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A Projection Exhibition Presented with Greenpeace Canada

When: October 2018

Where: Montreal

Deadline to Apply: July 13, 2018

Greenpeace Canada is seeking artists who are interested in developing a projection project that is inspired by the Canadian Boreal forest. This artistic vision will connect urbanites to the splendour of this northern forest, raise awareness of the plight of the threatened woodland caribou and inspire people to take action to protect this forest.

Canada’s Boreal forest extends across Canada’s north, covering more than half of our country’s landmass and including the territories of many Indigenous Peoples who have stewarded these landscapes since time immemorial. This forest, part of a unique global ecosystem that encircles our planet as a green crown, is home to an incredibly rich diversity of life and culture and plays a critical role in preventing climate chaos.

Today, the Boreal is at a crossroads. Industrial development has left a heavy footprint and continues to expand. Habitat for iconic species like the caribou continues to shrink. Despite Indigenous leadership in many places, governments are failing to act and take the necessary measure to safeguard this ecosystem for future generations.

Greenpeace Canada is seeking multimedia installation, animation and projection art proposals for a nighttime projection in October 2018 to engage Montrealers and showcase the breathtaking beauty and significance of the boreal forest as well as its vulnerability. As part of the on-going Boreal forest campaign, the attention surrounding this artistic projection seeks to reach a wide audience both online and offline and will inspire Quebecers to care for the Boreal Forest, engage in our campaign and demand political action.

We are seeking work that, ideally, is immersive, site-responsive, participatory, and will inspire people to act and get involved in the protection of the Boreal forest. The audience should leave the projection feeling more connected to the Boreal, in awe with its beauty and life it holds and concerned with its fragile state. Artists will have fair creative control yet must also work in collaboration with Greenpeace as well as potentially others to elaborate the concept. Greenpeace can provide some video footage and images of Boreal forest scenes and wildlife, but we also encourage the use of creative drawing and animation intertwined with real footage from the Boreal.

Submission Guidelines

All submissions must include the following components:

Proposal: Clearly describe the proposed project (max 3 pages).

  • How will the project respond to the ecological and cultural significance of the Boreal, the threats it faces and the plight of the caribou.
  • A brief description of your creative concept - ideas for the imagery, tone, and style (feel free to link references of other videos/images that may serve as inspiration), as well as the ideal location for the projection.
  • Please provide details about your spatial and material requirements, including equipment needs, as well as a budget estimate.

Curriculum Vitae : This will help us understand your artistic background and determine your feasibility of completing this project.

Images/Support Material: Up to 10 images and/or up to three videos.

  • The easiest way: submit the link to your online portfolio
  • If you do not have an online presence, please submit digital images in JPG format.
  • For Video submit only the material that demonstrates your artistic accomplishments related to the proposed project, and please limit each example to five minutes in length. Please submit video/audio files through file transfers via Dropbox, WeTransfer etc., or through file sharing sites like Youtube, Vimeo, etc. You may also send files on DVDs or USB key if the file is too large. Please note that these will not be returned.

Greenpeace’s Forest Campaign committee selects proposals through a peer review process and selection is based on the artistic merit of the project, relevance to the environmental issues, and the feasibility of the proposed project. To see an example of a past Greenpeace projection please visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b36Wa7-GaXI&t=2s.

Greenpeace Canada embraces equity and diversity and is committed to collaboration that is enriched by the people, needs and desires of Canada’s diverse community. Greenpeace especially welcomes applications from Indigenous Peoples, racialized persons / persons of colour, women, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ persons, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas. Knowledge of the Indigenous cultures which define the Boreal will be a strong asset.

Greenpeace Canada is committed to paying a professional fee for this projection project. We thank all applicants, but only those invited for interviews will be contacted.

Please submit your application to Greenpeace Canada Forest Campaigner Philippa Duchastel de Montrouge pduchast@greenpeace.org by July 13th, 2018.

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Some leopards never change their spots.

Our colleagues at Greenpeace USA just dug up some hard-hitting evidence showing that Energy Transfer Partners (the company infamous for building the Dakota Access pipeline and quashing resistance at Standing Rock) continues to be up to no good. And there are some good reasons why Canada should care.

From the use of notorious private military and security services to backing legislation that criminalizes protest — and even launching a $900 million lawsuit against Greenpeace entities that could force them to close their doors — Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) is making it clear that we need to continue to stand together to resist threats to our rights and our environment.

All of this and more is detailed in a new report by Greenpeace USA entitled, Too Far, Too Often: Energy Transfer Partners’ Corporate Behavior On Human Rights, Free Speech, and the Environment. While ETP is operating south of the colonial border, people in Canada should be deeply concerned by these tactics as efforts to stop the controversial Trans Mountain Expansion pipeline and tanker project heats up.

Think tactics like ETP’s wouldn’t fly in Canada? Guess again. In fact, indications of some of them are already happening.

Here’s an in-depth look at both how and why this is happening.

ETP will stop at nothing to get its pipelines built 

In the fall of 2016, the resistance against the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) at Standing Rock in North Dakota, captured international attention when ETP used private security firm TigerSwan to infiltrate and use violent tactics against peaceful Indigenous Water Protectors.

“If one thing is abundantly clear, it’s that ETP will stop at nothing to get its pipelines built. Think about it, if as a corporation, your overarching approach to profit protection is to hire TigerSwan — a U.S. military contractor tasked with clearing munitions during the Iraq war — and allow them free-reign to use military-style counterterrorism tactics against Water Protectors and allies at Standing Rock, it’s obvious that respecting human rights is, how shall I say it, not in your wheelhouse,” said Annie Leonard, Executive Director of Greenpeace U.S.A., whose team stood in solidarity with the courageous Indigenous Water Protectors who led the protests. 

In building DAPL, ETP violated Indigenous sovereignty and rights. DAPL was approved without meeting the international standards of free, prior, and informed consent of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, a right enshrined in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. A Sioux Elder and cultural leader reported damage to at least 380 cultural and sacred sites along the pipeline routes.

Today, displaying the kind of poor corporate behaviour that directly contributed to the DAPL controversy in the first place, ETP continues to apply dirty methods. In fact, it has doubled down on its unethical practices in numerous other locations in the U.S.A. where it has pipeline projects, including the Rover pipeline in Ohio, the Bayou Bridge pipeline in Louisiana, and the Mariner East 2 project in Pennsylvania.

Here’s a snapshot of what ETP has been up to since building DAPL, as detailed in the report, Too Far, Too Often:

  • Filing a $900 million SLAPP suit against Greenpeace entities, Banktrack, and EarthFirst!, accusing the groups of inciting and directing acts of “eco-terrorism.” ETP also sued the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman and Tribal Councilman and several others “seeking restraining orders and unspecified monetary damages.” ETP’s extreme use of litigation, including misuse of laws designed to prosecute organized crime to intimidate Greenpeace and others, could set a chilling new precedent that silences much-needed protest.
  • Directly supporting at least one of 60 bills introduced across the U.S.A. post-DAPL that restricts the right to protest and criminalize protest. ETP has likely influenced/supported more of these efforts through measures like financial contributions to politicians’ campaigns and working with front groups like the American Legislative Exchange Council.

  • Continuing to use private security companies, including TigerSwan, which provides services on the Mariner East 2 pipeline project in Pennsylvania. 

  • Aggressively seizing private property through eminent domain proceedings in all of their current major pipeline projects, including the Bayou Bridge pipeline.

So, how far will Justin Trudeau go to build the Trans Mountain Expansion?

Greenpeace U.S.A.’s report raises a number of flags for us here in Canada.

In May, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s federal government announced that it was prepared to spend $4.5 billion in Canadian taxpayers’ money to buy the existing Trans Mountain tar sands oil pipeline and infrastructure related to the planned expansion from Texas oil company Kinder Morgan, which abandoned the project in the wake of “untenable” opposition.

The Indigenous-led, people-powered movement that led Kinder Morgan to ditch the project is stronger than ever and has no plans to back down. So, how far will Justin Trudeau go to build the pipeline, especially since signing on to make the Government of Canada the country’s newest pipeline construction company?

Indications of the type of behaviour used by ETP to intimidate pipeline protesters have already been seen in Canada.

Last week, in comments that sparked the disgust of many, former Bank of Canada Governor David Dodge implied that “people are going to die" protesting this pipeline but that's the price of doing business. The remark was deeply concerning given that not too long ago, Canadian Minister of Natural Resources Jim Carr seemed to threaten to use the military against pipeline protesters.

Kinder Morgan has also used SLAPP-style tactics and private investigators to enforce injunctions against protesters (SLAPP stands for strategic lawsuit against public participation, the same kind of lawsuit ETP has launched against Greenpeace).

Energy companies, the federal government, and national security forces have a history of attempting to criminalize and intimidate the peaceful, Indigenous-led pipeline resistance movement.  Not long ago, Greenpeace exposed that Canada’s spies have given high-level security briefings to energy companies and the RCMP have long been investigating Indigenous and allied peaceful protesters in the environmental movement.

Meanwhile, government insiders say the federal approval process for the Trans Mountain Expansion project was rigged. The government has a duty to respect Indigenous communities’ right to consent (or not consent) to project like this. Yet, more than half of Indigenous communities along the pipeline and tanker routes have not consented to this risky project, which crosses or potentially impacts their lands an/or waters.

That’s why we’ve called on Prime Minister Trudeau to go on the record condemning ETP’s behaviour and promising to not use any ETP-style tactics against the public, including Indigenous Water Protectors resisting the Trans Mountain Expansion.

But to stop companies like ETP for good, and to stop projects like the Trans Mountain Expansion, we need to take even bigger action. That’s why courageous people everywhere are joining hands to do extraordinary things to stop new pipelines from being built. 

From leading on-the-ground resistance to convincing some of the world’s most important banks to stop giving pipeline companies the money they need to keep doing business, our unstoppable wave of resistance is growing stronger every day.

Sign this petition asking banks not to fund ETP or dirty tar sands oil pipelines like the Trans Mountain Expansion.

Already signed? Consider making a donation to Greenpeace to help us continue to stand up to bullies like ETP and its $900 million lawsuit designed to silence our movement.

Together, we are stronger. Together, we win.

With files from a blog by Greenpeace U.S.A. Executive Director, Annie Leonard. 

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Job Vacancy: Mobilization Campaigner
Location:     Montreal
Reports to: Head of Actions & Offline Mobilization
Closing date for applicants:  July 2, 2018

Greenpeace Canada is seeking an experienced mobilizer to help engage supporters around environmental and social justice issues as part of cross-Canada and global efforts to build the movement and win campaigns through people power. 

Mobilization Campaigners work within Greenpeace’s Offline Mobilization team to support and strengthen a network of supporters and volunteers. They are also responsible for designing and delivering offline organizing strategies to help advance those campaigns. Working closely with our Local Group Coordinators and our digital team, Mobilization Campaigners understand how to engage people on important issues and how to make that engagement count. The Montreal-based Mobilization Campaigner will work on issues across the country.

MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES: 

  1. In co-operation with campaign teams, Communications, Digital Mobilization staff, and other colleagues within the offline mobilization team, contribute to the implementation of the Mobilization Strategy within Greenpeace Canada.
  2. Strengthen, broaden and diversify Greenpeace Canada’s network of offline supporters and develop opportunities for engagement.
  3. Ensure the integration of mobilization activities into campaign strategies as appropriate, by working in close collaboration with other staff as part of cross-functional campaign and project teams.
  4. Contribute to the design, development and implementation of supporter engagement projects that will help achieve Greenpeace campaign objectives.
  5. Recruit, screen, motivate, engage, train and supervise volunteers. Maintain a volunteer database.
  6. Organize supporter meetings and participation events. Follow through, evaluate and report after meetings and events.
  7. Promote support within Greenpeace and to the public to advance campaign goals by acting as a spokesperson.
  8. Develop materials such as correspondence, orientation packages, and information for the website/online platforms, etc.
  9. Other duties as required.     

SKILLS REQUIRED:

  1. A demonstrated commitment, knowledge and passion for environmental and social justice issues;
  2. Knowledge of campaign techniques, strategies and practices and the principals of social movement and engagement organizing;
  3. Experience recruiting, engaging, training and organizing diverse groups of volunteers, allies and collaborators;
  4. Proven skill in analyzing campaign strategies, designing actions and anticipating ramifications;
  5. High level of professionalism while representing an organization, managing conflict, and maintaining work relationships;
  6. Experience setting and adhering to priorities in a volatile and ever-changing context;
  7. Demonstrated analytical skills;
  8. Excellent oral and written communication skills including public speaking and presentation skills, as well  as strong listening abilities;
  9. Extremely fine-tuned organizational, computer, administrative and time management skills;
  10. Ability to work independently, establish priorities, and proceed with objectives with sometimes limited supervision, yet participate effectively as part of a team;
  11. Flexible, collaborative personality;
  12. Bilingualism in French and English is a necessity; 

You will work with colleagues in Canada and around the world and some travel may be necessary. Evening and weekend work is sometimes required. 

Candidates should understand and support Greenpeace campaign tactics, including the use of peaceful civil disobedience.  All candidates must be legally entitled to work in Canada.

Greenpeace Canada embraces equity and diversity and is committed to a workplace that is enriched by the people, needs and desires of Canada’s diverse community. We thank all applicants, but only those invited for interviews will be contacted. 

APPLY NOW

Please circulate widely / Aussi disponsible en français

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Greenpeace activists send G7 leaders a hard-to-miss message one day before the G7 Summit in Charlevoix Quebec. © David Kawai / Greenpeace

This past weekend, the G7 announced the creation of a much anticipated Ocean Plastics Charter which was promised by our Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, to be a “zero-plastics-waste charter”. Unfortunately, the document’s text falls flat in providing solutions with clear targets and timelines that will result in concrete action to stop the flow of plastics into our environment.

The non-binding agreement, which was endorsed by five of the G7 countries and the EU, is laden with language that focuses squarely on end-of-life waste management such as recycling efforts that won’t do enough, and beach clean-ups that barely scratch the surface of the ocean plastics crisis. It leaves the option of incineration on the table which has other polluting impacts, and it simply doesn’t recognize the urgency of the plastic pollution crisis and the need to act now to fix the problem at the source.

But despite this disappointment from the G7, Canada can still take strong action domestically to get at the root cause of the plastics epidemic through binding legislation. In fact, the federal government is currently running a national public consultation and wants to hear from you on how they can get Canada on track for what we hope will be a plastic-free future.

Act now and tell the federal government to ban single-use plastics, hold corporations accountable for their waste, and invest in innovative delivery models focused on reuse.

We know now, more than we ever have, about how plastic pollution is littering our communities, impacting wildlife, and literally choking our oceans. Polling shows that this is among the top environmental issue of concern for Canadians. To address this crisis, we need to slam on the breaks and take a sharp turn away from our throwaway culture towards sustainable and reusable packaging and product delivery systems. We also need to hold corporations to account for the problem they created. Knowing that single-use plastics are among the biggest culprits of plastic pollution, the Canadian government can start by banning these problem plastics to cut their use and production before they even have a chance to pollute the planet.

Other jurisdictions across Canada and around the world are taking action on single-use plastics bans, so we know that our federal government can follow their lead. Vancouver, Montreal, and Victoria are already looking to ban certain single-use plastics, as are the UK and the EU. Costa Rica is on track to ban throwaway plastics by 2021, India just announced they’d like to do the same by 2022, Taiwan is aiming for 2030, and several countries in Africa, including Kenya and Morocco, have bans or fees to curb plastic bag use.

We need action that mirrors the scale of the crisis. We simply cannot continue to allow the production of billions of throwaway plastic products that are wreaking havoc on ecosystems and our communities. Let’s take the action that’s needed to cut throwaway plastics out of our lives for good.

Add your voice to the national public consultation on plastics to make sure Canada takes the action needed to address this crisis.

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Greenpeace activists send G7 leaders a hard-to-miss message one day before the G7 Summit in Charlevoix Quebec. © David Kawai / Greenpeace

 

This past weekend, the G7 announced the creation of a much anticipated Ocean Plastics Charter which was promised by our Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, to be a “zero-plastics-waste charter”. Unfortunately, the document’s text falls flat in providing solutions with clear targets and timelines that will result in concrete action to stop the flow of plastics into our environment.

The non-binding agreement, which was endorsed by five of the G7 countries and the EU, is laden with language that focuses squarely on end-of-life waste management such as recycling efforts that won’t do enough, and beach clean-ups that barely scratch the surface of the ocean plastics crisis. It leaves the option of incineration on the table which has other polluting impacts, and it simply doesn’t recognize the urgency of the plastic pollution crisis and the need to act now to fix the problem at the source.

But despite this disappointment from the G7, Canada can still take strong action domestically to get at the root cause of the plastics epidemic through binding legislation. In fact, the federal government is currently running a national public consultation and wants to hear from you on how they can get Canada on track for what we hope will be a plastic-free future.

Act now and tell the federal government to ban single-use plastics, hold corporations accountable for their waste, and invest in innovative delivery models focused on reuse.

We know now, more than we ever have, about how plastic pollution is littering our communities, impacting wildlife, and literally choking our oceans. Polling shows that this is among the top environmental issue of concern for Canadians. To address this crisis, we need to slam on the breaks and take a sharp turn away from our throwaway culture towards sustainable and reusable packaging and product delivery systems. We also need to hold corporations to account for the problem they created. Knowing that single-use plastics are among the biggest culprits of plastic pollution, the Canadian government can start by banning these problem plastics to cut their use and production before they even have a chance to pollute the planet.

Other jurisdictions across Canada and around the world are taking action on single-use plastics bans, so we know that our federal government can follow their lead. Vancouver, Montreal, and Victoria are already looking to ban certain single-use plastics, as are the UK and the EU. Costa Rica is on track to ban throwaway plastics by 2021, India just announced they’d like to do the same by 2022, Taiwan is aiming for 2030, and several countries in Africa, including Kenya and Morocco, have bans or fees to curb plastic bag use.

We need action that mirrors the scale of the crisis. We simply cannot continue to allow the production of billions of throwaway plastic products that are wreaking havoc on ecosystems and our communities. Let’s take the action that’s needed to cut throwaway plastics out of our lives for good.

Add your voice to the national public consultation on plastics to make sure Canada takes the action needed to address this crisis.

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Greenpeace Canada by Insung Lee, It Campaigner At Greenp.. - 1y ago
Remember the time we gave Samsung stores a makeover...

Protest in Berlin for Samsung to Commit to Clean Energy

Or when we did this…

Greenpeace activists in Berlin and Taipei called out Samsung for sponsoring this year’s Winter Olympic Games in South Korea.

 And remember when you shared this?

 

After months of people-powered actions around the world, Samsung finally accepted our challenge to #DoWhatYouCant and taken the first steps towards 100% renewable energy! This is great news for our planet and the hundreds of thousands of people around the world taking action for a renewably powered future.

So what exactly has Samsung committed to?

1) A 100% renewable energy commitment in the US, China and Europe by 2020 (including all its own manufacturing factories).

2) Onsite installation of solar and geothermal energy in Korea, near its Hwaseong, Pyongtaek, and Suwon semiconductor plants. Samsung also supports the government’s national strategic plan to increase the country’s renewable energy use by 20% by 2030

3) Join the CDP's (formerly known as the Carbon Disclosure Project) supply chain program next year, which helps to identify and manage climate change risks, to lead change in their supply chain.

See Samsung’s full statement here.

What does this mean?

This is a really important first step for Samsung to reduce its massive global manufacturing footprint. Just imagine, in 2016 alone, the tech giant’s energy consumption amounted to 16,000GWh, that’s the same as the Dominican Republic! This could help drive a faster transition away from fossil fuels like coal countries like China and South Korea.

If we see more ambitious actions from companies like Samsung and a shared responsibility then there is still time for us to turn the corner and build the renewably powered future we urgently need.

What is key now is to make sure Samsung follows through on this commitment with meaningful actions that actually lead to more renewable energy and expands this same level of ambition to other key regions like Vietnam.

With your help, we will be watching to make sure they do. For now though help us celebrate the good news! Share this tweet.

 

BREAKING NEWS: @Samsung commits to go 100% renewable energy in US, EU & China by 2020. https://t.co/gravazyt1Y #DoBiggerThings pic.twitter.com/O0HSzQPtfR

— Greenpeace Canada (@GreenpeaceCA) June 14, 2018

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REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS: EVENT PLANNING PREPARATIONS FOR A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR GREENPEACE CANADA

"The concert was a sell-out, the biggest counter-culture event of the year," Rex Weyler recalls in his Greenpeace biography. The sixteen thousand that filled Vancouver’s Pacific Coliseum left the concert entranced. 

Background:

Greenpeace was founded in Vancouver in 1971 and is an independent, non-profit organization that works to protect the environment.  We challenge government and industry to halt harmful practices by negotiating solutions, conducting scientific research, introducing clean alternatives, carrying out peaceful acts of civil disobedience and engaging the public.

On October 16, 1970, a rock concert was performed by Joni Mitchell, James Taylor and Phil Ochs at the Pacific Coliseum in Vancouver. The event funded Greenpeace's protests of 1971 nuclear weapons tests by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission at Amchitka, Alaska.  It was then that Greenpeace was launched.

We are seeking an experienced event planner who will contract with Greenpeace Canada to help plan a benefit concert to be held in Vancouver on or around October 16, 2020, the 50th anniversary of the Amchitka concert.  This individual will manage the preliminary aspects of the benefit concert to include scouting out the venue and talent with the help of Greenpeace Canada staff, planning the day of coordination and event logistics, creating the budget and managing/supporting a volunteer committee.

The event

This Greenpeace Canada benefit concert will take place on or around October 16, 2020 in Vancouver to raise funds for Greenpeace and celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Amchitka concert which started the Greenpeace Canada environmental movement. The vision is to re-new the energy of October 1970 concert by having a music concert with diverse artists ideally at the same venue, the Pacific Coliseum in Vancouver but other venues should be scouted.  We also hope to inspire new audiences and supporters to the Greenpeace movement.

Scope of Work

This is a one day a week contract, for a year, based in Vancouver and reporting to the Executive Director.  Responsibilities include:

  • Develop event logistical plan and timeline
  • Create an event budget
  • Help build, manage and support a volunteer committee
  • Scout event venues in Vancouver, BC
  • Work with Greenpeace Canada staff to scout talent
  • Search other in kind and financial donations available

We have received a generous donation to get this planning going, but have not yet raised sufficient funds for event planning.  As such we are currently only able to support an individual on this part time basis and paying $30/hour.

Qualifications

  • Education: Bachelor's degree in Events Management preferred.

    • Experience: Minimum 2 years’ experience in all aspects of event planning including benefit concert event experience
    • Experience managing volunteer team
    • Experience managing event budgets
    • Excellent organization and project management skills
    • Energetic, innovative, creative self-starter
    • Problem solver and results oriented
    • Able to work well under pressure of event deadlines
    • Ability to prioritize tasks in a fast-paced environment

Applicants should understand and support the Greenpeace values, campaign tactics, including the use of peaceful civil disobedience.  All applicants must be legally entitled to work in Canada.

Greenpeace Canada embraces equity and diversity and is committed to a workplace that is enriched by the people, needs and desires of Canada’s diverse community. We thank all applicants, but only those invited for interviews will be contacted.

How to Apply

Please submit your application that includes a resume that highlights your relevant experience and a cover note as to why you would be the ideal individual for this project.  Please email your applications to marilyn.wigglesworth@greenpeace.org by July 3, 2018.

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Greenpeace Canada by Sarah King, Head Of Oceans & Plasti.. - 1y ago

The Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise was in the Antarctic at the beginning of 2018

It’s not what we wanted to find. When Greenpeace set sail to the Antarctic earlier this year, we were going to look for the incredible wildlife - tottering penguins, majestic whales, soaring seabirds - that call the Antarctic Ocean home.

But even in these incredibly remote waters, we couldn’t escape from that scourge of our seas which is making all the headlines: plastic pollution.

Analysis now shows that microplastics and chemicals were present, respectively, in the water and snow samples that we took in the Antarctic during our recent expedition. This reveals that even the ‘world’s last wilderness’ is contaminated with microplastic waste and persistent hazardous chemicals.

Sandra Schoettner (marine biologist and oceans campaigner with Greenpeace Germany) and Jono Emms doing water sampling on Joinville Island in the Antarctic Sound to investigate the presence of persistent organic pollutants like PFCs (per- and polyfluorinated chemicals) in the Antarctic environment.

Some of the pollution was immediately visible: our crew saw waste from the fishing industry floating in the waters, such as buoys, nets and tarpaulins drifting in between icebergs. We took these items out of the water when we came across them. But, as this discovery of microplastics shows, the problem is so much bigger than just the visible rubbish - and it needs to be tackled at source.

Plastic has now been found in all corners of our oceans, from the north pole to the south pole, and even in the deepest point of the ocean. It’s previously been thought that the ocean currents around the Antarctic act as a kind of buffer zone, protecting the region from the plastic that is polluting the rest of the world’s oceans. While it is possible that some of the microplastics we found came from local sources (like land-based sources or shipping), some studies now suggest that microplastics could be coming from further afield.

Sandra Schoettner, marine biologist and oceans campaigner with Greenpeace Germany and crew deploying the so-called manta trawl – a net specifically designed for skimming small particles from the sea surface whilst being towed alongside the ship. 

The chemicals that we detected in snow samples also show how pervasive humanity’s impact can be. These chemicals are widely used in many industrial processes and consumer products, and have been linked to reproductive and developmental issues in wildlife. The snow samples gathered included freshly-fallen snow, suggesting the hazardous chemicals were deposited from the atmosphere.

Our snow sampling and water trawling were an important part of the science work that Greenpeace carried out during our three month expedition in the Antarctic. While it’s not the first time microplastics have been found in the Antarctic, Greenpeace’s report confirms the significant and measurable amount of plastic pollution in this area.

Campaigner Thilo Maack takes snow samples, for testing of environmental pollutants, on Greenwich Island in the Antarctic.

Our analysis provides valuable new information to deepen our understanding about the problem of plastic pollution in our oceans - and emphasises why we need urgent action to tackle the problem at source, in order to protect our oceans and marine life.

That means taking action on land and at sea to protect our ocean. Across the world, we need to stop the flow of plastic into the ocean by calling on companies to reduce the amount of plastic being produced and urging governments to introduce measures that can help end the era of single-use plastic.

Chinstrap penguins on Half Moon Island, in the South Shetlands of the Antarctic.

It also means creating safe havens at sea, which are off-limits to human activity, to allow animals to recover from the pressures they’re facing. This year, governments have the opportunity to create an Antarctic Ocean Sanctuary, protecting an area five times the size of Germany. 1.6 million people around the world are backing the call for this huge ocean sanctuary. Finding plastic and chemical pollution in the Antarctic only raises the stakes and increases the pressure on governments to protect it.

Sign the petition to protect the Antarctic 

 

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It’s unbelievable and it’s reckless.

Yesterday the federal government poured $4.5 billion dollars of public money to buy Kinder Morgan’s failing pipeline and tanker project. $4.5 billion dollars for a project that violates the Prime Minister’s own commitments to climate action, to Indigenous rights, to end fossil fuel subsidies, and to protect the coast.

It is nothing short of a colossal mistake that will punish the Liberals in the next election and will haunt them everyday in between.  

I don’t think Justin Trudeau has realized what it will do to his International reputation when it is the federal government ordering in police to arrest Indigenous elders, teachers, seniors and students who are just trying to protect the things they love but it will sink in soon. Already over 22,000 people have pledged to put their bodies on the line to stop this project and those numbers are likely to grow after today.

The world saw Justin Trudeau stand-up in Paris to commit to climate action, they applauded when his government endorsed the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and held out hope that in the darkness that is Trump, Trudeau would become the voice of hope, and reason that the world so desperately needs to see.

With today’s announcement I think it’s fair to say that hope is gone (or at least faded). While other world leaders chart their path to a 100% renewable energy future, Canada’s ‘sunny ways’ Prime Minister bought a dirty oil pipeline to one of the largest carbon bombs on the planet.

There is no climate leadership to be found down a pipeline and no Indigenous reconciliation to be found their either. The majority of Nations impacted by this project have not given their consent and seven are already suing the federal government over it. Despite pledging to respect Indigenous consent Trudeau continues to violate it compounding over a century of broken promises to First Nations people.

Photo Credit: Liz McDowell

You can buy a lot of things for $4.5 billion dollars.

For $3.2 billion, we could provide safe, clean drinking water for every Indigenous Nation in Canada. The full $4.5 billion  could pay for the salaries of 60,000 nurses or 88,156 teachers. It could cover the average tuition costs of 684,827 students, put solar power systems on 180,000 homes, build 2045 wind turbines, or build the world’s largest solar power plant 16 times over.

These are the opportunities lost with yesterday’s announcement. Opportunities that could have saved lives, cleaned our air, or powered our cities. Instead the government put that money in a broken pipeline for export that will never even get built.

This pipeline still faces a litany of lawsuits, crumbling economics - that seemed to scare everyone but the federal government, and a growing resistance movement that yesterday’s announcement just supersized.

None of those dynamics are going away.

As the government attempts to move forward on its ill fated decision we will be there standing shoulder to shoulder with Indigenous leaders to stop them. We will confront them on the land, on the sea, and in the boardrooms because the things this pipelines endangers are too much to stand by and let happen.

1 National Park.

1300 streams and waterways.

130 Indigenous Nations.

76 Southern Resident Killer Whales.

200,000 jobs in BC alone.

1 already overwhelmed climate.

1 beautiful ocean.

Make your voice heard, let’s make it resound around the world, and together let’s stop this pipeline once and for all.

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Right now, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is thinking about using our tax dollars to bail out a Texas oil company’s failing pipeline and tanker project.  

The federal government announced today that it's prepared to "indemnify" the Kinder Morgan pipeline, putting taxpayers on the hook for the big losses this project is likely to run up.

Last month Kinder Morgan’s own CEO described its pipeline expansion project as “untenable” for a private company to undertake.

Now the federal government wants to use public money to send Kinder Morgan a blank check in a desperate play that violates Justin Trudeau’s own promises on climate change and Indigenous rights.

We can’t let that happen.

Tell the government not to throw your tax dollars behind this destructive pipeline.

First Nations, environmental groups and municipal governments are challenging this pipeline and its rigged approval in court.

On-the-ground opposition is growing from Land and Water Protectors who are willing to face arrest to stop this project.

Just yesterday, Greenpeace and Mosquito Fleet activists blocked a Kinder Morgan barge from entering the company’s Seattle facility by locking themselves to the pier.

Across the country, people are protesting outside Liberal cabinet ministers’ and MPs’ offices, blockading Kinder Morgan’s pipeline terminal, and calling out the funders of this destructive project.

Even the major banks funding tar sands pipelines are stepping away from this project. Just last month, Europe’s largest bank, HSBC, committed not to fund tar sands pipelines including Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain expansion.

This pipeline has no pathway forward. Kinder Morgan knows that and so should Justin Trudeau.

The bottom line is that this pipeline threatens the land, climate, and water we all share.

It would put clean drinking water supplies, endangered orca whale populations, and our already unstable climate in even greater peril.

Taxpayers should not be subsidizing the damage and on the hook to cover the losses of a Texas companies failing pipeline project.

Tell the government not to throw your tax dollars behind this destructive pipeline.

It’s time to let Kinder Morgan walk away.

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