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National Union of Students leader denies allegations and claims she is victim of racism

The National Union of Students is conducting an investigation after allegations of bullying and intimidation were made against the NUS president, Shakira Martin, by fellow officers.

Martin has denied the allegations, accusing her critics of electioneering as campaigning begins in earnest ahead of NUS officer elections in March. She has also made counter allegations, claiming she is a victim of “racism and classism”.

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Reduced hours for same pay increased work-life balance by 24%, cutting stress levels and boosting commitment

The New Zealand company behind a landmark trial of a four-day working week has concluded it an unmitigated success, with 78% of employees feeling they were able to successfully manage their work-life balance, an increase of 24%.

Two-hundred-and-forty staff at Perpetual Guardian, a company which manages trusts, wills and estate planning, trialled a four-day working week over March and April, working four, eight-hour days but getting paid for five.

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Changes will not be made compulsory at schools in England until September 2020

Campaigners have criticised delays to the introduction of a new sex and relationships curriculum that will now not be made compulsory in schools in England until September 2020.

According to draft guidance published on Thursday, pupils are to be given lessons on consent and LGBT issues as part of government efforts to update sex and relationships education for the first time in a generation.

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Few teachers have had quite the impact on so many young lives as my former colleague and friend Derek Fry, a teacher of physics and astronomy at the Grammar School at Leeds, who has died aged 77.

His legacy includes inspiring several pupils to pursue a career in science. More than a dozen former students have dedicated their doctoral theses to him. Derek taught for more than 50 years, the last 18 of which he continued on a voluntary basis following his “official” retirement in 2000.

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What are the different paths into medical school and what career options will you have with a degree in medicine?

How do medical students cope when illness hits close to home?

If the news that stethoscopes are on their way out hasn't put you off being a doctor – apparently they use hand-held devices to listen to chests and hearts these days, which may not have quite the same cachet – then what are the routes into medical school, and what career options do you have once qualified?

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Despite having a good grasp of vocabulary and grammar, Jonross Swaby found few understood him when he spoke Spanish and Portuguese. That was until he started singing

The late Nelson Mandela once said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.” But what if they can’t understand you when you do?

Many people who have learned a language outside of a country that speaks it will sympathise. You could be trouncing native speakers at Swedish scrabble, your French grammaire could be parfaite, and watching Colombian telenovelas could be a breeze – but open your mouth to say something to a native and you’re met with a bunch of “qué?”s and “quoi?”s.

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Children’s laureate and political cartoonist draws series of ‘grammar monsters’ in response to warnings that current system is bad for children

The children’s laureate Chris Riddell has waded into the row over the value of Sats with a series of surreal sketches.

Riddell, an illustrator and political cartoonist who was appointed children’s laureate last year, has sketched a series of what he calls “Sats beasties” in response to warnings by authors and parents that the current system of testing primary school children is detrimental.

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Study finds pupils who take part in organised sports and physical activities are more likely to achieve higher results

After-school clubs can improve the academic performance and social skills of children from disadvantaged backgrounds, research shows.

The study of 6,400 children in England found that those who took part in organised sports and physical activities at the ages of five, seven and 11 were almost one and a half times more likely to reach a higher than expected level in their Key Stage 2 (KS2) maths test at the age of 11.

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To help make the European debate decent and civilised, it is now more important than ever to value the skills of the linguist

I began learning German at the age of 13, and I’m still trying to explain to myself why it was love at first sound. The answer must surely be: the excellence of my teacher. At an English public school not famed for its cultural generosity, Mr King was that rare thing: a kindly and intelligent man who, in the thick of the second world war, determinedly loved the Germany that he knew was still there somewhere.

Rather than join the chorus of anti-German propaganda, he preferred, doggedly, to inspire his little class with the beauty of the language, and of its literature and culture. One day, he used to say, the real Germany will come back. And he was right. Because now it has.

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Next year sex education will become compulsory in England – but without teacher training we’ll only repeat the past

Each generation thinks it invented sex, so the saying goes. But perhaps each merely adds a new perspective. I recently saw the 10-year-old daughter of a colleague, nestled in a corner, diligently reading a book at a work event. Like the irritating former teacher I am, I inquired what it was about.

“It’s about two friends,” she said. “One is transgender and the other is bi. But it’s mostly about school and their lives.” All very matter-of-fact. “Bi … sexual?” I checked, trying to contain my surprise. She looked at me as if I was stupid: “Errr, yes. It means you like boys AND girls.”

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