Loading...

Follow Healthy Food America on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

The FDA recently proposed delaying the updated Nutrition Facts label from July 2018 to January 2020 for large companies the deadline to use the new labels from July 2018 to January 2020 for large companies. It has further delayed compliance for small companies from July 2019 to January 2021, and they account for a whopping 90 percent of the industry. The updated Nutrition Facts label would clearly indicate the amount of added sugar in a product, make calorie counts more visible, and reflect more realistic serving sizes.

The FDA is accepting comments through November 1, 2017. Continue reading below to see HFA’s full letter to the FDA. To join us and get step-by-step submission instructions for your own letter, visit CSPI’s website. You can also activate your networks to comment using CSPI’s online alert here.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If America’s largest and most powerful physician association has its way, unhealthy sugary drinks will cost more and will no longer be served or sold in the nation’s hospitals or medical facilities.

At the recent American Medical Association (AMA) annual meeting on June 14th, the AMA House of Delegates, which represents over 200,000 physician members, called for adopting evidence-based strategies to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) including:

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The Seattle City Council approved a 1.75 cent-per-ounce sugary drink tax on Monday June 5th, becoming the eighth locale in the U.S. to adopt such a measure. The tax, which was proposed by Mayor Ed Murray in February, passed by a vote of 7-1.

Seattle joins Berkeley, Albany, Oakland and San Francisco, CA; Boulder, CO; Philadelphia, PA and Cook County, IL (Chicago) in levying a tax on sugary drinks to address critical community needs while discouraging overconsumption of unhealthy drinks. Sugary beverages like soft drinks, sports and energy drinks, fruit drinks, and sweetened coffees and teas, have been linked to diabetes, heart disease, obesity and other chronic conditions.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

What if there were a public policy that rewarded industry for selling healthier products and led consumers to buy fewer health-harming ones, while at the same time raising revenue to improve people’s lives – all without damage to the economy? 

Turns out there is one. Meet the Berkeley sugary drink tax.

A new study shows that after one year of taxing sugary drinks at a penny an ounce, Berkeley saw sales of those beverages drop nearly 10 percent as water sales went up and store revenue remained constant. According to research co-led by researchers at The University of North Carolina’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and the Public Health Institute of Oakland, CA:

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview