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I realize I’m a little late to the velvet yarn party but what else is new? ;) I actually bought several skeins of Bernat Velvet when it first came out, because I was immediately drawn to it! But the first couple things I was trying to make didn’t quite work out (not the yarn’s fault!), so that’s why I’m late sharing anything about it.

So far, I’ve designed two hat patterns with velvet that I’m really happy with! The first was my Velvet Witch Hat for Halloween, and the newest is my Velvet Cloche.

Velvet yarn is so unique, I feel like there’s a little bit of a learning curve with it. So, I want to share a few tips that I hope will help you enjoy this yarn a little more!

#1 Work from the outside of the skein to avoid tangles

I’ve heard numerous people say that they’ve experienced some gnarly tangles with this yarn! With it being fuzzy, it’s definitely hard to see what’s going on when you have a tangle, so I totally understand how it can be so bad (and frustrating!) when you run into one. It happened to me once where I ripped out the entire center of the skein trying to figure out what the heck was going on. I decided from then on, I would work from the outside of the skein rather than the center to avoid this.

#2 Crochet tight to avoid sloppy stitches

Because velvet yarn is slippery, it can be a little difficult to get your stitches as tight as you’d like, which can lead to them looking a bit sloppy. On some of my first swatches, I had some weird long loops hanging off where a stitch was too loose. Going down a hook size was an easy fix for this problem, for me.  Also, I definitely recommend swatching before jumping into a project with this yarn, just so you can figure this out because see #3!

#3 Avoid frogging or buy extra yarn

I noticed that when I had to frog, this yarn ends up looking smashed. I might be too critical, but I thought it was pretty noticeable when I reused the frogged yarn. You could definitely tell which parts of my project were made with previously frogged yarn and which were not. I like to think of it as crushed velvet. It’s not ruined, it’s just a different look! I just personally prefer to save it for a different project where it’s not combined with the non-frogged yarn, so in this case, it was handy to have extra.

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Ever since I made the Velvet Witch Hat last Halloween, I’ve been wanting a similar but non-pointy version of it. You know, a more everyday kind of hat! ;) This simple cloche is exactly that and I’m so pleased with out it turned out using the same Bernat Velvet yarn!

I see this as the type of hat that you could wear when you want something cozy like a beanie, but fancier! Because when you make something with velvet, it really can’t help but feel a little fancy, right? :) It can easily be dressed up or down depending on how casual (or not!) the rest of your outfit is.

This super beginner friendly hat is made entirely with double crochets and best of all, both sizes use less than half a skein of Bernat Velvet so you can make one for yourself and one for a friend!

DOWNLOAD THE PATTERN

You can find the FREE pattern by scrolling down. A print friendly, ad free PDF of this pattern is also available to download for a small fee. If you enjoy my patterns, please consider purchasing the PDF – your support will help me keep the new patterns coming! :)

>> CLICK HERE TO GET THE PDF ON ETSY <<
>> CLICK HERE TO GET THE PDF ON RAVELRY << Yarn

Bernat Velvet, #5 bulky weight yarn: Approximately 130 yards (size small) / 150 yards (size medium) of #32007-Indigo Velvet

Materials

US Size J/10 (6mm) crochet hook or size needed to obtain gauge, yarn needle, scissors

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you click & make a purchase, I will receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps to ensure that I’m able to continue posting free patterns and tutorials! Thank you for your support! :)

Difficulty

Easy

Finished Measurements

Size Small:
Length: 8” (from center of top to edge of brim, laid flat)
Circumference before brim: 22” (at round 11)

Size Medium:
Length: 9” (from center of top to edge of brim, laid flat)
Circumference before brim: 24” (at round 12)

Gauge

6 dc and 3 rows = 2”

Abbreviations

ch(s) – chain(s), dc – double crochet, st(s) – stitch(es), sl st – slip stitch

Notes

1. Pattern is worked in joined rounds, starting at the top.
2. Ch 2 at beginning of rounds will always count as 1 dc.
3. If you would prefer the brim to be stiffer, you could crochet the final round over a piece of jewelry wire.

Size Small Instructions:

Make magic ring.
Round 1: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc now and through out), 11 dc in ring, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 12 dc.

Round 2: Ch 2, 1 dc in same st, 2 dc in each st around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 24 dc.

Round 3: Ch 2, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in next st, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 36 dc.

Round 4: Ch 2, 1 dc in next st, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 48 dc.

Round 5: Ch 2, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 60 dc.

Round 6-11: Ch 2, 1 dc in each st around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 60 dc.

Round 12: Ch 2, 1 dc in each of the next 4 sts, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 5 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 70 dc.

Round 13: Ch 2, 1 dc in each of the next 5 sts, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 80 dc.

Round 14: Ch 2, 1 dc in each of the next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 7 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, invisible join to top of ch 2 and fasten off – 90 dc.

Size Medium Instructions:

Make magic ring.
Round 1: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc now and through out), 10 dc in ring, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 11 dc.

Round 2: Ch 2, 1 dc in same st, 2 dc in each st around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 22 dc.

Round 3: Ch 2, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in next st, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 33 dc.

Round 4: Ch 2, 1 dc in next st, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 44 dc.

Round 5: Ch 2, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 55 dc.

Round 6: Ch 2, 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 4 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 66 dc.

Round 7-12: Ch 2, 1 dc in each st around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 66 dc.

Round 13: Ch 2, 1 dc in each of the next 4 sts, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 5 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 77 dc.

Round 14: Ch 2, 1 dc in each of the next 5 sts, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, sl st to top of ch 2 to join – 88 dc.

Round 15: Ch 2, 1 dc in each of the next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in each of the next 7 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around, invisible join to top of ch 2 and fasten off – 99 dc.

TERMS OF USE

You are welcome and encouraged to sell any items you make using this pattern! All I ask in return is that when selling online, please credit Julie King / Gleeful Things & provide a link to www.gleefulthings.com.

You may NOT sell the pattern, distribute it in any form, repost it online, or alter it to claim it as your own. Copyright © 2019 Julie King / Gleeful Things. All Rights Reserved.

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>> Click here to purchase <<

Once each year, I have a massive sale where I offer ALL of my crochet pattern PDFs for a crazy low price! It’s such a low price that even if you already own several of my patterns, you’ll still be saving a ton of money on the rest! This year, I have 53 crochet patterns and you can get them all for only $25!

If you enjoy all of the free patterns, tutorials and videos I post, I would be so grateful if you would consider showing your support for my work by taking advantage of this bundle! It really is the best possible deal I’ll be offering on them being a discount of $169.39!

>> Click here to purchase <<
53 Crochet Patterns for $25

Offer expires March 5th, 2019

Click here to see the patterns you’ll receive. Everything you see on that page is included in this bundle!

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Today I want to share one of my very favorite things with you! I call this my “crochet to-go kit”. There might be a better name for it but really, that’s exactly what it is. These are my most commonly used crochet tools and I put them all together in one small case that I can easily throw in my purse or project bag when I think I’m going to want to crochet on the go!

It all started with this pink case that I found at Hobby Lobby. There are glasses cases out there that are very similar, so you could definitely go that route if you wanted to put one together for yourself! But Hobby Lobby sells this one for $1.99, right next to all the crochet hooks and I thought it was perfect!

The first thing I put in is hooks! My Clover Amour size H/5mm & I/5.5mm are pretty much always in there because I use them the most. But the rest get switched out depending on what I’m working on at the time.

I make sure to always keep a couple yarn needles in there as well as some stitch markers. On top of all that, I add a small pair of scissors. I use these 4″ Fiskars ones and find that if I put them in with the tip down, they fit perfectly and leave just enough room on top for my measuring tape!

Really, this is everything that I need for most projects, aside from the yarn obviously! ;) I’ve taken it with me on so many trips and it always accompanies me on my days spent crocheting on the beach! Even when I’m at home, it’s nice to know that my essentials are all in one place, so its worked out really well for me to be able to keep everything together in this case that hardly takes up any space!

Do you have a similar way of keeping your tools together on the go? 

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you click & make a purchase, I will receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps to ensure that I’m able to continue posting free patterns and tutorials! Thank you for your support! :)

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When I was first learning to crochet, I really had no idea what yarn weights were or that they even existed, and that is my inspiration for writing this post. Because in the time that I’ve been publishing patterns, I’ve noticed that it’s kind of a common topic of confusion, not just with beginners, but for anyone who is newer to using patterns. So if you too, don’t quite get what the heck yarn weights are, don’t worry, I’m here to thoroughly explain!

First of all, yarn weight categories are NOT relevant to the physical weight of the yarn. Actually, they refer to the thickness of the yarn.

Now you might be wondering, why is that even important?

One of the most common questions I get about crochet patterns is regarding yarn substitution. “Can I use ____ yarn instead for this pattern?”. And to answer that question, if ____ yarn is the same weight category as what the pattern calls for, most likely, yes. However, if ____ yarn is from a different weight category, usually no.

Think about it like this; if you’re following a hat pattern that calls for a thin yarn, you really can’t substitute a thicker yarn because it will make your hat come out too big.

I know we all have our favorite yarns that we would love to use all the time, but unfortunately, you definitely cannot use any & every yarn for any & every pattern out there. So, understanding yarn weights is the key to knowing which yarns you can substitute when working with a pattern.

So how to do you know which yarn is which weight category? Typically yarn labels will have a little yarn symbol on them that has a number on it. That is your yarn’s weight category. Below, I’m going to list the weight categories along with some examples of each:

0 – Lace

Examples: Knit Picks Aloft, Malabrigo Lace, Cascade Alpaca Lace

1 – Super Fine, a.k.a. “sock” or “fingering”

Examples: Loops & Threads Woolike, Lion Brand Sock-Ease, Knit Picks Palette

2 – Fine, a.k.a. “sport”

Examples: Premier Cotton Fair, Lion Brand Ice Cream, Knit Picks Andean Treasure

3 – Light, a.k.a “DK”

Examples: Patons Grace, Cascade Ultra Pima, Lion Brand Mandala

4 – Medium, a.k.a. “worsted”

Examples: Red Heart Soft, Caron Cakes, Lily Sugar n Cream

5 – Bulky, a.k.a. “chunky”

Examples: Bernat Velvet, Patons Shetland Chunky, Loops & Threads Charisma

6 – Super Bulky

Examples: Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick & Quick, Bernat Blanket, Loops & Threads Cozy Wool

7 – Jumbo

Examples: Red Heart Collage, Red Heart Grande, Bernat Maker Big

I hope that if you were confused by yarn weights, that you now have a solid idea of what they are! If you have any questions, please ask in the comments and I’ll try to add to this post to make it even more helpful!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you click & make a purchase, I will receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps to ensure that I’m able to continue posting free patterns and tutorials! Thank you for your support! :)

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The V stitch is a great beginner stitch because it’s made of just double crochets & chains. If you work it up using a solid colored yarn, you can expect it to look something like the example below.

But you can also create some neat effects with it by using a multi-colored yarn. As you can see in my Mountains Cowl, the yarn changes colors which will reveal a subtle zig zag pattern in some places. You can also use two different colors, changing colors in each row to create a more obvious zig zag, as shown above.

Below, you’ll find written instructions as well as a video tutorial to help you get started with this stitch!

Abbreviations

ch(s) – chain(s), dc – double crochet

Notes

Each [1 dc in next ch/ch space, ch 1, 1 dc in same ch/ch space] = 1 V stitch.

Instructions

To begin, chain multiples of 3, plus 4. For this example, I’m starting with 22 chs.

Row 1: 1 dc in 5th ch from hook (previous chs count as 1 dc), ch 1, 1 dc in same ch, *skip 2 chs, 1 dc in next ch, ch 1, 1 dc in same ch; repeat from * across until 2 chs remain, skip 1 ch, 1 dc in final ch – 2 dc + 6 V sts.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc) & turn, *1 dc in next ch space, ch 1, 1 dc in same ch space; repeat from * across, 1 dc in final dc – 2 dc + 6 V sts.

Repeat row 2 until you reach your desired size.

Video Instructions

Watch the video tutorial below or on YouTube and let me show you how to work this easy stitch!

Crochet V Stitch Easy Tutorial - YouTube

Try these patterns to use this stitch

Here are a few patterns that I’ve designed, that use this stitch. The two cowls are very beginner friendly and the hats are only a tiny bit more difficult.

Canyons Cowl

Mountains Cowl

Festival Slouchy Hat

Ziggy Beanie

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Are you wondering what the magic ring, a.k.a. the magic circle, is? Simply put, it’s an awesome little technique that is the ideal way to start a crochet project that will be worked in a round that needs to be cinched closed in the center (think hats!).

It’s an alternative to working into a chain. You may notice that a hat pattern, for example, would instruct you to chain 3 and then proceed to make a round of double crochets into the 3rd chain from the hook. Well, the magic ring works in place of that 3rd chain from the hook.

The reason the magic ring is so cool is that it’s really easy to close up! Have you ever ended up with a hole in the center of the beginning round when using the chain method? When you use the magic ring, all you have to do is pull on the tail and it’ll close that hole right up!

VIDEO INSTRUCTIONS

Watch the video tutorial below or on YouTube and let me show you how to start your project with the magic ring!

Magic Ring Crochet Tutorial - YouTube

If you have any questions about this technique, feel free to ask here in the comments, or on YouTube! :)

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A few years ago, I released the Mountains Cowl crochet pattern, and it got so much love! It had been my intention for quite a while to also write a super bulky version of the pattern, that could be whipped up quickly. When I saw Red Heart Stellar in the color, Meteorite, I was inspired to do just that! It’s a bouclé yarn, which in the past, I haven’t exactly loved. But I thought it was perfect for this!

This pattern is really pretty basic, just V stitches (or double crochets and chains, if you aren’t familar with the V stitch yet). So I really wanted to use a yarn that would make a basic stitch pattern a little more exciting. Bouclé yarn seemed like just the thing and Stellar even has some sparkle in it!

Just like the yarn that I designed the Mountains Cowl with, this yarn has slight color changes in it, which will reveal a subtle zig zag pattern in some places as you work. Using a solid color would obviously be just as cozy! ;) Or you might choose to change colors each round to create a more obvious zig zag pattern.

My favorite thing about this oversized cowl is that it’s long enough to pull up over your head to wear it as a hood, if you’d like. And it’s still plenty long to keep your neck covered and cozy. I also think it would look awesome with fringe around the bottom, should you choose to add that! :)

Download The Pattern

You can find the FREE pattern by scrolling down. A convenient, print friendly, ad free PDF of this pattern is also available for a small fee, if you’d like.

>> CLICK HERE TO GET THE PDF ON ETSY CLICK HERE TO GET THE PDF ON RAVELRY
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The linen stitch, also known as the granite stitch or moss stitch, is one of my absolute favorites! It’s so simple but creates a beautiful texture. To work this stitch, all you need to know how to do is single crochet and chain. Below, you’ll find written instructions as well as a video tutorial to help you get started with this stitch!

ABBREVIATIONS

ch(s) – chain(s), sc – single crochet

NOTE:

Ch 2 in beginning of rows always counts as 1 ch space.

INSTRUCTIONS:

To begin, chain an odd number. For this example, I’m starting with 23 chs.

Row 1: (1st 2 chs count as 1 ch space) 1 sc in 3rd ch from hook, *ch 1, skip 1 ch, 1 sc in next ch; repeat from * across – 11 sc + 11 ch spaces.

Row 2: Ch 2 & turn, 1 sc in 1st ch space, *ch 1, skip 1 sc, 1 sc in next ch space; repeat from * across – 11 sc + 11 ch spaces.

Repeat row 2 until you reach your desired size.

VIDEO INSTRUCTIONS

Watch the video tutorial below or on YouTube and let me show you how to work this easy stitch!

Crochet Linen Stitch Easy Tutorial - YouTube

I find that this stitch really flatters self striping yarns. It’s perfect for when you have a pretty yarn and just want to use a basic stitch pattern that will allow the yarn to shine. Here are a few patterns that I’ve designed, that use this stitch. They’re all very beginner friendly!

Ombré Slouchy Beanie crochet pattern

Either Way Cowl crochet pattern

Amethyst Scarf crochet pattern

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Can we talk about cake yarns for a sec? I have to confess that I don’t really care for most of them due to the way that they jump abruptly from one color to the next. Lion Brand Shawl in a Ball/Cake is the first one that I got really excited about because it isn’t like that. The colors fade beautifully into each other, creating a really pretty ombré!

When I first got ahold of this yarn, all I wanted to do was design something simple that would really show off that ombré! Now I have to admit that this was about two years ago. So here I am, showing up all late to the Shawl in a Ball/Cake trend! I have a pretty good excuse though. This hat almost made it into my book! It turns out that I designed more hats than we needed for the book so today, I get to share my first “extra” with you!

Late to the trend or not, I hope you’ll still enjoy making your own ombré slouchy beanies! The entire hat is made using the linen stitch, one of my favorites due to the simplicity and texture. It’s really a great project for when you just want to relax and not think too hard, or when you aren’t able to give it your full attention.

The pattern offers four different sizes and because there is so much yardage in Shawl in a Ball/Cake, you can get at least two hats out of each skein/cake, even when making the largest size! So grab your favorite colorway, get comfy, and enjoy watching each color fade into the next as you work! :)

DOWNLOAD THE PATTERN

You can find the FREE pattern by scrolling down. A convenient, print friendly, ad free PDF of this pattern is also available for a small fee, if you’d like.

>> CLICK HERE TO GET THE PDF ON ETSY << >> CLICK HERE TO GET THE PDF ON RAVELRY << Yarn

Lion Brand Shawl in a Ball/Cake, #4 worsted weight yarn: Child: 190 yards, Teen: 210 yards, Women’s: 230 yards, Men’s: 250 yards of #201 Restful Rainbow

Materials

US Size H/8 (5mm) crochet hook or size needed to obtain gauge, yarn needle, scissors, stitch marker

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you click & make a purchase, I will receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps to ensure that I’m able to continue posting free patterns and tutorials! Thank you for your support! :)

Difficulty

Beginner

Finished Sizes & Measurements

Child: Length: 8”, Circumference: 17”
Teen: Length: 9”, Circumference: 19”
Women’s: Length: 10”, Circumference: 21”
Men’s: Length: 11”, Circumference: 23”

Gauge

[1 sc, ch 1] 8 times (working each sc into the ch spaces in previous row) and 18 rows of pattern = 4”

Abbreviations

ch(s) – chain(s), sc – single crochet, st(s) – stitch(es)

Notes

1. Pattern is worked in continuous rounds without joining, starting at the top.
2. Use a stitch marker to mark the beginning of rounds and keep track of how many you’ve completed.
3. When making the magic ring in the beginning, it helps to make it really big because you’ll be working a lot of stitches into it.
4. Complete a few rounds before closing the magic ring – it will be easier to see your stitches.
5. The circumference of the hat can easily be adjusted by working more or fewer stitches into the magic ring in the beginning. Length of the hat can be adjusted by completing more or fewer rounds.
6. Yarn substitution: Lion Brand Shawl in a Ball is labelled as a #4 worsted weight yarn but is actually noticeably thinner than other #4 worsted weight yarns. If substituting a different yarn for this pattern, I recommend using a #3 DK weight yarn instead.

Child Size Instructions:

Make a magic ring.
Round 1: Ch 1 (does not count as a st), 26 sc in ring – 26 sc.

Round 2: [1 sc, ch 1] in each sc around – 26 sc + 26 ch 1 spaces.

Round 3-40: *1 sc in next ch space, ch 1; repeat from * around – 26 sc + 26 ch 1 spaces.

After round 40, invisible join to next sc and fasten off.

Teen Size Instructions:

Make a magic ring.
Round 1: Ch 1 (does not count as a st), 34 sc in ring – 34 sc.

Round 2: [1 sc, ch 1] in each sc around – 34 sc + 34 ch 1 spaces.

Round 3-44: *1 sc in next ch space, ch 1; repeat from * around – 34 sc + 34 ch 1 spaces.

After round 44, invisible join to next sc and fasten off.

Women’s Size Instructions:

Make a magic ring.
Round 1: Ch 1 (does not count as a st), 42 sc in ring – 42 sc.

Round 2: [1 sc, ch 1] in each sc around – 42 sc + 42 ch 1 spaces.

Round 3-48: *1 sc in next ch space, ch 1; repeat from * around – 42 sc + 42 ch 1 spaces.

After round 48, invisible join to next sc and fasten off.

Men’s Size Instructions:

Make a magic ring.
Round 1: Ch 1 (does not count as a st), 46 sc in ring – 46 sc.

Round 2: [1 sc, ch 1] in each sc around – 46 sc + 46 ch 1 spaces.

Round 3-53: *1 sc in next ch space, ch 1; repeat from * around – 46 sc + 46 ch 1 spaces.

After round 53, invisible join to next sc and fasten off.

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT

If you use this free pattern, please consider supporting me by purchasing a pattern from my shop. Your support will help ensure that I’m able to continue making new patterns to share. Thanks for considering! :)

TERMS OF USE

You are welcome and encouraged to sell any items you make using this pattern! All I ask in return is that when selling online, please credit Julie King / Gleeful Things & provide a link to www.gleefulthings.com.

You may NOT sell the pattern, distribute it in any form, repost it online, or alter it to claim it as your own. Copyright © 2018 Julie King / Gleeful Things. All Rights Reserved.

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