary Institute. The school’s reputation and graduate success can be credited to our Founder Dorothy Cann Hamilton’s original vision—to establish a culinary school that would educate aspiring chefs in a fast-paced program that got them into the workforce quickly and well prepared.

It all began while studying at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in England, during which Dorothy made frequent trips to France that exposed her to the world of French cuisine. After spending time in the Peace Corps in Thailand following college, she ventured back to New York City to work with her father, the Founder of the Apex Technical School. During this time, she continued her education, attaining a Masters in Business Administration from NYU. With a deep love of food at her core, it was then that she envisioned a way to bring her passion for food and education together.

It’s hard to imagine there was ever a time in New York City without a variety of cuisines at your fingertips—before you could order from virtually any restaurant on Seamless. A time before the Michelin Guide was even handing out stars in America. But, it’s true. There was indeed a time when the diversity of food culture was absent and the infamy of chefs did not yet exist. Dorothy’s vision for culinary education began to take shape alongside the evolution of cuisine and dining in New York City during the late 80’s and 90’s.

Many have said this before, but Dorothy was a true visionary. Known for her ability to identify what was missing and find a way to fill in the gaps, she brought a limitless creativity and resourcefulness to any problem. She identified a void in the culinary education of chefs in America—all over the world chefs were being trained in the codified techniques of French, but there was no true equivalent in the US.

Only someone with Dorothy’s determination and fearless spirit could bring the right people together to make this happen. From gathering a roster of legendary deans—Jacques Pépin, Alain Sailhac, André Soltner and Jacques Torres—to the support of industry giants like Julia Child, some of the most well known chefs in the world joined her dream, believing in what she set out to accomplish. That was the special thing about Dorothy; she had a keen ability to connect people from all walks of life. Dorothy didn’t just have a seat at the table—she was the one that built the table for the culinary world. Her gravitas and ability to connect those around her was her superpower. For this reason, many sought out her mentorship, helping numerous individuals launch their own careers, businesses and ideas in the food industry and beyond.

She cared deeply about education and the success of her students. From creating the renowned TV series Chef’s Story—later a podcast on Heritage Radio Network, featuring candid conversations with the biggest names in the industry—to her blog, and eventually book, Love What You Do, Dorothy was passionate about setting people up for success in their careers. Dorothy wasn’t afraid of failure; rather, it was another way for her to learn and educate others. Her desire to continue to learn allowed her to embrace new educational pursuits for the school, establishing ICC’s Intensive Sommelier Training program and Olive Oil Sommelier Certification programs in recent years. It was her passion for education that inspired the recent addition of a Professional Development Scholarship for industry professionals to continue the pursuit of their education at ICC.

Today, we hope that each student who walks through our doors charts their own successful career with Dorothy in mind. Her vision, passion for food and the culinary industry, as well as her innovative spirit can be applied to everything that you do.

The post Women’s History Month: The Legacy of Our Founder appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Since 1970, Earth Day has provided a way to bring environmental challenges to the forefront of our conversations. A catalyst for ongoing education, action and change, Earth Day promotes environmental awareness and solutions while celebrating our connection to the Earth.

Here at ICC, we often think about the impact of practices in the culinary industry on the environment. Culinary education plays an important role in teaching one to think about the use of whole ingredient cooking. Our students learn the art of charcuterie and butchery to make use of the entire animal, in addition to learning to make stocks, sauces and more utilizing vegetable cut offs. Promoting usage from leaf-to-root and snout-to-tail not only minimizes food waste, but also cuts down on food cost.

In the Farm-to-Table extension of our Professional Culinary Arts program, students take their culinary education beyond the kitchen through the 4-day Farm Powered Kitchen field trip to Blue Hill at Stone Barns and Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture. They also participate in lectures from the agriculture specialists and Stone Barns, as well as field trips to urban farms, green markets and more.

There are other ways to decrease food waste in the kitchen, one of which is composting. Since 2007, the school has composted an average of 350 lbs per day. When possible, the school also regularly donates food to The New York City Rescue Mission, including 3-tier cakes made in our Professional Pastry Arts program. To further efforts on campus to counteract our environmental impact through food, we implemented a Meatless Monday program into our Family Meals.

Meatless Monday encourages people to eliminate meat from their diet just one day a week to see both increased health benefits and decrease their environmental impact. In just one year, by eliminating meat from our family meal each Monday, we eliminated 4,600 lbs of meat, saving 4.8 million pounds of greenhouse gases from being emitted into our atmosphere. Since an average car emits 12,000 pounds of greenhouse gases per year, that’s the equivalent of taking 400 cars off the road!

In honor of this year’s Earth Day celebrations, we’re dedicating our event programming in April to promote sustainability in food, farming and business practices to better understand your foodprint. From panel discussions about the effect of climate change on viticulture and wine making, to demonstrations with sustainable seafood farmers and urban farm-to-table restaurants, we’ll look at the many ways food impacts the environment, and vice versa. Find a list of April demos & events below focused on sustainability and stay tuned for additional details as they become available!

Sustainable Seafood Demonstration and Lecture
with the Sustainable Shrimp Partnership
Wednesday, April 3rd | 3:30-5pm | ICC Amphitheater
Open to students & alumni – NO RSVP required. Limited seating available to the public, RSVP to events@culinarycenter.com.

Urban Farm-to-Table Demonstration with Riverpark
Led by Executive Chef Andrew Smith & Riverpark Farm Manager Jonathan Sumner
Wednesday, April 10th | 3:30-5pm | ICC Amphitheater
Open to students & alumni – NO RSVP required. Limited seating available to the public, RSVP to events@culinarycenter.com.

Off the Vine: Climate Change in Wine
Thursday, April 11th | 6:30-8pm | ICC Amphitheater
RSVP to events@culinarycenter.com

Business Bites: Sustainable Practices for Your Restaurant
Thursday, April 18th | 6:30-8pm | ICC Amphitheater
RSVP to events@culinarycenter.com

Stay tuned for more event details coming soon!

The post Understanding Your ‘Foodprint’ – April Sustainability Programming appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

OFF THE VINE, brought to you by the Intensive Sommelier Training program at ICC, is a series of tastings, discussion panels and networking events designed to support wine professionals in the beverage industry. Each event is designed to provide education, information and the opportunity to connect with industry experts in a collaborative setting.

The wine and beverage industry is dynamic & diverse, and offers many opportunities to build an exciting career—with options that suit different backgrounds, personalities and lifestyles. For those who are seriously considering a career in the wine industry, the possibilities are endless.

This month, we gathered for a dynamic panel discussion with Slim Mello, Head Sommelier at the Mandarin Oriental; Michele Thomas, Assistant Manager and Buyer at Greene Grape Wine & Spirits; Patricia Alazraki, Brand Manager for Monsieur Touton; and Cristina Coari, Wine Education and Press Manager for Vias Imports.

Together, we explored topics like career paths, hiring practices, qualities that employers seek and the paths that each panelist took to get to where they are today. Below, learn what our panelists said about translating skill sets, building your network, hiring practices, and salary expectations!

How can my skills translate to the wine industry?

When people consider changing careers to enter the wine industry, they are often worried that their skills won’t translate to wine. It’s intimidating to think about starting a new career at any point in your life, but if you share a passion for wine, you’ll fit right in to this new industry.

Your resume doesn’t always have to be perfectly polished—many of your previous work experiences can be translated into the skills needed to pursue the wine career of your dreams. So what are some of the skill sets that you can utilize in your future wine career?

For starters, a desire to learn, listen and study are all very helpful. Pursuing your wine education requires a dedication to study. Even as a professional, you’ll find it important to continue to learn about new wines, taste new producers, etc. Previous front of house or service experience is a plus, as well as any sales background. Being a people person and feeling comfortable speaking with others is very important. Don’t be afraid to ask questions—being able to read a room and help identify what someone wants is not a small task. Make sure you can talk about your previous experiences and apply them to what you want to do in the future. Use your qualifications as leverage and know that all experience is good experience!

How do I build my network?

Building your network is key in any industry, especially within the tight-knit community of wine. If you want to be a part of this community, you have to put yourself in the position to meet people. Attend a tasting event. Frequent industry meet-ups. Reach out to a professional contact on social media. Making a connection, even through social media platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram can introduce you to new people who can become great resources in this business.

Panelist Patricia Alazraki, ICC alumna and Brand Manager of Monsieur Touton, found her current job through a friend’s social media post on Facebook. After reaching out to a mutual friend and asking to get coffee to learn from her expertise, her new contact ended up offering her a job. Never be afraid to reach out to someone already working in the industry or at a company you want to work for—more often than not, they are more than willing to help in any way that they can.

Speaking of social media, use your channels to build your own wine presence. Demonstrate your knowledge of wine by posting tasting notes and using popular wine hashtags. You never know who might reach out to you!

What do hiring managers look for when interviewing?

Although a resume is important in any interview, all of our panelists—who are hiring managers themselves—agreed that two of the most important skills you can bring to your interview are not actually on your resume. Passion and people skills are integral to how you sell yourself in any interview. By bringing your passion for wine to the forefront of your interview, you’ll show that you’re able to connect with customers and consumers.

Interactions that you have in your interview are a good indicator for how you will interact with your customers. You have to be able to carry a conversation and learn about someone’s interests so that you can recommend the right wine to them and have them coming back for more.

What can I expect for my salary?

Like any industry, salaries in wine vary greatly. According to our panelists, who all have years of combined experience, you can expect to start at around $15-$20 while working in retail. Then, anywhere from $25,000-$50,000 is a great ballpark when you begin in a restaurant, not including what you’ll make in tips! From there, Head Sommeliers can make $70,000+ with experience, higher level certifications and percentages of monthly sales or tips. Brand Ambassadors can make anywhere in the $60,000-$90,000 range and added sales commission can increase salary.

Want to learn more about how ICC’s Intensive Sommelier Training program can help you pursue your wine career? Check out our next Off the Vine panel in April!

The post How to Jump-start Your Career in Wine appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Lustau, maker of top quality Sherries, presents a brand new wine certification available to all wine students and professionals: the Certified Sherry Wine Specialist. Offered by Lucas Payà, Certified Sherry Educator and Lustau’s Brand Educator, this brief course offers Intermediate Level study material that has been reviewed and approved by the Regulatory Council of Jerez.

After many successful SOLD OUT workshops, ICC has partnered with Lustau again to host the certification seminar this April. Register today to reserve your seat!

Monday, April 22 3:30pm-6:00pm International Culinary Center
28 Crosby St, 5th Floor | New York, NY 10013

Cost: $35 per person

EVENT DETAILS

The program consists of a 2.5-hour class that includes:

    • Instruction on the history, geography, climate, viticulture, wine-making, and wine styles.  When studying the styles of sherry, students will learn about their differences, pairings, and best ways to serve.
    • A tasting of 6 wines, including all the basic styles (Fino, Amontillado, Oloroso, and Dulce).
    • A 28-question test, graded after the course to award the Certified Sherry Wine Specialist recognition to those with a passing score of 20 or higher.

The Certificate of Achievement will be signed by both Lustau’s CEO and César Saldaña, Director of the Regulatory Council of Jerez. They will be numbered and a list of those that passed the course will be shared with the Regulatory Council.  A Certificate of Recognition will be issued to those that do not achieve the passing grade but only signed by Lustau.

Attendees must be at least 21 years of age.

The post Certified Sherry Wine Specialist Seminar appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
LET YOUR EDUCATION BLOOM AT ICC THIS SPRING

Spring is just around the corner and while April showers bring May flowers, our Spring Scholarships Special is sure to brighten your day and help you pursue your culinary or pastry education this April!

We’re excited to announce FIVE of our largest scholarship awards are being offered to help you take the first step in pursuing your culinary or pastry career this spring. Begin in any of the Professional Culinary Arts of Professional Pastry Arts programs this April and you could be eligible to receive one of our spring scholarships with awards ranging from $10,000-$25,000 towards your tuition.

Submitting your application is easy! All you need is to submit your FAFSA, complete the scholarship application online, and share your educational and career goals in either a short essay or 1 minute video. Imagine, just 60 seconds could help you save up to $25,000 on your culinary or pastry education!

Don’t wait to let your dream career blossom—check out all the ways you can get into the kitchen with a scholarship from ICC this spring. Submit your application today!

Culinary Scholarships
ICC Grand Culinary Scholarship

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $25,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL CULINARY ARTS programs:

  • 4/4/2019 Professional Culinary Arts (Mon-Fri, Day)
  • 4/8/2019 Professional Culinary Arts (Mon, Wed, Fri, Eve)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

  • March 25, 2019

AWARD DATE:

  • March 29, 2019

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

ICC $15,000 Culinary Scholarship

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $15,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL CULINARY ARTS programs:

  • 4/4/2019 Professional Culinary Arts (Mon-Fri, Day)
  • 4/8/2019 Professional Culinary Arts (Mon, Wed, Fri, Eve)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

  • March 25, 2019

AWARD DATE:

  • March 29, 2019

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

Pastry Scholarships
ICC Grand Pastry Scholarship

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $25,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL PASTRY ARTS programs:

  • 4/1/2019  Professional Pastry Arts (Mon, Wed & Fri, Eve)
  • 4/2/2019 Professional Pastry Arts (Mon-Fri, Day)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

  • March 18, 2019

AWARD DATE:

  • March 22, 2019

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

ICC $15,000 PASTRY SCHOLARSHIP

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $15,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL PASTRY ARTS programs:

  • 4/1/2019 Professional Pastry Arts (Mon, Wed & Fri, Eve)
  • 4/2/2019 Professional Pastry Arts (Mon-Fri, Day)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

  • March 18, 2019

AWARD DATE:

  • March 22, 2019

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

Friends of the ICC Scholarship

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $10,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in the following PROFESSIONAL PASTRY ARTS program:

  • 04/27/2019 Professional Pastry Arts (Tues & Thurs, Eve, Sat, Day)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

  • April 17, 2019

AWARD DATE:

  • April 22, 2019

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

The post ICC’s Spring Scholarships Special Announced appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Raise your hand if you’re a self proclaimed chocolate lover! Whether you enjoy dark or milk chocolate, bon bons or bars, single-origin or blended, we can all agree that chocolate sparks joy in our lives. But do you know how cacao is turned into one of the most beloved treats in the world?

In Ecuador, cacao has been around since prehistoric times. Ranked 4th in the world for cacao production after the Ivory Coast, Ghana and Indonesia, they help to grow 65% of the world’s production and export 86.45 million pounds of cocoa beans to the US.

In celebration of National Chocolate Lover’s month, this February, the ProEcuador council in New York City visited ICC to discuss the intricacies of Ecuadorian cacao. As experts in exportable goods and services from Ecuador, alongside Ecuadorian chocolatier Jenny Samaniego of Conexion Chocolate, they shared their vast knowledge of cacao—from harvesting, fermenting and roasting to packaging and consumption—in a tasting of single origin cacao beans and chocolates. Below, check out what we learned about the different steps to turning cacao into chocolate!

Picture by Barry Callebaut

Harvesting

The harvesting of cacao pods is a culmination of years of hard work. It can take anywhere from 3-5 years for the trees to grow to the point that the flowers, and eventually cacao pods, will be ready to harvest.

Once ready, each tree produces around 30 pods each, depending on the size. The pods are then cracked open and approximately 40-50 seeds per pod are removed. It takes one tree’s entire annual harvest to make roughly 1 lb of chocolate—that’s a lot of beans!

Fermenting

Fermenting is a crucial step in the cacao to chocolate process. It is through this process that the natural aromas from the beans are brought out, and ultimately how the flavor is developed. As the beans ferment, a liquid excretes out and allows the bean to dry. This process can take around 7 days as the beans are left in the sun to dry, bringing out the flavors.

Roasting

After the drying process, the beans are cleaned to remove sticks and leaves. Similarly to coffee beans, cacao beans also have to be roasted before being turned into chocolate.

This roasting brings out the flavor from the fermentation process, but duration of roasting and at what temperature will depend on the chocolate manufacturer. During roasting, the bean are opened, allowing the part of the bean that can be eaten to be extracted.

Processing

Picture by Barry Callebaut

After the roasting is complete, the outer cacao shell is removed the the inner “meat” is extracted. This is ground into a powder, which can also be separated into cocoa butter. It is this cocoa butter that can be liquefied and turned into cocoa liquor, which is then cooled and formed into blocks commonly known as bakers chocolate.

Packing

After all of these steps, the once cacao pod is turned into bakers chocolate, ready to be packaged and shipped to manufacturers!

Check out our photo gallery below from our Ecuadorian Chocolate & Coffee Tasting!

The post How Does Cacao Become Chocolate? appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

For restaurants and food business owners, sourcing quality ingredients and importing products unique to your brand play an important role in setting you apart from your competitors. Your patrons become loyal customers for the quality you retain—and your prices can reflect that. Today, the expansion of global trade and ease of digital communication allows for access to exotic, hard-to-find ingredients from around the world, making it possible to introduce products direct from their origin.

With consumers moving towards ethical buying habits, higher standards for quality and equality are vital in day-to-day business operations. In our latest installment of our Business Bites series, Unearthing Your Sources, our panel of experts shared how they operate profitable food businesses without compromising on quality or fair trade practices. Check out the three things to know when sourcing your products below!

Know Your Farmers

In today’s global market, consumers want to know where their ingredients and products are coming from. Whether it’s intended to support fair-trade practices or identify single-origin goods, it’s an important aspect to the buying process. Being able to connect your customers with the farmers you source from can be both a storytelling and brand building opportunity that results in loyalty and trust.

But, that isn’t the only reason food businesses want to know where, and who they’re sourcing from. Developing a relationship with your farmers can mean the difference between getting the right products for your business, and the best quality for your customers.

Burlap and Barrel stresses this sentiment. During the panel discussion, Ethan Frisch, co-founder of Burlap and Barrel, shared a story about a farm in upstate New York that he has been working with for the past two years. Over this time, Ethan has fostered a strong relationship with Norwich Meadows Farm, opening the door to new opportunities. After much discussion, they have decided to work together to develop a special project, which wouldn’t have happened without Ethan nurturing this relationship.

Know What Your Consumers Want

It’s important to identify what motivates your customers to buy. Is it your uniquely sourced products? Is it your commitment to fair-trade, sustainability or single-origin? Is it your packaging? Figuring out the most meaningful way to communicate to your customers is a time old challenge, but the rewards can be integral to your success.

When Raaka Chocolate rebranded in 2018, they invested time and resources to figure out what their consumers really wanted to know on their bar of chocolate. In order to make the reintroduction of their brand successful, they tested everything from taste to packaging, and even rewrote their brand story. After all, much had happened in the eight years since they had founded their company. Their new packaging is vibrant and bold, much like the chocolate that it encompasses. Although subtle, it is also modeled after the landscapes from which their cacao beans come from. Instead of using common buzz words like fair trade, when you open their bar of chocolate, you’ll see their term “transparent trade” to exhibit their commitment to be transparent in everything that they do, including sourcing.

Know Your Ingredients

Sourcing quality ingredients, especially in a restaurant, market or food business that’s just starting out, can make or break the business. Whether you provide access to a hard-to-find product, a uniquely curated selection or incorporate it into a signature dish, specialty ingredients help to grow a loyal following of customers that return time and time again. They can even create demand when an ingredient has limited quantities. But, relying on specialty ingredients can also pose a difficulty for new companies.

When Vega Coffee was starting out, they knew that they wanted to import coffee from Nicaragua. In order to receive the ingredients they desired, they had to create a system with the governments in both the US and Nicaragua to import the products through customs. Although this is an extreme example, navigating import laws is an important part of sourcing your products, so you must be prepared to do your research as a business owner.

One of Rishi Tea’s best selling drinks is a masala chai drink. A key ingredient to this drink is a delicious Madagascar vanilla, but because of climate change and a few other factors, the price of vanilla has sky rocketed in recent years. As a business owner, they weighed the benefits of raising the price of their best selling drink, but possibly seeing sales decline, with the cost of sourcing the vanilla. In order to keep the price the same, they decided to source vanilla from another country—something that is not easy to do, as vanilla is grown in few places around the world. In the end, they found an amazing quality vanilla in Mexico and were able to continue their masala chai offering without raising the price or compromising on quality.

ABOUT BUSINESS BITES

The BUSINESS BITES, brought to you by the Culinary Entrepreneurship program at ICC, is a series of workshops, discussion panels, networking events and resources designed to support entrepreneurs in the food industry.

The post Business Bites Resources: How to Unearth Your Sources appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

ICC In The News provides monthly highlights from articles published around the world that feature alumni, deans, faculty and more within the ICC community. Stories of our 15,000+ alumni network and their successes are continuously popping up across various prestigious publications. Below, we have brought together some of our favorites from February 2019, aimed to keep you connected with our community and inspire readers to #LoveWhatYouDo in the kitchen and beyond.

HAUTE LIVING One Thousand Museum Residences Gives A Sneak-Peek To Gourmet Culinary Offerings At The Sky Lounge

One Thousand Museum Residences is one of Miami’s most historic, architecturally significant and most luxurious developments in all of Miami. The launch of this project is highly-anticipated and comes with many amazing amenties– including The Sky Lounge, where our alumna Mame Sow is the project’s Director of Culinary. Read more in Haute Living here.

Even though National Chocolate Lovers Month is behind us, we like to celebrate with our Dean of Pastry, AKA Mr. Chocolate, all year long. Check out Jacques Torres on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert making his limited edition chocolate violin!

In the kitchen of his 50-seat restaurant, Technique, Westwood resident and ICC alumnus Ross Goldflam is applying the all-important French cooking techniques he learned while studying at ICC. The casual restaurant offers classic French food with an American twist. Check it out here.

Zoe Kanan, Pastry Plus speaker, ICC alumna and head baker at Simon & the Whale, was one of the 22 ICC graduates that received semifinalist nominations for the 2019 James Beard Awards. Congratulations Zoe on your Outstanding Pastry Chef nomination! Read more about her outstanding achievements here.

Beautiful wine glasses don’t have to be expensive! Slate sat down with our Dean of Wine Studies, Scott Carney, MS and ICC Intensive Sommelier Training graduate Michele Thomas, as well as other wine experts, to learn which wine glasses are the best. Read their recommendations here.

NY Mag How to Clean Wooden Cutting Boards, According to Experts

Whether you’re julienning carrots or breaking down a full chicken, if you cook regularly, your kitchen arsenal probably includes a few good knives and cutting boards. If you’re at all serious about cooking you’ve probably learned that wooden boards are fantastic, but more difficult to clean. Read Chef Hervé Malivert’s recommendations for how to clean a wooden cutting board in NY Mag.

Margaret Eby, recent graduate of our Culinary Techniques program, gave insight into what she learned in the 100-hour program that changed the way she cooked! Read about her journey here.

Chris Morocco is a senior food editor at Bon Appétit where he works in the Test Kitchen developing recipes, dreaming up food content, and figuring out what the next big thing in food is. He regularly appears in the brand’s video content, including Bon Appétit’s new show “Making Perfect.” Read more about him here.

Want to learn more about our Dean of Pastry Jacques Torres? Check out his favorite things in this article about him from Barron’s!

Hyacinth, a new Italian restaurant in St. Paul, is one of the hottest reservations in town. Chef/owner and ICC alumnus Rikki Giambruno dishes in this interview on how he got his start, food philosophy, love for Italian food and what’s ahead. Read the interview here in Twin Cities.

EATER A.M. INTEL

Have you bought your tickets for Pastryland yet? Read more about our charity bake sale in Eater, and be sure to get your tickets before next Saturday, March 9th!

Miami New Times Cancer, Diabetes, and Glaucoma Can’t Stop Restaurateur Richard Hales

Read the unbelievable story of ICC alumnus and restaurateur Chef Richard Hales. He has faced the unimaginable circumstances of overcoming brain cancer, glaucoma, and thyroid cancer, all while battling diabetes and dominating the Miami food scene with his multiple restaurants. Read his story here.

Fresh off of Atomix’s semifinalist nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation, Jhonel Faelnar, Intensive Sommelier Training alumnus and Wine Director of Atomix sat down with Wine & Spirits to share his recommendations for what to drink with Korean food. Read his wine pairing recommendations here.

Congratulations to ICC alumnus Whang Suh, the owner and pastry chef at Hen & Heifer in Guilford, CT! He is a semifinalist in the Outstanding Pastry Chef category for the 2019 James Beard Awards. Read more about him in the Hartford Courant here.

Model, Chef, and ICC alumna Paige Jimenez recently graduated from our Professional Culinary Arts program in 2018. Read about her love of the culinary arts and her advice here in Ocean Drive.

Read Food and Wine’s article featuring Stacey Kwon, Culinary ’13, President of H Mart, an asian supermarket chain, started by her father in Queens in 1982. Learn more about H Mart’s expansions and what you should buy when you take a trip to one of their stores!

EATER IPA Hitmaker Other Half Brewing Is Joining Williamsburg’s Domino Development

Co-founder of Other Half Brewing and ICC alumnus Matt Monahan is expanding his popular brewery into the new Williamsburg Domino Development and opening a new Rochester location later in the year. Read about the expansions here in Eater and check out the brewery with a cult following!

The post ICC In The News: Highlights from February 2019 appeared first on www.internationalculinarycenter.com.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview