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We already know from previous studies that coffee consumption may inhibit progression of prostate cancer (but the “how coffee does it” has not been made clear). Now Japanese researchers (Iwamoto et al, in The Prostate) have targeted 2 compounds in Arabica coffee (kahweol acetate and cafestol) that were shown to inhibit grow of prostate cancer cells in mice in a pilot study, including cells that were resistant to chemotherapy. While interesting, we are still at the early “petri-dish” phase of this science, and the researchers tested the compounds in mice, not men. Further testing is needed to determine if the same effect is even possible in men with prostate cancer. In materials released by the European Association of Urology, an increase in coffee consumption is not advised, especially in men with other medical conditions (always check with your doctor). March 22, 2019.
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Men 66 years or older who treat their (nonmetastatic) prostate cancer with surgery or radiation are more likely to take antidepressant medications than men who do not undergo treatment, according to a new study (Matta et al) that was published online in European Urology. Researchers looked at data from over 12,000 men with prostate cancer (4,952 had surgery, 4,994 had radiation, and 2,136 had surveillance). One year prior to starting treatment, 7.7% of men were prescribed an antidepressant, which increased to 10.5% a year after their treatment. Men also had an increased risk of using antidepressants 5 years after surgery vs men who had no treatment (surveillance). Bear in mind, however, that this was a retrospective study. Retrospective studies look backwards at existing data vs a prospective study that looks for specific outcomes during the course of a study period. Prospective studies typically have fewer potential sources of bias (ie, systematic errors that encourage one outcome over others, which can result in incorrect conclusions). November 7, 2018.
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Men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer who added enzalutamide (brand name XTANDI) to their androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) had a significantly reduced risk (by 61%, P
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Men 66 years or older who treat their (nonmetastatic) prostate cancer with surgery or radiation are more likely to take antidepressant medications than men who do not undergo treatment, according to a new study (Matta et al) that was published online in European Urology. Researchers looked at data from over 12,000 men with prostate cancer (4,952 had surgery, 4,994 had radiation, and 2,136 had surveillance). One year prior to starting treatment, 7.7% of men were prescribed an antidepressant, which increased to 10.5% a year after their treatment. Men also had an increased risk of using antidepressants 5 years after surgery vs men who had no treatment (surveillance). Bear in mind, however, that this was a retrospective study. Retrospective studies look backwards at existing data vs a prospective study that looks for specific outcomes during the course of a study period. Prospective studies typically have fewer potential sources of bias (ie, systematic errors that encourage one outcome over others, which can result in incorrect conclusions). November 7, 2018.
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Two drugs used together may be more effective for erectile dysfunction (ED) following the failure of either drug alone, according to an article (Moncada et al, 2018) published in the International Journal of Impotence Research. The clinicians looked at various published articles about two drugs for ED: first-line phosphodiesterease-5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) and alprostadil, which is often a second-line choice by physicians. They suggest that combination therapy may be a treatment option for men to consider following prostatectomy, if they have had a poor response to either drug alone. October 9, 2018.
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To those of us who have been watching, it comes as no surprise that a recent study has found that prostate cancer screenings are down, which has led to fewer American men being diagnosed and treated. Part of the decline is no doubt a direct result of the 2012 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation against prostate cancer screening. But the numbers started to fall in 2009, according to a new study of 6 million men published in the online edition of CANCER. Specifically, the prostate cancer biopsy rate per 100 men following a PSA test decreased from 1.95 to 1.52 (over the study period, which was from 2008-2014). The incidence of prostate cancer, however, increased from 0.36 to 0.39. The proportion of men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer that underwent local treatment decreased from 69% to 54%. After 2011, both PSA testing and prostate cancer incidence decreased significantly (P
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