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Since I was a kid, I was the go to guy in our family for figuring out what was wrong with a particular plant or, for that matter, a whole field of plants.

I’ve seen flea beetles and cutworms destroy huge fields of cabbage and lettuce in just a couple of days, and I’ve also seen equally huge fields of vegetables that weren’t killed by pests but rather by application of the wrong pest control product.

Thankfully, in home gardens, the scale of the pest problems is many orders of magnitude smaller than commercial horticulture businesses. But whether it’s massive fields or small gardens, pests are still pests and must be controlled.

During my time studying pests both in the field and at university, and then, subsequently, becoming a certified pesticide applicator provided me with a more thorough understanding of pests and their interaction with plants.

So to pass on some of the things that I’ve learned during my tenure as the ‘bug guy’ at our greenhouses, here are a few of my tips for helping you to keep the pests under control in your yard:

Start with clean plants and try to keep them clean
Plants that are already infested with plant pests are tough to get back on track. It’s never a good bargain to buy a $10 plant and spend $40 for pest control products

Correctly identify the pest
Insect pests like Scarlet lily beetles are devastating on a wide range of lily species, but many gardeners misidentify the insect as a lady beetle. Often by the time the insect has been correctly identified the lily beetle has levelled the lily patch.

Choose the correct pest control product
BTK is an excellent biological control (bacteria) for caterpillar pests (i.e. cabbage worms and forest tent caterpillars) but has no affect on sawfly larvae even though they look very similar to caterpillars. Similarly, while insecticidal soaps are a good choice for soft-bodied aphids, they work rather poorly on hard-shelled beetles. Matching the pest control product to the pest is critical for success.
 
Always be proactive with pest control
Don’t wait until you have a major infestation before treatment. Start treatments early in the crop’s life cycle before the pest populations explode. Killing 99% of a 1,000,000 aphids still leaves 10,000 aphids that will return the population to pre-treatment numbers in very short order.

Don’t forget about ‘exclusion’ for controlling pests!
Lightweight, spun fabrics (i.e. ‘Crop Cover’)  provide an excellent physical barrier to insects like moths, flea beetles and aphids thus preventing them from attacking many of your vegetable and fruit crops. The cover still allows excellent penetration of sunlight.

Talk to pest control experts before applying pest control products
Grabbing a bottle of pesticide and applying it to your plants without understanding what the pesticide is, what it controls, and what plants it can be applied to, is a recipe for disaster. 
 

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Plant Support, Stakes and Ties Trellises

Decorative Flat Trellis

Garden Trellises are made to support climbing vine type plants, from ornamental thunbergia (black-eyed susan) to edibles such as cucumbers or peas. There are vast array of styles and sizes of trellises to suit any garden. 

A flat, decorative trellis is ideal for your showy annual flowering vines either along a fence or wall. There are also obelisks or “trellis towers” that are 3- or 4-sided or circular and come to a point at the top. These are better suited to be a free-standing feature in your garden as the widening base provides stability in wind storms. 

Support you edible vines in your vegetable garden with more plain, more functional trellises. Peas grown on a flat trellis benefit from the extra space and airflow are easy to harvest from both sides. If you’re container gardening, fan-shaped trellises are a great choice. The narrower base fits easily into planters while the wider top gives more room for your cucumbers (and other veggies) to spread.  
 
No matter the style of trellis, young plants in the first half of the season may need help “finding” and latching onto a trellis. Find the growing tip and gently guide the anchoring vines to the trellis. If plant is too small to reach, wait a couple of days for it to grow and try again. In most cases, once a vine has latched onto the lower part of a trellis, it will continue to grow up it with little help. However, if one decides to go a little sideways, you can always guide it back the same way.


Arches

Like Trellises, arches are best used to support vining plants and are an ideal way to make a living entrance to your garden oasis. Choose your favourite annual climbing vine to plant or as a low maintenance option, plant a perennial vine such as clematis for an arch that’ll grow fuller each year!


Stakes

Pole-style stakes are great for providing support to plants with a main “trunk” or stem with foliage that branches off. Classic examples are indeterminate tomatoes and pepper plants. The stake acts as a reinforcement and guide for the main stem as the plant grows. Stakes can be made of wood, natural bamboo, coated metal or plastic and are available in different heights for your plant’s needs. 

The key with stakes is to insert the stake near the plant but not touching, and to secure the plant to the stake loosely, allowing room for the plant to grow. Keep adding loose ties as the plant gains height, always checking that none of the lower ties have started to choke the plant.


Cages and Towers

Folded 4-Panel Plant Tower

For plants that get tall and top heavy while still bushing out, or for plants with multiple stems, a plant cage or tower is best. As an example, determinate tomatoes don’t grow to the same heights as their indeterminate brothers, but instead their branches split creating a “bush” effect that needs to be supported on all sides.

Cages and towers can be used your in vegetable garden rows, raised beds or containers. They should be place around the plant early in the season—when still small—and plants are allowed to grow into the cage. This way the cage gives supports all around the plant as the branches grow where they need to.

Most cages have 2 or 3 tiers of outside rings and are usually made of weather-resistant galvanized or coated metal. As a side note, folding 4-panel towers can be opened flat and instead of being used like a cage, can be used like a flat trellis against a wall to grow peas and other climbing vines.


Peony Rings

Peony Ring with Grid

Similar to cages and towers, peony rings are meant to support multi-stemmed plants such as, you guessed it, peonies. Peony rings are designed a little differently—usually with only 1 ring, sometimes 2—and are generally coloured to be attractive or blend into the plant. There are also Peony rings with a wire grid attached to its ring that provides support to interior stems so that the entire plant stands up right.

Like cages, peony rings should be placed around plants when they are young and allowed to be grown into. For rings with the aforementioned grid, you can guide the stems to different quadrants as they just get to the ring to separate and balance the plant as it grows.

Peony rings of course don’t have to be used just for peonies, they’re great supports for a variety of plants including top heavy poppies.


Path Fencing

Low-to-the-ground path fencing lies in-between garden decor and plant support. While designed to look great along your path, these fences can keep your path clean and plants healthy. They are great bracers for any taller or trailing plants right at the edge of your beds that might otherwise fall over onto your path and be trampled. 


Plants Ties

When you need to secure your plants to your supports, there are a variety of ties to choose from. Traditional garden twine and nylon strips are economical solutions if you have a lot of tying to do, but these also need to be cut off at the end of each season. Soft coat or foam wire and Velcro plants ties are easy and fast to use—no knots—and are reusable season-after-season. In general, most plant ties come in spools or rolls where you can cut lengths to suit your needs. 
 

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Your Questions Answered

Over the weekend I had the pleasure to receive some questions about health and fitness from you. 

I have answered them in video form. Enjoy!

Question 1: I'm trying to lose weight, do I need to eat 6 times a day?
Answer: CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT

Question 2: What core exercises burn the most belly fat?
Answer: CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT

Question 3: I'm a woman over 50, is lifting weights dangerous for me?
Answer: CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT

If you have any more questions, I would be happy to answer them. There are no silly questions and you don't have to give me your name if you wish to be anonymous.

Send your questions to rob@rmfit.com  

Thanks

- Robin Mungall NSCA CPT

Results One Habit At A Time
Robin Mungall Fitness
www.rmfit.com 
780-554-9569

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I think most people are aware of the role of nitrogen for crop growth. It is the nutrient that plants need in great quantity and is responsible for lush, leafy growth.
 
But, I suspect, that most people who fertilize their lawns with nitrogen don’t realize that half of the nitrogen fertilizer that they apply can be lost to the air!
 
While this may seem a little hard to believe, it has a lot to do with the type of nitrogen fertilizer that you buy and it boils down to a bit of soil chemistry. Yes, I know, you don’t subscribe to this newsletter to read about chemistry but if you read on you might save yourself a few dollars and have a better looking lawn to boot!
 
For lawns, nitrogen often comes in the form of compound called "Urea". Urea readily breaks down in soil and releases nitrogen that your grass can use. However, when it is applied to the lawn surface it is broken down by soil microbes who "break apart" the urea which is then released as a nitrogen containing gas called "ammonia". Up to 50% of the surface applied urea can float away into the atmosphere.
 
Part of the solution to the prevention of the loss of this ammonia is to incorporate an "enzyme inhibitor" with the urea which dramatically reduces the amount of your nitrogen floating away into space.
 
At Hole's Greenhouses, we have a lawn fertilizer with the highest concentration of nitrogen available anywhere, and it comes with an enzyme inhibitor to keep your nitrogen in the ground where it should be. It’s called Nitro Boost 46-0-0.

When Should I Fertilize?

Stay off your lawn in the spring until it is dry.

Mowing: Mow your lawn between 2.5” and 3”. Mow your lawn often, never cutting too much at a time as this causes shallow roots. Thick deep roots will make your lawn greener longer. And NEVER cut your grass stems in half.

Thatch: Thatch is the dead grass on top of the soil. Stick your finger into the soil to measure. A healthy amount of thatch is around ½”. Too much thatch prevents fertilizer from doing its job and you will need to dethatch. If you have too little thatch, stop bagging your clippings for a while to build up a thatch base of ½”.

Watering: Never water over ¾”, especially when you fertilize. Do not water in the evenings as this promotes fungus.

Fertilize: Fertilize on moist soil, not before a heavy rain. Fertilize after a rain or during a light drizzle for best results. Fertilize sometime after May long weekend if you are only doing one application a year.

SPRING: Once lawn is dry, rake, aerate and apply fertilizer.

SUMMER: Apply fertilizer every 30 days until mid-August.

FALL: Final application of fertilizer after first frost.

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I hope you had a NEAT weekend! I know I did and I’m happy I did. Now you may have noticed that I used the word NEAT in all caps. No, no it’s not because I think it’s the greatest word to say in the English language, that word is boing (seriously you can’t say it without thinking about something fun) but I digress.

In fact NEAT is an acronym for possibly the most underrated element in your fitness and healthy lifestyle repertoire. It is also one of the most important ones.

NEAT stands for Non Exercise Activity Thermogenesis

Basically NEAT is the energy you burn through activities in the day that aren’t associated with formal exercise sessions. Yes going for walks, moving furniture, mowing the lawn, chasing after a 19month old son… running as fast as you can to the change table after his diaper gets… well you know; are all good forms of NEAT. Now before you roll your eyes and brush off yet another “active living” article, think about the impact of NEAT on your lifestyle and your waistline.

NEAT can account for a large amount of calories burned day in and day out, year in and year out with painless effort.

We know that these days high intensity interval training is all the rage, and for good reason, it burns lots of calories in a relative short amount of time. The problem is that you have to work your fitness level up to a point where high intensity interval training is effective enough to produce a desired effect. The other downside is that it can exhaust you so much that you actually move less through the day basically nullifying the calorie burning effects of the workout. While NEAT when applied can painlessly increase the amount of energy your burn, and of course if you can do both you have a super burn tandem.

One other thing that NEAT does better than any other form of exercise is that it seems to have very little effect on hunger compared to high intensity interval training which is important if you are eating less calories in order to lose fat.

For the next two weeks be aware of just how NEAT you are and look for ways to improve so you can burn more calories and gain more stamina day in and day out and have your health and your waist line thank you for it.

Here is an example of a High NEAT day.

Wake up in the am. Have breakfast; take the dog for a short walk (10minutes)

Take 4-minute stretch break at work every hour (set a reminder on your phone, do it with a work mate)

Every “smoke” break your co-workers have, give yourself a “health” break and move

I know working through lunch seems like a good idea, (maybe today will finally be the day that working through lunch = getting caught up…. HAHAHAHAHAHA) Instead make lunch time, mobility time or walk and laugh time with co-workers

Take the stairs, not the elevator

Learn to dance, go out on a mini “city adventure or hike” Learn to garden, every commercial break or break between binging on Netflix, get up and MOVE.

And on the weekend, you have plenty that you can do to move more especially during these summer months.

If you are a numbers person get yourself a fitibit® pedometer and aim for 8,000+ steps a day.

There are so many ways to be NEAT. It’s easy to do and when done consistently in a way that’s mostly fun for you, the more effective it will be.

P.S.

Next week I'm busting some myths about fitness and health. I have room to fit in two more questions, if you would like me to "clear the air" on a particular subject, send me an email rob@rmfit.com.

Thanks

- Robin Mungall NSCA CPT

Results One Habit At A Time
Robin Mungall Fitness
www.rmfit.com 
780-554-9569

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The May long weekend is coming! This is the traditional weekend for getting everything in the garden. 

I think that many gardeners still tend to lump all vegetables into one category when it comes to temperatures. The prevailing sentiment is that cold and frost is devastating for all varieties of vegetables. But nothing could be further from the truth. 

Vegetables are truly individuals and they run the spectrum when it comes to ideal and injurious temperatures. To illustrate this point, I’ve included my vegetable/temperature chart.

The temperatures in the chart list the baseline temperatures that plants require to grow. For example, eggplant essentially stops growing at 15.6 celsius while at the other end of the spectrum, onions will grow at temperatures above a chilly 1.7 celsius! Onions can also tolerate several degrees of frost without sustaining damage. 

The ‘heat unit’ component of the chart is particularly important for commercial growers especially in our region. For example, different varieties of sweet corn will require varying amounts of heat to develop mature cobs. Growers look at the average high temperatures and average low temperatures, for their region, then calculate the average heat units. If the calculation shows that they are growing in a ‘2200 corn heat units’ zone, then they would be pretty safe growing 2200 heat unit corn varieties. 2800 heat unit corn varieties would be very risky and likely not mature before the first fall frost.

So if you follow the chart data, you can pretty much plant all of your vegetables, but you may want to hold-off on the eggplant and okra for a few more days. 

– Jim Hole
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Stay Hydrated, Lose Inches (5 Tips)

Finally it seems that summer is upon us. The time for sipping on a cold drink on a patio, BBQ’s with friends and family and more outdoor activity is going to be a big part of life for the next 4 and maybe even 5 months. 

This time of year also calls for more awareness around staying hydrated while out and about. I always tell my clients, “master hydration and you get a winning situation for your health and your waistline. 

Here is the laundry list of benefits from getting enough fluids in:

  • Regulates Body Temperature
  • Lubricates Joints
  • Moistens Mouth Nose & Eyes
  • Protects Organs & Tissues
  • Helps With Bowel Movements
  • Key Component To Kidney & Liver Function
  • Carries Nutrients & Oxygen to blood cells
  • Helps to dissolve vitamins and minerals so the body can absorb them
  • Help manage appetite

Naturally you can see there are plenty of great health benefits to getting in the right amount of fluids. But how does that help your waistline?

For starters, drinking more zero calorie fluids helps you to feel more full between meals making you less likely to snack. Also sipping on fluids during a meal makes you more likely to eat less. 

It’s pretty simple, but I also give my clients a guideline to strive for and defined a protocol for mastering hydration. Here it is:

  • Drink enough water each day so your urine is pale yellow to nearly clear most days. (Usually 8-14cups for most people, but it varies from person to person and day to day based on activity level, how much fruits and vegetables you eat, having soup and cereal etc.  So work on finding your optimal level, mine is 14-16 cups a day.
  • Consume 4 or less total cups of calorie containing drinks in the week.

Note: If you normally have 1-2 cups of coffee or tea with 1 sugar and 1 cream or less, you can count that as a non-calorie drink.

And finally, if you need some strategies to get more fluids in the day here are 5 battle tested tips:

HOW TO INCREASE WATER INTAKE

1. Have 1-2 cups with each meal

With each meal take sips in between bites. This also helps with slowing down your meal. Or simply start or end your meal with a big glass

2. Set an alarm

Set your alarm to go off at certain intervals in the day as a reminder to drink 1⁄2cup to 2 cups of water. Popular times in the past are: 9:30am, 1:45pm, 3:30pm

3. Carry A Water Bottle Around

Get yourself an eco-friendly water bottle that you can sip on during the day. Depending on the size, tie some elastic bands over the bottle and remove an elastic each time you drank all the water and had to refill. This reminds you of how much you had and how much more you need to drink.

4. Add Flavor For Variety

Adding citrus, fruit or cucumber and mint to your water is a great way to add some variety and give you an extra kick of nutrients at the same time.

5. Weed Out The Liquid Calories

If 4 Cups or less of calorie drinks is too hard, start with weeding out a little at a time. A “Tall instead of a Grande, 1⁄2 a can instead of a full one etc.

Start tracking how many cups of fluids you have in a day and how many of those are from calories and look to improve how many zero calorie drinks you have and lower the calorie containing beverages and enjoy the summer. 

If you’d like to know how to make sure you drink more water, especially to help you achieve your fitness and weight goals, I have created a special 1 page hydration tip sheet for you.

If you would like to have it, simply click here to download.

 

- Robin Mungall NSCA CPT

Results One Habit At A Time
Robin Mungall Fitness
www.rmfit.com 
780-554-9569

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Plan a
rock garden
that’s a hit


Made to look as though time sculpted the landscape, a rock garden is a classic hit. Part of a rock garden’s appeal is the way it takes care of itself. With nary an annual
in sight, it’s a perennial lover’s paradise. And although it does require some effort and thoughtfulness to compose, a rock garden will provide years of satisfaction with minimal maintenance. A reasonable investment for an ample reward. It’s not hard to understand why this type of garden rocks.


Brilliantly coloured and perfectly poised, a cyclamen’s petals are impossible to resist. Heart-shaped leaves with silver markings add to this plant’s charm. Cyclamen coum is low growing, blooms from late summer to fall and does best in partial shade. Apply deep, loose mulch for winter. 
If you’ve got a natural slope with ample sunlight, you’ve got the perfect place for a rock garden. Here are some tips to get you started.

Getting it Right
Start small. It takes lots of material and energy to create a large rock garden, so start with a bed just over one metre wide and two metres long (4x8). You can pack a lot of plants into a space that size, especially if they’re smaller alpines. It will still be labour intensive, but on a smaller scale.
Prepare the soil properly. Most alpine and rock garden plants need good drainage and, therefore, require gritty soil. To create the perfect mix, add at least one part coarse, sharp sand or finely crushed rock to each part organically rich soil. Supplemental grit can also be added to the planting holes.
Choose the right plants. Rock gardens are primarily comprised of perennial plants that thrive in good drainage. Most contain alpines, other low-growing perennials, dwarf bulbs, dwarf conifers and miniature shrubs. Some of our favourites are profiled in this article.
Place rocks thoughtfully. Combine small, medium and large rocks to create a natural-looking landscape. Seat rocks into the soil by one-third to one-half their width or height—this mimics natural stone outcrops and provides stability. Also place rocks so their grains run parallel to each other. Ideally, cover 20–40 percent of the area with rock, keeping
in mind that a medium-to- large-sized rock will weigh about 45 kg (100 lb).
Top-dress. Top-dressing with crushed limestone or pea gravel isn’t done only for esthetic reasons. It also reduces erosion and compaction, retards evaporation and keeps roots cool. Deep collars of top-dressing around plants are also helpful in preventing what is called winter wet—moisture that sits at a plant’s crown, causing roots to break during freeze-thaw cycles.

Create a container rock garden. A miniature landscape contained within a stone (or faux stone) trough is a lesslabour-intensive way to enjoy rock gardening. Provided your container is placed on the ground, has good drainage andis thoroughly watered before freeze-up, you can successfully overwinter plants—even in colder climates, such as ours. Of course, you will need to be selective with your plant material. Try hens and chicks, low-growing sedum, mountain avens, sandwort, moss campion, alpine willow or miniature spruce.

 

 

Alpine Sandwort

Arenaria obtusiloba

Sandworts are eminently popular choices for rock gardens, wall crevices or between paving stones. This one sports white flowers in summer. Mat-forming and evergreen. Avoid winter wet. Height: 10–15 cm; width: 30 cm. Sun.

 

Gentian

Gentiana sino-ornata

Dramatic cobalt-blue flowers are what attract people to gentian. This one is also a late-summer to fall bloomer, which makes it a valued addition to a rock garden. Shiny needle-like foliage is semi-evergreen. Height: 5–10 cm; width: 30–40cm. Shade to A.M. sun.

 

Alpine Thyme

Thymus comosus

No rock garden would be complete without at least one kind of thyme. Pretty pink flowers shine above the greyish foliage of this species. Height: 2–5 cm; width 15–30 cm. Sun to P.M. sun.

 

Golden Primrose

Vitaliana primuliflora ssp. Praetutiana

Evergreen foliage provides its own stunning show after the bright-yellow spring blooms of this primrose have faded. It has rosettes of grey-green leaves with frosted edges, which arrange themselves into attractive looking cushions. Avoid winter wet. Height: 2–5 cm; width: 15+ cm. Sun to P.M. sun.

 

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Sorrel

Rumex acetosa

Hardy perennial

Height 30 cm to 1.5 m; spread 25 to 45 cm.

Distinguished by pale-green stems and thick, long-stalked leaves.

Try these!

Rumex acetosa (common sorrel):

Rumex scutatus (true French sorrel):

Planting

Seed sorrel directly into the garden as soon as the ground is workable or, to get a jump on the season, set out young plants purchased from a garden centre.

How much: Two or three plants.

When: Around the date of average last spring frost.

Where: Full sun. Prefers moist, well-drained soil. Space plants 60 cm apart.

Care and Nurture

Sorrel is very easy to grow! Once established, water during periods of dry weather. Remove flower spikes as soon as they appear to encourage leaf production. Divide and replant sorrel every 3 to 4 years, or when the plants get crowded. Early spring is the best time to do this, just as the plants are emerging. Sorrel requires little fertilizer.

Harvesting

Once sorrel is established, you can harvest leaves right through to autumn: sorrel is quite frost tolerant. To keep the leaves mild and tender, remove any flowers before they open. The leaves get very bitter after the plant has flowered.

For best flavour: Harvest young, tender, juicy leaves: older leaves can have a sharp, sometimes bitter, flavour.

Leaves: Clip leaf stalks where they attach to the main plant; discard any tough stems.

Flowers: Edible, but not normally eaten.

Preserving the Harvest

Dried sorrel has little flavour. Use it fresh or freeze it.

Tips
  • Pick a few leaves from each plant as soon as they are big enough to use. For one thing, small leaves taste much better than big leaves; for another, removing leaves regularly encourages the plant to produce bushier growth and many more small, tender leaves
  • Sorrel contains oxalic acid, which should be avoided by individuals with gout, rheumatism, and kidney problems.
  • Sorrel requires minimal care and attention beyond watering. I like to give my plants a good shot of 20-20-20 after I cut them back severely. This creates a fresh flush of tender, young leaves.
To Note:
  • Sorrel is high in vitamins A and C.
  • In Lapland, the juice of sorrel is used in place of rennet to curdle milk.
  • The name sorrel comes from an old Teutonic word meaning, "sour."
  • In Scotland, sorrel is known as "Gowkemeat."
  • The sorrel plant is also called “Cuckoo's meate" from the old belief that the bird cleared its voice by eating sorrel.
  • Farmers harvesting their crops on a hot day would often take a few leaves of sorrel to chew to quench their thirst.
  • Sorrel was eaten in Egypt and by the Romans, who liked sorrel because it offset the effects of eating too much rich food.
  • The sorrel plant was held in high repute in the court of Henry VIII—until the introduction of French sorrel.

 

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We often have people coming into the greenhouse here in Alberta asking for recommendations of houseplants to grow in Edmonton or St Albert.

One of the top choices—especially for the high humidity and filtered light of bathrooms and kitchens—are ferns. Ferns look so tropical and lush during our dark, cold, dry winters. The humid, clean air that these plants bring into our homes is quite literally a breath of fresh air!

There are so many different types and styles of ferns that can be grown indoors as houseplants—some easier to grow than others. Leaf shape varies, as does size (some are as small as 5 centimetres while others are as big as 2 metres!), but most ferns prefer high levels of humidity and bright indirect light.

A tip for keeping your fern in tip-top condition: keep the soil of your ferns consistently moist but not soggy and make a habit of removing dry, dead foliage to maintain your fern's beautiful appearance. 

Ferns are also great for removing indoor pollution from the air, and Boston Ferns are one of the top 10 indoor plants recommended by NASA for improving indoor air quality. 

Ferns also look great in pots—or in hanging baskets!—and are generally easy-to-care-for plants.

“Boston Ferns are one of the top 10 plants recommended by NASA for improving indoor air quality.”

As mentioned, there are many different varieties of ferns to choose from. If you are looking for a Fern that is the easiest to care for, you may want to look into:

  • Asparagus Fern
  • Foxtail Fern
  • Maidenhair Fern
  • Staghorn Fern
  • Boston Fern (Including varieties like "Macho," "Little Ruffles," and more!)
  • Rabbit's Foot Fern
  • Crispy Wave Fern

These Ferns require fertilizer every 2 weeks from February to October, prefer bright indirect light, and typically require a good watering once a week.

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The Crispy Wave Fern, also known as Japanese Asplenium nidus is a very popular choice right now due to its modern, neat appearance and the fact that it is a great natural air purifier. The fact that this fern can grow endlessly if put in a larger container means that its air purifying properties will only improve the longer you have it!

A Crispy Wave Fern has a few big leaves instead of lots of little ones, and is the perfect addition to your kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, living room, or any place needing a breath of fresh air!

The Crispy Wave Fern is low maintenance plant that also has one of the longest life span due to uniquely strong fronds, hardiness, and adaptability.

No matter what kind of fern you pick for your home (and there are lots of kinds of ferns), it will soon become one of your favourite plants!

“A tip for keeping your fern in tip-top condition: keep the soil of your ferns consistently moist but not soggy and make a habit of removing dry, dead foliage to maintain your fern’s beautiful appearance. ”
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