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Our family recently bought an ice cream maker. While enjoying our first batch of ice cream, we talked about what flavor we wanted to make next. My middle son said, very excitedly, “I want to make rainbow ice cream!” I started to think about ways to meet his request, and my thought was to make 6 batches of vanilla ice cream of all the colors of the rainbow. But our new ice cream maker would make huge batches. Then I remembered a simple way how to make ice cream at home. Unfortunately, it took a long time. Remembering something from my heat transfer class in college, I thought if we changed the amount of one ingredient, we could speed up the process. I gathered all the boys together, and we learned how to make ice cream quicker together!

How to Make Ice Cream as Quickly as Possible!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see disclosure.

We live in Texas, its summer, and right now its HOT! Add that to the lack of patience of my three boys, and finding a way to make ice cream quickly would be nice. More than nice. A dream for this stressed out mom!

My son’s request for rainbow ice cream gave me an idea for an experiment. When my oldest was in kindergarten, he had made ice cream in a bag. But I remembered it took awhile. Of course, we could jump in the car, and drive to buy some ice cream, but if you have 3 young boys, you know this is NOT an option. So I thought of an experiment to figure out how to speed up making ice cream in a bag.

Following the instructions from this recipe, we set off to make 6 batches of ice cream!

Step 1: First I poured the cream, sugar, and vanilla from the recipe into a small ziplock bag. Then I added a few drops of red food coloring into the bag.

Step 2: I repeated step 1 with two more small ziplock bags. I added green food coloring to one, and blue food coloring to the other. I labeled each bag with the first letter of each of my sons’ names, so they wouldn’t fight over who got to make which ice cream. Mommy win!






Step 3: Next I gave each one of my sons a large ziplock bag, and had each of them pour 8 cups of ice into their bag.

Step 4: The post with the recipe had a great explanation of the science behind making ice cream. But I was curious if we could make our ice cream faster if we added more salt to the ice bag. To test this theory, my youngest son put 3/4 cup of rock salt in his bag of ice, my middle son added 1/2 cup salt in his bag, and my oldest added just 1/4 cup of salt.


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Step 5: We placed the red bag in my youngest son’s bag of ice, green in my middle son’s bag, and blue in my oldest son’s bag of ice.






Step 6: Then they rolled their bags of ice around, while I kept track of time to see how long it took each bag of cream and sugar to become ice cream.

Notice we put some socks on my 2 year old’s hands. The bags get really cold!

Step 7: We repeated steps 1 through 6 for the colors orange, yellow, and purple.

When running an experiment, always make sure that your results are repeatable. Repeatable means when you run your experiment more than once, and you get the same results both times.

Results:

Both times we ran our experiment, the milk in the bag of ice with 3/4 cup of salt was the first to turn into ice cream. The bag that took the longest to turn into ice cream was the bag with only 1/4 cup of salt.

So, the more salt you have in the ice bag, the quicker your milk will become ice cream!

The Science Behind our Experiment

Adding salt to the ice lowers the melting temperature of the ice. While the ice is melting, it is undergoing  a endothermic reaction. An endothermic reaction means that the ice is taking energy, in the form of heat, from its surrounding area. So while the ice is melting, heat energy is transferring from the small bag to the large bag. The less energy in a substance, the less their molecules move. Eventually, enough energy transfers from the milk/sugar mixture that the molecules essentially stop moving, resulting in a solid. In this case our solid is ice cream!

Adding more salt to the ice speeds up melting, thus increasing the endothermic reactions. Which is why the cream in the ice bag with the most rock salt became ice cream the fastest!

Rainbow Ice Cream

From the experiment, we had all the colors of the rainbow. Now it was now time to make the rainbow ice cream my son wanted!

Step 1: I found a mason jar big enough for all the ice cream.

Step 2: Next I slowly poured the red ice cream into the mason jar.

Step 3: Then I put the jar into the freezer, along with the remaining 5 colors.

Step 4: I repeated steps 2 and 3 for each color. After pouring the purple ice cream into the jar, I returned the now full mason jar to the freezer one last time.

**Tip: Remove the ice cream still in the bag from the freezer to defrost a little before adding it to the mason jar. Defrosting the ice cream will make it easier to pour and level inside the jar. Also make sure the ice cream in the mason jar is completely frozen before adding another color on top.**

Step 5: Once the purple ice cream was completely solid, I removed the mason jar from the freezer, and voila! Rainbow ice cream!

My little boy was so excited to eat his rainbow ice cream!

I loved I could involve all 3 of my boys in learning how to make ice cream fast. I really want to find more experiments that involve all three of them. Do you have any ideas for experiments you can do with multiple kids? I’d love to hear your ideas!


Did you enjoy our summer time experiment? Then you’ll love my other science experiments!

Angular Momentum Experiment with Beyblades!
Making the Layers of the Ocean-A Density Activity
Easy Beyblade Science Experiment: Explore Different Types of Beyblades
Easy and Fun Garden Preschool Science Experiment
Rainbow Crayon: a Crayon Melting Point Experiment
The Science Behind Melting Crayons
Tensile Strength Experiment: Find the Strongest Spider Web!

The post How to Make Ice Cream Quicker using Heat Transfer! appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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Have you ever heard of simple machines? Simple machines are in every piece of machinery in a factory. They’re in your car, and many toys. But what are they? Simple put, simple machines are a way to make things move easier. For example, try pushing a heavy box full of textbooks from one end of the room to another. It takes a lot of work, hu? But give your box 4 wheels and two axels, and its a lot easier to move! My son’s recent Tinker Crate used two kinds of simple machines to make a bird fly!

Simple Machine Bird: Levers, Gears, and Birds! Oh my!

This post contains affiliate links. Please see disclosure for details.

My son opened his latest Tinker Crate box, and immediately pulled out the TinkerZine (a little book that comes in every Tinker Crate). He started reading and soon learned about all the forces on a bird, and airplane, during flight. He was already familiar about the forces from a book we had read a few years ago, but it was great for him to refamiliarize himself with lift, weight, drag, and thrust forces.





As he continued to read, he also learned about several types of simple machines, and how they are apart of everything that moves! To illustrate the idea, his Tinker Crate had him make a bird out of simple machines!

Building a bird wing out of Levers!

First my son built a wing of the bird using levers. Levers are a type of simple machine. A lever is a bar with a pivot point. The pivot point is called a fulcrum.

Check out the simple machine lever in action!

Wing made of Levers in motion - YouTube




Moving Wings using Gears!

Another class of simple machines is gears. Gears are a great way to transfer motion or to change the speed of motion. The next part of this month’s Tinker Crate instructed my son two use 4 gears to move the wings of the bird.

First he connected two gears together by a shared shaft through the bird’s base. This made the gears turn at the same time.

Gears on a shared shaft - YouTube

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Next he connected another set of gears to the bird’s base. The teeth of both gears engaged, transferring motion from one set of gears to the next.
Two Sets of Gears Moving together - YouTube





In the last step, my son connected the levers of one of the wings the gears. When the gears spun, our bird’s wing moved!

A bird's wing moves using lever and gears! - YouTube

My son connected the other wing, and the rest of the bird. Now our simple machine bird could fly!

Flying Simple Machine Bird - YouTube

My son loved building his simple machine bird, and I loved it because it introduced my son to simple machines. Building the bird introduced the idea to my son that simple machines used together can be used to create complicated machines.

Have you tried Tinker Crate? We’ve loved each and every one of the boxes we’ve received over the past year and a half. If you’re curious about other boxes, check out some of my other Tinker Crate posts.

Exploring Polymers by Making Slime
Building Electrical Circuits and Playing with Light
Learning about Optics with Two Fun Light Experiments!
Teach Your Kid about Biomechanical Engineering
The Mechanics Behind Our Hands

The post Simple Machine Bird: Levers, Gears, and Birds! Oh My! appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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The best way to figure out how something works is to take it apart, or reverse engineer it. A while back, my son had  bought a solar powered toy at Dollar Tree. We decided to reverse engineer the toy to better understand solar energy. Our decision ended up being a great way to learn about solar energy for kids.

Solar Energy for Kids: Reverse Engineering a Solar Toy!

In a previous post, I wrote a list of 25 great STEM toys available at Dollar Tree. One of the toys I featured was a swinging toy, powered by solar energy. To learn what caused the toy to move, my son and I took the toy apart, and learned about each part of the toy.

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see the disclosure.

Step 1: First we looked over the toy. We noticed a mirror-like rectangle on the base, and a magnet under the snowman.





Step 2: Next we turned the solar toy over to see the bottom of the base. We removed the bottom plate of the base using a flathead screwdriver.


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Step 3: When we took the base plate off, we saw four parts to a circuit:

solar panel
capacitor
circuit board
copper coil






These 4 parts make up an electrical circuit. Let’s explore these 4 components:

Solar Panel

All light is made of photons. When photons from sunlight hit a solar panel, they release electrons from orbiting the nucleus of the atom. The electrons then travel to the capacitor through a wire connecting the solar panel and capacitor.

Capacitor

The capacitor is where electrons are stored until they are needed to flow somewhere else. The electrons stay in the capacitor until they are able to flow out again.

Circuit Board

A circuit board connects electronic parts. On the circuit board is a black blob, which is a circuit chip. The circuit chip acts as a gate between the capacitor and copper coil. The circuit chip releases electrons to the copper coil at a specific timing.

Copper Coil

When the electrons flow through the copper coil, the coil becomes a magnet!

How does the coil become a magnet?

All electrons have a negative charge. The drawing below shows the movement of electrons in two magnets. Electrons flow in the direction of the arrows. The movement of the electrons is called a magnetic field. The side of the magnet receiving electrons has a negative charge. On the opposite side of the magnet electrons are leaving, so that side has a positive charge. When positive sides (or negative sides) of two magnets are put together, the magnets repel each other. The reason the like charge sides repel each other is because the electrons in the magnetic fields are pushing each other away.






On the dollar tree magnetic toy, when the copper coil receives electrons from the circuit chip, the side of the magnet that receives the electrons has a negative charge. Since the two magnets push away, this tells us the charge on each magnet is the same.

Reviewing our Project about Solar Power for kids

After going through our exercise, and talking about all the parts of the circuit, my son and I summarized our electrical circuit by drawing a diagram of the movement of electrons:

I loved how this super inexpensive toy introduced my son to a seemingly complicated concept like solar energy. I’m also loving how my son is exploring green energy sources. I’m going to have to find other activities to spark his interest in green energy!

Did you enjoy this post? Try some of my other STEM projects!

Reverse Engineering a Fidget Spinner
Beyblade Stadium Engineering: Repurposing to Solve a Problem
Making the Layers of the Ocean-A Density Activity
Troubleshooting Your Bot
Easy and Fun Garden Preschool Science Experiment
Beyblade Stadium Engineering: Repurposing to Solve a Problem
Make a Light up Card with a Simple Circuit!
Building Electrical Circuits and Playing with Light
Material Science Activity: Building a molecular structure!

The post Solar Energy for Kids: Reverse Engineering a Solar Toy! appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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Now that its summer, all 3 of my sons are playing with their beyblades non-stop. Unfortunately, the beyblade stadium they have is a too small for all three of them to play at the same time. So for awhile, my oldest and I started making plans to make our own beyblade stadium. We considered making one out of a cardboard box, but didn’t think the surface would be smooth enough. Then my husband thought of an ingenious way to repurpose a winter toy as a beyblade stadium!

Beyblade Stadium Engineering: Repurposing to Solve a Problem

Many people believe engineers are always designing new technology. Making the next bigger and better widget. While this is true to some extent, creativity is not limited to always designing a new thing to solve a problem. Some time all you need to do is re-purpose something that already exists.



Designing a Space Writing Utensile

During college I interned for an aerospace company that worked for NASA. I remember a story they told me comparing the American and Russian space programs. The American astronauts requested a writing tool for space travel. All pens designs rely on gravity to force the ink down to the tip of the pen. So NASA engineers had to design a pen to be used in zero gravity. Russian astronauts made the same request. The Russian space program gave their astronauts a pencil.

Genius! While a zero gravity pen may sound awesome, the design of the pen required hours and resources to create. The Russian pencil only required a quick shopping trip.

You see, engineering isn’t always about creating fancy new technology. Engineering means finding creative solutions to a problem.



An Inventive Beyblade Stadium

This brings me to our beyblade stadium. While my son and I were busy thinking of different kinds of designs and materials we could use for our beyblade stadium, my husband was remembering a family vacation just over a year ago. In my post “Learning about Friction while Playing in the Snow“, we learned about friction while sledding down a hill.

My husband’s idea was to use one of the sleds as a stadium! Not only did we already have the sled, we also didn’t need to buy materials or spend time making a stadium!


Next we tried out our new stadium!

Home Made Beyblade Stadium - YouTube

Our beyblade stadium worked perfectly! All 3 brothers were able to play with eachother at the same time. Perfect!

And it was easy to store under a bed. A big plus to me!

Can you think of anything else you can re-purpose to solve a problem you’re having right now? Don’t always rush to the store to buy something. Think like an Engineer, and reuse something you already have!

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Looking for other activities about Engineering? Try one of these!

Reverse Engineering a Fidget Spinner
Teach Your Kid about Biomechanical Engineering
The Time my Son Out Engineered Me!
Teach your kid to be a Materials Engineer!
Teach Kids about Reliability Engineering!
Teach Your Kid to be a Mechanical Engineer!
Teach your kid to be a Project Engineer!
Troubleshooting Your Bot

The post Beyblade Stadium Engineering: Repurposing to Solve a Problem appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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Beyblades. All three of my boys are really into beyblades, even the 2 year old! In an effort to connect with my boys, I started making up beyblade science experiments. In one of the experiments, my kids and I measured the weights of the four types of beyblades. We learned the Stamina type of Beyblade was heavier than the other 3 types. From my kinematics class in college, I remembered that the greater mass an object had, the greater angular momentum it had when moving in a circle. Angular momentum is the resistance of a body in motion to stop rotating. Because the Stamina type beyblade weighed the most, we hypothesized it would stay in motion longer than the other 3 types of beyblades. We decided to test our hypothesis with a simple angular momentum experiment!

Angular Momentum Experiment with Beyblades!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see the disclosure.

Supplies:




Procedure:

Step 1:  Start with the Attack type beyblae. Launch the attack type beyblade using your beyblade launcher. Time how long it takes the beyblade to completely stop. Record the time in Table 1.

Table 1: Time for Beyblade to Completely Stop
Type of Beyblade Experiment # Time it takes for Beyblade to Stop (seconds)
Attack 1
2
3
4
average
Defense 1
2
3
4
Average
Stamina 1
2
3
4
Average
Balance 1
2
3
4
Average

Step 2:  Repeat Step 1 three times.

Step 3: Take the average of the four runs, and record it in table 1.

        How to take an average:
  1. Add all the data together.
  2. Divide the sum from Step 1 by the number of data points.

Step 4: Repeat Steps 1 through 3 for the Defense, Stamina, and Balance beyblades.



Data:
Table 1: Time for Beyblade to Completely Stop
Type of Beyblade Experiment # Time it takes for Beyblade to Stop (seconds)
Attack 1 56
2 52
3 65
4 46
average 54.75
Defense 1 87
2 88
3 83
4 83
Average 85.25
Stamina 1 94
2 91
3 81
4 89
Average 88.75
Balance 1 74
2 88
3 82
4 80
Average 81
Your Fidget Spinner Inertia Experiment Guide!

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Results of our Angular Momentum Experiment:

Our hypothesis that the heaviest beyblade would have the greatest momentum was right! Our experiment showed the Stamina beyblade stayed in motion for 88.75 seconds on average. Our lightest beyblade was an Attack beyblade, which only stayed in motion for 54.75 seconds on average.

One result that was unexpected was that the Defense type beyblade kept rotating longer than the Balance type beyblade, even though the Balance type beyblade weighed more than the defense type. Our result made us realize there are more factors than weight that affect how long a beyblade stays in motion.

Now time for us to do some more exploring!

Did you like this experiment? Then you’ll my other ones! Try one today.

Making the Layers of the Ocean-A Density Activity
Physics for kids with Beyblades
Law of Inertia Experiment using a Fidget Spinner!
Easy Beyblade Science Experiment: Explore Different Types of Beyblades
Center of Mass Fidget Spinner Experiment
Make an American Flag Using Water Science Experiments
Easy and Fun Garden Preschool Science Experiment
Rainbow Crayon: a Crayon Melting Point Experiment
The Science Behind Melting Crayons
Exploring Energy for Kids: How Are Height and Distance Related?

The post Angular Momentum Experiment with Beyblades! appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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In second grade, my oldest studied the layers of the ocean. As a fun activity at home, I thought we could bring what he learned alive by modeling the layers. As it turned out, making the layers of the ocean was also a great simple activity to teach density for kids!

Making the Layers of the Ocean-A Density Activity 3 Main Layers of the Ocean

The three main layers of the ocean are the surface ocean, the deep ocean, and the seafloor sediments. In our model of the ocean, we will use 3 substances (sand, salt water, and water) of different densities to create the ocean layers. We’ll also calculate the density of each substance.

What is Density?

Density is how much a substance weighs in a certain volume. For example, 1 cup of rocks weighs more than 1 cup of cheerios. So rocks have a higher density than cheerios. The formula for density is:

where  is Density
mass is how much something weighs

When in liquid, the material with the highest density always sinks to the bottom, and the lowest density material floats to the top. To create the deep ocean layer, we will increase he density of water by adding salt to it. Adding salt to water will increase the weight of the water, and the density too!

Supplies:

-water
-salt
-sand
food coloring
fish shaped ice tray
1 cup measuring cup
1/2 cup measuring cup
digital scale

Procedure:

Step 1: Fill a cup with water, then add green food coloring to the water.

Step 2: Measure out 1/2 cup of the green water, and weigh it on the electronic scale. Write down the weight in table 1 below.



Table 1: Finding the Density of Sand, Salt Water, and Water
Material Weight Volume Density (oz/cup)
Water
Sand
Salt Water

Step 3: Fill the fish shaped ice tray with the green colored water. Place the ice tray in the freezer.





Step 4: Fill the 1/2 cup measuring cup with sand.

Step 5: Weigh the measuring cup of sand, and write the weight down in table 1.


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Step 6: Pour the sand into a clear, cylindrical cup or vase.






Step 7: Boil 6 cups of water, and add a cup of salt to the boiling water. Stir the hot water until all the salt is dissolved. Add a few drops of blue food coloring to the salt water, and stir. Set aside to cool.

Step 8: Once the blue water from step 6 is room temperature, measure 1/2 cup of the salt water, and weigh it on the electronic scale. Write the weight down in table 1.






Step 9: Pour 1 cup of the blue salt water from steps 7 and 8 into the vase from step 6.

Step 10: Take the ice tray out of the freezer. Place 6 ice fish into the cup of sand and salt water.






As the ice melts, the green water remains as the top layer, and the sand stays at the bottom of the vase.





What Happened?

Let’s start by looking at Table 1 with all the data filled..

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My oldest is finishing up second grade in the next two weeks. He’s learned so much this year in math, from fractions, to multiplication and division. I don’t want him to lose anything he’s learned this year, but I also don’t want to fill his summer break with math worksheets. The best way for my son to learn is with hands-on fun math activities! Here is a list of over 45 fun math activities for K-2 to prevent your kids from summer slide!

45+ Hands-on Fun Math Activities for K-2nd Grade to Prevent Summer Slide! Numbers

Card Games for Learning Math Facts

True Aim Math Game; An Active Math Game the Kids Love to Play

100 Color Challenge

Math Game for Kids: Fishing for Numbers

Quick Set-Up Number Game For Your Preschooler

Math with Magnetic Numbers 

Shapes

2nd Grade Math Activities: Loose Change


Counting

Counting Activity: Fruit Themed Count and Clip Cards

Counting Math Game for Kids: Action Dice

Ocean Themed Counting Worksheets to Use with LEGO

LEGO Count and Move Math Game

Watermelon Seed Matching Game

Easy Kinesthetic Math Activity to Practice Skip Counting

Garden Flower Ten Frame

Super #WIKKISTIX Math Wraps – 5 Printable Games!

Free Preschool Math Activity!

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Data and Graphing

Mystery Grid Art Challenge

Fun and Surprising Statistics for Kids

Fractions

Fractions Fun with Hands-On Activity for Equivalent Fractions


Measurement

Backyard Measurement Scavenger Hunt

How Big is a Blue Whale? Outdoor Science Activity

Measuring Tree Height

Multiplication

Multiplication Battleship for Math Practice


Patterns

Math Patterning Game With a Blindfold

Fractals in Nature: A Mathematical Suncatcher Project

Telling Time

Sidewalk Chalk Outdoor Clock Game

Any Math Fact!

Add the concepts you want to review to these printable games!

Stand off: Simple Water Gun Math game

Leap into Leaping Flip Box

How to get Young Kids Learning Math – Zap Zap Kindergarten Math App Review

The post 45+ Hands-on Fun Math Activities to Prevent Summer Slide! appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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“Let it rip!” Anyone who plays with beyblades knows what this means. Any time all three of my boys are together, you can hear their beyblades battling after they “rip” them from their beyblade launchers. Even my two year old knows to shout “Let it rip!” My husband has even joined into the fun, and bought his own beyblade. But when he went to the store, he realized there were 4 different types of beyblades. My sons already had two types of beyblades, so my husband bought the other two types, just so we could figure out if there really was anything difference between the 4 types of beyblades. What we found was pretty cool!

Easy Beyblade Experiment: Exploring the Types of Beyblades Types of Beyblades and their Advantages

After my husband’s trip to the store, we found out there are four types of beyblades:

Attack – this type of beyblade “attacks” or hits its opponent more than other types of beyblades.

Stamina – these types of beyblades will out-spin other types of beyblades.

Defense – These Beyblades specialize in knocking back attacks. They are slower and heavier than the other beyblade designs, resulting in the opposing beyblade being deflected.

Balance – this type of beyblade is a mix of the other three beyblade designs.

Parts of a Beyblade

Beyblades are all made of three parts. We started our investigation by comparing the three beyblade parts:

  • Energy LayerTM : The top part of the beyblade. It is made out of plastic, probably made by a process called injection molding, where a mold is made, then plastic is injected into the mold. As a mentioned in a previous post, injection molding is a way many plastic toys are made, and is a three step process.
  • Forge DiscTM: The middle part of the beyblade. This piece is heavier than the top, and is made of some sort of metal. It is likely this piece is also made using the injection molding process.
  • Performance TipTM: The bottom part of the beyblade. The tip is the point the beyblade spins on.





Beyblade Science Experiment – Comparing Weights

For our beyblade science experiment, we decided to compare the weights of each part of the beyblade.

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see the disclosure.

Supplies:

Procedure:

Step 1: Starting with the attack beyblade, measure the weight of the beyblade’s Energy LayerTM on the digital scale, and record the weight in Table 1 below, or download Table 1 here.

Table 1: Beyblade Parts Weights
Type of Beyblade Beyblade Parts Weight (oz)
Attack Energy LayerTM
Forge DiscTM
Performance TipTM
Stamina Energy LayerTM
Forge DiscTM
Performance TipTM
Defense Energy LayerTM
Forge DiscTM
Performance TipTM
Balance Energy LayerTM
Forge DiscTM
Performance TipTM

Step 2: Repeat step 1 for the attack beyblade’s Forge DiscTM and Performance TipTM.






Step 3: Repeat steps 1 and 2 for the other types of beyblades (Stamina, Defense, and Balance).

Type of Beyblade Beyblade Part Weight (oz)
Attack Energy LayerTM  0.30
Forge DiscTM 0.70
Performance TipTM 0.20
Stamina Energy LayerTM 0.30
Forge DiscTM 0.90
Performance TipTM 0.20
Defense Energy LayerTM 0.30
Forge DiscTM 0.70
Performance TipTM 0.20
Balance Energy LayerTM 0.30
Forge DiscTM 0.80
Performance TipTM 0.20
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Results:

When we look at the different weights of all the beyblade parts, we notice that the Energy Layers and Performance Tips all weight the same. The difference in weight is all in the Forge Discs.

The heaviest Forge Disc is the one for the Stamina beyblade toy. Stamina means the ability for something to keep doing something for a long time. In physics terms, having stamina means the items has a lot of momentum.

So what makes something have momentum? Weight!

The equation for momentum is a circle (or angular momentum), L is:


where r=radius of the item in motion
m=mass (or weight without gravity)
v=velocity (or speed) of the item in motion

So if the radius and velocity of the beyblades are approximately the same, then the beyblade with the greatest angular momentum is the one that weighs the most! So it makes sense to name the heaviest beyblade “Stamina type”. If the stamina type beyblade is the heaviest, it will have the greatest angular momentum, and will stay in motion the longest!

Another Science Experiment idea with Beyblades!

Test out our theory! See if the Stamina Beyblade has the greatest momentum! Time how long it takes for each type of beyblade takes to stop. It should take the stamina beyblade longer to stop, since it has the greatest momentum.

You must have the exact same conditions when you time each beyblade, so use one of these stadiums for your experiment!

Did you like this science experiment? Then you’ll love my other experiments!

Physics for kids with Beyblades
Law of Inertia Experiment using a Fidget Spinner!
Center of Mass Fidget Spinner Experiment
Make an American Flag Using Water Science Experiments
Easy and Fun Garden Preschool Science Experiment
Rainbow Crayon: a Crayon Melting Point Experiment
The Science Behind Melting Crayons
Exploring Energy for Kids: How Are Height and Distance Related?

The post Easy Beyblade Science Experiment: Explore Different Types of Beyblades appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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STEM education is thought of as relevant for first grade and up. But I believe STEM education starts as early as possible!  I love doing experiments with my sons because it is growing their love of learning. They are seeing that learning is not just done within the walls of their school, but also at home. My middle son will start kindergarten in a year, so I am looking for fun STEM activities for us to do together. But as I looked at my own STEM activities, I realized only a handful were geared towards kindergarteners. So I decided to find some great STEM activities for Kindergarten, and  create the a list for us to work through in the next year! Here is the list of  STEM activities for Kindergarten!

STEM Activities for Kindergarten

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Science

Easy and Fun Garden Science Experiment – From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom

Galaxy in a Jar STEM Activity for Kids – The Inspiration Edit

Tape Resist Dinosaur Bone Art – Pink Stripey Socks

Corny Science: Will it sink or float? – Capri + 3

Magical COLOR CHANGING Bracelets – Pink Stripey Socks

Growing Mint in Water – Sloely

Making Snow at Home when its Hot Outside – From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom

Simple Light Refraction Experiment – Look! We’re Learning

Green Kid Crafts: The Crafty Way to get your Kids into Science  – What’s Up Fagans?

Orange Volcanoes – A Fun Science Experiment for Kids Using Simple Ingredients – The Art Kit

A Fun way to Teach Newton’s First Law of Motion – From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom

Heat Wave Science Magic for Kids: Make Crayons – Mama Smiles

How to make Grass Heads – Red Ted Art

Simple Science – Sprout Heads & Sunshine – Red Ted Art

LEGO Pendulum Painting and 100+ Ways to Create, Play, and Learn with LEGO – Kids’ Craft Room

Make an American Flag Using Water Science Experiments 


Technology

9 Math Apps to Improve Your Child’s Math Skills




Engineering

Let’s design a zoo! – Pink Stripey Socks

Stick Raft Building STEM Project –  Kids’ Craft Room

Teach your kid to be a Project Engineer! – From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom

STEM Challenge for Kids: Build a Hexbug Maze Using Straws – Buggy and Buddy

STEM for Kids: Egg Drop Project – Buggy and Buddy

STEM Challenge for Kids: Build a Shelter from the Sun and Test it with UV-Sensitive Beads – Buggy and Buddy

STEM Activities for Kids Using Household Items – Mama Smiles

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  Math

Playdough Geometry: Exploring 2D & 3D Shapes – School Time Snippets




 Looking for STEM Activities for older elementary? Try some of these!

Teach Your Kid to be a Mechanical Engineer!
Troubleshooting Your Bot
Building Electrical Circuits and Playing with Light
Rainbow Crayon:  a Crayon Melting Point Experiment
Teach your kid to be a Project Engineer!
Make a Light up Card with a Simple Circuit!
Reverse Engineering a Fidget Spinner
Teach Your Kid about Biomechanical Engineering
Be a Process Engineer: Play How’s it made?
Material Science Activity: Building a molecular structure!
Teach Kids about Reliability Engineering!
Teach your kid to be a Materials Engineer!

The post STEM Activities for Kindergarten appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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