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Pardon our dust!  GeneaBloggers.com is currently in maintenance mode.  Please check back soon or visit our sister site, GeneaBloggersTRIBE.com.

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1 June 2017

Chicago, Illinois and South Jordan, Utah: Announcing a new initiative benefiting genealogy consumers and content providers alike, GeneaBloggers.com and GeneaBloggersTRIBE.com have agreed to streamline features to meet consumer expectations and provide blogger support. Thomas MacEntee will continue working to assure great deals for the wider genealogy community via the GeneaBloggers.com site. A team of dedicated bloggers will expand support for family history bloggers under the new domain GeneaBloggersTRIBE.com.

“Genealogy consumers need Thomas’ direction to continue creating great deals on genealogy site membership, books, and DNA test kits. His masterful approach gets the job done. He has certainly improved my bottom line,” says Pat Richley-Erickson, author of the DearMYRTLE Genealogy blog.

Thomas says, “It’s exciting that DearMYRTLE, a respected blogger and community builder in the family history sector, has agreed to lead the GeneaBloggersTRIBE transition team. I look forward to the valuable and creative content the team will produce.”

About GeneaBloggers.com

What began in 2007 with Jasia Smasha’s Carnival of Genealogy, morphed into the GeneaBloggers group supporting online genealogy writers. In January 2009, Thomas began robust community building around conference attendance, blogger beads and a website of resource assistance.

About Thomas MacEntee

Thomas MacEntee is a genealogy professional based in the United States specializing in the use of technology and social media to improve genealogy research and as a way to connect with others in the family history community.

About DearMYRTLE

DearMYRTLE is the nom de plume of Pat Richley-Erickson, author of the award-winning DearMYRTLE Genealogy Blog, consistently among the top 5 family history blogs internationally, where the focus is beginning genealogy topics. DearMYRTLE hosts several weekly hangouts including Mondays with Myrt, and Wacky Wednesday. She moderates more intense study groups including Beginning Genealogy, Mastering Genealogical Proof, The Written Conclusion, and Genealogy and the Law. Online since 1985 in membership development with Q-Link’s Your Family Tree and with AOL’s Golden Gate Genealogy Forum’s Leadership team, Pat is a retired post-secondary and corporate computer instructor.  Find out more at: www.DearMYRTLE.com

The post Announcing a new initiative: GeneaBloggersTRIBE.com appeared first on GeneaBloggers.

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Actually it really isn’t an “end” but a “beginning.”

What Will Change at GeneaBloggers.com and Related Sites?

Right now here are some of the items that may change on or before June 1st:

  • Other geneabloggers.com associated social media (Twitter, Pinterest, etc.) will be converted to Abundant Genealogy assets where that conversion process is available.
  • The Archive Lady column will transfer from geneabloggers.com over to abundantgenealogy.com.

Note: there may be other minor changes during the next few months.

Check GeneaBloggers.com on June 1, 2017

The final update for GeneaBloggers.com will be on Thursday, June 1st, 2017 with information on how to continue following the genealogy blogging community and accessing valuable blogging resources.

©2017, copyright Thomas MacEntee.  All rights reserved.

The post GeneaBloggers.com: The End Is Almost Near! appeared first on GeneaBloggers.

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May I Introduce to You . . . Emma Jolly

I have the great pleasure of introducing you to Emma Jolly and her blog, The Blog of Emma Jolly, described as, “. . . My blog features occasional reviews, comments or insights on the world of family history today.”

Emma, please tell us a little about yourself

“I grew up in quiet, rural Lancashire and now live in the very busy capital city of London.”

How long have you been doing genealogy and how did you get started?

“I grew up living with my grandparents who used to tell me bits and pieces about their childhoods. As I grew older, I wanted to make sense of the places and people they were talking about. They had both been born and raised in the Black Country (the West Midlands of England), which was an area I didn’t know at all. Neither of them were keen to give me exact details of their family. This, of course, only made me more curious and determined to find out all I could.”

When and why did you start your genealogy blog?

“I created a genealogy blog to accompany my website. When my website was revamped a few years ago, I took some of the resource pages I had on my original website and adapted them into features. Lots of my friends are writers and I like to review their books. I’m often asked by family history publishers to review their titles. More recently, I have been dipping my toe into the deep and mysterious waters of genetic genealogy. I’ve been delighted to review various DNA products from a family history perspective.”

Emma, is your favorite post on your blog?

Naming Napoleon.”

How much time are you able to spend researching your ancestors?

“I work as a professional genealogist and research every day except Sunday.”

Emma, do you have any favorite ancestors?

“This varies but I tend to like my female ancestors. I admire all of them for raising as many children as they did (anything from one to thirteen). The most beautifully named ancestor was Violetta, who died when she was just 23. She died without knowing what impact her short life would have on the world. I hope she would be happy to know that she has hundreds of descendants alive today, doing all kinds of interesting and helpful things.”

What is on your genealogy bucket list?

“To identify my mysterious Ashkenazi ancestor.”

* * *

Please take a moment to visit Emma’s blog. Be sure to leave her a comment letting her know you stopped by. Thank you for the opportunity of getting to know you a bit more, Emma!

© 2017, copyright Gini Webb. All rights reserved.

Gini Webb lives in San Diego, California and manages her own blog, Ginisology, while also researching her own German heritage, retired, enjoying life with wonderful husband Steve and visiting with her grandchildren! Are you a genealogy blogger who would like to be interviewed for the “May I Introduce To You . . .” series? If so, contact Gini Webb via e-mail.

The post May I Introduce to You . . . Emma Jolly appeared first on GeneaBloggers.

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May I Introduce to You . . . Michelle Murosky

Most bloggers will tell you that it is important to include at least one photo or other image in every post. Adhering to that rule is often one of the most difficult challenges many of us face, but not for Michelle Murosky. She has been blessed with a wealth of old photos passed down through the family over many generations. I am proud to introduce to you Michelle Murosky and The Murosky-McDonald Ancestral Lines where every blog is a visual treat.

Michelle, please tell us a little about yourself.

“I was born and raised in Erie, Pennsylvania. After graduating from The Pennsylvania State University with a degree in Architectural Engineering, I relocated to the Greater Chicago area. My career started in the building design and construction industry. Since then I have transitioned into the energy consulting sector. When I am not working or spending time working on the family tree I enjoy photography with a focus on nature and fine art. My day to day work involves planning for the future. Family history involves spending time in the past while also planning for the future. For me photography is a nice way to pause and be present. My husband and I recently launched a small photography related business called MB Boutiques.”

How did you get interested in doing your family genealogy?

“We lost my paternal grandmother, Mary Eugenia McDonald, when I was in high school.  After her death her siblings said, ‘We should have written all those stories down – Mary Jean knew all the family history.’  For me this was the trigger point. Following my grandmother’s death I spent a lot of time with my grandfather Arthur Murosky. It all started with a notebook and a pen, following Grandpa around asking questions. Sixteen plus years later I am still working at it!”

Has your research focus changed over time?

“Like many researchers, in the early days I was focused on building out the tree and making sense of the relationships. I was very fortunate that I connected with other family historians on my paternal grandmother’s side of the family who kindly shared their work with me. This was the generation that did their research before computers – traveling to locations and transcribing records manually. During my college years I was able to piece together a substantial portion of my paternal grandmother’s family tree and I also made initial progress researching my paternal grandfather’s family tree.

“In 2011 Grandpa turned 92, and I dusted my initial research off and started working on Our Ancestors The Book: Volume I: The Murosky and Bukowski Family History.

My goal was to write a book on my paternal grandfather’s family history and incorporate the photographs of the family. To prepare for writing the book I reviewed and expanded all of my existing research on the Murosky and Bukowski families. Since conducting my initial research there were more databases available. This was a good opportunity to review the data with an open mind, verify and in some cases correct previously recorded facts. I also made an effort to ensure my records were properly sourced.

“In the last two years I have taken a break from extensive research and focused on what I am calling the Portraits of a Life Project. I acquired a large collection of family photographs that previously belonged to my great-grandmother, Frances Philomena Selker. The goal of the Portraits of a Life Project is to digitize, archive, restore and share the large collection of family photographs that are in my care.”

What has been your most exciting discovery through research?

“One of the most exciting was finding the original spelling of Murosky. My paternal grandfather had told me the original surname was Murauskas. Many variations of our surname have been recorded over the years but there was no Murauskas. In 2015 Ancestry released the Pennsylvania Birth Certificates. Included in the collection was the birth record for my 2nd great uncle, Frank Murauskas. The birth record included the original Lithuanian spelling of the surname and provided clues to the region where the family was from. Records for the family located prior to WWI traditionally pointed to Russia and records after WWI traditionally pointed to Lithuania. The birth certificate indicated the family was from the region previously known as the Suwałki Governorate.

“A second discovery was unraveling the mystery of civil war veteran Pvt. John McDonald, my 4th great uncle. He enlisted in the Union Army with his two brothers James and Andrew. He was one of those ancestors that you search and search for but can never find. In 2015 I connected with another researcher who helped me determine that John died on October 16, 1864 in a military hospital. He is buried in Beverly National Cemetery in Beverly, Burlington County, New Jersey.”

Where do you get your ideas for your blog posts?

“My posts have always been a reflection of what I was working on at the time. My post types have included writing about a specific person, sharing a historical record or discussing a research visit. More recently my posts have focused on sharing old family photos.

“Historical events and milestones are great prompts. For example, around the 70th Anniversary of D-Day I wrote a post about my cousin Philip Selker who participated in the D-Day invasion.

“For National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day I compiled a list of deceased infants recorded in the family tree.”

What are your favorite posts on your blog and why?

“One of my favorite posts is the WWI Centennial: Where were they? The Vincinety Frank Bukowski Family. As a history enthusiast the WWI Centennial made me pause and reflect. Where were my family members? How were they impacted? Would they be reflecting on their brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins living in Europe? The WWI Centennial series explores the impact the outbreak of the war may have had on my 2nd great grandparents.

“Another of my favorite posts is St. Mary’s Cemetery: Crown, PA – Find A Grave Updates. In July of 2012 I visited St. Mary’s Cemetery in Crown, Pennsylvania with my father and my aunt. This was a visit about going home to find our roots. Our McDonald family moved to the Crown area from Ireland in the 1830’s. Many of our ancestors are laid to rest at St. Mary’s Cemetery. During our visit I attempted to photograph as much of the old section of the cemetery as I could. In time the photographs were included into Find A Grave Memorials. Using my photographs I was able to help a cousin fill in some gaps in his family tree. Like many researchers I have benefited from the content at Find A Grave. It was nice to give back to the genealogical community.”

Michelle, what is your favorite family story or heirloom?

“In 1906 my 2nd great grandfather Joseph William Selker returned to Germany. It was his first and only trip to his birth country after departing 21 years prior. He traveled with his 9 year old son Frederick William Selker. The two traveled to three different cities to visit their relatives. Two of Joseph William Selker’s nieces, Johanna Anna Selker and Philomena Selker, returned to Pennsylvania with him. The girls remained in Pennsylvania for the rest of their lives.

“One of our cherished family heirlooms is a copy of an original letter written in German that Joseph William wrote to his brother Karl Friedrich Selker. Joseph William penned the letter after returning from the trip. The letter shares details of their trip and is filled with emotion. A copy of this letter is highlighted in JW Selker: A Letter to Germany.

“We are very fortunate that our family has original tin type photographs. Some of these are well over 100 years old now. I commissioned Gary Clark at phototree.com to assist me dating the photographs and providing identifying details.”

Besides major websites like Ancestry and FamilySearch, what research tool or source has been helpful in researching your family history?

PolishOrigins has a great forum for folks with Polish ancestors. The forum contains a wealth of knowledge and users can assist with translations.

PhotoTree has an extensive collection of dated old photographs. The case studies section provides examples on how to date old photographs.

“I have I commissioned Ute Brandenburg with German Script Experts to research my paternal ancestors in Germany. The initial research I had was shared with me by others, but I did not have any sources to validate the records. Ute has located many German records which have validated and enhanced the original research. If you are looking for someone who can navigate old German records and read old German script, Ute is highly recommended.”

What other genealogy blogs inspire you?

“There are two blogs that have great examples of research and analysis:

  • The author of Genealogy Adventures has done extensive research and has utilized DNA testing to document his family tree.
  • DNAeXplained provides a lot of helpful information on genetic genealogy. The site also has great examples of detailed traditional research.”
Michelle, you have a companion page on Facebook for your blog. What are the benefits of having a Facebook page?

“The Facebook page was originally launched to connect with my close and extended family members who are Facebook users. Several distant cousins have found my Facebook site and are now followers. Facebook has been a great platform to share content and collaborate with family. It is easy for a Facebook user to leave a comment, post on my page or send a private message.”

Do you have any tips for new genealogy bloggers?

“If you’re considering starting a blog, I would encourage you to do it. Over the years I have had the opportunity to connect with distant cousins who found me through my blog. If I had to guess, these cousin connections most likely would have never happened. These cousins have provided a wealth of knowledge.

“I have found tags to be a great way to organize content so readers can browse by topic. In fact I use them all the time when quickly looking for an older post. My tag types include post types, dates, locations, surnames, photo collections and the names of featured individuals. Grouping these tags allows for multiple navigation options.”

Finally Michelle, what is on your genealogy bucket list?

“This is a list that never seems to get any shorter! I am always coming up with new ideas.

  • “My Polish family has always been a bit of a mystery. A rainy day project will be to determine if a city of origin for these families can be located.
  • “In time I would also like to expand the Our Ancestors family history series to feature volumes on my maternal grandmother’s family.
  • “I would love to visit Europe and visit the cities where my ancestors are from.”

*   *   *

Please take a moment to visit Michelle at The Murosky-McDonald Ancestral Lines and leave her a comment letting her know you stopped by. Thank-you, Michelle, for letting us inside your blogging world.

© 2017, copyright Wendy Mathias. All rights reserved.

Wendy Mathias is a retired teacher who divides her time between her home in Chesapeake, Virginia and Smith Mountain Lake.  She enjoys researching her family and digging for the story behind old family photos for her blog Jollett Etc. Are you a genealogy blogger who would like to be interviewed for the “May I Introduce To You . . .” series? If so, contact Wendy via email wendymath@cox.net.


The post May I Introduce to You . . . Michelle Murosky appeared first on GeneaBloggers.

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Here is information on some decisions I’ve made regarding GeneaBloggers.com and transitioning the GeneaBloggers concept to a community owned/administered asset . . . meaning run by genealogy bloggers as a community resource.

  • I really don’t think there is any economic advantage for me or my business in having a subscription or membership site. When I look at the income I make via affiliate marketing using the Geneabloggers.com traffic (1.5 million hits per month), I can’t justify the administrative time element and costs of running a community site – either for free or a subscription. Also, I really feel I need to make a clean break with the community admin aspect of GeneaBloggers – I think we’ve made great progress over the past eight years but I really need to move on.
  • I will be retaining the geneabloggers.com domain – not selling it- and redirecting traffic to abundantgenealogy.com – it is just too valuable an asset. Right now I am seeing my domain and site priced at a minimum of $25,000 and up to $350,000 based on various online models and emails from domain brokers. This may seem like a lot of money, but consider that I’ve put in eight years of “sweat equity” meaning 20+ hours per week – GeneaBloggers.com has only been profitable the past three years and I am slowly repaying all my retirement funds that I used to live on between 2008 and 2014.
  • I will be converting all GeneaBloggers social media assets over to Abundant Genealogy as of June 1, 2017.
  • I  am currently working with key leaders in the genealogy blogging community to:

a. Administer the GeneaBloggers Facebook GROUP and continue it as a resource for blogging and genealogy.

b. Set up a new GeneaBloggers site to serve as a community resource.

* * *

This has not been an easy decision for me but right now I need to do what is best for me, my family, and my business. I will always be available for guidance and recommendations to the genealogy blogging community.

Stay Tuned

Another update will be posted one week from today, Monday, May 29th and then a permanent post on Thursday, June 1st, 2017.

©2017, copyright Thomas MacEntee.  All rights reserved.

The post UPDATE: GeneaBloggers.com Transition to Abundant Genealogy appeared first on GeneaBloggers.

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Cheryl from Oklahoma asks: “I have my great-grandfather’s World War I uniform, which includes the jacket and pants, that I inherited. All of his medals have been pinned to the jacket and they look like they have been there for some time because they are starting to wear holes in the material. What is the best way to store the uniform and do I keep the medals on the jacket or take them off?”

Cheryl asks a great question, especially since we are in the middle of commemorating the 100th anniversary of World War I, also called the Great War. This war lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918 and saw the death of many across the globe.

Preserving textiles, such as a military uniform, can be quite easy as long as the correct materials are used. The key to preserving textiles is to protect them from the elements, especially light and moisture. Textiles can be very fragile, torn or wearing thin by use or not being properly stored. Our ancestor’s textiles are an important part of collecting and preserving the life story of our ancestors.

World War I Jacket, Houston County, TN. Archives

Before storing the uniform, make sure it is as clean as possible. It is acceptable to take the uniform to a reputable dry cleaner for a professional cleaning. Make sure and remove all medals or other attachments before cleaning. If the uniform is in bad condition, do not attempt to have it dry cleaned, just leave it as it is.

To properly preserve a military uniform, the archival materials that need to be purchased include an archival box and archival tissue paper (see Archival Materials Store list below). The archival box needs to be big enough to hold the military jacket lying flat and not folded. Remove all medals, other military honors, and ribbons from the jacket.

Military uniforms should be stored flat; never store them on hangers in closets. Be sure to remove the dry cleaner’s plastic bag from the uniform. Stuff some archival tissue paper into the shoulders of the jacket to help them keep their shape. Insert a piece of archival tissue paper inside the military jacket, lay the tissue paper flat inside the jacket and fold the jacket closed.

World War I Jacket with archival tissue paper inserted, Houston County, TN. Archives

Lay a piece of archival tissue paper inside the archival box. Lay the military jacket in the box so it is lying flat. Lay another piece of archival tissue paper on top of the jacket and then place the pants, folded once at the knees, in the box. Last, lay one more piece of tissue paper on top of the pants.


Archival box with archival tissue paper, Houston County, TN. Archives

The military medals and awards should be stored separate from the uniform. The metal in the awards could rust and damage the uniform, so it is important to store them separate from the uniform. Also, wool uniforms contain sulfur and could actually attack the metal and damage the metals. Before handling medals, put on gloves. The dirt and oils on human hands can cause oxidation of the metal and cause damage to the metals over time. Military medals should be cleaned with a dry, soft brush. Wrap each medal with acid free tissue paper and store in an acid free box lined with acid free tissue paper. If the original presentation cases survive, it is appropriate to put the medals back in their original cases for storage in an archival box. Be sure to wrap the presentation cases in acid free tissue paper before storing in an acid free box.

Military Medals

Store military uniforms and medals in a cool, dark and dry place. Avoid extreme temperature areas such as attics, basements and garages. Check your stored items once a year for any discolorations or stains that may need to be addressed. The sooner these problems can be identified the better. Also, when checking stored textiles, refold the items in a different way so creases do not imbed themselves in the cloth.

Preserving our ancestor’s textiles, such as military uniforms, should be just as important to us as genealogists as preserving our ancestor’s documents.

Archival Material Websites

Here is a listing of online archival materials stores. They all have online catalogs and paper catalogs that can be sent to your home. Also, be sure to sign up for email notifications because they periodically have sales and will send out email notifications.

***

NEW! Legacy Family Tree Webinar

Metal Paper Clips, Rubber Bands and Tape, OH MY!
http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1614

NEW! Legacy QuickGuide

Scrap Paper and Orphan Documents in Archives
http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1815

You Can Now Follow The Archive Lady on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/TheArchiveLady/

***

If you have a question about researching in archives or records preservation for The Archive Lady, send an email with your question to: melissabarker20@hotmail.com

Melissa Barker lives in Tennessee Ridge, Tennessee. She is the Houston County (TN) Archivist and a Professional Genealogist. She writes the blog, A Genealogist in the Archives, and has been researching her own family for over 26 years. She lectures, teaches and writes about researching in archives and records preservation. 

©2017, copyright Melissa Barker. All rights Reserved.

The post The Archive Lady: Preserving Military Uniforms and Medals appeared first on GeneaBloggers.

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May I Introduce to You . . . Julie Wiesinger

I have the great pleasure of introducing you to Julie Wiesinger and her blog, Julie’s Treasure Chest, described as, “. . . In my blog, I share information on how genealogical research can be done in Austria and what sources are available. As various sites are in German, I explain the functionalities for Non-German speakers. Further, I write about Austrian history, to bring family research into context. I also want to introduce my own research and my ancestors in the blog.”

Julie, please tell us a little bit about yourself.

“I was born in Vienna, the capital of Austria, and lived there most of my life (with the exception of a year studying abroad in Edinburgh, Scotland). Besides our flat in Vienna, we (myself and my family) have a house in a small village in Lower Austria, where we spend a lot of time.”

How long have you been doing genealogy and how did you get started?

“I started researching my family history when I was pregnant with my daughter in 2013. I came across a family tree app. As I entered the names and dates of my grandparents, I suddenly realized how little information I had and how little I knew about them. That got me started, as I am a curious person and I love a challenge!”

When and why did you start your genealogy blog?

“I started my blog just recently, in January 2017. I was researching on the Internet and found some genealogy blogs. I liked the idea of sharing experiences with others, maybe even spark the genealogy flame in others. And I thought: My ancestors immigrated to the US, so other researchers may have Austrian ancestors, maybe I can support them finding their Austrian roots.”

Julie, how did you choose the name for your blog?

“I have always been a fan of good pirate stories and lost treasures. For me, all the information on my family waiting to be found is like a treasure – therefore the name Treasure Chest.”

Julie, what research tool or source has been particularly helpful in researching your family history?

“In Austria, there is a site, Matricula online by ICARUS which offers Austrian church books for many parishes in Austria (new ones being added constantly). This site is definitely the most important research site for me, as church books are the main source of information on baptisms, marriages and deaths in Austria. Very helpful sites are also, Gen Team and Familia Austria. Both sites contain databases for Austria and the former Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy. Familia Austria additionally offers a lot of research information (which is in German and partly tied to a membership in the association).”

Do you have any tips for new genealogy bloggers?

“As I am a new blogger myself, I actually have only one tip: If you are thinking about starting a blog, just do it! Get started! Even after only a few weeks, I have already had great experiences, as the contact with and comments by other bloggers. It’s really worth it.”

Julie, what other genealogy blogs inspire you?

“This is a difficult question, as there are so many genealogy blogs out there (which I even did not know some months ago). I think every blog I found so far is special, as it always gives a different angle to the research.”

What has been your most exciting genealogy discovery in your research?

“One of the most exciting discoveries was only just recently, when I found out that the sister of my great-great grandfather, actually was the eldest woman in Vienna and was featured several times in newspapers, even with photos (I did not have any photos before). Another great moment was when I got a box full of letters from my grandfather’s half-brother written to his wife in WWII, which give insight in his WW experiences and life, but also in my grandfather’s life, as he is mentioned in the letters.”

Julie, what is your favorite post on your blog?

“My favorite post so far is about the ‘Buffalo Zither Club – Friday’s Faces from the Past’ as I literally made an astonishing discovery while writing the post. It all started with a photo I have of my ancestors who immigrated to Buffalo. I wanted to write about how one could find out more about unknown persons in a photo. While writing the post, I started researching and really found out a name for one of the musicians in the photo. That was absolutely thrilling!”

How much time are you able to spend on your research?

“With a family (my husband and my two children) and a part time job, my research time is limited. However, on weekends, I usually find some time to continue efforts to find out more about my ancestors.”

Julie, who is your favorite ancestor and why?

“My favorite ancestor is definitely Bartholomäus Wiesinger. He lived an adventurous life (at least in my imagination), as he was wandering around Austria, doing many different jobs (as servant, cattle drover or wool dyer). At some time he even owned a house in Linz, but apparently ‘lost’ it again. He and his wife had 10 children, all born in different villages in Upper and Lower Austria (I am not even sure, I found all of them yet). I have not been able to find out his birth place, which is my biggest genealogy challenge!”

Julie, what family story or heirloom do you cherish most?

“For me, every heirloom and every story is precious, but there are two that stand out, as they are the oldest ones: One is a sketch of a newly commissioned altarpiece of around 1845 which was given to my ancestor who was then the head of the village. The other one is a red goblet which came with my great-great-grandmother from Bohemia to Vienna in about 1880.”

In what ways has genealogy improved your life?

“Genealogy has made me more aware of my roots, of where I come from. I appreciate all my ancestors have accomplished, as it brought me to where I am now. Through genealogy, I see things differently (for example houses, photos or books), I wonder much more about the history of things.”

Julie, what do you love most about doing your genealogy?

“I love the moments when I uncover facts and details about ancestors, which I did not know before. To have more knowledge about past generations makes them come more ‘alive’ for me.”

What is on your genealogy bucket list?

“I want to visit all the places, my ancestors have lived in to see the surroundings in which they lived their lives.”

If you wanted to leave a message for future generations, what would you tell them?

“Awareness of a family’s past is a great strength for the future.”

***

Please take a moment to visit Julies’s blog. Leave her a comment letting her know you stopped by. Welcome Julie, thank you for sharing your blog and family history with us!

© 2017, copyright Gini Webb. All rights reserved.

Gini Webb lives in San Diego, California and manages her own blog, Ginisology, while also researching her own German heritage, retired, enjoying life with wonderful husband Steve and visiting with her grandchildren! Are you a genealogy blogger who would like to be interviewed for the “May I Introduce To You . . .” series? If so, contact Gini Webb via e-mail.

The post May I Introduce to You . . . Julie Wiesinger appeared first on GeneaBloggers.

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I have the pleasure of introducing you to Alexis Maurer and her blog, The Adventures of the Baby Genealogist, described as, “a comedic journey with the youngest genealogist ever.”

Alexis, please tell us a little about yourself.

“I’m Alexis and am a fairly new mom to the cutest little girl ever. Born and raised in Utah, I have always had a love for family history but didn’t actually start digging deep into research until three or four years ago. I am pretty obsessed in making new discoveries whether that is on my own family tree or someone else’s. I want my daughter to know and love her heritage.”

When and why did you start your genealogy blog?

“I actually started a different blog first but I just didn’t stick with it. I was trying to do what I thought others would want but it just wasn’t a good fit for me. After I had my daughter,  I thought it would be funny to take some pictures of her in giant glasses and the idea just spread from there. There were other kid bloggers but I was sure there weren’t any baby genealogists, at least not known about. So the baby genealogist was born and it’s so much more fun for me to write about our family history adventures and not worry about if someone else reads it or not.”

What are your tips for new genealogy bloggers?

“Write about whatever you want to. If you just want a public place to write your family stories or explain your research then do that. Blogs are a great way to get in contact with unknown cousins. Just write! Whatever you are more passionate about or will get you even more excited to do your family history.”

Please tell us about your favorite post(s) on your blog.

“I loved when I asked my family for memories of my husband’s grandma, who the Baby Genealogist is named after.

“I also loved when I wrote about how Disney shows the power of family history through Moana.”

How much time do you spend on family history research?

“Every minute I can squeeze in with a baby to take care of and starting my own business.”

What do you love the most about genealogy?

“I love making new discoveries and sharing them with family members. Piecing families together is also amazing. And getting anyone and everyone interested in their own family.”

What family story or heirloom do you cherish?

“I absolutely love photographs! (Who doesn’t?!) I have so many favorite stories but one that is cherished in my family is of a pioneer ancestor, Stillman Pond, who was a lot like Job in the Bible. He lost everything, including 2 wives and many children. But he never gave up. And eventually he did have a family again and became a wealthy man.”

Which genealogy blogs inspire you? What interesting connections have you made through blogging?

“So far I haven’t met any distant relatives through my blog, though I would love to make a connection like that. But I have met some wonderful bloggers who are passionate about family history themselves. I am even part of a mommy genealogy group where we share ideas and spread the word that family history is for all ages and is especially important to share with kids. It’s an amazing group to be a part of! The blogs I listed are from this group.”

What is on your genealogy bucket list?

“I really want to visit the homelands of my ancestors! And finding ways to get kids more interested and involved in their family history, which is part of my business I am starting.”

An additional message from Alexis.

“I am excited to share that I am starting a fun subscription box for kids! I want to get them more involved in family history in fun, simple ways. The boxes are filled with books, games, activities, and crafts that help kids connect to family members, living or decreased. They will learn, relate, discover, and create to discover more about their family and themselves. Learn more at Addi’s Nest.”

* * *

Please take a moment to head over to Alexis’ blog, Adventures of the Baby Genealogist and leave her a comment, letting her know you stopped by. Thank you Alexis for telling us about yourself and your blog. It’s been a pleasure getting to know you better.

© 2017, copyright Jana Last. All rights reserved.

Jana Last is a wife, mom and grandma living in sunny California. She loves family history and enjoys learning about her ancestors. She started her family history research in 1996 after the death of her maternal grandfather. She is the author of three blogs and a website: Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog, Grandpa’s Postcards, Jana’s Place and Jana’s Genealogy and Social Media Hub. Are you a genealogy blogger who would like to be interviewed for the “May I Introduce To You . . .” series? If so, contact Jana via email at jmlast61@gmail.com.

The post May I Introduce to You . . . Alexis Maurer appeared first on GeneaBloggers.

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