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It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a semi-regular feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from the Boston [Mass.] Herald newspaper dated 19 May 1946:


The transcription of this article is:

"Miss Madeline South Bride of Mr. Seaver

The Rev. J. Caleb Justice assisted the bridegroom's brother, the Rev. Ralph F. Seaver, Jr., of Thompsonville, Ct., in performing the 4:30 o'clock ceremony at the Union Congregational Church of Weymouth and Braintree, last Saturday afternoon, when Miss Madeline G, South and Mr. Wallace G. Seaver were married.  The ceremony was followed by a reception in the church parlors.

"The bride, daughter of Mrs. Harold T. South of East Braintree and the late Mr. South, was given in marriage by her brother, Mr. Robert T. South.  She wore a gown of white silk and net with a train and sweetheart neckline.  Her finger-tip veil edged with lace fell from a seed pearl coronet and her bouquet combined carnations and sweet peas.

"As maid of honor, Miss Grace Rideout of East Braintree was gowned in yellow lace.  Mrs. Robert T. South, sister-in-law of the bride, was matron of honor, wearing lavender lace.  Both had headdresses of flowers with short veils and arm bouquets of mixed spring flowers.  Two other bridal attendants were gowned in pink taffeta and net, while the other two wore similar gowns of blue.  Miss Jean Cochrane of Cambridge and Mrs. James D. Cummings, Jr., of Malden were bridesmaids.  The junior bridesmaids were Miss Marjorie Klay of Braintree and Miss Natalie Richard of Norton.  They all wore flowered headdresses and carried arm bouquets of yellow snapdragon and blue delphinium.

"The bridegroom had his brother, Mr. Leigh Seaver of East Wareham as best man, and two other brothers, Mr. Clifford Seaver of Norwood and Mr. Kenneth Seaver of Onset, ushered with Mr. Thomas Reidy of East Wareham and Mr. James D. Cummings, Jr., of Malden.

"After a short wedding trip, Mr. Seaver, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph F. Seaver of Onset, and his bride will make their home in East Wareham."

The source citation for this article is:

"Miss Madeline South Bride of Mr. Seaver," Boston [Mass.] Herald, 19 May 1946, page 19, column 5, Madeline South and Wallace Seaver marriage; online image, GenealogyBank (www.genealogybank.com : accessed 19 April 2018), Newspaper Archives collection.

Five sons of Ralph Fremont Seaver (1884-1963) and Grace Blanche Aldrich (1884-1971) are mentioned in this wedding announcement - the bridegroom and four of his brothers, including the presiding minister, Rev. Ralph F. Seaver, Jr.  

I had all of these persons in my RootsMagic family tree database, but I did not have the marriage date and place.  I did not know that Ralph F. Seaver Jr. was a minister.

I have not been able to connect Wallace G. Seaver's 2nd great-grandfather, Joseph T. Seaver (1805-????) of Taunton, Mass. who married Betsey N. Davis in 1830 to a set of parents, although I have several candidates.  .  

  =============================================

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

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It's Treasure Chest Thursday - a chance to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the 1726 marriage record of Joseph Richards and Mary Bouden in the Lynn, Massachusetts vital record book:

The Richards-Bouden marriage record is:


The transcription of this record is:

"[RICHARDS] Joseph, and Mary Bouden, May 5, 1716*"

The source citation for this record is:

Vital Records of Lynn, Massachusetts to the end of the Year 1849 (Salem, Mass. : The Essex Institute, 1906), 2 Volumes, Marriages, page 327, Joseph richards and Mary Bouden entry, 1726.

Joseph Richards (1703-1748) was the son of Crispus Richards and Sarah Collins of Lynn, Mass.  Mary Bowden (1705-1755) was the daughter of Michael Bowden and Sarah Davis of Lynn.  Joseph and Mary (Bowden) Richards had eight children between 1730 and 1746.  

Joseph Richards and Mary Bowden are my 6th great-grandparents.  I am descended from their daughter Mary Richards (1733-????) who had a relationship with Isaac Buck (1732-????).

===========================================

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

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I accept guest posts that deal with genealogy and family history topics.  One of my correspondents is Tony Ho Tran, who writes the interesting SaigonToSiouxCity blog.  He offered this guest post (original at http://saigontosiouxcity.com/2018/04/11/how-to-get-started-with-genealogy-in-5-steps/):

=====================

How to get started with genealogy in 5 steps
By Tony Ho Tran


Ah genetic genealogy. 

It’s endlessly heartwarming, maddeningly frustrating, and ceaselessly entertaining all in one hobby. 

Plus it can both solve mysteries AND open the Pandora’s Box to a ton of new ones as well. You literally don’t know what is out there. The things you learn can totally upend your worldview and everything you THOUGHT you knew about your family.

Okay, that’s a lot scarier than I meant it to sound (but it’s true).

And since I’ve started, I’ve had a lot of people come to me for advice on how they can get started too. That’s why I want to break down a great system to help YOU get started with genetic genealogy today.

Step 1: Set a concrete goal

A good, clear goal can mean the difference between finding lost family members and uncovering your family tree OR aimlessly browsing census records for a few days before ignoring your ancestry research forever.

I’m not exaggerating. Setting goals is an important psychological trigger. Knowing what you want will give you the focus and drive to become a successful genealogist.

Many genealogists just skip this because they don’t even think to do it. When you do that, though, you’re setting yourself up to fail.

BUT it’s not enough to just set a goal — it also needs to be a good one. And a good goal will have three crucial elements:

  • Precise. Vague goals are bad goals. That’s why so many people fail when they set New Year’s Resolution goals like, “I want to hit the gym” are doomed to fail. Rather if your goal was something like, “I want to lose 30 pounds,” you’d have a much better chance of attaining it.
  • Measurable. How do you know when you’ve accomplished your goal? Is it when you’ve found your birth parents? Or is it when you’ve discovered where your 3x great-grandfather was born? Give a clear measure of success to your goal.
  • Timely. While this isn’t entirely necessary it can help. If you have a time constraint to your goal, it could give you the motivation to accomplish it. Maybe you want to find the county in Ireland where your family is from in time for Christmas. Maybe you want to find your birth mom in time for next Mother’s Day. Time cues like this can be a huge psychological factor for you.

ASSIGNMENT: Set a genealogy goal that’s specific, measurable, and timely (3 - 10 minutes)

What’s YOUR genealogy goal? Do you want to expand your family tree by 5 generations? Do you want to find your sibling who was given up for adoption? The sky is the limit for your goal.

My first genealogy goal was to find my grandfather’s name and birth location. Each time I booted up AncestryDNA, I had that in mind. It especially helped when I got a DNA test and began reaching out to cousins.

Which brings us to...

Step 2: Get a DNA test

This is the part that puts the “genetic” in “genetic genealogy.” If you’re reading this now, you’re #blessed enough to be in a time I consider to be the golden age of DNA testing kits.

For the low price of $79 to $100, you can uncover shocking and sordid family secrets you wouldn’t have conceived of in your wildest imagination. Amazing!

But with so many DNA tests out there, which do you choose?

My answer: One of the Big Three ancestry tests:

  • 23andMe. This is the DNA testing kit that really brought genetic genealogy into vogue. Currently, the company offers two kits: A $100 edition that provides just the ancestry composition and a $200 one that includes a comprehensive medical report. While the medical report is fun, I suggest going with the lower cost ancestry composition
  • FamilyTree DNA. Another great ancestry test — if not a little more lean in terms of tools than the other two on the list. FamilyTree DNA does offer y-DNA and mt-DNA testing along with autosomal, which really help with your journey as you become more advanced. 
  • AncestryDNA (my recommendation). This is the most well-known ancestry company on the list — and for good reason. Ancestry.com has helped millions of users find their family members for over a decade. And now with their AncestryDNA service, you can connect with their massive database of users and family trees to help with your search. I recommend this one for any beginner.

While I do think that AncestryDNA offers everything a beginner genealogist could want, you shouldn’t just stop at one. Renowned genealogist Cece Moore suggests that genealogists “fish in all three ponds” when it comes to their research.

That means getting a test from 23andMe, Family Tree DNA, and AncestryDNA. That’s what I did and I was able to connect with the man who turned out to be my grandfather’s brother on Family Tree DNA — and it’s not even the one I recommend! Crazy.

ASSIGNMENT: Get a DNA test — or more! (6 - 12 weeks)
COST: $79 - $200

Though the time varies for each company, a typical DNA test is going to take 6 - 8 weeks to get an ancestry composition report and start connecting you with cousins. I know. It’s TRAGIC how long it takes — but you’re going to find that patience is one of the most important qualities to have as a genealogist.

While you’re waiting, though, it’s the perfect time to get started on another important step:

Step 3: Build a family tree on Ancestry.com

Your family tree is your business card. It’s the thing you’re going to share with the other people you meet in your journey that’ll help you connect with even more family members.

And like any good business card, it needs to be simple and shareable.
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I received this via email from reader Gloria recently:

"I started receiving your blog after I read about it in Roberta Estes' blog and it has prompted 'a question' about the birth and death records that were in my paternal Grandmother's Family Bible ... the first entry is 1828 ... last entry 1895. My son scanned these pages for me before the Bible was given to my oldest cousin. What is the best way to publish or make these records known?" 

My response to Gloria via email was this:

1)  You need to publish something online, and/or in a published journal, that will stand the test of time.  Something that will last, something that Google or other search engines will find when someone searches for one of the names in the Bible records.  Consider:

a)  Transcribe the Bible records, word for word, exactly as they are shown on the Bible pages, in a document (word processor, PDF, etc.).  Create a source citation for the Bible pages using Evidence Explained guidelines.  Explain the provenance of the Bible pages - how did you come to have it?

b)  Write a blog post of your own on your own blog.  However, that requires creating the blog and writing something more than about the Bible records.  Show the Bible page images and present your transcription and source citation.  Here is an example blog post (I didn't post images then):



c)  Write a guest blog post on some other blog, such as mine, or Roberta's, or someone else's.  I'm willing to publish guest blog posts.  I have over 5,000 readers every day.  The blog post should include images of the Bible pages and a transcription of the records.

d)  Write an article, or submit the records, to one of the major genealogy society periodicals - e.g., National Genealogical Society, New England Historic Genealogical Society, a state society, etc.  

e)  Write an article for the Bible records with the images and transcription, save it as a PDF and upload it to a service like Scribd.com It's free, searched by Google, etc.  

f)  For the surnames in the Bible records, and the locations in the Bible records, post an article in the Surname and Locality boards on the Rootsweb Message Boards.  Start at   http://boards.rootsweb.com/.  See an example at the Family Bibles message board at   http://boards.rootsweb.com/topics.familybibles.bibles/mb.ashx.  These messages can be found by Google searches.

g)  Transcribe the Bible records in a document, or with an image, and attach them as a Story for the persons in an Ancestry Member Tree.  That means you need to have an Ancestry Member Tree, of course.  Here is one of the Bible pages in the profile for my grandfather in one of my Ancestry Member Trees:

h)  Transcribe the Bible records and attach the transcription and page images as a Memory or Note for the persons on the Bible pages who are in the FamilySearch Family Tree, on Geni.com, on WikiTree.com, etc.  You may have to add as profile to the online tree if there is not one already there.

i)  All or some of the above.  

2)  One of the principles that many of us try to observe is:  Lots Of Copies Keeps Stuff Safe (LOCKSS).  Doing several of the suggestions above will help.

3)  Many of us have records like this in our family record collections.  I do.  When I die, my heirs may throw all of those records out or donate them to some place where they might languish unseen in an archived box in a repository.  Each of us needs to proactively do some or all of the suggestions given above.  

4)  Perhaps my readers have another idea - let's help Gloria with this in a comment to this blog post or in an email to me that I can pass on to Gloria.  

==============================================

The URL for this post is:

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

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I'm posting family photographs from my collection on Wednesdays, but they aren't Wordless Wednesday posts like others do - I simply am incapable of having a wordless post.

In August 2014, I went up to Santa Cruz to help my daughter and had fun with my two grandsons, Lucas (then 10) and Logan (then 8).  Here are some of the photos:

1)  We went to breakfast on a Saturday at Rocky's Cafe in Felton - it's a favorite.  Here is Logan ready to eat:


2)  Lucas is about to attach his waffle:


3)  They have lots of trees on their property - here's Lucas climbing one of the trees:


4)  And Logan in the same tree (I think):


This is part of MY family history!

More photos next week!


==============================================

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

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Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last three days include:

1)  News Articles:


 Three New Writing Courses on World War II Research and Writing Center

Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy Scholarship Opportunities Available

ISBGFH: Mini-Institute Aug 2018, Philadelphia
2)  Record Databases:

*  Added or Updated Ancestry.com Collections - Week of 8 to 14 April 2018

*  Added or Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - Week of 8 to 14 April 2018

*  New York Catholic Records Online

3)  Genealogy Education:

 GeneaWebinars Calendar

 FamilySearch Classes Presented at RootsTech 2018 Now Online

*  Free Family History Library Classes and Webinars for April 2018

*  Irish Genealogy Virtual Conference 21st April

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Tuesday, 17 April, 5 p.m. PDT:  Better Together: Making Your Case with Documents and DNA, by Patti Hobbs

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 18 April, 11 a.m. PDT:  Lincoln's Laws and the Records of War, by Judy G. Russell

*  UGA Virtual Chapter Webinar - Thursday, April 19, 6 p.m. PDT: Where are the Records on FamilySearch, by James Tanner

*  Genealogy Gold Podcast:  (#174) Who’s Who in the American Revolution: Patrick Henry

*  Extreme Genes Podcast and Radio Show:  Episode 232 – Cousins All: The Black O’Kelleys And The White O’Kelleys

*  The Photo Detective Podcast: #14 Finding Family Photos

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube Channel:  Learning how to Write from Amy Johnson Crow

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube Channel:  MyHeritage Review Update

4)  Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains for Tuesday, April 17,  2018

MyHeritage DNA National DNA Day Sale – Just $69

5)  Neat Stuff:

*  Man Finds Biological Father Through Ancestry Site

*  Leesville woman finds biological parents

*  Siblings Unite After 57 Years

Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 13 April 2018?

==============================================

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

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I received this information from Jennifer Holik of the World War II Research and Writing Center:

==============================================

FOR RELEASE 17 APRIL 2018
Jennifer Holik
Global Coordinator of the World War II Research & Writing Center,
Chicago IL & Amstelveen, Netherlands
http://wwiirwc.com info@wwiirwc.com

The World War II Research and Writing Center is pleased to announce the release of three new online courses on our educational website WWII Education. Did you know that the strategies we teach also apply to World War I and Korean War Research? When you take our courses, you can apply your new skills and knowledge to multiple research projects.

Finding the Answers: Starting WWII Research

Learn everything you need to know about starting WWII research in nine short lessons with nine
handouts. This course presents material all at once to allow you to move through the process as
quickly or slowly as you choose. Please see our website for full course information.

Finding the Answers: WWII Research Online

Are you ready to take your online research to a new level? This course, in six modules which
drip every 7 days, with numerous handouts, introduces you to:

  • Reasons to research WWII service online.

             o What records may be available online.
             o Techniques to make searching easier.

  • Strategies to help you search the 'Go-To' websites for research.
  • A look at library and newspaper websites.
  • Explore military museums, research libraries, and social media sites.
  • An introduction to European research experts and grave adopters.
  • Information on how Americans can work with European researchers to preserve more stories.
  • Where to go to learn more.

Are you ready to start? Please see our website for full course information.

Finding the Answers in the IDPF

Course dates: May 14 - July 16, 2018

The Individual Deceased Personnel File (IDPF) is one of the most important files researchers can
obtain for World War II service members who died or are still considered Missing In Action
(MIA.) The details contained in these files are more than date of death, cause of death, and
locations of burials. We learn about the service history, medical history, family stories and grief,
decisions which had to be made by family members, family drama, the inability to recover
remains, and sometimes connect with other researchers who have requested the file in the past.

This course will begin on Monday May 14 and run for 10 weeks. You will explore seven
extensive modules, which include 27 downloads, case studies, and worksheets. Additionally, you
will be given access to an exclusive Facebook Group during the course period plus two
additional weeks, in which you can have conversations, share files, and connect with other
researchers.

Please see our website for full course information.

We will offer another session this fall. Registration information will be posted in July.

================================

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Copyright (c) 2018 World War II Research and Writing Center

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

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It is spring, so the snow is off the gravestones in the northeast United States (well, mostly!).  I submitted a photograph request some time ago for my 3rd great-grandparents, Jonathan White (1803-1850) and Miranda (Wade) White (1804-1850).

The photo request was fulfilled by Ken Deady on 2 April 2018, and I was notified of the fulfillment by email.  The Find A Grave memorial for Miranda (Wade) White is at   https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/64214262/miranda-white.



I contacted Ken and asked if I could use the photographs on my blog and in my online family trees, and he agreed.  Here is the best of the three photographs on the memorial for Miranda White:



The inscription says:
MIRANDA WADE
Wife of 
Jonathan White
Born Jan 25, 1804
Died Aug 27, 1850

The information on the White-Chace Lot in Glocester, Rhode Island is at  https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/2384559/white-chace-lot.  The lot is located at "Location: 100 ft west of SHELDON RD at TEL pole # 77.5" and has 26 burials listed in the Rhode Island Historical Cemetery survey.    

I added the photograph to my digital file folder for Jonathan White + Miranda Wade, attached the photo to the Miranda (Wade) White profile in my RootsMagic family tree database, and wrote this post.  I may add it to my Ancestry Member Tree profile, the Geni.com profile, the WikiTree.com profile, and the FamilySearch Family Tree profile for Jonathan.  

Thank you to Ken Deady for making the effort to obtain this photograph of the gravestone of my third great-grandfather, and for permitting me to display the photograph.


  =============================================


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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

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It's Genea-Musings 12th Blogiversary ... yesterday (15 April)!!!!!!!  Oops.


It seems like just yesterday that I started my Randy's Musings blog - here is the first post on 15 April 2006. I explained the name change to Genea-Musings in my first anniversary post on 15 April 2007. In my two-year anniversary post, I showed a screen shot of the early blog page. 

I like to spout some numbers on my blogiversary, so please bear with me:

1)  After twelve years of Randy's Musings and Genea-Musings, this is post number 11,635.   Over 4,383 days, that averages out to be 2.65 posts per day. In the past year, I've written 1,044 posts, or 2.86 posts per day (that is a little higher than last year, 2.70). I think that the most in a year was 1,053 in 2017, and the most posts in one day was 8, but I've had some days with zero posts (usually when on vacation).

2)  I find it mind-boggling that I have posted:

*  424 Amanuensis Monday posts
*  174 Tuesday's Tips posts
*  409 Wordless Wednesday posts
*  500 Treasure Chest Thursday posts
*  224 Ancestors in 52 Weeks posts
*  442 Surname Saturday posts
*  470 Saturday Night Genealogy Fun posts
*  555 Best of the Genea-Blogs posts

3)    My Blogger statistics from Google indicate that I have had 8,383,990 page views in the 12 years.  Currently, I average about 100,000 page views per month, or about 3,300 per day.

4)  In addition, about 3,525 persons subscribe via email using Feedburner, and over 2,000 persons subscribe via RSS using Feedly.  I don't have a count for other feeds, blog readers and  Facebook  readers. If I had to guess, I would say that about 6,000 persons read part of Genea-Musings on an average day. A significant number of the readers (probably over 25%) on the actual website come via Facebook or a search engine.

Please permit me to genea-muse for a bit here:

1)  I really appreciate the Genea-bloggers Tribe community and all of my Genea-Musings readers. Without all of you, we would not have as much genealogy information (news, research experiences, family history, photographs, etc.) online. Blogging and social networking has brought democratization to the world of genealogy writing - anybody can do it (and many do it very well) and the genealogy community has more information, provided faster and more up-to-date, than it ever has had before.

2)  The genea-blogger community is overwhelmingly friendly and supportive of each other and their readers.  There is very little overt competition, back-biting or flame wars.  This reflects the genealogy community as a whole, I believe, and almost everyone believes in and works at collaborating with, educating, and helping others from the most famous (e.g., the genea-rock stars like Elizabeth Mills, Tom Jones, Judy Russell, Blaine Bettinger, etc.) to the beginners (new society members, new blog readers, etc.).

3)  The genea-bloggers community as a whole has garnered the respect of the genealogy industry - the record provider companies, the software companies, website owners, and genealogical societies.  We have been treated and recognized as legitimate media outlets for the genealogy community.  They understand that genealogy blogs are a significant way to announce and publicize their products or services, and to create genea-buzz at conferences.  This could not happen without the commitment of genea-bloggers to objectivity and collaboration.  Not to mention time, energy and lifelong learning.

4)  I'm really proud to be a member of the genea-blogger community and to enjoy the camaraderie online and in person.  At a genealogy conference or seminar, genea-bloggers tend to flock together - it's an instant brother/sisterhood - many of us read and comment on each other's blogs.  Facebook and other social media sites have enabled us to "know," rejoice, or commiserate with the life and research experiences of our colleagues.

5) Life is good in the genea-cave, and it's even better when family history is made with our daughters and the five grandchildren (we added grandson Charlie 43 months ago).  We love to travel to a genealogy seminar, conference or society talk (we attended RootsTech in February/March, and we're going to Genealogy Jamboree in seven weeks in Burbank). 

6)  Lastly, thank you to my faithful readers.  I do this to help the genealogy community pursue their hobb obsession, and to document my own family history.  I appreciate your feedback to my posts and learn a lot from the collected wisdom and experience of my readers.  

Can I take the rest of the week off?  Probably not.  Maybe I'll do some research until the Padres come on TV tonight.

================================

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

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Here are some of my family history and genealogy related activities over the past week:

1)   I moderated the Research Group meeting of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society on Wednesday and discussed my "news" in the first hour and the group shared their successes and challenges in the second hour.  I talked about my blog on Do I Still Need a Desktop Genealogy Software Program?, the Find A Grave memorial photo request that was fulfilled, and the MyHeritageDNA autosomal segment match download process.

2)  I taught the second class of "Beginning Computer Genealogy" at OASIS (a senior adult-education center) on Thursday.  This group asks a lot of good questions and I hardly got through the presentation.  This session covered starting a family tree in RootsMagic software (including data entry, sourcing, notes, media, etc.), using the LearnWebSkills tutorials, commercial record providers, and census research tips.  

3)  I made more progress on my genealogy project - I am researching the ancestry of a local personality, and will present what I find at the CVGS Family History Day in September.   I took one more English line back one or two generations, and took the German line back several more generations.  I searched GenealogyBank for obituaries for the ancestors who died in the USA.  The RootsMagic tree has grown - 170 persons with 508 citations!  I TreeShare this with an Ancestry Member Tree (which generates Hints!), access the WebHints for FamilySearch and Findmypast, and share data with  FamilySearch Family Tree profiles.

4)  The presentation I did for the Surname Society Annual Meeting on 17 March was posted on the Family Tree Webinars collection behind the paywall for members, without a handout.  The presentation is Using FamilySearch Digital Microfilm to Find Genealogical Records.   

5)  The Padres games "interfere" with my genealogy time, and will until October.  We didn't go to a game last week, but we watched all of them.  The Padres won five and lost two last week (so now 7-10 on the season), and are doing better.  I read the newspaper and fiction mystery books during the game, and check my mail and blogs on my cell phone.  

6)  I participated in the 16 April edition of the Mondays With Myrt webinar.  In today's webinar, we discussed:  Creating a Virtual Cemetery on Find A Grave; the 1939 UK register and associated maps; old photographs for Nottingham and Seattle; URL re-direction for genealogy sites with multiple country sites (e.g., Ancestry has US, Canada, UK, Germany, etc.); using FamilySearch record collections and FHL Catalog entries to find land records in each county and state; Family History Library Catalog access options - "Any," "Online," or a specific Center - "Any" shows you everything available wherever it is, but "Online" does not include digital microfilm available only on the Catalog site; and more.

7) There were occasional sessions working in RootsMagic to update FamilySearch Family Tree profiles for Seaver families and other database families, with occasional additions to the RootsMagic profiles. I have matched 23,210 of my persons with FSFT.  I now have 49,835 persons in my RootsMagic file.   I TreeShared once during the last week.  There was also one session in Ancestry Hints to add content and source citations for the new RootsMagic profile additions.   I've fallen behind on the Record Hints with 60,817 waiting to be resolved, but I'm working on them.

8)  I have 279 Shared Ancestors on my AncestryDNA list (I had 277 last week), 832 4th cousins or closer (up from 823 last week), and 744 pages (over 37,150 matches with at least 5 cM) (was 733 pages last week) of  matches.  I have 13 matches that are third cousins or closer, and 94 matches with 34 cM (0.5%) or more (was 93 last week).  My highest match has 779 cM (11.5%), and is one of my first cousins.  I have 19 DNA Circles (was 19 last week). Very few of the new matches have an Ancestry Member Tree.

9)  I have 3,488 DNA Matches on MyHeritage (up from 3,402 last week) with at least 8 cM (0.1%), with 20 matches with more than 34 cM (0.5%) or more (was 20 last week).  I have two close relatives, both first cousins twice removed.  The highest match is 293 cM (4.0%).  Most of my  matches have very small trees with no common ancestors shown.

10)  I have 1,046 DNA Relatives on 23andMe (I had 1,062 last week) who share at least 0.10% with me.  Of these, only 1 shares 1.0% or more, and 42 share 0.50% or more (was 41 last week), with the highest match being 1.54%.  I struggle to find out anything about most of these testers.

11)  I have 2,537 autosomal DNA Matches on FamilyTreeDNA (up from 2,521 last week) who share 0.25% (18 cM) or more, with the highest match being 96 cM (1.42%).  I have 12 who share at least 1.0% (68 cM) with me, and 1,367 who share at least 0.50% (34 cM) or more (was 1,362 last  week) with me.  I have had better luck finding shared ancestors here with a few of these testers.
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