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Welcome to our Spring newsletter.  After what feels like a long, hard winter, the In Equilibrium team have taken Leo Tolstoy’s words to heart, “Spring is the time of plans and projects”. Since Spring has sprung one of our plans has already come to fruition with the Dunfermline team successfully moving into their new office. They are all enjoying the extra space and light their new environment provides, not to mention the on-site café those not based there keep hearing all about!

This edition includes:
In Equilibrium News – we introduce a new trainer, share recent testimonials & give the link to a Radio 4 programme featuring one of our trainers
A Stress and Wellbeing Tip – that reminds you to pay attention to your posture during the working day, your neck muscles will thank you for it
An Ask the Expert Q&A – trainer Louise Overy provides tips on how to deal with a manager whose mixed communications prove challenging to their team
External Resources and Articles – covering a range of relevant topics
And Finally – we leave you with 7 random acts of kindness which should restore anyone’s faith in humankind

Click Here to Subscribe to our Bi-Monthly Newsletter

In Equilibrium News


NEW POSTAL ADDRESS
Our new postal address is:
Office 19, 15 Pitreavie Court,
Pitreavie Business Park, Dunfermline, KY11 8UU
Our phone number and all email addresses remain the same.

IN EQUILIBRIUM TRAINER FEATURED IN RADIO PROGRAMME
Trainer Tinu Cornish recently featured in a half hour Radio 4 programme on gender and unconscious bias, “Why are even women biased against women?”


NEW TESTIMONIAL for Mental Health Awareness Training
River Canal Rescue is very aware their ‘front line’ staff and engineers are continually helping people in what can be very stressful situations. Warm feedback was received following the delivery of our Mental Health Awareness course, news of which reached the canal and waterways site, Narrowboat World.


NEW TRAINER – Dr Phillipa Spencer

Phillipa is a Chartered Psychologist who has comprehensive experience as a trainer and clinician and provides a thoughtful & compassionate approach.
She is already receiving great feedback “… really good – presenter clear and very knowledgeable” and we’re delighted to welcome her to the In Equilibrium team.


NEW TESTIMONIAL for Stress Management Training

As Brenda from Bristol famously commented, “Not another one?” Spare a thought for those responsible for administering the recent spate of elections. Members of the Association of Electoral Administrators really appreciated our recent “Practical Approaches to Handling Pressure” workshops.

Recent Articles Added To Our Blog


Stress management for managers – the importance of being self-aware

8 tips for successful diversity & inclusion training

Tackling bullying training – what forms can workplace bullying take

Stress and Wellbeing Tip


If you have the odd ache and pain by the end of the working day, it may be worth checking our latest tip.

Read our Stress and Wellbeing Tip

Read our tips archive

Ask the Expert


The Question
“I am the leader of a small team whose work is project based.  I am directly responsible to a line manager.  Do you have any tips on how I can manage the stress felt by myself and my team as our line manager is never clear about what is required but is consistently very vocal about what they had expected each time I present the team’s work?”

Trainer, Louise Overy provides advice and a suggested framework to help a team leader structure the conversation they need to have with their line manager.

Read Louise’s answer here

Amanda’s Column


A recent visit provides Amanda with a new project, the need for which isn’t all of her own making.

Read Amanda’s Column

The archive of Amanda’s column is available here …

Resources

View this edition’s featured resources which are:
• A guide to Neurodiversity at work produced by the CIPD
• A factsheet from The What Works Centre for Wellbeing about why employers should invest in employee wellbeing
• 10 top tips for good sleep produced by the Mental Health Foundation
• A report published by the British Psychological Society entitled “Psychology at Work: Improving Productivity and Wellbeing in the Workplace”

Date for your diary


Mental Health Awareness Week : 14 – 20 May 2018

The question for this year’s mental health awareness week is “Stress: are we coping?”.
The Mental Health Foundation’s website has lots of resources and information about how you can get involved.

Quotations


“The oak fought the wind and was broken, the willow bent when it must and survived.”
Robert Jordan, American Author, 1948 – 2007

“No-one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”
Eleanor Roosevelt, American Politician, Diplomat and Activist, 1884 – 1962

News from the Outside

A selection of external articles which may be of interest:

 …and finally …

Seven wonderful random acts of kindness
Some days it seems that our papers and news channels are full of negative stories. This article may not be the most up-to-date page on the internet, but it’ll almost certainly leave you in a better place than reading today’s headlines.

Thank you for taking the time to read our newsletter.  We are always delighted to hear from our readers, so if you would like to share your comments or suggestions with us, please don’t hesitate to contact us at: training@in-equilibrium.co.uk.

The post Spring 2018 Newsletter includes tips on difficult conversations & workplace posture appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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This article’s expert is trainer Louise Overy Question

“I am the leader of a small team whose work is project based. I am directly responsible to a line manager. Do you have any tips on how I can manage the stress felt by myself and my team as our line manager is never clear about what is required but is consistently very vocal about what they had expected each time I present the team’s work?”

Answer

It’s tricky, ‘managing upwards’ – it feels awkward and perhaps risky, and in this kind of situation it’s absolutely essential! Here are some ideas about what you can do.

There is lots of advice about how to reduce stressful feelings once you’ve got them, elsewhere on this website. You can also increase the resilience in your team by ensuring that you are working collaboratively and appreciatively with them – have a look at our CUSP framework for suggestions.

What’s important here, though, is to deal with the source of the stress – the uncertainty created by your line manager, and the consequent unwarranted criticism when inevitably you fail to read his/her mind.

Remind yourself of what you are here to do and also what your line manager is here to do – each of your responsibilities, and the rights that these bring. You have the right (and the responsibility – you are responsible for the team’s work) to tell your manager that their way of managing is causing the team difficulties, and that there are some simple ways to improve the way this is done…

Does the thought of doing this create feelings of stress itself?! Don’t worry, it’s understandable – and that adrenaline can be put to good use to help you have the conversation! You can manage this if it feels too much by slow breathing to relax, perhaps a couple of minutes focusing on the outside world – a short walk or simply looking out of the window to reduce unhelpful thoughts in your head and feel stronger and more confident about what you are going to say.

And plan what you are going to say, if you are not sure how to out it. Like a script-writer, work out how the conversation might go and the important parts of what you want to say. You can practise it – with a colleague you trust, family or friend – or just out loud by yourself. Get more comfortable with the words beforehand, and it will be easier to say them for real.

Ask for a meeting, say what it’s about in overall terms, and make sure the time allowed is enough for a good discussion.

Here’s an easy framework to help you structure what you want to say. Find the words that feel right to you and get the message across clearly.

What you like about working with your line manager (it’s got to be true!)
‘It’s great that we have the freedom to decide how we achieve our work targets and goals’

What you don’t like about it (say this courteously, simply and briefly– don’t dress it up)
‘What I and the team find really difficult is that we are often quite unsure about what it is that you actually want or are expecting from us. Then when we present what we’ve done, it feels like it’s always wrong, that we’ve failed … and that is creating stress and affecting the morale of the team’

What you want
‘What I and the team would like is to be able to make sure that we have your/the requirements absolutely clear before we start. To do this we need…[a specification / a project kickoff meeting / whatever it is]‘

It is useful to think through the consequences for your line manager, as described below, although you may not want to use them as part of your initial description / statement to him/her.

If you do …
‘We will get more work right first time – it will save time, increase our productivity. And the team will be much happier’

If you don’t …
‘I’m concerned that we will lose some good people from the team, who are getting discouraged. And it’s difficult to work efficiently like this’

None of us know exactly how a conversation will go … and using this framework, you can feel confident that you have a way of saying what you want to say clearly, to get what you need.

Good luck!

The post Ask the Expert : Help! My manager’s poor communication skills stress me & my team out appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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The four resources included in our spring 2018 newsletter:

Guide to Neurodiversity at work

The CIPD have produced a guide for HR professionals and leaders to explain the benefits neurodiversity can bring to the workplace and how they can help neurodivergent individuals to be more comfortable and successful in their place of work. The guide is free to download from the link provided in the title above.

Why invest in employee wellbeing?

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing have produced an A4 factsheet which defines wellbeing at work and highlights the employer benefits, alongside evidence, of why investing in wellbeing for employees should be considered.

Ten Top Tips for Good Sleep

For World Sleep Day, which fell on 16 March this year, the Mental Health Foundation produced 10 top tips for good sleep.

Psychology at Work: Improving Productivity and Wellbeing in the Workplace

A report published last Autumn by the British Psychological Society considers issues relating to work, health and disability. It makes recommendations for employers and policy makers to challenge poor employment practices by using interventions that work with, rather than against, human behaviour.

The post Resources include a guide to neurodiversity at work & good sleep tips appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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According to the British Psychological Society, during the working week we spend an average of 5 hours and 41 minutes every day sitting at our desks. Add to this the amount of time we spend outside of work on our phones, tablets or laptops and it’s no wonder so many of us have aching necks, heads and shoulders and are aware of pain in our arms and fingers before the end of the day.

Paying attention to our posture and taking some corrective action may not resolve all our aches and pains but can help – not only to relieve tight muscles but also to increase our productivity and creativity.

Try a combination of the following 4 tips regularly throughout the working day:

  1. Consider your posture – when we work on our laptops or phones we can constantly be straining our neck muscles by looking downwards. Bring your phone up to eye level or raise your laptop when reading, although obviously don’t keep it at this level when you start typing again!
  2. Set a 30-minute alarm – to alert you to get up and move around, it’s too easy to sit in the same position for a long period of time when we’re concentrating on the job in hand.
  3. Look away from the screen – it’s recommended that we take our eyes off our screens every 20 minutes to focus on something at least 6 metres away for 20 seconds. This not only helps reduce eye strain but also gives us a reminder to correct our posture and flex our neck muscles.
  4. Stretch regularly – simply turning your head 90 degrees to the left, holding it for a few seconds and repeating to the right can help stretch your neck muscles. You could also try some of these stretches which can be done at a desk.

Many other tips are available on our website – please have a browse to find some that work for you

The post How good’s your workplace posture? appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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You know you’re getting old when your children, or more accurately your children’s friends, are starting to get on the property ladder.  And, like everything, things seem to have changed considerably in terms of expectations since I was at that stage.  Memories of my first flat include me doing creative things with cardboard boxes and pieces of material for makeshift tables; painting to camouflage rather than replace copious amounts of peach anaglypta wallpaper; and asking people to bring their own crockery and cutlery if there were more than two for dinner.

A stark contrast was highlighted to me the other week when I visited my daughter who was staying in an old school friend’s first flat.  The décor was perfect, with what looked like no outstanding jobs, and even the spare bedroom was immaculately furnished – a feat which I still can’t claim to have mastered!  Amongst my feelings of happiness and admiration at her friend’s achievement of having created such a comfortable home at such a young age, nestled something else.

It took me a while to work it out, but it was akin to envy.  That look of everything being in its place … and no clutter!  Strangely, it’s not the new, designer sofas or freshly laid wooden floors which I hanker after, it’s the lack of 30 years of accumulated necessary and not so necessary ‘stuff’.  I returned home and looked at my surroundings with fresh eyes … then I got on with the evening’s chores with a sigh of resignation.

However, your work tends to rub off on you, which in my case is very helpful!  Thoughts of previous stress tips we’ve provided about breaking what seems like an unmanageable project down into smaller parts sprung to mind, along with a knowledge of the link between your physical and mental space and the benefits a lack of clutter can bring to your creativity and energy levels.  I would like to say the spring weather has added to my motivation, but in my neck of the woods I can’t remember what a day without a misty grey sky looks like and I haven’t been complacent enough to put my hats and gloves in the wash for a final time.

So yet again a visit to one of my kids has given me food for thought and provided me with an aim to free myself, as far as possible, from over 30 years of accumulated ‘stuff’.  A month on and I’m two kitchen cupboards and half a wardrobe down … baby steps I know but I’m trying to keep focused on the journey rather than the destination and finding it relatively therapeutic.

One thing that has struck me though, it’s no wonder first homes are clutter free, a large part of the ‘stuff’ taking up space in my home doesn’t belong to me at all – it belongs to the two lovely people who lived with me for 18 years before physically fleeing the nest for pastures new whilst the majority of their belongings stayed put, to be returned to whenever their owners see fit. Is that what’s called having your cake and eating it?  They may have left me with an empty nest in one sense but far from it in another!

The post Why having an empty nest isn’t an accurate description appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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This privacy policy explains how Equilibrium Associates Limited (In Equilibrium) uses and protects any information that we collect about you when you use this website.

Equilibrium Associates Limited is committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. Should we ask you to provide certain information by which you can be identified when using this website, then you can be assured that it will only be used in accordance with this privacy policy statement.

Equilibrium Associates Limited may change this policy from time to time by updating this page. You should check this page from time to time to ensure that you are happy with any changes. This policy is effective from 3rd April 2018.

What information do we collect about you?

We may collect the following information:

  • name and job title
  • contact information including email address,
  • organisation address and postcode
  • other information relevant to customer surveys and/or offers

We collect this information when you complete forms on our website or book one of our training courses.  We also collect information when you voluntarily complete customer surveys and provide feedback.  Website usage information is also collected using cookies.

How we will use the information about you?

We require this information to understand your needs and provide you with a better service, and in particular for the following reasons:

  • Internal record keeping.
  • We may use the information to improve our products and services.
  • If you have requested it we will email you our bi-monthly newsletter which contains articles, resources and tips as well as details about new training courses and other information which we think you may find interesting using the email address which you have provided.
  • If you have requested it we will email you our weekly update which contains training course details using the email address which you have provided.
  • From time to time, we may also use your information to contact you for market research purposes.
  • We may use the information to customise the website according to your interests.

Security

We are committed to ensuring that your information is secure. In order to prevent unauthorised access or disclosure, we have put in place suitable physical, electronic and managerial procedures to safeguard and secure the information we collect online.

How we use cookies

A cookie is a small file which is placed on your computer’s hard drive. The cookie helps analyse web traffic or lets you know when you visit a particular site. Cookies allow web applications to respond to you as an individual. The web application can tailor its operations to your needs, likes and dislikes by gathering and remembering information about your preferences.  For more information visit https://www.aboutcookies.org/

We use traffic log cookies to identify which pages are being used. This helps us analyse data about webpage traffic and improve our website in order to tailor it to customer needs. We only use this information for statistical analysis purposes and then the data is removed from the system.

Overall, cookies help us provide you with a better website by enabling us to monitor which pages you find useful and which you do not. A cookie in no way gives us access to your computer or any information about you, other than the data you choose to share with us.

The following are the cookies currently running on our website:

Google Analytics – this logs the time that you’re on our site and what you look at and we use it so we can make our site better, including adding more relevant content and making it easier to use. It’s there for you as much as we use it for ourselves.

YouTube.com – this is used to show YouTube videos and track where a video has been played. If this cookie can’t run, there’s no way to watch videos on our website.

Vimeo.com – this is used to show Vimeo videos and track where a video has been played. We don’t use this much, but it’s just like YouTube. No cookie, no video.

You can choose to accept or decline cookies. Most web browsers automatically accept cookies, but you can usually modify your browser setting to decline cookies if you prefer. This may prevent you from taking full advantage of the website.

What about the EU Cookie Law and Equilibrium Associates Limited?

As we’re not using any third party cookies to serve up behavioural ads that would take you elsewhere, we don’t believe we should be showing a pop up to ask if you accept our use of cookies.

Links to other websites

Our website may contain links to other websites of interest. However, once you have used these links to leave our site, you should note that we do not have any control over that other website. Therefore, we cannot be responsible for the protection and privacy of any information which you provide whilst visiting such sites and such sites are not governed by this privacy statement. You should exercise caution and look at the privacy statement applicable to the website in question.

Controlling your personal information

You may choose to restrict the collection or use of your personal information in the following ways:

  • whenever you are asked to fill in a form on the website, look for the box that you can click to indicate that you do not want the information to be used by anybody for direct marketing purposes
  • if you have previously agreed to us using your personal information for direct marketing purposes, you may change your mind at any time by writing to or emailing us at training@in-equilibrium.co.uk

We will not sell, distribute or lease your personal information to third parties unless we have your permission or are required by law to do so. We may use your personal information to send you promotional information about third parties which we think you may find interesting if you tell us that you wish this to happen.

You may request details of personal information which we hold about you.  If you would like a copy of the information held on you please write to

In Equilibrium, Office 19, 15 Pitreavie Court, Pitreavie Business Park, Dunfermline, Fife, KY11 8UU.

We want to make sure that your personal information is accurate and up to date.  You may ask us to correct or remove information you think is inaccurate.

Emails

We have created this email privacy policy to demonstrate our firm commitment to your privacy and the protection of your information.

Why did you receive an email from us?

If you received a mailing from us, (a) your email address is either listed with us as someone who has expressly shared this address for the purpose of receiving information in the future (“opt-in”), or (b) you have registered or purchased or otherwise have an existing relationship with us. We respect your time and attention by controlling the frequency of our mailings.

How we protect your privacy

We use security measures to protect against the loss, misuse and alteration of data used by our system.

Sharing and Usage

We will never share, sell, or rent individual personal information with anyone without your advance permission or unless ordered by a court of law. Information submitted to us is only available to employees managing this information for purposes of contacting you or sending you emails based on your request for information and to contracted service providers for purposes of providing services relating to our communications with you.

How can you stop receiving emails from us?

Each email sent contains an easy, automated way for you to stop receiving emails from us, or to change your expressed interests. If you wish to do this, simply follow the instructions at the end of any email.

If you have consented to receive marketing emails, you may opt out at a later date.  You have a right at any time to stop us from contacting you for marketing purposes.

If you no longer wish to be contacted for marketing purposes please email us at training@in-equilibrium.co.uk

If you have received unwanted, unsolicited email sent via this system or purporting to be sent via this system, please forward a copy of that email with your comments to training@in-equilibrium.co.uk for review.  Also if for some reason you have problems unsubscribing directly from an email please get in touch using the address above and we will manually unsubscribe your details straight away.

Privacy Policy Changes

This policy was updated on 3rd April 2018.

How to contact us

Please contact us if you have any questions about our privacy policy or information we hold about you:

  • by email
  • or write to us at: In Equilibrium, Office 19, 15 Pitreavie Court, Pitreavie Business Park, Dunfermline, Fife, KY11 8UU.

The post Privacy Policy appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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Would you want to be one of those working for you?

A bit like the teacher who inspired you at school, people can usually name a boss who stands out from their others. Asked why, they may struggle to put the exact quality into words but often it’s due to that boss being self-aware and the essential qualities this brings to the workplace.

One definition of self-awareness is the “conscious knowledge of one’s own character and feelings”.  Naming your own strengths and developing them is the easy part, recognising your weaknesses can be a lot more difficult and uncomfortable.  Weaknesses aren’t just the areas you’re not so good at, they can also include your fears, suppositions and doubts.

People have much more confidence in a boss who doesn’t have all the answers and doesn’t see it as a failure to say so, someone who may make mistakes but then takes responsibility for those mistakes and isn’t ashamed to ask for help.  If people see these qualities in their boss, they appreciate that they must be acceptable characteristics within that workplace which will bring benefits to the individual, team and organisation in terms of, for example, continual learning, productivity and adaptability to change.

4 Tips for becoming more self-aware
  1. Listen to others – don’t try to formulate your response while a team member is still speaking.  Instead, listen actively, to pick up not only what is being said but the emotion behind those words – which is sometimes more important.  By acknowledging their emotion, the team member will feel they have been heard, even when it concerns a situation which cannot be changed.
  2. Listen to yourself – how often have you thought you should have gone with your gut reaction when making a decision? Taking time to listen to yourself can help in different ways.  Sometimes it is your life experience which swings your decision once you’ve weighed up all the different options put forward.  On other occasions you need to be aware that you don’t let an unhelpful emotion take control and lead you to make an emotional decision rather than one based on the facts you’ve been presented with.
  3. Encourage feedback – openly ask for feedback from all and take it on board without immediately trying to justify or defend yourself (see listening to others above).  Reflecting quietly by yourself at a set time or at the end of a project/meeting is also valuable in terms of considering how people reacted to you and how you worked with or managed others.  If those providing feedback feel you are listening and taking it on board, they will feel trusted and much happier to provide open and honest feedback in the future, which will increase your credibility.
  4. Experience coaching – like many journeys, many find it helpful to have a guide.  A trained coach can help you become aware of your own behaviour and thinking patterns. They can help you see that it may be your negative inner feelings and conversations which are holding you back and how the power and choice to be aware of them and change them lies with you.

The concept of self-awareness is encompassed in several of our training courses, you can view our full list of training courses here.

The post Stress Management for Managers – the importance of being self-aware appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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The history of diversity and inclusion training can be traced back to the 1950’s.  Many men returned to their workplaces following the end of the Second World War to discover that women had been covering the men’s positions during their absence.  Little more than a decade before, the British workplace had predominantly been a white male environment, and some found the change perplexing.  The ethos of equal opportunity for all, free from prejudice and discrimination, began to be discussed albeit with limited success.

Since then, much has been written about the success and failure of diversity and inclusion training courses and many who have been in the workplace for a while can highlight a negative experience or two.

However, when employers get it right, diversity and inclusion training can be educational, inspiring and make a difference to the whole workforce with the benefits enjoyed by all.  A couple of feedback comments received following attendance on a training workshop illustrate the value training can bring to an organisation’s equality, diversity and inclusion agenda:

“Interesting and informative discussions in an open and relaxed environment.”
“… am now more confident in moving forward and challenging issues around equality, diversity/inclusion.”

8 tips for successful diversity and inclusion training

1. Don’t make the training compulsory but offer it to everyone
If training is not approached with an open mind, it will not succeed. It’s been reported that hostility towards other groups can increase following the anger felt by some to mandatory training. Conversely, when training is voluntary it can lead to better results as attendees believe they are showing support for diversity and inclusion by turning up. Accept that diversity and inclusion is a topic which will bring challenges along with its opportunities.

2. Buy-in from senior management and executives is important and should be visible
If those leading the organisation are seen to attend the training and be keen to prioritise the goal of diversity and inclusion, it will send out a message that will encourage others to get on-board.

3. Offer training proactively and ask for help, don’t make threats
Holding up the legal case for diversity and inclusion and highlighting what happens to those that get it wrong can be interpreted as a threat and won’t be well received. Done badly, diversity and inclusion training can damage otherwise amicable working relationships through the belief that co-workers are even more biased than they thought at the start of the training. Research has shown that if people hear about others’ biases, it can heighten their own. However, if they feel they are surrounded by people who are actively fighting against stereotypes and prejudices, they too will fight against them.

4. Use positive language
If attendees understand that this isn’t a ‘them’ and ‘us’ scenario, that we are all biased, all try to fight it and it is not anyone’s fault, they are more likely to get on board and be more open and motivated to make changes.

5. Don’t make it a tick box exercise
If employees see it simply as HR fulfilling an organisational obligation, they will treat it as a tick box exercise themselves and everyone’s time will have been wasted.

6. Make it authentic and meaningful
Allow people to see its importance to their everyday working and business success. If they see the top leadership of their organisation on board and realise transparency will be required in decisions affecting diversity and inclusion, it encourages employees, peers and managers to attend.

7. Use role-play with extreme caution
Accept that in most workplaces, employees will have differing opinions and beliefs and may not even like each other. They must, however, communicate and work together. Including role-play exercises on the sensitive topics diversity and inclusion training will raise, where employees are required to share information about themselves, won’t make for a more inclusive or pleasant workplace following the training.

8. Utilise skilled trainers
Diversity and inclusion training cover delicate topics and discussions handled incorrectly can quickly escalate with damaging results. A skilled and experienced trainer will ensure that those attending feel it is being carried out in a safe space where they are shielded from embarrassment and empowered to take part in discussions. They will then leave the course with a more pro-active attitude and put the new information and suggested tools to practical use.

Ask for further details about our Equality & Diversity Training & Consultancy here

“Diversity is about all of us, and about us having to figure out how to walk through this world together.”
Jacqueline Woodson

The post 8 Tips for successful diversity and inclusion training appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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Bullying and harassment have always been considered a sensitive area and one that many don’t feel able to raise or discuss, even though we all know the effects can be hugely damaging for both individuals and teams, as well as the reputation and productivity of the wider organisation.

Applying the same principle as you would to any other potential issue in the workplace can be a valuable step … create awareness through training and encourage any unacceptable behaviour to be challenged.

We often receive feedback from participants on our bullying in the workplace courses, expressing surprise at the different forms bullying can take which they hadn’t considered would be classified as bullying or harassment. As harassment is unlawful under the 2010 Equality Act, this type of awareness is not only valuable but essential to create an organisational culture free from bullying and harassment.

We list below a few useful resources which outline the forms workplace bullying can take:

Bullying at work behaviours

Our short video asks the question, “bullying at work takes many forms, would you be able to recognise it?”

Subtle signs of bullying

Our blog article provides examples of some of the more subtle signs of workplace bullying to look out for.

Types of bullying

The Tim Field Foundation has a valuable article which identifies and explains some of the different types of bullying found in workplaces, from corporate bullying to vicarious bullying.

We also have a Bullying Awareness Resources page on our website which provides links to both our own and external articles relating to different aspects of workplace bullying.

Further details about the tackling bullying training we offer can be found here

“… any training of this standard helps to reinforce current practice and gives opportunity to re-evaluate current practice.”

Read the full testimonial following the bullying and harassment awareness training we recently delivered for the Charity of Civil Servants.

The post Tackling Bullying Training – what forms can workplace bullying take? appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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After 5 years in our current location, we are busy preparing to move our Dunfermline office at the end of this month.

There will be no change to either our telephone number or our email addresses.

However, please note that our postal address from Thursday 1 March 2018 will be:

In Equilibrium
Office 19
15 Pitreavie Court
Pitreavie Business Park
Dunfermline
KY11 8UU

The post Our Dunfermline office is moving appeared first on In Equilibrium.

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