Loading...

Follow German Neuroscience Center Dubai on Feedspot


Valid
or
Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook

On the holy month of Ramadan, we are wishing you and your family 4 weeks of blessings, 30 days of clemency, and 720 hours of enlightenment. Ramadan Kareem! Our Clinic Ramadan Timings are from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm Sunday -Thursday. Have a blessed Holy Month of Ramadan, Your GNC Team

The post Ramadan Kareem 2018 appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When two become one, it’s easy to assume what’s yours is theirs and vice versa. But the very nature of technology is forcing couples to redefine the rules

Privacy in marriage – is there such a thing when two become one? That was the hot talking point of a recent editorial meeting. The debate is probably as old as the institution of marriage itself. However, the advent of technology – and all the possibilities that it brings – has certainly lent the dialogue a renewed energy, not to mention, fresh perspective. Speaking to an array of folks, we found that opinions on the matter are as sharply divided as they are asserted. For while some believe that there can be no exceptions to the ‘openness cultivates trust’ rule, others are far keener to maintain a sense of their own individuality in their unions, rejecting what they see as an unreasonable demand for spousal control. Still others feel it may just be possible to have the best of both worlds. […]

Ironically, the point of contention for most has to do with extremely subjective views of what ‘trust’ means. While one camp believes an unwillingness to share passwords is a red flag indicating lack of trust, the other maintains the offence lies in asking for them in the first place. Dr Kennon Rider, a marriage and family therapist at the German Neuroscience Center, believes it’s both – and neither. “It depends on the spoken and unspoken ‘rules’ that individuals bring with them into the marriage,” he says.

Some people grow up in families where transparency and open sharing of information is the norm, he explains. These people are more likely to reach marriage and expect the same from themselves and their partners. “However, these same people, after leaving their families of origin, could have had experiences with broken trust that now shape their ‘rules’ about privacy and disclosure. In short, if a couple agrees on the ‘rules’ – whether to openly share passwords and information, or to respect the other’s privacy – either policy will work. The trouble comes when there is a disagreement about those rules.” […]

As a general rule, Dr Rider notes that honesty and openness is the best policy in marriage. However, he cautions, there could also be such a thing as over-sharing with your spouses. “Some of the professional literature would call such over-sharing ‘enmeshment’ – and that term is not complimentary. While it may, at first glance, look romantic for there to be no secrets whatsoever between a couple (every thought, feeling, behaviour is shared), it also removes the mystery, the excitement of not knowing but of discovering over time.”

How to find middle ground with your partner on the subject of privacy – Courtesy: Dr Kennon Rider

• Have a calm conversation about the roots of your beliefs on transparency and privacy.

• Discuss personal experiences from your pasts that have shaped your current thinking about these issues.

• Try to empathise, and not be defensive, once both of you have a good understanding of where the other is coming from.

• Seek professional help to get unstuck if you find that arguments on the subject are consistently the norm.

Original full article published in Khaleej Times on May 4, 2018

The post Does privacy exist in a marriage? – Khaleej Times Article appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The free support group is being launched by Katja, the sister of an anorexia patient, and supported by the German Neuroscience Center. It should help families of people who suffer from anorexia nervosa and associated eating disorders.

The Swiss national, resident in Dubai for three years, has launched a UAE support group for families after seeing her sister go through anorexia nervosa for 20 years. “I could see her and do nothing about it,” Katja said while speaking to Khaleej Times.

Date: Tonight, April 30

Time: 7 – 8 pm

Location: German Neuroscience Center – Jumeirah Lake Towers Branch

Call for reservation: 04 4298 578

The post TONIGHT – FREE ANOREXIA SUPPORT GROUP – CALL FOR RESERVATION appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The free support group is being launched by Katja, the sister of an anorexia patient, and supported by the German Neuroscience Center. It should help families of people who suffer from anorexia nervosa and associated eating disorders.

After watching her sister suffer from an eating disorder for 20 long years and not being able to do anything about it, Katja Geiser, thought it was high time she shared her feelings as a family to help others who were in the same spot as her.

The Swiss national, resident in Dubai for three years, has launched a UAE support group for families after seeing her sister go through anorexia nervosa for 20 years. “I could see her and do nothing about it,” Katja said while speaking to Khaleej Times.

According to the National Eating Disorder Association, up to 70 million people suffer from eating disorders worldwide. Approximately 50 per cent of those with anorexia nervosa make a full recovery.

“For as long as I can remember I knew my sister had issues with food, but it was only recently that I was able to accept she’s anorexic and allow myself to see her condition for what it is,” she said.

She also said that her sister did not understand her condition. “I am very close to my sister but it was difficult to tell her what was going on,” said Katja.

“Over the years, the situation has had a profound impact on our family in so many different ways and my parents and I have all struggled with emotions we’ve found difficult to deal with. One of the worst things is feeling powerless to help someone you love and acknowledging that the person suffering needs to help themselves,” she added.

“My sister has faced an incredibly hard and painful journey herself and her story as a sufferer is very different from ours as a family. That’s what led me to create a space where families could share their stories and seek support from each other.”

The support group is being launched in Dubai, to help the families of people who suffer from anorexia nervosa and associated eating disorders.

The free support group is being held at the German Neuroscience Center in Jumeirah Lake Towers every six weeks, with the first session taking place on April 30 from 7 pm to 8 pm.

Selma Yanik, psychologist at the German Neuroscience Centre explains: “Eating disorders, such as anorexia and bulimia, play out in extremely complex ways and watching a loved one suffer is emotionally devastating for the family and friends. Just as the sufferer needs to seek help, those close to them also need support and advice. A group like this provides somewhere safe and informal to address their feelings and share experiences with others who understand.” […]

The full article was originally published in Khaleej Times on April 22, 2018

The post Eating Disorder Support Group In Dubai – Khaleej Times appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A Swiss expat in Dubai is launching a new support group to help families of people suffering from anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders.

Katja Geiser told XPRESS the free support group will conduct regular meetings at the German Neuroscience Centre in Jumeirah Lake Towers every six weeks, with the first session taking place on April 30, between 7 and 8pm.

She said she was prompted to launch the group as she had seen how eating disorders could adversely affect people and their families. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders anorexia nervosa is characterised as a disorder in which the person refuses to maintain a minimally normal weight, intensely fears gaining weight, and significantly misinterprets his/her body and shape.

Fabian Sarloos, clinical and health psychologist at the German Neuroscience Centre, said, “The disorder has been recognised for many decades, and is more prevalent in females than in males, and usually has its onset in adolescence. Psychological issues related to feelings of helplessness and difficulty establishing autonomy, as well as desires for ultimate control over the body, have been suggested as contributing to the development of the disorder. Patients with anorexia nervosa frequently find support for their practices in society’s emphasis on thinness and exercise.”

He said anorexia nervosa is characterised by willful and purposeful behaviour directed toward losing weight, preoccupation with body weight and food, peculiar patterns of handling food, intense fear of gaining weight and disturbance of body image.

“About 50 per cent of this lot will lose weight by drastically reducing their food intake, and some will also develop rigorous exercising programmes. The other half will regularly engage in binge eating followed by purging behaviours. Because of their fear of gaining weight, they show peculiar behaviour about food and eating habits.”

“One of the worst things here is feeling powerless to help someone you love and acknowledging that the person suffering needs to help themselves”

Geiser said, “Over the years, the situation can have a profound impact on the patient. It’s a huge challenge for the family too as they have to deal with difficult emotions. One of the worst things here is feeling powerless to help someone you love and acknowledging that the person suffering needs to help themselves. So, I wanted to create a space where families could share their stories and seek support from each other.”

The article was originally published April 11, 2018 Gulf News XPRESS 

The post Support for people with eating disorders in UAE appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Relocating to a new community isn’t always plain sailing. Here’s how you can make the transition to a new place you’ll call home as easily and smoothly as possible.

A new home, community, or school can all be very scary for kids. Even if it’s within the same emirate, The Dubai Frame stands witness to how different two communities just a few kilometers apart can be. Kids move to a new home, with new rooms that carry no memories or belongings of sentimental value. It can often mean completely new friends or a new school, which defamiliarizes the notion of home sweet home. “A change of surroundings can lead to various emotions in kids: anxiety over the unfamiliarity of the new ‘strange’ environment, sadness about the loss of the old home and friends, feelings of loneliness, and anger towards parents and the new environment,” says Dr Fabian Saarloos, clinical and health psychologist at the German Neuroscience Center in Dubai.

These factors can lead to resistance and make integration into the new community very difficult. So how can you ensure your kids don’t experience any negative emotions associated with the move and embrace their new environment?

Positive social interactions

“Involvement in positive social interactions through play dates or community activities is very important,” adds Dr Saarloos. “A community’s social cohesion is crucial, so find out if there are more families with kids who may be able to support yours.”

Consider the safety and kid-friendly aspects of your new community, too. Dubai is a busy city, so areas where there are parks, playgrounds and facilities including nurseries, schools and health centres are ideal.

New school

A new community often means a new school. So how can your kids adjust faster? “It’s difficult for expat kids here, particularly non-English-speaking children, to integrate into their new school and make friends,” explains Dr Saarloos. “If other students live in the area, come from the same background and speak their language, it’ll be easier for them to connect and keep up at school.”

The psychologist recommends that when choosing a school, you consider the institution’s philosophy and how it matches your idea of a good education or your country of origin’s curriculum. “Also, consider how diverse the school is,” Dr Saarloos adds. “The more diverse it is, the more kids will be exposed to other cultures and learn from each other.”

You should also evaluate the extra-curricular activities on offer at the school, in addition to language development programmes and classes, since this is a very important aspect of child development. This is especially relevant if your kids are still learning English, which is the prevalent language of instruction in UAE schools. Similarly, you need to ensure that kids are still practicing their own language.

Art imitates life

Dr Saarloos says that parents could also watch kids’ movies that illustrate the consequences of a big move on children. A good example is record-breaking Pixar animation Inside Out, which follows the psychological implications of a young girl’s move to another home. Such movies can give parents a deeper insight into what really goes on in kids’ minds during this kind of upheaval.

“Inside Out really quite accurately reflects how the brain produces sadness in order to mourn the loss of the old environment, while at the same time cognitively changing the representation of what has been lost into memory,” Dr Saarloos explains.

Loving their new home

“You should listen to and analyse your kids’ expectations, and constantly highlight the new environment’s advantages. When it comes to the home, try to integrate elements of your home country including traditions, food, furniture and more,” Dr Saarloos says. In order to love their new home, kids need to feel safe and in control of their environment, and receive positive re-enforcement. The more friends and pleasurable activities the new environment offers, the more they’ll feel at ease and stimulated by their surroundings to interact, and thus integrate much faster.

The article was originally published by Time Out Dubai, 1 April 2018

The post Moving with Kids – Psychological Challenges – Time Out Magazine feat Dr. Fabian appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Changing the conversation around disease like Multiple Sclerosis in Dubai

CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta meets a young woman pioneering open dialogue about diseases like MS in Dubai. See Dr. Manio von Maravic, Neurologist at Dubai’s German Neuroscience Center, in talk with Maha:

The post CNN – Maha and Dr Manio talk about Multiple Sclerosis in Dubai appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

You’ve probably had your parents tell you to stop listening to so much music, but the right kind of music can actually have a positive impact on your brain. Dr. Manio von Maravic, neurologist, German Neuroscience Center, Dubai has spent a part of his illustrious career studying how the brain actually reacts to music.

Dr. Maravic equates listening to music to a brain workout as it requires the coordination of all areas of the brain, “Your ears send the music in the form of electronic nerve signals to different lobes of the brain, and each of those lobes have a complex job — to understand those signals and put the information together so that, at the end of this process, you are able to hear the music.” The brain enables you to feel a wide-range of emotions and understand the rhythm of each musical piece.

“When you’re listening to music, the brain is in an activated state, and this activation might help you to perform better in your daily life as it exercises your brain,” he explains.

Listening to music and learning to play a musical instrument also impacts your abilities to memorise, learn and concentrate. It can also improve brain functions, including reading and literacy skills as well as mathematical abilities. “We’ve found that listening to positive music or playing an instrument can actually help you learn better. The rhythm inherent in music also stimulates the cerebellum, which is the part of the brain that helps in coordinating your movements. Hyperactive kids have done better on schools tests when they listened to soothing music beforehand,” he tells us. If you’ve listened to the same upbeat song on a loop and still can’t get enough of it, it’s because listening to positive music also causes your brain to produce a specific hormone called dopamine. This hormone is required by the brain to stimulate positive feelings like happiness and love. But, the key to all this is listening to the right kind of music.

“If you’re already in a bad mood, listening to sad songs will just enhance those feelings,” he says. “Negative lyrics can manipulate your feelings and provoke aggression, which might make it difficult to focus,” he adds.

“Listening to positive music or playing an instrument can actually help you learn better.” – Dr. Manio von Maravic, neurologist, German Neuroscience Center, Dubai

Also, your parents are right when they ask you to not blast music while you have headphones on. Listening to music at a high volume can damage your hearing ability. “Hearing loss due to the use of headphones in this way has become more frequent,” he warns. Soothing music can help students relax and help with stress and anxiety while studying, but listening to songs that are heavy on lyrics while reading or writing tends to be less efficient. Dr. Maravic says that positive music — like listening to Mozart — can also aid with endurance during your long study sessions.

He encourages Young Times readers to learn an instrument to activate the part of their brain that controls motor skills and memory. Being a musician also improves communication skills as you are working with other musicians to create your masterpieces. Further, it can help your Math skills because reading music requires you to count notes and rhythms. “Learn to love music from all cultures and make music a part of your life. This can help to bring the world together and create friendships independent of cultural and national differences,” he advises.

The Article was originally published in Young Times by Aakanksha Tangri, March 18, 2018

The post How Music Makes You Smarter appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Expert psychologist, Dr. Fabian, goes into the pros and cons of UAE children growing up in a culture other than that of their parents

Dubai: A Moroccan man and his Dutch wife in Dubai are often at loggerheads as they both have strong belief systems which they feel their only child should imbibe. While the man values religion and is an emotional character, the woman is non-religious, rational and tries to suppress her emotions. Both met in the UAE and got married. They speak in English, stick to their own cultures and make little effort to understand each other’s traditions. Their families have no contact.

Elsewhere in the UAE, a young Syrian woman who has seen her native place crumble to pieces, has been diagnosed with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. On the one hand, she misses her true identity and the culture associated with it. On the other, she wants to assimilate new values that would liberate her from the past. The tearing conflict in her mind is something she finds hard to resolve.

In a third household, an Emirati mother is facing difficulties with her children. She sent them to an international school but finds them too westernised now. She often pulls them up and this leads to stress and arguments at home.

Situations like these abound in the UAE, says Dr Fabian Saarloos, clinical and health psychologist at the German Neuroscience Centre.

As someone who works closely with such families, he has some rare insights into what he calls the ‘third culture’ and the psyche of kids who are part of it.

“I too am a third culture kid. Third culture kids refer to children raised in a culture other than their parents’ original culture,” says the Dutchman who grew up in the UAE.

Different influences…continue reading on Gulf News

The full original article was published in Gulf News XPRESS, March 7, 2018

The post Inside The Mind Of ‘Third Culture’ Kids In Dubai appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Dr Fadwa Lkorchy, psychologist at German Neuroscience Centre in Dubai, advises youngsters to avoid peer pressure regarding the kind of content they should watch.

Parents, she believes, have a strong role to play in helping their children fight peer pressure and be able to make their own choices.

“Youngsters should be empowered by their parents and school,” Lkorchy said. “This would give them the ability to stand up for what they dislike and say no.”

Lkorchy also stressed that youngsters nowadays have a misconception about the term “cool”.

With wide-ranging definitions of what is ‘cool’, the outcome for a child who has no clear understanding of the term and is dictated to by what others say or believe can often be unpleasant.

“Kids and teenagers should understand that getting good grades, and excelling in any kind of sport is what makes them ‘cool’,” Lkorchy said. “Kids should also know that those who pressure them to watch YouTube that can be a bad influence is a negative thing.”

As for parents who are confronted with the reality of kids watching too much YouTube, Lkorchy advises them to take firm action. “Parents are obliged to remove the tool [gadget], whether a phone or tablet, that connects their kids to YouTube.”

Watching YouTube, with the right content, for half an hour or an hour per day is more than enough for youngsters, she said.

Lkorchy also expressed concern about the parental tendency, among some, to use YouTube as a tool to keep their kids quiet.

“Parents should realize that society doesn’t raise their kids; they do,” Lkorchy said.

It is the responsibility of parents to create conducive circumstances for their children to seek other means of entertainment and learning.

“Parents should involve their kids in physical activities to help them stay away from spending too much time on YouTube.”

Parents should also make sure that their children are watching appropriate content on YouTube.

“Monitor the videos that children are watching, making sure that there are no other links for inappropriate content.”

Original article published in Gulf News Dubai, February 16, 2018, Falak Kassab

The post Peer pressure for YouTube content a negative influence appeared first on German Neuroscience Center Dubai.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview