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It’s easy to forget a pair of sunglasses or even a wallet while flying, but a human heart? It happened on Southwest on Sunday.

While traveling across eastern Idaho, passengers aboard Dallas-bound Southwest Airlines flight 3606 learned that their plane would be heading back to Seattle, after their captain announced that a human heart had been left onboard, according to the Seattle Times.

The captain told the passengers that the heart, which had been left on the plane following a previous flight from Sacramento, was supposed to have been delivered to a local hospital in Seattle, the outlet reported.

RELATED: 11 Heart Failure Facts Cardiologists Want You to Know

A representative for Southwest confirmed to PEOPLE that the flight was turned around after “we learned of a life-critical cargo shipment onboard the aircraft that was intended to stay in Seattle for delivery to a local hospital.”

“We made the decision to return to Seattle as it was absolutely necessary to deliver the shipment to its destination in the Seattle area as quickly as possible,” the statement continued.

However, according to the Associated Press, no Seattle-area hospitals said they were involved in the transportation of the vital organ.

A spokesperson for organ-procurement organizations in Washington and California also told the Seattle Times that they never use commercial flights to transport organs, because of the time sensitive nature of organ transplants.

RELATED: Medical Mistakes: Nurse Throws Away Kidney Before Transplant

One of the passengers onboard the flight, who is also a doctor, described the incident to the Seattle Times as a “horrific story of gross negligence.”

“The heart in question traveled from California, to Washington, to the other side of Idaho, and back to Washington,” he said.

After returning to Seattle, a spokesperson for Southwest told PEOPLE that the fight was “taken out of service due to an unrelated mechanical issue.”

On Thursday, the Seattle Times shared an update about the heart’s intended destination. Deanna Santa of Sierra Donor Services in Sacramento, California, confirmed to the outlet that the heart was being sent to the tissue processor to recover a valve, which would be used in a future transplant, but did not yet have a designated recipient.

“We brought in a different aircraft to continue the flight to Dallas, with an estimated delay of approximately five hours,” the statement continued. “We sincerely regret the inconvenience to the Customers impacted by the delay, and we are following up with them with a gesture of goodwill to apologize for the disruption to their travel. Nothing is more important to us than the Safety of our Customers and the safe delivery of the precious cargo we transport every day.”

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Milagros “Mili” Hernandez has had a lot of success on the soccer field. She's so skilled, the 8-year-old girl is allowed to play on an Omaha, Nebraska club team with 11-year-olds.

Unfortunately, this past weekend, it wasn’t Mili’s talent that made her part of a viral news story but the fact that she was mistaken for a boy, and then disqualified along with her entire team from their soccer tournament semifinals game because of it.

While Mili’s family believes she was disqualified because officials thought she was a boy (and therefore not allowed to play on a girls team), Springfield Invitational tournament officials maintains that the reason Mili and her team got the heave-ho was because Mili was listed as a boy on their official team roster, reports WOWT.

It’s unclear how this error happened. But even when Mili’s father presented tournament officials with Mili’s insurance card, which indicated that she is female, tournament brass didn’t budge. The Nebraska State Soccer Association has since issued an apology to Mili and her family, and the group is investigating what went wrong at the tournament.

While Mili seems to be taking the mix-up in stride, being identified as the wrong gender can have a big impact on kids, says Health contributing psychology editor Gail Saltz, MD. “It could be very insulting and hurtful, particularly to a young person who may be insecure and who may be trying to fit it, and putting stock into what someone else thinks of them,” she says.

RELATED: Kids Soccer-Related Injuries Have More Than Doubled in 25 Years

Dr. Saltz believes that society is much more open to gender fluidity now, which may be why the story has generated such outrage. “I think for women and girls, the idea that ‘I would be strong and athletically capable and be shamed for that,’ I think that’s the crux of what’s disturbed people,” she said.

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Luckily, Mili has received an outpouring of support from star female athletes, including Billie Jean King and Mia Hamm—who invited Mili to her TeamFirst Soccer Academy on Twitter. Abby Wambach posted a supportive video on Instagram.

“I want to tell you a few things,” Olympic medalist Wambach said in her post. “You don’t look like a boy. You look like a girl with short hair, and that’s okay. Also, I know somebody else who has short hair, she’s won gold medals and a World Cup, and US Soccer Player of the Year and FIFA Player of the Year. You can do anything you want to do and be anything you want to be, and guess what? You can look like whatever you need to look like to do it.”

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.

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As the hype around LaCroix Sparkling Water has grown over the years, part of the intrigue has been the mystery: How do they pack so much flavor into those cans while maintaining their claim of “100% Natural, Calorie-Free, Sugar Free, Sodium Free, No Artificial Sweeteners.” Despite repeated questioning, the beverage brand has remained elusively coy. But a new lawsuit alleges LaCroix may have another good reason for keeping its mouth shut: The flavored sparkling water might not be as healthy as it claims.

RELATED: Why Your LaCroix Obsession Isn't So Healthy

Earlier this week, the law firm Beaumont Costales announced that it had filed a class action lawsuit in Illinois’s Cook County against the National Beverage Corporation, makers of LaCroix, alleging that the brand makes “false claims to be ‘all natural’ and ‘100% natural.”

“LaCroix has seen tremendous growth in popularity in recent years, driven presumably by American consumers’ increasing demand for healthier food and beverage options. National Beverage Corporation has seen net sales rise from $646 million in 2015 to $827 million in 2017,” Beaumont Costales wrote, announcing the suit. “However, LaCroix in fact contains ingredients that have been identified by the Food and Drug Administration as synthetic. These chemicals include limonene, which can cause kidney toxicity and tumors; linalool propionate, which is used to treat cancer; and linalool, which is used in cockroach insecticide.”

Even more damning, the law firm suggests that “LaCroix and National Beverage are aware of the synthetic chemicals contained in LaCroix sparking water, and yet they intentionally misled consumers into believing LaCroix all-natural in order to drive sales of the product.”

As should probably be expected, National Beverage immediately sent out its own statement that “categorically denies all allegations” calling the lawsuit “false, defamatory and intended to intentionally damage National Beverage and its shareholders.”

“Natural flavors in LaCroix are derived from the natural essence oils from the named fruit used in each of the flavors. There are no sugars or artificial ingredients contained in, nor added to, those extracted flavors,” the company explained in its retort. “All essences contained in LaCroix are certified by our suppliers to be 100% natural. The lawsuit provides no support for its false statements about LaCroix’s ingredients.”

RELATED: If You Have a Seltzer Habit, This Is What You Should Know

In National Beverage’s defense, Beaumont Costales statement only mentions that their findings were obtained through “testing.”

The lawsuit, which was filed on behalf of Lenora Rice and anyone who purchased LaCroix under false pretenses, wants LaCroix to alter its labeling and promotion, as is seeking an undisclosed amount of damages.

Meanwhile, National Beverage wrote that it “will vigorously seek actual and punitive damages among other remedies from everyone involved in the publication of these defamatory falsehoods.”

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Investigators have charged an elderly California man with killing his 67-year-old stepdaughter after data from her Fitbit, along with surveillance footage, allegedly linked him to the murder scene.

According to police reports obtained by PEOPLE, Anthony Aiello, 90, was detained Sept. 25 on a first-degree murder charge.

Police allege in the report that Aiello slashed and stabbed Karen Navarra, his 92-year-old wife’s daughter, on Sept. 8.

Her remains were found in her San Jose home on Sept. 13 after concerned relatives called police to request a welfare check.

When police arrived, the kitchen knife that had been used to cut her neck and head was found protruding from one of Navarra’s hands.

The police report on the murder alleges Aiello told investigators he last saw Navarra on Sept. 8, when he stopped by her home to bring her food.

He told detectives he was inside Navarra’s residence for no more than 15 minutes, the police report indicates.

But police managed to recover surveillance footage from the neighborhood that they say confirms Aiello’s car was parked in Navarra’s driveway for more than 20 minutes.

They also recovered data from Navarra’s Fitbit device.

The police report indicates that information showed Navarra’s heart rate spiked at around 3:20 p.m. on Sept. 8, at the same time Aiello’s car can be seen in her driveway.

The data also indicates her heart rate started to slow, eventually stopping at 3:28 p.m., according to the police report.

RELATED: How the Latest Apple Watch Could Help Empower Women to Take Charge of Their Health

Aiello has denied being in Navarra’s home at the time of the murder and told police someone else had to have been in his stepdaughter’s house.

“During the interview, Aiello was confronted about the information from Fitbit and the corresponding surveillance video indicating that his car was in the driveway,” reads the police report. “After explaining the abilities of the Fitbit to record time, physical movement and heart rate data,” investigators told Aiello that Navarra had died before he left.

Aiello “denied that he was present when she was killed and suggested that someone else might have been in the house,” the report says.

Aiello is being held without bail.

He will likely be asked to enter a plea during his arraignment Thursday.

It was unclear Wednesday if he was being represented by a lawyer who could comment on his behalf.

Fitbit did not reply to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

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With just three remaining in the United States, iron lungs are nearly obsolete — but Mona Randolph, a polio survivor, relies on one of the 700-lb. devices to keep her alive.

The 82-year-old Randolph has used the device on and off since being diagnosed with polio in 1956. She was 20 years old at the time, and doctors thought she was too old for the vaccine that had been invented just one year earlier.

She’d gone to the hospital in Kansas City with a massive headache, a fever and difficulty breathing, and doctors immediately put Randolph in an iron lung.

“They happened to have one in the basement because people were not using them much then,” she told The Kansas City Star.

Randolph survived the polio virus, but her left arm was permanently paralyzed, and she became dependent on others to live her life. Though she didn’t have to use the iron lung again for several decades, she needed other treatments, and went to the same Warm Springs, Ga. facility as President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Then in the 80s, breathing became difficult again and Randolph had to start using the iron lung at night. She’s been using it ever since — for 36 years.

She now goes into the 6-foot-long device six nights a week. It takes an hour to get Randolph into the iron lung — which she calls her “yellow submarine” — with the help of her husband Mark and a friend or an aide.

The machine does not cover her head — instead, Randolph’s body goes into the iron lung, which uses negative pressure to expand and contract her chest and lungs to help her breathe.

She uses a more modern device during the day — a CPAP machine — but Randolph says she isn’t a fan. The machine uncomfortably forces air into the lungs through a breathing tube in her mouth, and her three CPAP machines always seem to be broken.

Randolph said that the iron lung, in comparison, is a “relief.”

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A 12-year-old girl is recovering from the severe burns she received to nearly half of her body while she attempted a viral and dangerous internet challenge.

Just minutes into a mid-afternoon nap on Friday, Brandi Owens was awoken by a loud pop that echoed throughout her home. Moments later, Owens saw her daughter, Timiyah Landers, running down their halfway engulfed in a fireball that covered almost her entire body.

“She was running down the hallway past my bedroom on fire from her knees to her hair,” Owens, a mother of five from Detroit, tells PEOPLE. “I just screamed, ‘My baby!’ It was so awful.”

Owens and her fiancé then used towels to extinguish the flames, then placed the young girl in the bathtub and sprayed her down with cold water.

“I burned my hands in the process,” Owens, 35, says. “It was so traumatizing to see her on fire.”

The family rushed Timiyah to Beaumont Health, and she was transported to a nearby children’s hospital by the end of the night. She will stay there for the next several months to recover from the extensive second- and third-degree burns that cover 49 percent of her body.

RELATEDWoman, 18, Hospitalized After Attempting Viral ‘In My Feelings Challenge’ Based on Drake Song

“Her vitals are good, but she’s still on a ventilator and feeding tube. They’re slowly trying to wean her off the ventilator,” Owens says. “It will be a long recovery. She had surgery and received temporary artificial skin to her burns, but she’s going to need three or four more surgeries and skin grafts.”

It wasn’t until Owens questioned the two friends who were with Timiyah during the incident that she learned the horrifying truth about what occurred. The girls were engaging in a viral internet trend that sees people douse themselves with rubbing alcohol and then set themselves aflame, known as the “fire challenge.” Videos of the dare have gone viral over Facebook and YouTube.

“After a while, her friends told me what happened,” Owens says. “I was angry, very angry. I couldn’t believe she would do that, she knows better — I don’t know what she was thinking, doing that crazy stuff.”

Stories about young people becoming injured due to viral internet challenges are in no short supply.

In 2017, a couple from Texas connected their 15-year-old son’s suicide to the “Blue Whale Challenge,” a game where participants are asked to fulfill a series of increasingly dangerous dares over the course of 50 days. Earlier this year, an internet trend called the “Tide Pod Challenge” went viral after participants filmed themselves biting into the laundry detergent capsules. It is attributed to at least 10 deaths.

Last month, 18-year-old Anna Worden was hospitalized while attempting the popular “Kiki Challenge,” a once innocent dance trend that soon turned dangerous when thousands of people began to record themselves hopping outside of moving cars to dance to a Drake song.

After her extended hospital stay, Timiyah is expected to make a full recovery. A GoFundMe has been set up to help pay for the family’s mounting medical expenses, which has raised over $2,400 from 50 donors in just under a week.

Because she remains on a ventilator, Timiyah cannot yet tell her mother what influenced her decision to participate in the challenge. But Owens isn’t waiting to raise awareness for other parents about the dangerous dare.

RELATEDTexas Parents Say Deadly ‘Blue Whale’ Online Challenge Led to the Suicide of Their 15-Year-Old Son

“Monitor your kids, monitor what they’re doing. If you can get parental control on their phones, I would recommend that,” she says. “That way they can monitor what their kids are watching, and talk to them about peer pressure. I’m doing that now with my other daughters, I’m doing that now. It was a lesson learned.”

She adds: “I hate having these memories. It’s something I never want to relive.”

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Twenty-year-old Iowa college student Mollie Tibbetts, who disappeared in the middle of July after going for her usual jog around town, was found dead early Tuesday in a field not far from where she vanished, a police source tells PEOPLE.

The source says the body was located in a field in Poweshiek County.

Confirmation is pending but authorities are confident that it belongs to Tibbetts, according to the source.

Additional details about the discovery — a grim end to a search that captured national attention — were not immediately available.

State investigators are holding a news conference Tuesday afternoon about the case, a spokesman says. He declined to comment further to PEOPLE.

Tibbetts, who was set to be a sophomore at the University of Iowa studying psychology, was last seen alive the night of July 18 while running in Brooklyn, in Poweshiek County, where she lived.

RELATED: Investigators Say They Have ‘Solid Timeline’ in Mollie Tibbetts Case

She had been staying with her boyfriend, Dalton Jack, in his older brother Blake Jack’s home and was dog-sitting while the two Jack brothers were out of town.

After she headed out for some exercise, she was spotted in her workout clothes and her boyfriend told ABC News that he opened a Snapchat photo from her later that night, though it is unclear when it was sent.

Then Tibbetts disappeared. Her family reported her missing the next day after she failed to show up for work.

Both Dalton and Blake were cleared as possible suspects early on in the investigation.

Her mom, Laura Calderwood, called the mystery around what happened to her “excruciating.”

“[There are] no words to describe how you feel when you don’t know where or how your child is,” she said in an interview with ABC.

PREVIOUSLY IN THE CASE: 20-Year-Old College Student in Iowa Vanishes on Jog

Rob Tibbetts, Mollie’s father, could not immediately be reached for comment by PEOPLE but he previously spoke candidly about the case — even appealing directly to her possible captor, asking that she be released.

Hundreds of people helped search for Mollie in the days after she disappeared, while local authorities said they remained baffled by what could be the longest such missing-persons case in the county in recent memory.

RELATED: Missing Mollie Tibbetts’ Dad Addresses Possible Abductor — ‘Do Not Escalate This’

A reward fund for information leading to her safe return broke records in Iowa as hundreds of thousands of dollars poured in.

Mollie’s story also attracted wide notice on social media, with celebrities such as Brandon Routh and American Idol‘s Maddie Poppe sharing information about her.

“She really does not have a single enemy — everybody loves Mollie,” friend Alyssa King previously told PEOPLE, describing Mollie as always there when she was needed and “always trying to make people laugh.”

Mollie was set to attend the wedding of her boyfriend’s brother in early August, about two weeks after she went missing.

The discovery of her remains marked an end that her loved ones never hoped to see.

“We know that Mollie knows how much we love her and how important she is to her entire family,” cousin Emily Heaston previously told PEOPLE, adding, “We know Mollie wants to be home.”

This is a breaking news story. Please return for updates.

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Goldfish Cracker lovers might have to take a break from the snack due to fears that an ingredient could potentially be contaminated with Salmonella.

The maker of the small, gold crackers, Pepperidge Farm, announced on Monday that they were recalling four different flavors of their product.

In a statement released by the company on their website, the company explained that one of its ingredient supplies alerted them the whey powder in a seasoning used in four flavors was the subject of a recall.

“Pepperidge Farm initiated an investigation and, out of an abundance of caution, is voluntarily recalling four varieties of Goldfish crackers,” the statement said. “The products were distributed throughout the United States. No illnesses have been reported. No other Pepperidge Farm products in the U.S. are subject to this recall.”

A spokesperson for the company did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

The four products include Flavor Blasted Xtra Cheddar, Flavor Blasted Sour Cream & Onion, Goldfish Baked with Whole Grain Xtra Cheddar, and Goldfish Mix Xtra Cheddar + Pretzel.

Pepperidge Farm urges customers to avoid eating the snacks if they’ve bought them. The company recommends throwing out the snacks that have been recalled or returning. They offer a reimbursement on their website.

This is not the first product that contained whey powder to have been recalled recently. A number of Ritz Crackers products were voluntarily recalled after an ingredient used was possibly contaminated with Salmonella.

Mondelēz Global LLC, the company that produces the snacks, announced on Saturday that 16 products—including Ritz Cheese Cracker Sandwiches and Ritz Bitz Cheese — are being pulled from store shelves in the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands because the whey powder used to make them has a “potential presence” of the infection.

Though no illnesses have been reported in connection with the products, the company is issuing the recall as a precaution, they said in a statement.

RELATED: Ritz Cracker Products Are Being Recalled Over Salmonella Concerns

“Consumers who have these products should not eat them, and should discard any products they may have,” said Mondelēz Global.

Those with questions or concerns over the recall can contact the company at 800-679-1791.

“Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection,” according to the CDC. “The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment.”

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By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many older Americans are unnecessarily screened for breast and prostate cancer, which can lead to treatments they don't need, a new study contends.

The practice may also be costing the U.S. health care system $1.2 billion a year, the researchers added.

Almost 16 percent of those 65 and older are being screened for breast or prostate cancer even though they may have less than 10 years to live, the study found. A 10-year life expectancy is a benchmark for deciding whether to screen or not. And guidelines recommend against screening for these cancers in people with a life expectancy less than 10 years, the researchers said.

"Physicians, as well as patients, should consider life expectancy when deciding the necessity of prostate cancer or breast cancer screening," said lead researcher Dr. Firas Abdollah, of the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit.

"To achieve this goal, we need to overcome many hurdles," he said, which include the lack of easy-to-use and accurate life expectancy calculators to guide doctors in making screening recommendations.

Also, busy doctors may find it hard to explain the concept of life expectancy and why screening is not recommended for certain individuals, he added.

Robert Smith, vice president for cancer screening at the American Cancer Society, said: "This can be a hard conversation for doctors to have with patients. If a patient shows some enthusiasm for getting these tests, it's just easier to do the test than it is to have that conversation, especially if you're not that good at doing it."

In addition, it's difficult to estimate whether somebody has 10 years to live, Smith said.

The report was published online Jan. 21 in the journal JAMA Oncology.

Smith said that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends mammograms for women up to age 74. The task force does not recommend screening for prostate cancer at all, he said.

Using 10-year longevity as a benchmark for screening is the American Cancer Society's guideline, Smith said.

"We recommend that men should not be offered prostate cancer screening if they don't have 10 years of life left," he said. "Our breast cancer guideline is the same."

Abdollah said cancer screening aims to detect tumors early, before symptoms appear. "Evidence suggests that detection and treatment of early stage tumors may reduce cancer mortality among screened individuals," he said.

Despite this benefit, screening may also cause harm, he said. Screening may identify low-risk tumors that would never become life-threatening, but subject patients to the harms of unnecessary treatment, such as side effects of therapy and a reduced quality of life, he added.

For the report, Abdollah and his colleagues collected data on nearly 150,000 people 65 and older who responded to the Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System survey in 2012.

Among these people, 51 percent had had a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test or mammography in the past year. Of those who were screened, almost 31 percent had a life expectancy of less than 10 years. The rate of non-recommended screening was 15.7 percent, Abdollah said.

This rate varied across the country, from 11.6 percent in Colorado to just over 20 percent in Georgia, the researchers found. States with a high rate of non-recommended screening for prostate cancer also had a high rate of non-recommended screening for breast cancer.

Smith said the other side of the coin is that many doctors fail to recommend screening for patients who clearly have 10 years to live or more.

About one-third of women who die from breast cancer each year are over 70, Smith said. "That means there is a significant fraction of these deaths that could be avoided if women had been screened," he said.

Smith added that many doctors aren't aware of the tools available to predict longevity and many who are aware don't use them. "Doctors need to be better prepared to estimate longevity, and have conversations with patients about cancer screening," he said.

Smith did note that as patients get older they tend to lose interest in screening.

"There is a natural attrition as you get older -- patients lose interest in prevention and doctors become preoccupied with managing life-limiting conditions," he explained.

More information

Visit the American Cancer Society for more on cancer screening.

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Aerie has done it again. While looking at their latest rollout of products on American Eagle’s site, 20-year-old Abby Sams noticed a familiar face—her own. In a tweet that has since gone viral, Sams shared the news.

RELATED: These 13 Women Prove Every Body Is a Bikini Body

“@Aerie just sneakily released some of my photos!” wrote Sams, who is shown modeling in her wheelchair. “Look at this disability representation people!!! Also look at me because I [can’t] believe it's actually me so yeah.”

Sams also shared the series on Instagram, and she ended her post with the kind of amazing positivity we can't get enough of. “Beautiful with mobility aids. Beautiful in a wheelchair. Beautiful with an invisible illness. Beautiful, not despite those things, but because of them.”

Sams was sporting Aerie’s Boho Lace Bralette, and her candid shots were met with lots of cheers and excitement. One fan responded that this was the first time she saw herself represented in a model. Others were so thrilled, they couldn’t resist commenting in all caps.

Sams tells Health that the environment at the shoot was as fun as it appears in the photos. She was joined by several other models, some of whom had disabilities and conditions that are not usually represented in fashion spreads.

“There was always music playing and we were all dancing and making jokes while the photographer, Andrew Buda, was working his magic,” she says. “Most of the photos are candid and I love that. The crew was also always asking what they could do to make things accessible and make sure I could get around. They made sure not to do things for me but instead make them accessible enough for me to do myself which blew me away.”

She wasn’t the only one blown away by the photos. Sams says she woke up to more than 200 messages from people who had seen them.

“So many people are so excited that a major company is really going deep into representing diversity in all communities,” she says. “[People were] so happy to finally see someone like them in the media, totally unretouched and happy.”

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