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As any parent knows, there’s a lot to juggle when it comes to our kids’ lives. Throw homeschooling into the mix and there’s even more to balance between school and life: proper paperwork for the state, researching curriculum, planning lessons (sometimes for more than one student and grade level!), organizing field trips, gathering materials, teaching and grading, doctor’s appointments, vacations, extracurriculars, and more! That’s why — as great as the flexibility of homeschool is — it’s essential to have some sort of organizational system in place.

Why is it important to be organized? Well, it can help better facilitate learning, lessen distractions, create more peace and calmness, and separate “school” life from “home” life.

 

Here are 4 tips to help organize your homeschool.

 

1)  Start with “structured flexibility.”

One of the joys of homeschool is the flexibility it provides in terms of schedule. And while your schooling can fit around your schedule, it’s also important to remember to schedule it! At the start of each year (or quarter, or semester), sit down and plan out your lessons. See when you have vacations and holidays already scheduled. Figure out how much material you have to cover and how many days you have to complete it. Then, set a rough daily schedule that includes what will be taught each day. We say “rough” because, again, homeschool is flexible and you might find that you need more time than you had allotted for a certain topic, so you need to adjust lessons a bit. But having that tentative schedule will help make sure you stay on track! In case the opposite happens and you finish materials faster than anticipated, have a plan for what you’ll do with that extra time. Will you move on to next week’s work? Will you do extra activities centered around the lesson? Will it be free time? Set your schedule for how it works for you and your learner — maybe you don’t do math every day but do it 2 days a week in larger chunks, maybe you prefer hourly schedules — and know that things may change, and that’s okay.

 

2)  Determine your plan, objectives, and goals.

Figure out what you want to accomplish this week, month, semester, and year. Get your kids involved, too! At the start of each week, sit down and discuss the plan, see what questions your kids have, and ask what they want to accomplish. Having a plan will help you stay on track, and goals give you and your children something to work toward. Is there anything better than that sense of accomplishment you get when you meet — and exceed — those goals?

 

3)  Have a dedicated school room.

When you homeschool, it can be difficult to transition from “school” time to “home” time. And as tempting as it can be to want to sit on the living room couch and “do school,” it can bring some unwanted and unnecessary distractions. If you’re able to, we suggest having a dedicated “school” room to use when it’s time for lessons each day. Set it up like a classroom. Have a desk for each student and yourself. Hang up a whiteboard in the front of the room and use it to teach from. Create a reading nook in one corner with books, comfy chairs or pillows, and blankets. Hang posters of multiplication tables, the periodic table, anatomy — whatever topics your learner will cover that year.

In your school room, you should keep all the supplies your child will need. Assign each learner a cubby or bin, in which they can keep pens, pencils, paper, tablets (if you use one for school), workbooks, lessons, and assignments. This way, everyone knows where they need to go to find their work. Keep that list of goals in there too, as a reminder of what they’re working toward.

If you can’t have a whole separate room dedicated to school, designate an area of a room as the “school area,” or put a desk in your child’s room for school work. Those bins will really come in handy in this case, ensuring school-related items don’t end up all over your house!

 

4)  Organizational procedures are your friend.

So, your student completed their lesson, and now where does it go? Back in his bin or cubby where you’ll never see it? On your desk for review and grading? Set up procedures so that at the end of a unit lesson or term, you aren’t scrambling to grade assignments that got lost in the shuffle and never made their way to you. You could have a folder for each student, where they put completed assignments, that then goes into a tray on your desk for review. Is the work that they’re doing on a computer? Make sure they know whether or not you should see it before they submit or complete it! Those bins and cubbies we discussed above? Have each student return items to their assigned cubby at the end of each day so things are ready to go the next day. Even little things, like knowing when to let you know if they are running low on supplies from their cubby or bin, can be helpful for making your day run more smoothly. Set calendar reminders for things like assessment testing (if your state requires it), grade-reporting deadlines, and anything that has a set date, for a few weeks before the deadline so you have everything you need when the time comes, and it doesn’t sneak up on you.

 

Sometimes, homeschooling can seem a little overwhelming, with lots of different moving parts. But with a little organization, your homeschool day and year can be easy. What are your favorite organizational and planning tools, tricks, and tips?

The post How to Organize Your Homeschool appeared first on Bridgeway.

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Irina Casasnovas has been driven to succeed since a young age. On the waiting list for the violin program at her school, the then 7-year-old Irina knew the instrument would be her passion and practically begged her mom and her school to take her off the waiting list and put her into the program so she could begin honing her craft.

By the age of 12, violin was an important part of Irina’s life, and was becoming more demanding between practicing, competitions, and traveling for competitions. It became more and more difficult to balance training and performances with a regular school schedule and a tween’s social life. Quickly, Irina realized that it was impossible to do it all and she would have to change something. In Costa Rica, where Irina grew up, homeschooling is practically non-existent. But she knew some people in the United States, including a ballerina with a demanding practice schedule like hers, who homeschooled and thought it could be the answer she needed. So, Irina approached her parents about switching to homeschool.

Her parents got on board with the idea of homeschooling right away, which Irina admits surprised her. “Because people don’t homeschool in Costa Rica, I didn’t think they’d be supportive of it.” But as her mom, Alla, explained, “We didn’t have a reason why she couldn’t. We just knew we’d have to do some research to figure it out.”

When they started their research, there were a few specifics Alla was looking for in a program. She knew she wanted Irina to have a U.S.-based program — one that would send materials to Costa Rica and offer support throughout the process, because the idea of homeschooling was a little overwhelming. Their research led them to Bridgeway Academy, which “immediately caught our eye,” Alla says. “We liked that it was based in Pennsylvania, which has stricter regulations for homeschooling. We like the Christian aspect of it. Knowing they’d send us everything, give me teaching guides and support us was great. Bridgeway made it look so easy.”

Irina and her sister, who decided she wanted to homeschool too, started with the half-year program to test the waters. Almost immediately, the family knew they’d continue into the full-year programs with Bridgeway. As Irina and her mom explain, “There was no downside to homeschooling. It’s united our family because the girls aren’t spending two hours a day commuting to school and then spending all day in school. We have more time together. The flexibility allows us to make our own schedule. Irina can practice violin when she wants, get her schoolwork done and still have time for normal ‘teen‘ life. When we first started homeschooling, she was practicing 3 hours a day. As she got older, Irina was practicing 6 hours a day and homeschooling gave her more time for extra violin lessons, rehearsals, and travel, and to be more involved in what she loves. It’s worked so much better for us than a traditional school and has been so easy.”

That ease was important too when the family relocated to Chicago so Irina could advance her violin training. “We didn’t have to change anything. We could continue schooling the way we have for the last few years.”

Irina’s dedication to her craft has certainly paid off. She was recently named a YoungArts Foundation award winner for the second year in a row. And in the fall, she’ll move to London to study at the Royal Academy of Music, one of the top 5 music conservatories in the world, which counts Sir Elton John among its alumni.

We wish Irina the best of luck as she progresses in her education and violin practice, and we are happy that Bridgeway Academy could be a part of her story. We look forward to following all of her accomplishments in the years to come.

The post Bridgeway Academy senior and Two-time YoungArts Foundation Award winner off to Royal Academy of Music appeared first on Bridgeway.

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From the time my son was in preschool and we started down the homeschooling route, we had always expected to teach him at home all the way through high school. That is still our plan; and since Jackson is a junior this year, we’re approaching the achievement of that goal!

However, something unexpected happened along the way in our homeschool journey. The older my son grew, the more I began to notice that we were suddenly bumping up against subjects I felt absolutely unqualified to teach. Now, when your child is in elementary or middle school, it’s much easier to learn new material before or as you are teaching. But the closer your child gets to college, and the more advanced the subjects become, the more difficult that task can be. And while I am generally a “can-do” sort of person, I began to feel enormous trepidation at the thought of teaching some of the high school courses that Jackson was going to need for college entrance. What they would require from me suddenly seemed to be more than I could provide.

I am, by both inclination and ability, a words gal. So, it is both a delight and very natural for me to teach my son literature, grammar, history and writing. And even some foreign languages. But upper-level sciences and math? My own high school science education ended at biology; my math, with algebra 2. I never took chemistry, physics, calculus, or trigonometry, at the high school or college levels. And while I have a passing acquaintance with them from life experience and from Jackson’s early education years, that’s all I really have. I feel as though they are written in an esoteric language that I don’t even know the alphabet for. And yet, they are completely necessary for my son. What can a homeschool mom do when faced with this challenge?

For us, the solution was two-fold. My wonderful husband, who has always been completely on board with our homeschooling, actually majored in math and computer science. He has taken over the math instruction for Jackson. That has lessened my anxiety over not teaching this upper-level subject well and in ways that my son could really apprehend. In addition, when he has to explain a subject or math task, he actually understands it already instead of needing to teach it to himself first! The outcome of this is that Jackson is progressing, with his dad, way beyond what I could have brought had I continued with his math instruction.

The second part of our solution was Bridgeway Academy, and they have provided excellent upper-level science instruction for my son. Jackson took Bridgeway Academy’s Biology and Lab last year as a tenth-grader, and had an incredible experience that included everything: experiments, online class work, semester projects, testing, and textbook work. This year, he has been enrolled in Bridgeway’s high school Chemistry and Lab class. Chemistry meets online each week for an hour and a half. The instructor teaches them about the elements, the experiments they’ll do on their own, goes over math equations they’ll need, and engages with them in this work. During the rest of each week, students complete assignments, reading, and experiments and other lab work.

I am so grateful for this! Bridgeway Academy’s science instructors are certified teachers. They are educated in science themselves, which means that they speak and understand this language that is so foreign to me but that my son definitely needs for higher education and for life. And the classes provided not only a way for him to study these courses, but to excel in them. For me, it removed so much difficulty, and even anxiety at having to learn these courses and attempt to teach them well.

I would recommend Bridgeway Academy for many reasons. But perhaps most important, having the opportunity for Jackson to take his upper-level science courses with Bridgeway’s certified teachers met a significant need that we had — one that would have been very difficult for me to accomplish with Jackson myself. In closing, I’d tell homeschooling families to consider online learning with Bridgeway Academy! Your children will be able to learn well from experts in each subject and field, and you’ll be able to rest in knowing that they are being well-educated.

The post What Happens When a Homeschool Mom Hasn’t Mastered What She Needs to Teach appeared first on Bridgeway.

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Homeschooling Help by Naphtalee Stutzman - 1w ago

The temperature is warming up, the sun is shining, flowers are blooming — spring is finally here! And that most likely means you’re about to see your child get a case of spring fever. When the weather gets nice, it’s difficult to keep students’ minds focused on learning and school work. Yet, the work must get done because there are still days left in the school year. Happily, we’ve found some ways to help combat that spring fever and push your student over the finish line to end the year on a strong note.

Incorporate the season into your lessons
  • Use the nice weather as a reason to take a field trip, go on a hike and incorporate a science lesson into it (like how rivers carve rocks), plant a garden and discuss cell biology, or do an outdoor science experiment.
  • Take a page from the Chicago Tribune which suggests using a walk around your town as a way to teach history (who founded the town, what was its main industry when founded, what major events shaped the town) and city planning (why was the town built here, what advantages and disadvantages are there to the city being designed the way it is, what problems could have arisen in building the area, etc.).
  • When spring cleaning, don’t forget to spring clean your homeschool space! Create a clutter-free learning space to help minimize stress. Use it to teach the importance of being organized.
Incentivize and reward
  • Kids tend to respond to rewards, so set some goals and then reward them when they accomplish the goal. Complete all assignments for the week = have an ice cream party on Friday! Score a 100 on a test and pick the movie and snacks for movie night. When kids have a tangible goal to works towards, they tend to be a little more motivated to reach those goals.
Making learning relatable
  • During lessons, demonstrate why and how the material is relevant to your student’s life. Why do they need to know this? How will they use it in their everyday life? By making the content relatable, you’re giving them a reason to remember it.
  • Use multimedia to break up lessons. Take a break from pencil-and-paper activities and add a little variety to lessons by incorporating multimedia. Engaging videos, demonstrations, and even songs, can be used to reinforce topics.
  • Let your learner pick a topic they’re interested in or passionate about and have them complete a project based upon that topic. By letting them pick, you can ensure it’s something they want to learn about. And since they’re already interested in it, they’ll be more likely to fully dive into the project and complete it.
  • Find a fun fact-of-the-day and center lessons around it. For example, on April 24, 1916, the Easter Rebellion began in Dublin, Ireland, that ultimately led to the establishment of the Republic of Ireland. Focus your social studies lesson on events that led to the rebellion, have a civics lesson on how to establish government in a new country, introduce math and economics by talking about how you would fund a new country.

Spring fever can be hard to beat, but we are sure you can manage it and get to the end of the school year successfully! What other tips do you have for combating spring fever?

The post How to Combat Spring Fever appeared first on Bridgeway.

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Bridgeway Academy senior recognized by US Figure Skating Association for performance on the ice and in the classroom

Bridgeway Academy congratulates senior Morgan Bottesch on being an award recipient in the US Figure Skating’s Graduating Seniors Program! This program recognizes students who excel both on the ice and in the classroom.

It’s probably hard for Morgan to remember a time when she wasn’t out on the ice. Living across the street from the ice rink, Morgan’s mom enrolled her daughter in skating lessons to keep then-4-year-old Morgan busy while Mom was starting a company. Those lessons ignited a passion in Morgan, and by the time she was 7, she wanted to compete seriously.

When Morgan was 10, her family faced a tough decision. Morgan’s coaches were moving to a different city in Florida that was two-and-a-half hours away. Morgan didn’t want to stop working with her coaches, but her family couldn’t move. After a lot of thought, her parents made the difficult choice to let Morgan move with her coaches, stay with a host family, and continue to pursue her Olympic dreams. As Morgan’s mom tells us, “We said, ‘Let’s try it for a year and see how it goes.’ We set rules, like we’ll never go more than 6–8 weeks without seeing her. We’d drive back and forth throughout Florida in a weekend just so she could have ‘home time.’” Trying it out for a year ended up turning into the next 7 years, as Morgan progressed into an Olympic-level coaching team at the age of 13. Her training saw her move around Florida, then to Colorado, back to Florida, and then to Michigan.

Between constant moving and her training schedule (spending upwards of 6 hours a day at the rink), Morgan and her family knew she needed an alternative to “regular school,” so they turned to homeschooling to give her flexibility in her schedule and the ability to complete schoolwork where and when she could (often in the car on the way to competitions or in the dressing room of skating rinks). Morgan’s mom looked for programs that would prepare Morgan for college, that she would be comfortable with, that had a worldview mixing fact and science with religion, and where she would be accepted and respected for her beliefs. They found that with Bridgeway Academy. “Everyone is so respectful and welcoming at Bridgeway. Morgan really feels embraced and comfortable here,” says Morgan’s mom.

Morgan’s homeschooling situation might look a little strange to some people, since she and her mom live in two different states. Rather than having her mom there to guide lessons, Morgan does it all on her own. She gets the textbooks and tools to teach herself. Her mom receives the Bridgeway-provided Instructor Manuals so she can review and understand lessons and offer support from afar. Morgan completes the lessons, mails them to Mom, who reviews them and submits them to Morgan’s Bridgeway advisor. “Our circumstances are unique, but Bridgeway understands that. From the beginning, they have worked with Morgan’s schedule, and have supported and guided us. They understand the demands that elite athletes face, and her training is never an issue.”

In addition to liking that Bridgeway accommodates training schedules, Morgan loves that she has an advisor to whom she can turn when needed. “The world of skating is a tough one and can be isolating at times. But Morgan has never felt alone because she knows that no matter what she’s going through, she can turn to her advisor for support. And that’s incredible, to know that they care about your child that much.”

Because of that support and the flexibility of the programs, Morgan has been able to achieve excellence on the ice and keep her Olympic hopes alive. She qualified for the 2018 Solo Ice Dance Nationals and placed 6th in the nation at the competition. At the same time, she’s been able to keep up with her school studies and achieve top grades. We congratulate Morgan on her award from US Figure Skating and look forward to recognizing her achievements when she joins us at Bridgeway Academy’s graduation ceremony in June.

The post Bridgeway Senior to be Recognized by US Figure Skating appeared first on Bridgeway.

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It’s summertime, and you’ve decided to take the plunge! I don’t mean in the neighborhood pool (although that is probably on your schedule!) — I mean you have decided that summer school is a good choice for your child. Just like there are many things to consider when planning a vacation or other time off, there are multiple options to consider when choosing a summer school program.

Keeping in mind that summer schooling has many benefits, like getting a jump on the fall semester and minimizing “summer brain drain,” you’ll want a plan that suits your learner’s style and pace.

One option is to take traditional classes in a brick-and-mortar local school. Some things to consider with that option:

  1. Many students learning together means one pace and schedule are set for the entire class.
  2. Transportation may not be convenient.
  3. There may be a limited number of subjects to choose from.
  4. This would free up time for you while your child is out of the house, and you would not have to prepare a lesson.

Brick-and-mortar options tend to leave little room for flexibility, something that can be important during the busy summer months. Bridgeway Academy’s options not only give your schedule flexibility though self-paced learning, but can also be tailored to your child’s personality and learning styles, and give you hundreds of courses to choose from.

We offer three styles of classes for summer school:

Traditional textbook courses

  • Our top-rated textbook titles and Bridgeway-authored teaching manuals give your student the best materials and learning experience in a home learning setting.  You also get the support you need to help teach the course.

Online classes

  • Our online courses include access to pre-recorded instruction videos, opportunities for student engagement, and a variety of online assessments to measure understanding. There is even a digital calendar to assist your student with staying on track.

Blended learning

  • Blended courses bring together the best of textbook and online learning. Students receive instruction online while completing pencil-and-paper activities to reinforce ideas.

Ready to dive into summer school? Explore our course offerings to find the right one for your student. Save 15% on your courses when you enroll before July 1st, 2019. Questions? Contact us at 1-800-863-1474 to speak with an admissions representative.

The post Which Type of Summer School is Right for You? appeared first on Bridgeway.

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Fourteen years old and a high school graduate? One Bridgeway Academy student shows how self-paced learning helped her excel at a record pace.

Imagine knowing your child is gifted and needs to be challenged in school. Imagine knowing she’s advanced beyond her current grade level. Imagine the shock upon hearing, “We’re sorry, but your child has to stay in their grade and age level. We can’t move them into a higher grade.” That shock is what caused Beth Morehead to start researching personalized homeschool programs for her daughter.

At the time, Beth was already a longtime homeschool parent. As a parent in a frequently-moving military family, Beth started homeschooling to keep consistency in her children’s education. As a result, her youngest child, Amelia, was in a classroom from the time she was a week old. “I was homeschooling her older brother and sister, so wherever we went and whatever we did, Amelia went and did,” explains Beth. So, it wasn’t necessarily a surprise when Amelia progressed quickly through lessons and Beth realized early-on that her daughter was gifted.

After Amelia completed both kindergarten and first grade within a year, Beth knew she needed to move her daughter into a higher grade. The program she had been using, though, wouldn’t let her. Not wanting to hinder her daughter’s love of learning and hold her back, Beth began researching and found Bridgeway Academy.

 When starting with Bridgeway, Amelia should have been in the 2nd grade, but testing put her into the 4th and 5th grades. Bridgeway “helped us fit the needs we had at the time and let us progress at our own pace, advancing as needed,” says Beth. That pace allowed Amelia to move through the curriculum at a rapid rate. By the time she was 14, Amelia was graduating high school.

A dual-enrollment student, Amelia already had 15 hours of college credit on her record when she graduated, and went on to study at Copiah-Lincoln Community College. This past December, at age 16, Amelia received her associate degree and became one of the youngest CLCC graduates in history. She’s taking a little break this semester, but when fall starts, Amelia will begin classes at Mississippi College, where she’ll enter as a junior, majoring in Child Psychology and minoring in English Lit. She’ll turn 17 shortly after the semester starts and is on the path to becoming one of Mississippi College’s youngest graduates, due to graduate when she’s 18. The state of Mississippi recently passed a House Resolution recognizing Amelia for her academic achievements.

Speaking about Bridgeway, Beth Morehead said, “Bridgeway put Amelia on a path to be above her time.” Bridgeway is honored to be a part of Amelia’s story, congratulates her on all she’s accomplished, and looks forward to seeing where her path takes her next.

 

The post Bridgeway Graduate Amelia Morehead set to Graduate College at 18 appeared first on Bridgeway.

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Homeschooling Help by Naphtalee Stutzman - 1M ago

According to George Gershwin and DuBose Heyward, it’s “Summertime, an’ the livin’ is easy.” So why would you want to spend summertime in school?

To some students, the thought of taking classes in the summer doesn’t seem fair. We might pity the kids who sweat out their summer school lessons while we sweat in the playgrounds, parks, and picnics!

In reality,  summer school has many benefits for homeschoolers, and can  keep students from having to catch up in the future. Brains need not go on vacation when the family does. Brain drain — when the student forgets what was learned during the year — is an all-too-real possibility during the summer months, and you can avoid it!

Besides plugging up summer brain drain, other benefits of summer school include:

  • Forward progress Your pace may slow down, but that pace can allow students to continue learning without the pressure of a tight schedule.
  • Field trips Summer weather and more free time allow families to catch up on field trips they may have missed, as well as take advantage of summer deals.
  • Flexibility A relaxed summer schedule can allow buffer days for when unexpected events shake up your schedule.
  • Future planning Keeping the kids’ minds on school helps you and them discover interests and incorporate them into the “regular” school year.
  • Focus Preparing and facilitating just one or two classes allows you to focus on a new area or reinforce a subject for a struggling learner.
  • Flow Many students prefer routine and a predictable schedule, and a sudden reentry into a school year after a long break can be jarring.
  • Further study A less-intense time of summer school can challenge a student by allowing him or her to dig more deeply into a favorite subject.
  • Fun! There are a lot of summer activities that combine learning with fun! Day camps can provide opportunities for science studies, like, “Why do mosquitoes seem to like me more than others?” and “What exactly does allow a boat full of campers and snacks to float?” The budding journalist can keep a record of summer action. History comes alive at reenactments and museums.

As you can see, there are many opportunities for summer learning that don’t have to steal the season’s spirit from the homeschooled student. Summer schooling can prepare you and your student for homeschool success in the fall!

What ideas and stories can you share about summer homeschooling?

The post Why Choose Summer School? appeared first on Bridgeway.

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Homeschooling Help by Naphtalee Stutzman - 1M ago

Easter is right around the corner, and no matter how you prefer to celebrate, the holiday lends itself well to activities to engage your learner. We’ve scoured our favorite blogs and websites to bring you 10 activities for Easter fun!

  1. Easter-themed vocabulary lists are a great way to practice spelling and handwriting. 
  2. Word searches and crossword puzzles fire up the brain. 
  3. Make Easter Bunny Munch Mix for a festive snack. Turn the recipe into a math lesson (ask your learner questions, like “How many pounds is 24 ounces?”) or a science lesson (“How does hot air cause corn kernels to pop?”). 
  4. Test the strength of egg shells with this bridge-building experiment
  5. Similarly, test the strength of eggs by seeing what happens when you walk on them. For older kids, make it a lesson on pressure and force. 
  6. Get chemistry involved by growing your own Easter crystals:
    1. Good for younger kids
    2. Better suited for older learners
  7. Explore Newton’s 3 laws of motion with an Easter catapult
  8. Look into Easter traditions from your family’s heritage. Then, try out one of the traditions! I may introduce my family to the Irish Cake Dance this year.
  9. Burn off some energy with Easter Egg Tag, an activity perfect for the whole family! 
  10. Make math interactive with this egg toss game

Are there any Easter activities that you and your family enjoy?

The post 10 Activities for Easter Fun appeared first on Bridgeway.

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Fourteen years old and a high school graduate? One Bridgeway Academy student shows how self-paced learning helped her excel at a record pace.

Imagine knowing your child is gifted and needs to be challenged in school. Imagine knowing she’s advanced beyond her current grade level. Imagine the shock upon hearing, “We’re sorry, but your child has to stay in their grade and age level. We can’t move them into a higher grade.” That shock is what caused Beth Morehead to start researching personalized homeschool programs for her daughter.

At the time, Beth was already a longtime homeschool parent. As a parent in a frequently-moving military family, Beth started homeschooling to keep consistency in her children’s education. As a result, her youngest child, Amelia, was in a classroom from the time she was a week old. “I was homeschooling her older brother and sister, so wherever we went and whatever we did, Amelia went and did,” explains Beth. So, it wasn’t necessarily a surprise when Amelia progressed quickly through lessons and Beth realized early-on that her daughter was gifted.

After Amelia completed both kindergarten and first grade within a year, Beth knew she needed to move her daughter into a higher grade. The program she had been using, though, wouldn’t let her. Not wanting to hinder her daughter’s love of learning and hold her back, Beth began researching and found Bridgeway Academy.

 When starting with Bridgeway, Amelia should have been in the 2nd grade, but testing put her into the 4th and 5th grades. Bridgeway “helped us fit the needs we had at the time and let us progress at our own pace, advancing as needed,” says Beth. That pace allowed Amelia to move through the curriculum at a rapid rate. By the time she was 14, Amelia was graduating high school.

A dual-enrollment student, Amelia already had 15 hours of college credit on her record when she graduated, and went on to study at Copiah-Lincoln Community College. This past December, at age 16, Amelia received her associate degree and became one of the youngest CLCC graduates in history. She’s taking a little break this semester, but when fall starts, Amelia will begin classes at Mississippi College, where she’ll enter as a junior, majoring in Child Psychology and minoring in English Lit. She’ll turn 17 shortly after the semester starts and is on the path to becoming one of Mississippi College’s youngest graduates, due to graduate when she’s 18. The state of Mississippi recently passed a House Resolution recognizing Amelia for her academic achievements.

Speaking about Bridgeway, Beth Morehead said, “Bridgeway put Amelia on a path to be above her time.” Bridgeway is honored to be a part of Amelia’s story, congratulates her on all she’s accomplished, and looks forward to seeing where her path takes her next.

 

The post Bridgeway Graduate Amelia Morehead set to Gradate College at 18 appeared first on Bridgeway.

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