Loading...

Follow Hudson Allergy » Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Holiday Allergies

If you thought the winter season was a relief from allergies, you might want to think again… Is it possible to get winter allergies? Yup!

The holidays bring many things: time with friends and family, goodwill and, unfortunately, winter allergies in unexpected places. Winter allergy symptoms could include sneezy or runny nose, itchy eyes, nose or throat, watery eyes, dry scaly skin or redness. Lucky for you, we’ve outlined some of the triggers to look out for to reduce your exposure to winter allergies and make for a much cheerier holiday.

1. Poinsettias.

Did you know poinsettias are a member of the rubber tree family? These plants contain compounds similar to those found in latex, so they may cause an allergic reaction in someone that has a latex allergy. If you or a family member has a latex allergy, the best course of action when it comes to poinsettias is to not have them in your house or workplace at all.

2. Christmas trees

While some people are allergic to pine trees, there is a more common allergen that could be sneaking into your home, hidden on the branches of your live Christmas tree: mold. Christmas trees that are cut ahead of time may have been stored in a humid environment, allowing mold spores to form, and those spores can continue to increase in your home. (Pollen that has been stuck to the tree may also be released once inside your home.) To avoid these symptoms, wear gloves and long sleeves to prevent allergens from coming into contact with your skin. If possible, spray the tree down with a hose and let it dry before bringing it into the house. Or, if you sense you do have an allergy to mold, maybe go for a fake tree this year?

3 . Chestnuts

Some allergy sufferers might want to think twice before building a fire to roast chestnuts over. And it’s not just because of nut allergies! Firewood can contain mold spores and wood burned in a fireplace can release airborne irritants and pollutants, which may cause asthma symptoms or allergic rhinitis.

4. Drinks.

Did you experience flushed skin, hives, or nasal congestion after you consumed alcohol at the holiday party? Or did you experience sickness after just one or two drinks? You might have an alcohol intolerance. Click here to learn more about alcohol intolerance triggers and the related allergens that cause reactions.

Wishing you a happy, healthy, allergy-free holiday from all of here at Hudson Allergy!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Suck it up (literally) and deal with the runny nose?

Sneeze uncontrollably in the middle of your presentation or – even worse – on a date?

#nothanks

In a city where it’s not realistic to avoid outside air or other people, it’s important to understand how to take control of your allergies before they get the best of you.

Let our guide to spring allergies in NYC help you!

NYC Allergies - YouTube

How you get triggered.

Can you guess which nasty P-word is responsible for igniting your sniffling flare-ups?

Get your head out of the gutter, it’s…

Pollen.

These microscopic molecules that we call pollen are the plant world’s equivalent to a male animal’s sperm (so maybe it’s not a mistake that other P-word came to mind).

Pollen is the magic dust that helps trees and flowers and grass reproduce. It travels by wind or through animal helpers, and in its trail, it can severely aggravate our immune response.

Even if your neighborhood isn’t tree-heavy, pollen travels in the air for miles, so it can still do its damage from far away.

Typically in NYC, tree pollens hit us earlier in the spring, while grass pollens become more predominant towards the end of spring and into the summer. If you’re sensitive, this could mean a long stretch of annoying symptoms.

The key is to be prepared and prevent allergies from crushing you.

First thing’s first: Know when allergy season starts. Spring allergy season can begin as early as February if the weather is warm enough, so it’s best to think ahead. Make an appointment with your allergist and start treating symptoms before they start.

Next, know your pollen counts. Convenient apps like this, this, or this, are here to help you keep track of pollen levels in New York at different times of the day so that you can plan your activities accordingly. Obviously, it’s best to stay indoors during peak pollen hours!

Finally, make some time for spring cleaning. Regularly cleaning and vacuuming your home can help you eliminate allergens from your living space that could get tracked in from outdoors. (You might want to keep windows closed, too, for that reason!) Vacuum cleaners with a HEPA filter are your best choice for trapping symptom-causing particles.

Biggest Mistake - YouTube

Don’t make this allergy mistake.

By far the biggest mistake you can make when it comes to allergies is…

Waiting until your allergies get really bad before taking action.

Those cold symptoms that aren’t going away?

Could actually be allergies. If your “cold” symptoms are lasting more than 7-10 days and aren’t responding to over-the-counter meds, you’ll definitely want to see a doctor and get tested.

Even if you’ve never had allergies before?

It’s totally possible to develop allergies later in life, especially when you’ve moved to a new location or get exposed to new environmental allergens.

We got you.

Whatever your cause for concern might be, our doctors are here for you, in 3 different locations around Manhattan, ready to help you understand your allergies and know exactly how to treat them.

Don’t wait until it gets bad!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Have you heard of allergy shots?

(And no, we’re not talking about tequila to forget you’re sneezing.)

Also known as “Allergen Immunotherapy,” this is a long-term treatment option for patients – both adults and children – with with allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and other conditions.

Allergy shots decrease a patient’s sensitivity to allergens, which can lead to longer lasting relief from allergy symptoms, like runny or stuffy noses, sneezing, coughing, watery eyes, and more.

How do allergy shots work?

Allergy shots, a.k.a. Allergen Immunotherapy treatments, work by exposing the body to injected amounts of an allergen protein, given in gradually increasing doses. This helps the body build a tolerance, or immunity, to the allergen.

One or two times a week, you’d receive a shot that gradually builds up in increasing amounts of the allergen. After the shot is administered, you hang out for about 30 minutes, just to be monitored for any reactions that might occur. Once an effective dose is reached, which is determined by your sensitivity and response, we’ll move you to the maintenance phase.

Maintenance allergy shots are usually given every 4 weeks; however, your allergist will help you determine what’s appropriate for you.

Give it a Shot - YouTube

It is worth it for YOU to give allergy shots a shot?

If you suffer from ongoing allergy symptoms that are affecting your life and driving you crazy, then it’s definitely worth a shot! There’s nothing to lose but the box of tissues you’ve been carrying around.

Set up an appointment today with one of our expert allergists, and let us give you a shot an allergy-free lifestyle.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

So you’ve gotten past the swiping and texting and first few dates, and it seems like things are moving forward with this new hottie.

(sweeeeet!)

The only problem is –

He’s allergic to Muffin.

What to do when you want to snuggle up with both your pet AND your allergic new partner?

The good news is, you don’t have to give Muffin away to a new owner OR break up with the human. (Unless of course you’re looking for a reason to break up… which is probably a topic for another type of Google search )

  1. It might not be pet allergies after all. Often times, sneezing around pets can make you think you’re allergic to the furball itself, when actually you’re allergic to dust mites that can grow and multiply from their dander. If you are having symptoms from pet allergies don’t forget about dust mites! They too can be easily treated.
  2. There are environmental ways to minimize the allergic reactions. Air filters and vacuums with a HEPA filter are fantastic ways to minimize dust mites that could trigger allergic reactions. Especially if you have a pet, it’s essential to do a cle an sweep once or twice a week. Also, keep pets off of your furniture – or get leather furniture that will not hold onto allergens.
  3. There are treatment options for allergies beyond over the counter medicine. Getting allergy shots, a.k.a. Allergen Immunotherapy, is a fantastic way to decrease a patient’s sensitivity to pet allergens, which can lead to longer lasting relief from symptoms, like runny or stuffy noses, sneezing, coughing, watery eyes, and more. Talk to your allergist to see if this could be an option for you.

Do We Break Up? - YouTube

First thing’s first –

Make an appointment with an allergist here at Hudson Allergy to confirm the kind of allergy you have and the best ways to treat it. We pride ourselves on getting you into your appointment on time and walking away with a solution as quickly and painlessly as possible. (Much more painless than having to get back on Bumble to find a new partner…am I right?)

Don’t let allergies ruin your Netflix and chill plans.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Penicillin allergy is the most commonly reported medication allergy. Up to 10% of all people and 15% of hospitalized patients report an allergy to penicillin. Around 90% of these people, when evaluated are found not to be allergic, and are able to safely receive penicillin antibiotics.

How does this happen?

Drug allergies are typically diagnosed based on signs and symptoms rather than a definitive test. Furthermore, drug allergies present with a variety of symptoms, including rashes, which can also occur due to the underlying infection being treated. Viruses, especially, are known to cause non-specific rashes as well as classic hives which are often mistaken as drug allergies. Therefore, the onset of symptoms while taking a medication is often attributed to the medication, and results in the diagnosis of drug allergy to err on the side of caution, as true drug allergies pose the risk of more severe, life-threatening reactions. These symptoms, however, may have been due to something entirely unrelated to the medication (i.e. the infection) and therefore warrants evaluation by an allergist.

Why is it important to know if you are truly allergic to penicillin?

Having an allergy to penicillin means you must avoid all medications in this class of antibiotics including medications like Amoxicillin, Augmentin, and Ampicillin. Some physicians may also avoid the closely related class of antibiotics called cephalosporins (examples including Cephalexin and Cefdinir) out of fear of possible cross-reaction. This poses a serious health risk not only for those labeled as penicillin allergic but also for society as a whole. Penicillin antibiotics are often the best (or first-line) treatment option for a variety of common and frequently encountered infections including ear infections, strep throat, and sinus infections. When we can’t use penicillins, we are left with alternative antibiotic options which are less effective, associated with more side effects, and stronger than needed (more broad-spectrum). Using broad-spectrum antibiotics can unnecessarily result in the development of antibiotic-resistant organisms which may be harder to treat in the future.

Do you avoid penicillins because one or both of your parents have a history of penicillin allergy?

Research shows that children are not at increased risk of an allergy to a specific medication because of parental history of reaction. If you test negative on penicillin allergy testing, the chances are very high that you can tolerate the medication and prevent unnecessary avoidance in the future.

Did you have a reaction as a child? Were you told you were allergic but don’t recall the reaction yourself?

If you were diagnosed with a penicillin allergy in infancy or childhood and don’t know more details about your reaction, the chances are still high that you can tolerate penicillin antibiotics. Studies show that of the 10% of those with reported allergy that do test positive, about 50% of people lose their allergy after 5 years and more than 80% lose their allergy after 10 years. Therefore, all people with a history of penicillin allergy should get evaluated by an allergist to determine if they are still allergic.

Is penicillin allergy an issue in pregnancy?

Did you know that all pregnant women are screened for a common bacteria called Group B Strep (or GBS) around 36 weeks of pregnancy? If positive, your OB/Gyn doctor will recommend you receive an antibiotic during delivery to help prevent this bacteria from causing serious infection in your baby soon after birth. The best antibiotic for preventing this is penicillin. Since the risks associated with any type of allergy testing are increased during pregnancy, we highly recommend you consider allergy testing to penicillin prior to getting pregnant.

What should you do?

If you think you have a penicillin allergy you should not ignore this and start taking penicillins as true drug allergies do pose a serious risk of a severe life-threatening allergic reaction if taken. You should, however, see an allergist for penicillin skin testing as this is a well-studied, safe, and easy way to determine if you are truly allergic.

Do you have questions about managing your allergies? Don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We are here to help! Feel free to give us a call at 212-729-1283 or email us at info@hudsonallergy.com.

  Meet the author of this blog Dr. Rushita Mehta, an allergist and immunologist that specializes in environmental allergies, asthma, chronic sinusitis, food allergies, insect venom allergies, anaphylaxis, eczema, hives, angioedema, and immunodeficiency. She is board certified with the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Board of Allergy and Immunology. You may schedule an appointment with Dr. Mehta online or by calling 212-729-1283.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The winter holidays bring a lot with them – food, festive cheer, family gatherings… and a new set of allergy triggers.

In addition to the food allergens that lurk in many traditional holiday dishes, people with allergies will also face a variety of environmental allergens that could trigger symptoms. While those with pollen allergies may get a bit of a break during the winter months, the same isn’t true for people with mold, dust, or pet allergies, for example. (And people with food allergies need to be vigilant all year.)

There are things you can do to keep your allergies under control this winter, but first you need to know your triggers and how to properly manage them. Below you’ll find some of the most common holiday season allergy triggers and our advice for dealing with them.

Food. Winter holidays often mean dining away from home, whether it’s an office party, dinner at a friend or relative’s house, or eating at a restaurant. It can be easy to get caught up in the mood of a party and accidentally consume a food you are allergic to. If you have been prescribed an EpiPen, be sure to carry it with you at all times and instruct at least one other person in its use. Minor symptoms may be treated with over-the-counter medications and treatments. It is also important to have an allergy action plan in place before you attend events. (If you don’t have an allergy management plan, schedule an appointment with us today and we can help you create one.)

Decorations. Your holiday decorations spend most of the year packed away, collecting dust and potentially developing mold. When you bring these decorations out of storage you are stirring these allergens up and spreading them throughout your home. With new allergen particles in the air, you’re likely to begin experiencing symptoms like sneezing, itchy or red eyes, wheezing, coughing, and nasal congestion. You can prevent or reduce these symptoms by wiping down your decorations thoroughly before placing them around your home. When it’s time to pack the decorations back up for the year, wipe them down again and store them in airtight containers away from sources of moisture.

Christmas trees & wreaths. While some people are allergic to pine trees, there is a more common allergen that could be sneaking into your home, hidden on the branches of your live Christmas tree: mold. Christmas trees that are cut ahead of time may have been stored in a humid environment, allowing mold spores to form, and those spores can continue to increase in your home. (Pollen that has been stuck to the tree may also be released once inside your home.) To avoid these symptoms, wear gloves and long sleeves to prevent allergens from coming into contact with your skin. If possible, spray the tree down with a hose and let it dry before bringing it into the house.

Poinsettia. Did you know poinsettias are a member of the rubber tree family? These plants contain compounds similar to those found in latex, so they may cause an allergic reaction in someone that has a latex allergy. With regard to allergies, the best course of action when it comes to poinsettias is to not have them in your house or workplace at all.

Gifts. The holiday season is also a time for gift giving. If you are having trouble deciding what to buy for someone that has allergies, take a look at our list of holiday gift ideas for people with allergies. When it comes to receiving gifts, we recommend that you mention your allergies ahead of time with anyone you will be exchanging presents with so they know what to avoid getting you. If you receive an unexpected gift that you are allergic to, we recommend thanking the giver but explain why you are unable to accept it. (If you feel awkward about refusing the gift, you can accept it and donate it or give it to someone else who might appreciate it.)

Do you have questions about managing your allergies over the holidays? Don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We are here to help! Feel free to give us a call at 212-729-1283 or email us at info@hudsonallergy.com.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Holiday Allergies

If you thought the winter season was a relief from allergies, you might want to think again… Is it possible to get winter allergies? Yup!

The holidays bring many things: time with friends and family, goodwill and, unfortunately, winter allergies in unexpected places. Winter allergy symptoms could include sneezy or runny nose, itchy eyes, nose or throat, watery eyes, dry scaly skin or redness. Lucky for you, we’ve outlined some of the triggers to look out for to reduce your exposure to winter allergies and make for a much cheerier holiday.

1. Poinsettias.

Did you know poinsettias are a member of the rubber tree family? These plants contain compounds similar to those found in latex, so they may cause an allergic reaction in someone that has a latex allergy. If you or a family member has a latex allergy, the best course of action when it comes to poinsettias is to not have them in your house or workplace at all.

2. Christmas trees

While some people are allergic to pine trees, there is a more common allergen that could be sneaking into your home, hidden on the branches of your live Christmas tree: mold. Christmas trees that are cut ahead of time may have been stored in a humid environment, allowing mold spores to form, and those spores can continue to increase in your home. (Pollen that has been stuck to the tree may also be released once inside your home.) To avoid these symptoms, wear gloves and long sleeves to prevent allergens from coming into contact with your skin. If possible, spray the tree down with a hose and let it dry before bringing it into the house. Or, if you sense you do have an allergy to mold, maybe go for a fake tree this year?

3 . Chestnuts

Some allergy sufferers might want to think twice before building a fire to roast chestnuts over. And it’s not just because of nut allergies! Firewood can contain mold spores and wood burned in a fireplace can release airborne irritants and pollutants, which may cause asthma symptoms or allergic rhinitis.

4. Drinks.

Did you experience flushed skin, hives, or nasal congestion after you consumed alcohol at the holiday party? Or did you experience sickness after just one or two drinks? You might have an alcohol intolerance. Click here to learn more about alcohol intolerance triggers and the related allergens that cause reactions.

Wishing you a happy, healthy, allergy-free holiday from all of here at Hudson Allergy!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Suck it up (literally) and deal with the runny nose?

Sneeze uncontrollably in the middle of your presentation or – even worse – on a date?

#nothanks

In a city where it’s not realistic to avoid outside air or other people, it’s important to understand how to take control of your allergies before they get the best of you.

Let our guide to spring allergies in NYC help you!

NYC Allergies - YouTube

How you get triggered.

Can you guess which nasty P-word is responsible for igniting your sniffling flare-ups?

Get your head out of the gutter, it’s…

Pollen.

These microscopic molecules that we call pollen are the plant world’s equivalent to a male animal’s sperm (so maybe it’s not a mistake that other P-word came to mind).

Pollen is the magic dust that helps trees and flowers and grass reproduce. It travels by wind or through animal helpers, and in its trail, it can severely aggravate our immune response.

Even if your neighborhood isn’t tree-heavy, pollen travels in the air for miles, so it can still do its damage from far away.

Typically in NYC, tree pollens hit us earlier in the spring, while grass pollens become more predominant towards the end of spring and into the summer. If you’re sensitive, this could mean a long stretch of annoying symptoms.

The key is to be prepared and prevent allergies from crushing you.

First thing’s first: Know when allergy season starts. Spring allergy season can begin as early as February if the weather is warm enough, so it’s best to think ahead. Make an appointment with your allergist and start treating symptoms before they start.

Next, know your pollen counts. Convenient apps like this, this, or this, are here to help you keep track of pollen levels in New York at different times of the day so that you can plan your activities accordingly. Obviously, it’s best to stay indoors during peak pollen hours!

Finally, make some time for spring cleaning. Regularly cleaning and vacuuming your home can help you eliminate allergens from your living space that could get tracked in from outdoors. (You might want to keep windows closed, too, for that reason!) Vacuum cleaners with a HEPA filter are your best choice for trapping symptom-causing particles.

Biggest Mistake - YouTube

Don’t make this allergy mistake.

By far the biggest mistake you can make when it comes to allergies is…

Waiting until your allergies get really bad before taking action.

Those cold symptoms that aren’t going away?

Could actually be allergies. If your “cold” symptoms are lasting more than 7-10 days and aren’t responding to over-the-counter meds, you’ll definitely want to see a doctor and get tested.

Even if you’ve never had allergies before?

It’s totally possible to develop allergies later in life, especially when you’ve moved to a new location or get exposed to new environmental allergens.

We got you.

Whatever your cause for concern might be, our doctors are here for you, in 3 different locations around Manhattan, ready to help you understand your allergies and know exactly how to treat them.

Don’t wait until it gets bad!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Have you heard of allergy shots?

(And no, we’re not talking about tequila to forget you’re sneezing.)

Also known as “Allergen Immunotherapy,” this is a long-term treatment option for patients – both adults and children – with with allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and other conditions.

Allergy shots decrease a patient’s sensitivity to allergens, which can lead to longer lasting relief from allergy symptoms, like runny or stuffy noses, sneezing, coughing, watery eyes, and more.

How do allergy shots work?

Allergy shots, a.k.a. Allergen Immunotherapy treatments, work by exposing the body to injected amounts of an allergen protein, given in gradually increasing doses. This helps the body build a tolerance, or immunity, to the allergen.

One or two times a week, you’d receive a shot that gradually builds up in increasing amounts of the allergen. After the shot is administered, you hang out for about 30 minutes, just to be monitored for any reactions that might occur. Once an effective dose is reached, which is determined by your sensitivity and response, we’ll move you to the maintenance phase.

Maintenance allergy shots are usually given every 4 weeks; however, your allergist will help you determine what’s appropriate for you.

Give it a Shot - YouTube

It is worth it for YOU to give allergy shots a shot?

If you suffer from ongoing allergy symptoms that are affecting your life and driving you crazy, then it’s definitely worth a shot! There’s nothing to lose but the box of tissues you’ve been carrying around.

Set up an appointment today with one of our expert allergists, and let us give you a shot an allergy-free lifestyle.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

So you’ve gotten past the swiping and texting and first few dates, and it seems like things are moving forward with this new hottie.

(sweeeeet!)

The only problem is –

He’s allergic to Muffin.

What to do when you want to snuggle up with both your pet AND your allergic new partner?

The good news is, you don’t have to give Muffin away to a new owner OR break up with the human. (Unless of course you’re looking for a reason to break up… which is probably a topic for another type of Google search )

  1. It might not be pet allergies after all. Often times, sneezing around pets can make you think you’re allergic to the furball itself, when actually you’re allergic to dust mites that can grow and multiply from their dander. If you are having symptoms from pet allergies don’t forget about dust mites! They too can be easily treated.
  2. There are environmental ways to minimize the allergic reactions. Air filters and vacuums with a HEPA filter are fantastic ways to minimize dust mites that could trigger allergic reactions. Especially if you have a pet, it’s essential to do a cle an sweep once or twice a week. Also, keep pets off of your furniture – or get leather furniture that will not hold onto allergens.
  3. There are treatment options for allergies beyond over the counter medicine. Getting allergy shots, a.k.a. Allergen Immunotherapy, is a fantastic way to decrease a patient’s sensitivity to pet allergens, which can lead to longer lasting relief from symptoms, like runny or stuffy noses, sneezing, coughing, watery eyes, and more. Talk to your allergist to see if this could be an option for you.

Do We Break Up? - YouTube

First thing’s first –

Make an appointment with an allergist here at Hudson Allergy to confirm the kind of allergy you have and the best ways to treat it. We pride ourselves on getting you into your appointment on time and walking away with a solution as quickly and painlessly as possible. (Much more painless than having to get back on Bumble to find a new partner…am I right?)

Don’t let allergies ruin your Netflix and chill plans.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview