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It’s estimated that 10 percent of the world’s population is affected by kidney disease and millions die due to a lack of treatment or no treatment at all. Although dialysis is a debilitating disease, patients are still able to do many of the things they enjoy doing. However, they also need to make some important lifestyle changes in order to ensure their safety. One of the most important concerns many dialysis patients have about dialysis treatment is how to avoid infection while undergoing either in-home dialysis treatment or treatment at a dialysis center. Keep reading to learn a few helpful tips.

Communicate

As a dialysis patient, maintaining open lines of communication to your doctor, caretakers, and family members is very important. Unfortunately, many dialysis-related deaths could have been prevented with more communication and better care. Infections that result from poor sanitation can further disable patients, prolong illness, or increase the cost of treatment and even lead to death. According to the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, among hemodialysis patients, infection is the second leading cause of death. By communicating any concerns you have to your doctor or caretaker, they’ll be able to provide for you more easily.

Clean Frequently

Dialysis patients and their caretakers should spend a lot of time cleaning before and after a dialysis treatment. As a patient, you should clean your fistula site with soap and water before each treatment as well as washing your hands with an alcohol-based sanitizer before and after treatment. If you use a catheter, ensure that you wear a mask while your caregiver is connecting it to the machine. This will prevent any germs from reaching it. If you’re still concerned about infection, speak with a nurse or doctor, and let them know immediately if you experience a fever, nausea, or fatigue.

Stay Alert

Another thing you should take note of is any change to the normal routine. For example, patients who change locations frequently — especially moving in and out of hospitals — may be more susceptible to catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Try to stay more consistent with your dialysis treatment to avoid these infections.

Use Proper Easy Access Clothing

If you are undergoing dialysis or chemotherapy treatment, you need clothing that’s adapted to your new lifestyle. This clothing allows medical specialists to easily access certain parts of your body via dialysis catheter or other medical devices. Easy access clothing is designed to be comfortable and loose fitting so that it doesn’t irritate any sensitive areas. And because you won’t be taking your clothes off and putting it on again after treatment, you’ll reduce your risk of infection.

Here at Hemowear, we offer a large variety of easy access clothing for both men and women including t-shirts, long sleeve t-shirts, sweatshirts, sweatpants, hoodies, and more. We even offer peritoneal belts (PD belts). This belt is used by thousands of patients and helps to keep catheter tubes and transfer units secure and stable during treatment. Give us a call if you have any questions.  

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Hemowear was started with the goal of helping medical patients receive treatment for their condition without having to remove clothing. Our easy access clothing line is most commonly used by dialysis patients who need to be hooked up to a dialysis machine for several hours a day or every couple of days. Our easy access clothing makes this process more manageable and less tedious. In this blog, we’re going to look at some of the top benefits of using Hemowear easy access clothing.

Comfortable

Just like any clothing you can buy from your favorite clothing store, our easy access clothing is comfortable. Instead of using velcro on access points, we use zippers meaning you won’t get poked or scratched. We have various types of clothing to suit your needs including t-shirts, sweatshirts, sweatpants, hoodies, as well as peritoneal belts that protect catheter openings from infection. These belts also have an easy access area that can be opened when you need to start your treatment and they fit comfortably with all of our clothing as well.

Functional

Although our easy access clothing is most commonly used by dialysis patients, it can be used by anyone who needs access to their body for medical purposes. We have clothing with access points on most areas of the torso, arms, and legs, and are available in various sizes for both men and women. Whether you do in-home dialysis treatment or you stay in a dialysis center, our easy access clothing allows for easy access to these areas, without having to remove your clothing every time you need treatment.

We understand that many dialysis or chemotherapy patients have trouble adapting to their new way of life. It’s not easy to undergo treatment like this because you have to sacrifice a lot. Our easy access clothing line can play a part in normalizing this new way of life so that dialysis treatment won’t seem like such a big deal.

Affordable

Hemowear is proud to be able to provide its customers with affordable easy access clothing. Many people expect to pay a premium for this type of clothing. However, since this is all we sell, we are committed to providing patients with the most comfortable high-quality easy access clothing for a low price. Hemowear was started out of a desire to help dialysis and chemotherapy patients receive treatment more easily, and part of that means offering our clothing for an affordable price.

Contact Hemowear Today

Hemowear has one goal: to provide patients with easier access to dialysis and chemotherapy access sites. Our easy access clothing makes dialysis treatment much easier for both the medical specialist and the patient. We aim to make it as easy as possible to get the exact clothing you need so if you have any questions, please let us know. Additionally, we do accept returns, so if your clothing doesn’t fit properly, send it back and we’ll send you one that does.

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Hello, and welcome back to our blog here at Hemowear. This is part two of our blog series about what you should know about peritoneal disease. Read part one if you haven’t already or keep reading to learn more.

Potential Risks

Although peritoneal dialysis may seem like the saving grace for anyone faced with choosing a dialysis option, there are some risks involved.

Effectiveness

After several years of being on peritoneal dialysis, some patients find that this dialysis option becomes ineffective and need to make the switch to hemodialysis.

Weight Gain

Dialysate is the fluid in a dialysis process that flows through the dialyzer. Although this is discarded along with the toxic substances, some of it can be absorbed by the body. Since dialysate contains sugar (dextrose), this could mean taking in several hundred extra calories a day. If you have diabetes, this could result in high blood sugar.

Infection

One common complication of peritoneal dialysis is an infection of the abdominal lining (peritonitis). There can also be infections where the catheter is inserted into the abdomen, however, the risk of infection is highest among people who don’t perform the procedure correctly, or were not adequately trained.

How It Works

During a peritoneal dialysis treatment, dialysate will flow into your abdomen and remain there for around four to six hours. This is known as dwell time. Dextrose within the dialysate works to remove extra fluid, waste, and other chemicals from the blood vessels around the abdominal cavity. The resulting fluid is drained into a collection bag. There are two main exchange schedules for a peritoneal dialysis treatment.

Continuous Cycling Peritoneal Dialysis (CCPD)

CCPD uses an automated cycler to process several exchanges overnight while you sleep. Once you wake up in the morning, you can empty the sterile bag. Since you’re connecting and disconnecting to the dialysis machine less often, you may have a lower risk of peritonitis.

Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)

CAPD is the alternative to CCPD. During this schedule, you’ll need to perform three to five exchanges during the day and another at night with a longer dwell time. The benefit to this is that you’ll be able to perform exchanges at work, home, or any clean environment and go about your normal daily activities while the dialysate dwells.

Dialysis training is an important part of the peritoneal dialysis process. Since you won’t be in-center, and you won’t have the supervision of a medical professional or caregiver, you’ll work with a dialysis nurse for one to two weeks in order to learn how to do exchanges and prevent infections. You should plan on bringing a family member or friend to dialysis training because if you ever need assistance with the process, you’ll have someone to call. By choosing automated peritoneal dialysis, you’ll learn about preparing the cycler, placing the drain tube, and connecting the bag of dialysate fluid.

Additionally, you’ll learn how to do exchanges manually if there were ever to be a power failure or you need an exchange during the day rather than only at night. There are several changes you’ll need to make after starting peritoneal dialysis including your daily routine, physical activity, diet, and medication. You should speak with your doctor and take notes so that you know exactly what you need to do. Depending on whether you’re doing your exchanges during the day or at night will determine how your schedule is affected and your diet will depend heavily on your current health condition and which type of dialysis you choose.

Speak With Your Doctor

There’s a lot to take into consideration when deciding between different dialysis options. It’s important to speak with your doctor to see what’s right for you, your current kidney condition, as well as your lifestyle and preferences.

As a dialysis patient, you need clothing that allows for easy vascular access without having to remove your clothes or be uncomfortable during treatment. At Hemowear, we have all the clothing dialysis and chemotherapy patients need including pd belts, dialysis jackets, t-shirts, hoodies, and much more for both men and women. Contact us today to learn more. 

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Peritoneal dialysis is one of several ways of removing waste from the blood when kidneys are no longer able to perform the job correctly. A tube called a catheter is used to send a cleansing fluid into the abdomen, filtering out waste. And after a certain period of time, the fluid flows out of the abdomen and is disposed of.

Chances are, you’ve heard of hemodialysis, a common form of blood-filtering procedure. Peritoneal dialysis differs in that you can give yourself treatments while at work, traveling, or in your very own home. This form of dialysis should only be considered if you either have the ability to care for yourself at home or have a reliable caregiver who can help. Keep reading to learn more about peritoneal dialysis.

Why Peritoneal Dialysis?

Dialysis is a necessary procedure for anyone who has kidneys that don’t function the way they’re supposed to. Kidney damage is something that usually takes place over many years, resulting from a number of conditions like kidney inflammation (glomerulonephritis), multiple cysts in the kidney (polycystic kidney disease), high blood pressure (hypertension), or diabetes. These can culminate into kidney failure meaning your kidneys will no longer have the ability to filter waste from your blood. It’s at this point that you’ll be completely reliant on a dialysis procedure. But why would you choose peritoneal dialysis over hemodialysis? Let’s take a look.

Benefits Of Peritoneal Dialysis Over HemodialysisIndependence

One of the primary reasons people opt for peritoneal dialysis over hemodialysis is the amount of flexibility and independence it offers you in your daily life. However, this also implies that you have a certain degree of independence already and are able to perform treatments without the help of a caregiver or medical professional. If you travel, work, or live far away from a hemodialysis center, this may be the best option for you.

Dietary Guidelines

Since peritoneal dialysis is performed every day as opposed to hemodialysis which is three times a week, there is less accumulation of sodium, fluid, and potassium. As a result, you won’t be as restricted in your consumption of these. It’s important to note, however, that there still are dietary guidelines, they’re just laxer compared to that of a hemodialysis patient. It’s important that you stay in contact with your healthcare team and follow the dietary guidelines they’ve set for you. If your sodium consumption is too high, you’ll be thirsty, which will lead to more fluid intake above the recommended amount, resulting in shortness of breath, swelling, and high blood pressure.

Stable Hydration And Blood Chemistry

Another benefit of peritoneal dialysis is that there is no need for intravenous access. In hemodialysis, since IV is required, you’ll have to undergo surgery that will allow for vascular access. With peritoneal dialysis, there is no threat of your circulation being disrupted or fluid levels changing.

Kidney Function

Although dialysis does not restore kidney function, peritoneal dialysis has proven to extend the normal functioning abilities of the kidney longer than hemodialysis does.

There are several things your doctor will take into consideration when deciding between peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. Your overall health, personal preferences, lifestyle, and current kidney function will all play a part. If you’re concerned about the disruption dialysis will cause on your lifestyle, have some remaining kidney function, or you aren’t able to deal with rapid fluid balance changes, peritoneal dialysis may be your best option.

On the other hand, there are a number of things that may prevent peritoneal dialysis from being a viable option. If you have limited ability to care for yourself, a hernia or scar in the abdomen, inflammatory bowel disease, protein malnutrition, or a critical illness, peritoneal dialysis is typically not recommended.

Speak With Your Doctor

It’s imperative that you stay in communication with your doctor during this process as well as take notes on what you learn. Dialysis can be a complicated process but it’s important that it’s done correctly for your well being.

At Hemowear, we have all the clothing dialysis and chemotherapy patients need including pd belts, dialysis jackets, t-shirts, hoodies, and much more. Contact us today to learn more. 

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Hello, and welcome back to our blog here at Hemowear. In part one of this blog, we talked about knowing your limits and taking your time when deciding to work as a dialysis patient. Although it can be devastating learning that you have kidney disease and you may think you’ll be confined to a hospital bed, you won’t need to be constantly attached to a dialysis machine and you should be able to live a full and happy life. However, there are a few things to consider. Keep reading to learn more.

Dialysis options

When you’re going over dialysis treatment, you may find that you have several options to work with that could impact how or when you are able to work. You should try to find a treatment plan that will allow you to work in the way that best suits you and your lifestyle.

Home hemodialysis (HHD) - Home dialysis treatment is often one of the most flexible options because it can be done in-home and around your busy schedule. The dialysis machine is smaller than what’s used in the medical centers and can be transported most places in case you need to travel.

In-center hemodialysis - This option is usually best for people who have more flexible schedules, work night shifts, or you are able to work from home. Some dialysis centers will allow what’s called nocturnal hemodialysis where the patient can stay overnight for treatment

Peritoneal dialysis (PD) - PD is usually done overnight while you sleep. It uses a device called an automated peritoneal dialysis machine.

Managing weakness or fatigue

Anemia is common in patients with kidney disease. As kidney disease becomes worse and in end stage renal disease (ESRD), most patients will develop anemia. Patients with anemia will experience fatigue, shortness of breath, and weakness. You should speak with your doctor who may prescribe ESAs or erythropoiesis-stimulating agents which will help to produce red blood cells which will help you feel less weak. Without treatment, you may find it difficult to continue working, especially if your job requires a lot of physical work.

Whether you need to continue working with kidney disease or feel more healthy and productive doing so, you should be able to as long as you find what works for you and don’t avoid dialysis treatment. It’s also important to stay in communication with your doctor, employer, and loved ones so that they’re aware of your schedule and can help in any way possible. Make sure to set realistic and attainable goals for yourself along the way.

Contact Hemowear today

Hemowear is your top provider for clothing for dialysis patients. our specialized clothing line allows for easy access to port sites, permanent catheter and AV fistulas. Our clothing is comfortable and allows patients to receive treatment without removing their clothing. We also have peritoneal belts that will protect the dialysis patient against the risk of developing peritonitis; a painful infection that enters the body through catheter openings. If you would like to learn more about our clothing or have any questions for us, please contact us today.

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