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Whether 90 degrees and sunny or below freezing and snowing, concrete pours happen year-round on commercial construction projects. But colder temperatures are not ideal for slab curing. To solve this problem, Granger Construction’s self-perform team is using permanent ground thaw hoses to improve the quality of slab on grade concrete during cold-weather concrete pours.

BIGGER CHALLENGES FROM LOWER TEMPERATURES

Contractors face three primary challenges with cold weather concrete pours:

  1. Longer Set Times: The cooler the temperature, the longer it takes for concrete materials to initially set. This means longer days for finishing crews which, in turn, increases job costs.
  2. Damage from Freezing: Freshly mixed concrete freezes at 29 degrees Fahrenheit. Therefore, pours at conditions near or below this temperature risk freezing before the concrete properly cures. Freezing is not acceptable as it degrades the slab’s long term durability and performance.
  3. Lower Rate on Strength Gain: Lower temperatures also reduce the rate on strength gain, increasing the time before protections can be removed and possibly raising project costs.
Cooler temperatures increase the time required for concrete to set. GROUND THAW HOSES

To eliminate these cold weather challenges, contractors have used ground thaw hoses for years, following these traditional steps:

  1. Place hoses over the subgrade (ground) and use portable heaters to pump a warm glycol and water solution through the hoses.
  2. Cover the hoses with blankets to trap and distribute heat across the subgrade.
  3. Once the subgrade is warm enough, remove the blankets and hoses to begin pouring the concrete.
  4. After placing the concrete, cover it with a layer of blankets, followed by the hoses and a top layer of blankets.
  5. Once the concrete has reached its desired strength, remove the top layer of blankets. Then remove the hoses and the final blanket layer.

With this approach, crews are able to reuse the same hoses on multiple projects.

Granger uses permanent ground thaw hoses to improve pour conditions for in cold weather. THE GRANGER DIFFERENCE

Breaking from tradition, Granger has found significant benefits from using permanent ground thaw hoses rather than temporary ones:

  1. Reduced Labor: Using permanent hoses eliminates multiple steps in the concrete placement process, reducing labor requirements. Not only do crews no longer need to place, remove, replace, then remove hoses again during the project, they also no longer need to regrade the area due to foot traffic from placing the hoses. Having permanent hoses also reduces the potential for accidentally adding holes in the vapor barrier when moving temporary hoses.
  2. Better Quality: With traditional methods, by the time crews finish placing concrete on large projects (ex. 40,000 SF), both the sub grade and the concrete itself have had time to cool, and possibly freeze. However, if permanent hoses are used, crews can maintain ideal temperatures during the entire pour. Similarly, this permanent heat source reduces the likelihood of bucking during extreme temperature shifts and ultimately leads to a better product for the client.
  3. More Predictable Curing: Leaving hoses in place allows the concrete to cure from within. This both reduces the curing time and the controlled environment also increase the reliability that the concrete will finish curing on schedule. In turn, this predictability allows contractors to better schedule other trades that need to work in and around the area.

Aside from benefiting the concrete placement process itself, crews can use the permanent hoses as a continued heat source during other construction work. The heat from permanently placed hoses can also help melt any snow that might fall on exposed concrete.

Granger’s new permanent hose approach has proven successful for a variety of construction projects, from parking lots to data centers, and we are excited to see how it can benefit future clients. To learn more about Granger’s innovative concrete work or other self-perform capabilities, contact us today.

The post Leveraging Radiant Heat for Cold Weather Concrete Slabs appeared first on Granger.

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Whether 90 degrees and sunny or below freezing and snowing, concrete pours happen year-round on commercial construction projects. But colder temperatures are not ideal for slab curing. To solve this problem, Granger Construction’s self-perform team is using permanent ground thaw hoses to improve the quality of slab on grade concrete during cold-weather concrete pours.

BIGGER CHALLENGES FROM LOWER TEMPERATURES

Contractors face three primary challenges with cold weather concrete pours:

  1. Longer Set Times: The cooler the temperature, the longer it takes for concrete materials to initially set. This means longer days for finishing crews which, in turn, increases job costs.
  2. Damage from Freezing: Freshly mixed concrete freezes at 29 degrees Fahrenheit. Therefore, pours at conditions near or below this temperature risk freezing before the concrete properly cures. Freezing is not acceptable as it degrades the slab’s long term durability and performance.
  3. Lower Rate on Strength Gain: Lower temperatures also reduce the rate on strength gain, increasing the time before protections can be removed and possibly raising project costs.
Cooler temperatures increase the time required for concrete to set. GROUND THAW HOSES

To eliminate these cold weather challenges, contractors have used ground thaw hoses for years, following these traditional steps:

  1. Place hoses over the subgrade (ground) and use portable heaters to pump a warm glycol and water solution through the hoses.
  2. Cover the hoses with blankets to trap and distribute heat across the subgrade.
  3. Once the subgrade is warm enough, remove the blankets and hoses to begin pouring the concrete.
  4. After placing the concrete, cover it with a layer of blankets, followed by the hoses and a top layer of blankets.
  5. Once the concrete has reached its desired strength, remove the top layer of blankets. Then remove the hoses and the final blanket layer.

With this approach, crews are able to reuse the same hoses on multiple projects.

Granger uses permanent ground thaw hoses to improve pour conditions for cold weather concreting. THE GRANGER DIFFERENCE

Breaking from tradition, Granger has found significant benefits from using permanent ground thaw hoses rather than temporary ones:

  1. Reduced Labor: Using permanent hoses eliminates multiple steps in the concrete placement process, reducing labor requirements. Not only do crews no longer need to place, remove, replace, then remove hoses again during the project, they also no longer need to regrade the area due to foot traffic from placing the hoses. Having permanent hoses also reduces the potential for accidentally adding holes in the vapor barrier when moving temporary hoses.
  2. Better Quality: With traditional methods, by the time crews finish placing concrete on large projects (ex. 40,000 SF), both the sub grade and the concrete itself have had time to cool, and possibly freeze. However, if permanent hoses are used, crews can maintain ideal temperatures during the entire pour. Similarly, this permanent heat source reduces the likelihood of bucking during extreme temperature shifts and ultimately leads to a better product for the client.
  3. More Predictable Curing: Leaving hoses in place allows the concrete to cure from within. This both reduces the curing time and the controlled environment also increase the reliability that the concrete will finish curing on schedule. In turn, this predictability allows contractors to better schedule other trades that need to work in and around the area.

Aside from benefiting the concrete placement process itself, crews can use the permanent hoses as a continued heat source during other construction work. The heat from permanently placed hoses can also help melt any snow that might fall on exposed concrete.

Granger’s new permanent hose approach has proven successful for a variety of construction projects, from parking lots to data centers, and we are excited to see how it can benefit future clients. To learn more about Granger’s innovative concrete work or other self-perform capabilities, contact us today.

The post Leveraging Radiant Heat for Cold Weather Concrete Slabs appeared first on Granger.

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As we begin celebrating our 60th Anniversary, Granger Construction is proud to announce our 2019 EMR (Experience Modification Rate) has been further reduced to 0.55. While this is a tremendous achievement for any construction firm, it is truly exceptional given Granger’s high volume of self-perform labor.

“One of Granger’s six core values is Strong and Safe Work Ethic,” says Dennis Carignan, Granger Construction’s Executive Vice President, “and our company has been dedicated to creating a safety culture since its foundation. But we couldn’t have achieved Granger’s lowest EMR ever without our employees’ continued efforts.”

EMR Defined:

EMR is an important measure of a construction company’s approach to safety, and the efforts taken to prevent injuries and accidents before they happen. The U.S. insurance industry uses EMR to adjust an employer’s workers’ compensation insurance premium based on their pre-existing claims history compared to other businesses in the same industry and state. EMRs also provide the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), as well as owners and buyers, with a quick tool for evaluating a constructor’s overall safety performance.

Granger’s 2019 EMR is nearly half the industry average of 1.0, and has continuously improved in recent years.

Granger’s Safety Champions:

“Achieving this type of EMR is a combined team effort,” says Brian Goodman, Granger Construction’s Corporate Safety Director. “I can think of many individuals who have helped Granger with this achievement, but if I had to narrow it down to a few champions, the following team members have recently made exceptional contributions to our safety culture.”

  • Carl Lamphere: As a Self-Perform Superintendent with Granger for almost 24 years, Carl puts a tremendous amount of thought into his projects, including getting ahead of safety issues or concerns. Teammates who have worked with Carl state he never lets anyone do anything he feels might be unsafe. Instead, Carl consistently makes time to plan work in a safe and productive manner.
  • Riley Thelen: A jobsite Foreman with over 12 years at Granger, Riley is another individual who always shows vigilance when it comes to safety. Riley is known for reminding team members and fellow trades-people of potential safety risks and is quick to identify and address hazardous situations on the jobsite.
  • Rich Grove: A Concrete Superintendent with Granger for over 5 years, Rich has been effectively using daily pre-task huddles to remind his team of potential hazards they will be exposed to while completing their tasks. He focuses on providing proper training for his crew, making sure they have the knowledge and tools to return home safe and injury-free at the end of each work shift.

“Other team members, like Marti Schrauben (Project Manager), Tiffany Spano (Project Manager) and Greg Brand (Director of Virtual Design and Construction) also come to mind as champions,” notes Goodman. “They’ll call to get clarification of specific safety standards and ensure not only Granger’s employees, but also our subcontractors, are completing tasks safely.”

Granger’s General Superintendent of Operations, Tom Owens, says Granger’s Safety Professionals, General Contracting, Yard/Shop and Self-Perform trades professionals should all feel proud of their contributions.

“These team members stay diligent every single day, through all types of weather and challenges,” Owens notes. “They keep up on trainings while maintaining project commitments, and hold one another to higher standards. It’s this team effort that ensures everyone returns home safely.”

The post 60 Year Safety Culture Reinforced by 0.55 EMR appeared first on Granger.

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As demand for oncology services continues rising, Granger joins Ann Arbor area residents in celebrating completion of St. Joseph Mercy Health System’s Cancer Center addition and renovation project.

MEETING A GROWING NEED To meet growing oncology needs, St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor partnered with Granger Construction to renovate and expand its Cancer Center. Image Credit: Dave Trumpie

Opening in 1993 as the Robert H. and Judy Dow Cancer Center, St. Joseph Cancer Center started with a staff of eight medical and radiation oncology specialists and three researchers. Today, this number has more than quadrupled, and the facility now accommodates over 40,000 patient visits per year (according to Rob Cassalou, president and CEO of Ann Arbor-based St. Joseph Mercy Health System).

To help meet this growing need, St. Joseph Mercy officials partnered with Granger Construction in August of 2017 to begin new construction and renovation work on the facility.

Plans for this project included:

  • 38 exam rooms and 22 private infusion bays
  • A reflection garden and courtyard
  • Work space for physicians, nurses, genetic counselors, dietitians, chaplains and social workers
  • An onsite pharmacy for chemotherapy services
  • A coffee shop in the front lobby
  • A new, two-story glass atrium and entrance

The project also included work on St. Joe’s National Cancer Institute Oncology Research Center, with space for 34 clinical research staff and a conference center equipped with video conference capabilities.

  • The newly renovated and expanded space should help to better serve the 40,000+ patient visits per year. Image Credit: Dave Trumpie
  • Granger completed work on 38 exam rooms and 22 private infusion bays. Image Credit: Dave Trumpie
  • To celebrate completion of the new space, St. Joseph Mercy Officials hosted a Grand Opening on Thursday, November 29, 2018.
CELEBRATING THE NEW SPACE

To celebrate completion of the new space, St. Joseph Mercy Officials hosted a Grand Opening on Thursday, November 29, 2018.

This celebration included a dedication and blessing, followed by a community open house. During the event, attendees received a first-hand look at various new and renovated areas, including a specially designed Infusion Center, tailored toward providing a better patient experience. Attendees also had the opportunity to learn about the 100+ clinical trials currently available at the Cancer Center.

“This is a fruition of a long-time dream,” said St. Joe’s Oncology Program Medical Director Dr. Philip Stella. “This building is a wonderful thing because it’s a place where we can provide the right kind of compassionate care and cutting-edge research. We will develop tomorrow’s breakthroughs here, and those breakthroughs will bring hope to our patients and their families.”

To learn about Granger’s other Cancer Center and Healthcare construction work, visit our Healthcare market page, or contact us today.

Feature Image Credit: Dave Trumpie

The post Cancer Center Expansion Complete at St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor appeared first on Granger.

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As Granger continues implementing Lean initiatives both on jobsites and in its offices, the company celebrates initial successes with a new cloud-based resource management software, ToolWatch.

With self-perform capability in both concrete and general trades, in addition to serving over six market segments across Michigan and the Midwest, Granger uses and stocks a vast supply of tools, equipment and materials. However, manually managing such a large, fluctuating inventory can prove difficult. Therefore, Granger team members were excited at the opportunity to begin testing a new cloud-based resource management system in 2018.

“The functionality of this program is amazing,” said Tom Owens, Granger’s General Superintendent. “Not only does it make it easier to request tools and equipment for onsite teams and to fulfill those requests for our Yard staff, it also provides valuable maintenance and benchmarking data.”

Granger employees across all site locations can make tool, equipment and material requests using Granger’s new Lean Resource Management Software, ToolWatch.

Now, rather than spending time calling in requests and waiting for Yard staff to verify item availability, Granger field superintendents can use ToolWatch’s new mobile app. They simply compile their list of items using the app’s requisition form, indicate when the items are needed, and submit the form.

The resource management system offers real-time data, so if items are not in stock, it gives Yard staff and onsite teams full visibility into each item’s location and availability. The program also allows easy transfer of tools, equipment and materials to different users or jobsites without requiring warehouse involvement, and integrates with Viewpoint, Granger’s project management software, to streamline operations and increase accuracy of job cost and billing charges.

All items in the warehouse are barcoded and entered in the system, and ToolWatch can track the location, purchase date and price of every tool or piece of equipment in stock, from something as simple as a saw blade to a 110-ton crane. It also tracks usage, maintenance history and return on investment.

All items in the warehouse are barcoded and entered in the system, and ToolWatch can track the location, purchase date and price of every tool or piece of equipment in stock.

“This information is extremely valuable, not only in significantly streamlining the requisition process, but also in helping the company make more informed purchasing decisions,” said Owens. “We look forward to watching the positive effect this new Lean initiative has on the entire company.”

The post Granger Implements Lean Resource Management System appeared first on Granger.

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Granger Senior Project Manager and K-12 Market Segment Leader, Jeff Tuley, offers advice on informed school bond voting.

Party affiliation notwithstanding, every election brings a chance of finding a K-12 school bond proposal on your ballot. As you consider your vote, will you make an informed decision, or one based on gut reaction?

As the main source of funding for capital projects (aside from private donations and grants), K-12 school bonds can range anywhere from hundreds of thousands to hundreds of millions of dollars – and voters who have not done due diligence before arriving at the polls may experience sticker shock. So how do you look past the intimidating numbers to ensure your vote supports your best interests? Granger’s Senior Project Manager and K-12 Market Segment Leader, Jeff Tuley, offers the following advice:

1) UNDERSTAND THE NEEDS.

“Everything has a life expectancy,” says Tuley, “and right now, most Michigan public schools are operating well beyond the life expectancy for systems. You have 75-year-old buildings that were built to last 50 years, and the facilities and maintenance staff at these schools have already done everything they can to keep things from falling apart. Eventually, duct tape and tenacity stop working and you need to invest in facility upgrades.”

Unfortunately, most schools do not have the money.

Michigan public schools are funded by tax payers on a per-student basis depending on the school district’s size and other factors. Overall that funding has decreased in past years, leaving schools operating on slim margins.

When a boiler breaks or the roof leaks, administrators must make difficult budget decisions or attempt to gain community support for a bond. If that bond fails, dollars must be diverted away from the students through measures such as laying off staff, consolidating learning spaces, or making similar sacrifices in schools where classroom sizes have already jumped from 20 to 30+ students.

2) UNDERSTAND THE NUMBERS.

If bonds are just meant to cover capital repair projects, why are they so expensive?

The short answer to this question is semantics.

According to language in the Michigan School Bond Qualification and Loan Program, bond funds are reserved for investment in new or upgraded facilities and may not be used for repairs. Therefore, when a school decides to push for a bond, they will often invest in a full facilities assessment to identify what systems are outdated or nearing end-of-life, and work with community members to identify a package of issues and opportunities they want the bond to address.

“We are experienced in conducting facilities assessments for K-12 schools,” Tuley notes. “We have an architect, a civil engineer, and Granger’s estimating team work for weeks, photographing, evaluating and documenting everything. We deliver a final list of opportunities and then it’s up to the school board, administrators and community to decide what their priorities should be and how much they think residents can afford to invest.”

3) UNDERSTAND THE BIGGER IMPACT.

Should residents without school age children vote to increase taxes to pay for facilities they will never use?

Tuley argues, “Yes.” Even community members with no K-12 school affiliation can benefit from new and upgraded facilities:

  1. Better schools increase property values.
  2. Businesses are more likely to invest in communities with strong schools.
  3. Communities can use school facilities for public events and programs unrelated to daily K-12 education (ex. Community Theater, arts programming, senior classes and group fitness activities).

“Communities are ultimately responsible for funding their public schools and it is up to community members to decide what they want that investment to be” says Tuley.

4) GET INVOLVED AND STAY INVOLVED.

What if a bond proposal does not include things you find important? Should you vote no to prove a point, and hope a better proposal will reach future ballots?

Tuley advises voters to be cautious when considering withholding their vote.

It costs money to conduct assessments and get on the voting schedule, and it takes time for the leadership of the school district to meet and develop a plan. There are definitely financial and time considerations with bond proposals.

“People vote no on bond issues for various reasons,” Tuley notes. “For instance, I know people who have children but who plan to vote no just because they are against something about the bond. Maybe it’s because they don’t have confidence in the leadership. Maybe they don’t like something that’s being done in the curriculum. Or maybe some of them are business owners with property that would be taxed at a higher level. I’ve seen a proposal voted down because it didn’t include tennis courts, and another voted down because it did.”

The challenge is that if someone just votes no, they are not passing along their reason why. Instead, if they proactively participated in bond meetings and open forums, sharing their thoughts and concerns earlier in the process, those issues can be dealt with as part of the bond. But if community members do not participate in these planning discussion, you never know.

“The best advice I can give,” offers Tuley, “is for voters to do their own due diligence, decide what is important to them, then be active. Have a voice, and be engaged in the planning process.”

Visit the Michigan Department of Treasury’s website to see upcoming school bond elections and results.

The post K-12 School Bonds: Things to Consider Before Voting appeared first on Granger.

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The Caro Center is one of only five state-operated psychiatric hospitals in Michigan.

Michigan takes one significant step toward addressing mental healthcare issues as it breaks ground on a new, state-of-the-art psychiatric hospital in Caro, Michigan. This facility will provide patients with improved recovery outcomes in a safer, more welcoming environment, while also addressing the state’s psychiatric facility shortage.

A Psychiatric Facility Shortage:

There is no argument that there has been a decades-long critical shortage of state psychiatric hospital beds in Michigan and across the country.

The Treatment Advocacy Center, a nonprofit working to improve treatment for severe mental illness, recommends 40 to 60 psychiatric beds for every 100,000 people. However, the current national average remains only 11.7.

With these numbers, the Treatment Advocacy Center estimates the country needs an additional 123,300 state psychiatric beds, along with more modern facilities and improved treatment programs, to sufficiently meet patients’ needs.

Celebrating Progress: Granger Executive Vice President, Dennis Carignan, presents Michigan Governor, Rick Snyder, with a ceremonial shovel during the historic Caro Center Groundbreaking.

As construction begins at the new Caro Psychiatric Hospital, Michiganders pause to celebrate the impact this facility will likely have on improving the state’s care options.

On Friday, October 19, Gov. Rick Snyder and other state leaders joined local lawmakers, hospital staff and the community for a ceremonial ground breaking at the construction site.

“The new Caro Psychiatric Hospital will help meet the long-term psychiatric care needs in Michigan,” Snyder said. “The existing Caro Center has served its patients well, but it’s an aging facility, and the time has come for it to be replaced with a modern facility that can provide a better environment for patient care.”

While the Caro Center originally opened in 1914 to care for people with epilepsy, the current facility provides service to adults with serious mental illness from 48 Michigan counties .

“We believe the benefits of a new hospital will affect our patient outcomes, our patient and family satisfaction, patient safety, staff efficiency and satisfaction, as well as organizational outcomes,” said Rose Laskowski, director of the Caro hospital.

The new hospital is also expected to positively impact the local community, maintaining 360 current jobs and adding at least 100 new positions. Currently, the Caro Center is the second-largest employer in Tuscola County.

Granger’s Role:

Granger Construction is honored to play a role in reducing the national psychiatric facility shortage by serving as Construction Manager for the new $115 million Caro Center Psychiatric Hospital. The 225,000 square-foot facility is scheduled to be completed in 2021, and will have capacity to serve 200 adults (with 50 additional beds than previously housed).

The post New Caro Hospital Addresses Michigan Psychiatric Facility Shortage appeared first on Granger.

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As chapels in healthcare settings continue taking on new life, Granger Construction is proud to have assisted St. Mary Mercy Hospital in Livonia with recent efforts to provide a more modern and diverse worship space.

On September 11, 2018, St. Mary Mercy Hospital hosted a ribbon cutting and blessing ceremony to celebrate completion of their new 2,600 square foot chapel.

The former structure (which will be repurposed for medical education) was over 40 years old and in need of significant upgrades. With completion of the new facility, St. Mary Mercy Hospital patients, staff and visitors gain access to a state-of-the-art space for rest, reflection and healing.

While the new chapel continues to honor St. Mary Mercy’s Catholic heritage with facilities for celebrating Catholic mass, the space has also been designed to encourage use by people of all faiths and backgrounds. For instance, one prayer room within the facility has been constructed facing Mecca and includes shoe racks, washing stations and other features for those practicing Islamic faith traditions.

“The new chapel is an important addition that allows us to meet the needs of our patients, visitors, staff and community members who seek healing for their body, mind and spirit,” said David Spivey, President and CEO of St. Mary Mercy Livonia.

Some other noteworthy details found in the chapel include:

  • A healing garden with Japanese maple tree and rock garden
  • Multiple prayer rooms
  • A modern-styled alter made from limestone excavated in Wisconsin, MI
  • A tabernacle from the recently closed All Saints Catholic Church in southwest Detroit
  • Stations of the Cross repurposed from closed parishes in Wisconsin and Ohio
  • A hand-carved crucifix from Germany

Granger Construction served as the Construction Management firm on this project, while the space was designed by Ply Architecture.

The post St. Mary Mercy Hospital Diversifies with Modern Worship Space appeared first on Granger.

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Lansing Community College recently welcomed a new landmark on campus with the completion and dedication of a new clock tower on Wednesday, September 19.

While team members at Granger Construction proudly assisted in construction of the new six-story timepiece, the LCC clock tower was made possible by a generous donation from Glenn and Trish Granger in honor of parents Alton and Janice Granger.

Over the years, Alton and Janice Granger have repeatedly supported educational opportunities and improvements for the Lansing Community. Therefore, Glenn and Trish thought it only fitting that the new clock tower could serve as a timeless reminder of their parents’ tradition of caring.

The post LCC Clock Tower Dedication appeared first on Granger.

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Granger Construction was honored to participate in the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) West Michigan chapter’s 32 annual Excellence in Construction Awards on Thursday, September 13, 2018.

Project Award

During the event, Granger team members received a project award in the “New Construction over $10 Million” category for work done on the Health Pointe Integrated Care Facility, in Grand Haven, MI.

Also competing in this category were 5 other projects.

About the Project

The Health Pointe Integrated Care Facility is a state-of-the-art complex, offering comprehensive healthcare in one convent location. With a three-story Mixed Office Building and a one-story Ambulatory Surgical Center, the new facility offers the following features:

  • Urgent Care
  • Radiology Suite
  • Orthopedic Suite
  • Various Primary Care Options
  • OR Suite
  • Endoscopy Suite
  • PACU/Prep and Recovery Units

Health Pointe began in September of 2016 as a partnership between Holland Hospital and Spectrum Health to provide extensive primary care and urgent care service to the Grand Haven, MI community, and Granger was brought onboard to serve as the Construction Management firm for this $30+ Million initiative.

Despite delays and working through two harsh West Michigan winters, Granger was extremely proud to complete the project in January of 2018, one month ahead of schedule.

“I think our purposeful pre-planning and pre-task exercises, along with continuous collaboration between everyone involved on the project were largely responsible for our success,” says Ryan Snellenberger (Granger Construction Superintendent for Health Pointe). “This was a great opportunity for Granger to further display our strong management capabilities in West Michigan, and we are honored that this project has been recognized for an Excellence in Construction award.”

The post ABC West Michigan 2018 Excellence in Construction Awards appeared first on Granger.

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