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HORSE NATION by Kristen Kovatch - 12h ago
…makes the dream work.

Haley and her brother Kolby. Photo by Taylor Soderholm

After a long weekend at my last IHSA Semi-Finals, I want to reflect on what made my collegiate riding experience memorable: watching and supporting my teammates, and being supported by them in turn. The format of riding as part of a team is exclusive to this type of show, and although at first it was disorienting to be part of a team in a sport usually geared towards individuals, cheering on my teammates was the highlight of my last show ever with them.

My own placings this weekend were disappointing, but I can’t find it in myself to dwell on that when I think of how proud I am of my teammates. They all overcame challenges to make it to Semi-Finals, and I would like to introduce each of them. They are all incredible role models for me, and I learn from all of them every time we show.

Going in order of division, my teammate Kristie Wagner won the Individual Advanced Horsemanship this weekend. Those of you who know Kristie and how talented a rider she is may think that this victory is a routine one for her, but two weeks ago she was in a hospital bed with a lacerated liver, bruised lung, and bruised ribs from being kicked. I visited her in the hospital the day after she was transported by ambulance, and the first thing she told me was that she still wanted to show at Semi-Finals (right after she complained that the doctors hadn’t let her eat in thirty hours). She made an appointment to get a scan the Friday before the show and, against all odds, it came back clear enough that her doctors allowed her to ride. She came back from not being allowed to move out of her hospital bed to having the courage to get back on a strange horse for the first time and have two flawless rides, winning her competitive class and qualifying her for Nationals.

If Kristie’s scan had not shown improvement, my teammate Sydney Popovski would have shown in her place, but she had the incredible grace and sportsmanship to step down and let her teammate show when Kristie’s results came back clear. The courage it took for both of them—for Kristie to ride again so soon after having a severe accident, and for Sydney to come all the way to the show and then step aside for her teammate—is something I aspire to find within myself.

In the Team Advanced Horsemanship, my teammate Taylor Soderholm had a beautiful ride, falling in love with the reiner she drew. Despite learning how to ride western only three years ago, Taylor has risen through the divisions all the way to Advanced her senior year and more than held her own against riders who have ridden western their whole lives. She is a force of nature and a class act in and out of the arena, hiding her nerves under an unfaltering layer of confidence. In addition to being one of the strongest riders on the team, she never fails to lift her teammates up and make sure they have everything they need, whether it be a helping hand with horsemanship makeup, a chap extender off of her own chaps, or a cup of tea for a sick teammate.

From Taylor, I have learned the incredible poise it takes to succeed in the horsemanship arena—I point her out to all of my nervous first-year teammates as an example of ring presence and the importance of looking confident. She has taught me that trying something new can be rewarding if you work hard at it, and that I always have a friend at the barn and a shoulder to lean on.

In the Individual Novice, my teammates Becca Scalen and Catie Donahue both showed class and elegance despite this being their first time showing at that level in Western IHSA. Becca, like Taylor, began as a hunt seat rider and proved that riding both western and hunt seat makes for a stronger horseman. Catie, a sophomore, made her Semi-Finals debut and showed sportsmanship in being proud of her ride regardless of placing.

My teammate Emma VanDyne showed in the Team Novice and Individual Intermediate divisions. Emma, an Open hunt seat rider, started riding western only last January and has made incredible progress in the last year, learning both horsemanship and reining at a pace I didn’t think was possible. She constantly seeks new learning opportunities, asking questions and soaking up every moment of practices and shows, never settling for “good enough.” I try to answer her western questions, and she always has my back on the hunt seat team. Emma is a beautiful rider in both disciplines and had some of her best rides yet at Semi-Finals, and will be one to watch in both show pens in the coming years. She is constantly aware of what’s going on with the team and is the first to step up and offer help, a role model and one-woman support group who proves the stereotype of cattiness in the horse industry wrong.

Julie Barr, a sophomore we also stole from the hunt seat side last year, made her Individual Intermediate Semi-Finals debut this weekend and made callbacks for a fifth-place finish, one place away from making Nationals with only two-years’ western riding experience. Despite her small frame, Julie’s martial arts experience and unwavering composure while riding make her a force to be reckoned with. She can sit any wild maneuver without batting an eye, and her sense of humor never falters in any situation, no matter how stressful. I try to emulate her coolness and ability to navigate any experience with a laugh.

One of two first-years to show this weekend, Amber O’Toole made her debut as the Intermediate Team rider. Coming in with a competitive spirit and a lot of talent but little horsemanship experience, Amber has worked in and out of the arena all year to become a better rider, and it paid off this weekend as she put points on the board for our first team class of the day. She overcame nerves at having to represent her team at Semi-Finals as a first-year to ride a beautiful pattern, and held the team together for the rest of the show with her constant positivity and sportsmanship. Amber also leads the team in fashion choices, from a flawlessly put-together show ring presence to the iconic sweatpants-and-cowboy-boots look that she rocked on the car ride home.

Vanessa Virgilio, a senior on the team, earned a fifth-place spot in the Beginner division. She has an injured foot and has changed from a walking boot to her cowboy boots countless times, working through the pain to practice and work out in preparation for Semi-Finals. As an Athletic Training student, Vanessa has been a source of athletic knowledge for the team and showed her strength in the show pen, laying down a strong ride on a horse that was pulled from the walk-jog class prior to hers because he wouldn’t jog, but she got through the pattern without breaking and proved her ability to make the horse perform.

One of the rides I am most proud of from this weekend was that of my little brother, Kolby Ruffner, in the Team Beginner class. Having only started riding this fall (after giving in to my constant begging for him to join the team), he has made great progress and held his own in a tough class. At his first horse show outside of Alfred, he remained absolutely unflappable despite his horse not wanting to jog, and trying to stop and say hello to spectators at the gate, staying focused and never quitting until he got the horse to follow his aids. He earned a fifth-place ribbon, putting points on the board for Alfred on a difficult horse.

My teammates, coaches, and family sustained me through this horse show, and they challenge me to improve myself every day to be more like them. As the end of my four years competing on a team draws to a close, I would like to thank every one of them that taught me something about riding and about myself. They made all the late nights, early mornings, and challenging rides worth it, and have picked me up when I couldn’t do it myself. I owe them everything, and could never hope to repay the experiences and kindness they have shown me.

Haley will continue to share more adventures from the perspective of a collegiate equestrian! Keep an eye out for The Academic Equestrian weekly.

Haley Ruffner is attending Alfred University, majoring in English with a minor in Equine Business Management. She owns two Quarter Horse geldings, Cricket (“At Last an Invitation”) and Slide (“HH Slick N Slide”). Haley is a captain of the AU western equestrian team, competing in horsemanship, reining and hunt seat. She also loves trail riding.

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Promising to have “something for everyone,” EQUITANA is coming to the US in 2020!

Image Courtesy of EQUITANA USA

EQUITANA, described as the “world’s largest equestrian trade fair and exhibition where equestrians of all ages come together for shopping, instruction, entertainment, and more,” is coming to the Kentucky Horse Park (KHP) in 2020. EQUITANA’s parent company, Reed Exhibitions, also runs EQUITANA Germany, a bi-annual event that attracts over 200,000 visitors and more than 750 exhibitors over the course of nine days.

According to KHP Marketing Director Kerry Howe, the event will be hosted over a three-day period during the fall, though exact dates, vendors, and exhibitors aren’t yet confirmed. Howe added that EQUITANA is unique because it, “is an all-breed, all-discipline show that has something for everyone.” The highlight of EQUITANA is the Hop Top show, which blends music, horsemanship, sound and lighting effects, and fantasy elements to put on a show that’s been compared to events such as Cirque Du Soleil. The Hop Top show focuses on the deep bond and subtle communication between horse and human.

The idea to bring EQUITANA to the United States stemmed from, “an email I sent back in 2017 to the German EQUITANA team, inquiring if they’d like to pursue the idea,” said Laura Prewitt, KHP Executive Director. “I figured they had the world’s largest and best equine trade show, and the KHP is the best equine facility – a perfect match! That email started a conversation followed by meetings with EQUITANA Germany and Reed Exhibitions. Last October, both teams visited the KHP for a series of meetings and discussion.” In an earlier press release, Prewitt stated that the KHP is, “excited to be the home of EQUITANA USA.”

Learn more at the EQUITANA USA website.

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In an effort to increase more adoptions of wild horses and burros, the Bureau of Land Management introduced an incentive program earlier this year. Get the details here.

Flickr/BLMIdaho/CC

If you’ve been thinking about adopting and gentling your first mustang, there may be no better time than the present: the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced earlier this winter that its new Adoption Incentive Program (AIP) would be paying out up to $1,000 to adopters of wild horses or burros through its adoption programs.

The incentive is intended to help reduce the numbers of horses in off-range holding corrals, which cost about $50 million in taxpayer dollars annually to maintain. The AIP is designed to help defray the costs of adopting a mustang, including veterinary care, property updates or maintenance, and even training. Ever wanted a mustang but had no idea where to begin? Put that incentive money towards professional training!

It’s not quite as simple as “take a mustang, get a thousand bucks,” of course — which is a good thing, as it gives the horses some manner of protection from unscrupulous dealers or contract buyers. Here are some of the details:

  • $500 is paid out within 60 days of adoption
  • The other $500 is paid out within 60 days of titling: mustang adopters receive their title to their horse after one year
  • AIP only applies to adopted animals — not those who have gone through a BLM or Mustang Heritage Foundation training program, and not those who were purchased through direct sale from the BLM
  • Up to four adopted mustangs can be eligible for the AIP annually per adopter

Adopters are still required to pay their $25 adoption fee and follow all other guidelines and rules regarding the adoption of wild horses or burros from the BLM.

While close to 250,000 wild horses and burros have been adopted through the BLM’s programs since the government agency was first charged with protecting herds in 1971, the demand for mustangs has not kept up with the supply as horses continue to reproduce on the range at a rate faster than they are adopted out. The BLM has set Appropriate Management Levels (AMLs) on Herd Management Areas based on all of the land’s intended uses, from supporting a healthy and diverse population of wildlife to leasing land for livestock grazing, plus logging and mining. The estimated population of 81,950 wild horses far exceeds the BLM’s set AML.

The subject of wild horse management always sparks heated debates, with advocates on all sides of the issue often failing to agree on any point: should wild horses numbers be managed through different means, such as fertility control, or should wild horses be free to live without any human intervention at all? Should horses be removed from the range when the range indicates it can no longer support them? Why should livestock grazing have rights to the land in addition to the wild horses? What about other large herbivores who depend on the land?

There are no easy solutions to any of these questions, but the Adoption Incentive Program at least promises to try a new tactic to attempt to get more wild horses adopted into good homes.

Learn more:

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HORSE NATION by Kristen Kovatch - 15h ago
Another week of horse life, rounded up in your images!

Join the conversation! Follow us on Instagram at @go_riding and tag your public photos with #goriding. We’ll share our favorites daily. Go riding!

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Pioneerof the Nile, himself a respected racehorse as well as an industry-shaping stallion at stud, passed away suddenly yesterday at the age of 13. We’re paying homage to the stallion today.

WinStar Farm, where Pioneerof the Nile stood at stud, announced yesterday that the stallion had died unexpectedly at the age of 13. He had bred a mare in the morning and started acting uncomfortably back in his stall, and died en route to the clinic.

Pioneerof the Nile was bred by Zayat Stables, and trained for racing under Bob Baffert. Under Baffert’s tutelage, the horse won two Grade 1 races and two Grade 2 races, as well as finished second in the Kentucky Derby. An injury forced his retirement after the Preakness Stakes, leaving many to wonder just how good he could have been.

2009 Santa Anita Derby - USA - Vencedor: Pioneerof The Nile - YouTube

At stud, however, Pioneerof the Nile left no doubts as to his abilities: he is the sire of the incomparable American Pharoah, who became North America’s first Triple Crown winner in 37 years. He also won the Breeders’ Cup Classic.

Belmont Stakes 2015 | American Pharoah's Belmont Stakes, Triple Crown win | NBC Sports - YouTube

Pioneerof the Nile also sired Classic Empire, himself a Breeders’ Cup winner in the Juvenile. Both Classic Empire and American Pharoah are now standing at stud themselves, hopefully to continue the family tradition.

2016 Sentient Jet Breeders' Cup Juvenile - YouTube

Pioneerofthe Nile’s contributions to the sport are still being realized, but he can safely be called a shaper of the industry, and his loss will be felt keenly. Our thoughts are with the connections of this great horse.

The Shoulder Relief Cinch by Total Saddle Fit, the only cinch that improves saddle fit and shoulder freedom. Learn more at totalsaddlefit.com.

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HORSE NATION by Esther Roberts - 1d ago
When Dr. Dale Rice’s patients needed him after last week’s intense blizzard in Colorado buried the roads in snow and abandoned cars, he strapped on his snow shoes, loaded up his horse, and headed out.

“Colic” is one of those words a horseowner dreads to hear. If you board your riding partner, somewhere deep inside is a tiny prick of fear every time your phone rings and your boarding facility’s number pops up on caller ID.

“Blizzard” is another one of those oft-dreaded words.

So when your boarding facility calls you to say your sixteen-year-old heart horse is colicking right as you’re watching the weatherman talking about the bombcyclone of snow outside, there’s a recipe for disaster.

The perfect storm… for heartbreak.

Callea Sherrill of Elizabeth, Colorado, had to endure that nailbiting scenario just last week, when the Midwest was hit with one of the worst blizzards in Colorado’s recorded history. Moisture-heavy clouds from the south met an arctic cold front smack dab in the middle of America’s heartland, and, as the barometric pressure bottomed out to the lowest ever in Colorado, everyone knew they were in for one helluva ride.

Sherrill boards her beloved horse, Red — an American Quarter Horse from sturdy Waggoner Ranch, Texas stock featuring Doc Bar lines — at Terolyn Farm in Elizabeth, Colorado. Terolyn Farm is home to Terolyn Horse Rescue (THR). Founded by Teri Allen and run by Allen and her daughter, Ryann (along with a host of dedicated volunteers), Terolyn Farm boards a few horses to help fiscally sustain THR’s mission of helping unwanted horses find forever homes.

Terolyn Farm, home of Terolyn Horse Rescue. All photos provided by Terolyn Farm and used by permission.

For two days before the storm hit, Teri, her husband, her daughter, and the volunteers rushed to prepare the farm and the horses as best they could. When the storm arrived, it came in fast and furious, featuring wind gusts up to ninety miles per hour. The snow fell at the rate of nearly two inches per hour for hours on end.

The bombcyclone struck so fast, in fact, that drivers all along the main road in Elizabeth had to abandon their vehicles and be transported to safety by emergency and rescue personnel. This left a string of cars blocking the road, and the snow quickly buried them. Unbeknownst to anyone at Terolyn Farm, they were now cut off from the world.

Next morning, as the Allens climbed through snowdrifts six feet high to check on all the stock, they miraculously found only one serious injury — one of the rescue horses, Artex, had somehow gashed his knee. Artex’s knee needed sutures, but Teri decided to wait to call their local vet, Dr. Dale Rice, until they had seen every horse. To triage Artex’s knee, Allen, a seasoned horsewoman, wrapped the knee with a feminine hygiene pad and used duct tape to hold it in place. With Artex’s bleeding stopped, the Allens moved on to the next barn.

There, they found Red.

Red was huddled, miserable, in his shelter, showing all the classic signs of colic: gassy, pacing, biting and kicking his abdomen.

Ryann Allen and Red.

Ryann immediately began walking Red to keep him moving and keep him from going down to roll. She gave him a little banamine to help with the pain.

Teri Allen made two phone calls. The first was to Red’s owner, Sherrill. Sherrill was heartsick at the thought of her “heart horse” so sick. “I was so upset, knowing how serious colic can be, and knowing I couldn’t even get out of my driveway, let alone to the barn. That line of cars that had been buried in snow was blocking the main road and the whole town was at a standstill. But I trust Teri and Ryann. I knew they would do everything possible to help Red, and I all I could do was wait and pray.”

Allen’s second call was to their local vet, Dr. Dale Rice. She told Rice about Artex needing sutures, and about Red. Both Allen and Rice knew time was of the essence on the colic case; both professionals also knew travel was impossible.

Sherrill recounts the issues: “It’s a few miles from the farm to Rice’s home and clinic. There was no way to load up Red and take him to Dr. Rice. And there was no way for Dr. Rice to drive out to the farm. I was so afraid it was hopeless for Red.”

But a little later, Rice called Allen back and said, “Awesome Promise is all loaded up, and I have my snowshoes and ski goggles.  I’ll be there as soon as I can.”

Allen called Sherrill and assured her, “miraculously, help is on the way.” Sherrill, isolated at home and unable to get to her horse, was overcome. “I just sat down and wept.”

Dale Rice, D.V.M. and Awesome Promise.

Using his favorite saddle horse as a pack-ambulance of sorts, Rice trekked the miles from his home office to his snowbound patients.

Doc Rice and Red.

Rice tubed Red and gave him a good dose of mineral oil and electrolytes. Ryann resumed walking Red and Rice went to tend Artex.

Suturing up Artex’s wounded knee.

Less than ten years ago, Dale Rice chose veterinary medicine as his second career. For many years he wore a suit and was a corporate executive, until, one day, he simply decided to follow his heart. He quit his job, chucked the suits, went to vet school, and set up shop in Elbert County, Colorado — the very rural section of the state that is home to Terolyn Farm.

To expedite the trip home as a courtesy to Awesome Promise, Rice left his materials at the farm and mounted up for the ride home.

Rice and Awesome Promise, heading home.

Shortly thereafter, Teri Allen was able to call Red’s mom and deliver some great news: “We have poop!”

Overjoyed and full of gratitude, Sherrill posted a few photos of “Doc Rice” on social media to thank him for his heroic efforts to save her horse. Rice, a humble and gracious man, neither expected nor wanted any recognition or notoriety, but, like Sherrill, we here at Horse Nation believe great news is worth sharing.

So we salute you, Doc Rice, for your dedication to your profession, and the phenomenal determination and resourcefulness you exemplified to help horses who were hurting. You are a healer, and a hero.

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A powerful combination of meteorological factors set up the Midwest for historic flooding last week, causing widespread damage and killing at least three people in Nebraska. Flooding also struck parts of Iowa and South Dakota.

Rapid melting of frozen ground and rivers along with inches of snowpack combined with heavy rain from a winter storm that had already created blizzard conditions in the Rocky Mountain states to create dangerous conditions. Flood protection systems including dams and levees were overwhelmed; bridges were washed out and ice dams created backup and rapidly-rising flood waters.

Entire towns were isolated, surrounded by floodwaters; other residential areas saw 6-7 feet of water where there were once roads and lawns. In rural areas, rising waters stranded livestock on “islands;” some stock could be evacuated but others had to shelter in place. Ranchers report feeding their animals by airboat until flood waters could recede. Many animals will likely be lost.

Horse owners are not exempt from this disaster; viral imagery is all over the internet of horses being evacuated or rescued from their farms and ranches or standing trapped in barns in standing water.

These horses self-rescued in what was certainly a scary situation, stranded by a rising creek. According to the video description, all of these horses eventually made it to dry ground, are in good health and doing well.

We have not found any official equine-specific disaster relief funds that have been earmarked for Midwest flood victims at this time, but we will continue to watch for such efforts. Nebraska Farm Bureau Foundation is collecting donations for farmers, ranchers and rural communities affected by the flooding.

Our thoughts are with all of those affected by these conditions in the Midwest.

[Historic Flooding in Parts of Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota Due to Rare Confluence of Meteorological Factors]

[Record-High Floods in Nebraska Breach Levees and Isolate Towns]

[No, Winter Isn’t Over. Hitting the Plains: A Flood and a Blizzard]

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Monday is already the crappiest day of the week, so it only makes sense that we make things official. Here’s our latest “oh crap” moment, gleaned from the internet.

Pro tip: this is not where a cow belongs.

All’s well that ends well!

Have an “Oh Crap” moment to share? Email your photo/video and a brief explanation of what is going down to kristen@nationmediallc.com! Instagram users, tag your moments with #OhCrapMonday (your photos need to be set to public or we won’t see them!)

Go forth and tackle your Monday, Horse Nation. Go Riding!

About Kentucky Performance Products, LLC:

InsulinWiseTM

Is your horse currently suffering from metabolic syndrome and insulin dysregulation?

Do you have a horse that is at risk for developing insulin resistance, or a horse with Cushing’s (PPID) that may become insulin resistant?

Ask your vet about InsulinWise™.

InsulinWise:

  • Maintains lower blood insulin levels, a marker of increased insulin sensitivity.
  • Reduces body weight.
  • Supports a decreased risk of laminitis in insulin-resistant horses.
  • Sustains normal insulin regulation, reducing the risk of developing insulin resistance in the future.

For more information on this new product, visit KPPvet.com.

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HORSE NATION by Kristen Kovatch - 2d ago
The adventures of SmartPak’s sponsored vet student Cheyenne Sams continue, with a trip to Texas A&M Veterinary School for the annual wet lab. Cheyenne details what she learned here!

Whenever we go to veterinary meetings, we always meet lots of vet students. These are some of the nicest, smartest, and poorest people we know. So we said to ourselves: what if we sponsored a vet student? And that’s how Cheyenne Sams, a 3rd year veterinary student at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, came to be the first-ever “SmartPak Vet Student Class Rep!”

On Saturday, January 19th of 2019, the Student Chapter of the American Association of Equine Practitioners at the Texas A&M Veterinary School hosted hundreds of veterinary students from schools all over the country to attend their annual wet lab. They had about twenty labs for students to choose four to participate in. When I arrived to the veterinary school with two other Illinois students and one student from Missouri, we saw the beautiful veterinary school that Texas A&M has. We were told that it is a relatively new building, and it was fantastic – fireplaces in an indoor study room, outdoor study spaces, relaxing courtyard, and the list goes on.

The first lab that I participated in was on alternative medicine. We learned about acupuncture and even got to practice placing acupuncture needles! However, first we had the opportunity to place an acupuncture needle in our own arms (so that we had a better idea how it feels for the horse) in a point that was supposed to be relaxing. I wasn’t able to push the needle in as far as it was supposed to go for my arm (it was weird placing a needle into my own skin), but I did better than I had anticipated I would be able to do! Placing needles in the horse were so much easier, and I definitely think that he became more relaxed during our session, because he dropped his head lower and lower. Alternative medicine has been growing in popularity and I am interested in pursuing some of these techniques following my graduation from veterinary school.

My second lab was all about hind-limb lameness. There was an equine veterinarian from Texas that enjoys lameness that was there to teach us about different ways to look for hindlimb lameness – what sorts of things he looks at when he is looking for lameness in the hind end – stuff like hip hike and drop, and also the fetlock drop. He also talked about various hind limb flexions that we can perform in order to help focus the lameness to various aspects of the limb. The best part was that we were able to watch two lame horses jog (trot) so that we could figure out which limb was lame and also practice our flexions.

Catch up with the rest of Cheyenne’s day at the SmartPak blog!

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Set aside some time in your training schedule to do some work over poles, or enjoy taking your horse on a hack.

By Reese Koffler Stanfield, USDF gold medalist, FEI-certified instructor, owner of Maplecrest Farm

Cross training improves your horse’s balance and coordination. Riding on different surfaces benefits both muscle fitness and bone strength. Horses love going out and doing something different every once in a while! So set aside some time in your training schedule to do some work over poles, or enjoy taking your horse on a hack.

Sponsored by Neigh-Lox® Advanced, providing complete digestive support to reduce the incidence of ulcers and colic in horses that are training and competing.

“I am truly amazed how well Neigh-Lox Advanced works. I was having a lot of issues with my young horse Denali. He was girthy, very cranky to groom and work with, and I could not get his coat to improve. After one month on Neigh-Lox Advanced I could not believe the difference in his overall body condition and his attitude. I had no problems with him traveling to Florida for the first time. I was amazed! I have all of my competition horses on Neigh-Lox Advanced and I make sure to never run out!

About Reese:

Reese Koffler-Stanfield is a lifelong professional horseman and United States Dressage Federation (USDF) bronze, silver, gold, and gold freestyle bar medalist. Reese operates Maplecrest Farm in Georgetown, Kentucky, a state-of-the-art training facility dedicated to boarding, training, care, and sale of performance horses and sport horses. As a USDF/FEI certified instructor/trainer, she works with a host of talented riders and horses. Reese is also the host of the Horse Radio Network’s Dressage Radio Show. If you have questions for Reese, you can contact her at reese@horseradionetwork.com.

About Kentucky Performance Products, LLC:

InsulinWiseTM

Is your horse currently suffering from metabolic syndrome and insulin dysregulation?

Do you have a horse that is at risk for developing insulin resistance, or a horse with Cushing’s (PPID) that may become insulin resistant?

Ask your vet about InsulinWise™.

InsulinWise:

  • Maintains lower blood insulin levels, a marker of increased insulin sensitivity.
  • Reduces body weight.
  • Supports a decreased risk of laminitis in insulin-resistant horses.
  • Sustains normal insulin regulation, reducing the risk of developing insulin resistance in the future.

For more information on this new product, visit KPPvet.com.

Read Full Article

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