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About a year ago, my son and I ran an experiment with his favorite toy, beyblades. The spinning toy is still a favorite in our house, with the younger two boys joining in on the fun! For Christmas, we gave our oldest a beyblade type toy that had some difference features than his other ones. We decided to rerun the experiment we had done before, but this time with his new spinning top toy!

Exploring the Physics of our New Beyblade

Post contains affiliate links. Please see disclosure for more details.

The toy we bought my son was actually called Metal Master Fusion Storm. The pack included four spinning top beyblades, and a few launchers. We set off to repeat our previous experiment, but this time with the new toy!

Beyblade Experiment Supplies Experiment

Step 1: We picked one of the bey spinning top toys from the package Metal Master Fusion Storm box. We weighed the toy, and timed how long it took for the toy to stop spinning.

Step 2: We picked 4 of my son’s beyblades to compare our new toy with, one attack, one stamina, one defense, and one balance.

Step 3: We repeated step 1 with each of the beyblades from STEP 2.

Results:
Beyblade TypeWeight (oz)Average Time to stop (s)
Metal Master Fusion1.0061
Attack1.15
17.6
Stamina1.3075.3
Defense1.2068.3
Balance1.1566.7

Our Metal Master Fusion bey blade some what followed the same angular momentum trend we had found in our previous experiment. In the previous experiment, we found that the more a beyblade weighed, the more angular momentum it had, and the longer it took to stop spinning. The Metal Master Fusion predictably stopped spinning in less time than the Stamina, Defense, and Balance beyblades, since it weighed less than the three beyblades at only 1 oz. But what was unexpected was that, while it weighed less than the Attack type beyblade, the Metal Master Fusion still spun longer.

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To better understand our results, we looked back at our videos of the two beyblades.

Here is a video of one of the Metal Master Fusion’s runs:

A Metal Master Fusion Beyblade type Spinning toy run - YouTube

And here is a video of the Attack type beyblade:

An Attack Type Beyblade Run - YouTube

As you can see from the videos, the two beyblades act very different as they spin. The Metal Master Fusion spins pretty much in the same place as where it was released. The attack type beyblade, on the other hand, races around the stadium from side to side, until it starts slowing down. The reason it stops sooner than the Metal Master Fusion spinnning toy is because each time it hits the side of the stadium, the beyblade loses kinetic energy. Losing kinetic energy slows down the beyblade, until it eventually stops.

This begs the question, why does the attack type beyblade behave the way it does? But that is another experiment for another day.

If you enjoyed this experiment, check our some of my other beyblade experiments!

Angular Momentum Experiments with Beyblades
Easy Beyblade Science Experiment: Explore Different Types of Beyblades
Physics for kids with Beyblades
Beyblade Stadium Engineering: Repurposing to Solve a Problem

Or try these STEM activities with other toys!

Circular Motion with Star Wars
A Fun way to Teach Newton’s First Law of Motion
Law of Inertia Experiment using a Fidget Spinner!
Center of Mass Fidget Spinner Experiment
Simple Machine Bird: Levers, Gears, and Birds! Oh My!
Programming with a fun Coding Robot

The post Beyblade Experiment: What affects Momentum? appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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It’s hard to believe Easter will be here soon. I still feel like Christmas was just last week! I need a little more motivation to get myself into the Easter spirit this year, so I created a list of STEM activities for the boys and I to do this week! From slime, to science experiments with Peeps, this will help you (and me) get excited about Easter!

Easter STEM Activities Peep Easter STEM Activities

Peeps Parachute STEM Challenge in Early Childhood – The Preschool Toolbox

Easy Peeps Science Experiment for Kids – Sixth Bloom

Peeps Experiment – Effects of Liquids on Peeps – JDaniel4’s Mom

Amazingly Stretchy and Fun Edible Peeps Slime Recipe – Schooling a Monkey

Fun Catapulting Marshmallow Peeps Game – There’s Just One Mommy

BEST Peeps Playdough Recipe – 123 Homeschool for Me

Egg Themed Easter STEM Activities

DIY Easter Egg Bath Bombs Recipe Kids Can Decorate – STEAM Powered Family

Easter Egg STEM Activity – Making Oobleck, Slime, and Playdough – From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom

6 Preschool Easter Egg Math Games – Sixth Bloom

Science Experiments with Egg Parachutes – JDaniel4’s Mom

Cracked Rainbow Dinosaur Eggs for Easter – Pink Stripey Socks

Easter Egg Visual Discrimination Activity – Preschool Play and Learn

Rainbow Rubber Naked Egg Experiment – Schooling a Monkey

Easter Catapult STEM Activity for Kids – Little Bins for Little Hands

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Other Fantastic Easter STEM Activities!

Spring Minute-to-Win-It in the Classroom – Primary Playground

Easter & Spring Pattern Block Design Templates – Adventure in a Box

12 Spring Lego Projects for Easter Egg Hunt or Basket – Adventure in a Box

Easter Engineering Activities for Preschoolers – Sixth Bloom

Angry Peeps: A Failed Easter Experiment – From Engineer to Stat at Home Mom

Spring STEAM Science Experiment Raised Salt Painting – Sixth Bloom

Jelly Bean Project for Easter STEM – Little Bins for Little Hands

Easter Oobleck for Messy Science Fun – Little Bins for Little Hands

STEM Challenge- Building a Trampoline for Peter Rabbit – JDaniel4’s Mom

Sparkly Salt Crystal Easter Eggs Science Experiment – Schooling a Monkey

Counting Coins Easter Basket Activity for Little Kids – The Keeper of the Memories

Triangle Paper Craft Chicken & Chick – Red Ted Art

Easter Bunny Paper Puppet – Simple STEAM Activity – Red Ted Art

I hope you have fun doing some of these STEM activities! I’ve done a few of them already, and plan to spend the long weekend doing a few more with my boys! Happy Easter!

The post 25+ Easter STEM Activities appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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After every Easter, our house has a plethora of empty plastic Easter eggs that I have NO idea what to do with. This year I came up with a great preschool STEM activity for my middle son. I used the leftover Easter eggs to make oobleck, slime, and dough using simple ingredients we had around the house! I was also able to teach him about how things are made (or manufactured). I added one supply to our STEM activity that helped us make oobleck and slime, but didn’t help with making dough.

Easter Egg STEM Activity: Learning how things are made

Post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see disclosure.

Supplies Easter Egg STEM Activity

Step 1: Most plastic Easter Eggs have holes in them. For this activity, we will need to close up the holes. I covered the holes with hot glue, then waited for the glue to dry.

Step 2: Pour 1 tablespoon of cornstarch and 1/2 tablespoon of water into one of the plastic eggs. Drop a marble into the egg, and add a few drops of yellow food coloring. Close the egg, and set it aside.

Step 3: Pour 1 tablespoon of cornstarch and 1/2 tablespoon of gel dish soap into an empty Easter egg. Drop a marble into the egg. Close the egg, and set it to the side.

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Step 4: Pour 1 tablespoon of glue and 1/8 tablespoon of laundry detergent into the last egg. Drop a marble into the egg, and add a few drops of blue food coloring. Close the egg, and set it aside.

Step 5: Carefully hot glue the eggs’ seams, to ensure the eggs don’t accidentally open.

Step 6: Shake each egg for about 1 minute.

Step 7: Peel the hot glue off each egg.

Step 8: Open each Easter egg to see what you have!

Results:

We opened our first egg, and we had oobleck! I talked to my son about how the marble had helped mix up the ingredients while he shook the egg.

We opened the second egg, and found we had a little bit of dough, but a lot of left over cornstarch. It looked as though the marble didn’t really help mix the ingredients, but instead pushed the cornstarch up against the egg.

When we opened the last egg, we had perfect blue slime. My son was so excited about his slime! He also noticed that the marble had helped mix the ingredients, just like it did with making oobleck.

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My oldest son has an interest in learning to code from some time now. He first exposure to coding was at school, with some online games. Then he learned to block code using a coding robot. But I really wanted him to learn a coding language, like I had learned in college. I researched other toys, online games, and subscription boxes, and found Bitsbox. Bitsbox is a monthly subscription box that teaches kids to program apps using JavaScript. I soon contacted Bitsbox to have our first box!

Bitsbox: Our First Box Experience

I received our Bitsbox for free to review. Opinions in this post are completely my own.

Our first box came with a binder, several large pages with coding, and 5 cards with coding. Each page and card included the JavaScript code needed to create an app or game. To watch my son unbox our Bitsbox, head over to my YouTube channel, or watch the following video!

Bitsbox Unboxing - YouTube

The first app my son wanted to code was called “Lazer Burner”. On the back of the card he found the JavaScript to code the app.

After logging into Bitsbox online, my son entered a code from the “Laser Burner” card. Then he copied the JavaScript code from the back of the card.

When he finished copying the code, he had programmed an app that used a lazer to draw!

Bitsbox Laser Burner App - YouTube
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The next app from his Bitsbox he decided to code was called “Its Raining Cats and Dogs”. He entered the code for the app (7722) into Bitsbox online, then copied the JavaScript from the back of the card.

When he finished writing the JavaScript code, he could make cats and dogs rain down the screen!

Bitsbox "It's Raining Cats and Dogs" App - YouTube

The card also included a few challenges. The challenges required him to manipulate the code to complete the task. First my son had to figure out how to make the cats and dogs bigger. He searched through the code for a command he thought determined the size of the animals. Then he changed the existing number to a larger number. Viola! It started raining huge cats and dogs! He also played around with different numbers to see how big the cats and dogs could get. Eventually, he settled on a size he liked the most.

Bitsbox "Its Raining Cats and Dogs" App - Big Animals - YouTube

The next challenge was to figure out how to add make it rain hamsters, in addition to cats and dogs. This time, my son searched the code for a place that specified cats and dogs, then added hamsters. He ran the code, and the app started raining all 3 animals!

Bitsbox "Its Raining Cats and Dogs" - adding Gerbils to the mix - YouTube

The third challenge taught him to change the rate at which the animals fell down the screen. First he changed the code so the cats, dogs, and gerbils fell slowly down the screen.

Bitsbox "Its Raining Cats and Dogs" App - Falling slowly - YouTube

Then he changed the code so the animals would drop from the sky at lightning speed!

Bitsbox "Its Raining Cats and Dogs" App - Falling Fast - YouTube

My son had a lot of fun coding these two apps. I thought his first Bitsbox was a great introduction to coding with JavaScript. I can’t wait for him to gain more experience programming with the other apps. Each app he completes helps my son become more familiar with JavaScript, and programming in general.

My favorite part about the apps he programmed were the challenges. Each one made my son dive deeper into understanding what he was coding. I loved watching him explore the code while trying to complete each challenge. Even more exciting was watching the light bulb moments! When he finally realized what the code was doing, and came up with challenges of his own!

And on a side note, I also love the cost of Bitsbox! One of my son’s closest friends attends a coding club once a week. A few months ago, his mom invited my son to join. But when I saw the monthly price tag, my eyes nearly popped out of my head! Bitsbox, on the other hand is much more affordable, with a 6 month subscription equal to the cost of one month at a coding club! If you’re interested in trying Bitbox, buy subscription for more than $50, and get $20 off when you use my coupon Christy20!

Other great ways to inspire kids to be engineers!

Your own Draco Constellation using Fiber Optics
My Favorite STEM Supplies
10 STEM Toys to Inspire Little Engineers
Programming with a fun Coding Robot
Wind Energy STEM Activity: Building your own model Windmill
Solar Energy for Kids: Reverse Engineering a Solar Toy!
Teach Your Kid about Biomechanical Engineering
7 Great Construction Engineering Books for Preschoolers!
Teach Kids about Reliability Engineering!
Teach Your Kid to be a Mechanical Engineer! 

The post Our First Bitsbox Experience appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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Dragons are big in our house right now. My oldest son is reading the Eragon series, and the young ones are huge Toothless fans. The youngest even roars like a dragon all day long! So when I decided to join other writers this month writing about storybook inspired science, I knew we needed to find a dragon book! So I went to our local library, and found a sweet book about the Draco constellation.

The Draco Constellation with Fiber Optics

This post contains affiliate links. Please see disclosure for details.

The book I found is called “Flight of the Last Dragon“. The story tells the tale of the last dragon on earth named Ultimon. The dragon hears a call from the stars, and ascends to the heavens to join them. I loved the story. I could truly sense the dragon’s loneliness, being the last of his kind on earth, and his desire to find a place to belong. 

My kids were excited to learn they could find a dragon in the stars, but they wanted to bring the Draco constellation into our house. Remembering a Tinker Crate about light we had done a year or so ago, I found a way to make the constellation come to life inside.

Materials:
  • Small Blue Fiber Optic Lamp
  • 1 piece of black construction paper or black origami paper
  • 1 piece of chalk
  • glue (make sure it will dry clear)
How to make a Draco Constellation

Step 1: Make a paper box using the black construction paper. (I used this great tutorial here to make my box!)

Step 2: Turn the box upside down, and draw the Draco Constellation on the box using chalk. The constellation is shown on the last page of “Flight of the Last Dragon”. Draw the stars as dots first, then connect the dots.

Step 3: Poke a hole through the box at each of the dots. Make sure the hole goes all the way through.


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Step 4: Flip the box over, and place one drop of glue on each hole.

Step 5: Push one strand of your fiber optic lamp through each hole, from the back to the front of the box. Leave alone until the glue is completely dry.

Step 6: On the front of the box (the side where the constellation is drawn), snip each strand of the fiber optic cable that extends too far. You want each strand to extend no farther than 1 or 2 mm.

Step 7: Take your box and lamp to a dark room, and turn on the lamp. You now have your own Draco constellation!

All three of my boys thought it was amazing to have a dragon in our house! They were also in awe of how the light traveled through the fiber optics to the very tip of the fiber to make the stars of our constellation!

Adding a fun activity when reading a book is a great way to make a story really come alive! As my oldest went to bed tonight, he told me “Thank you for making the constellation for me. Its like I have the last dragon in my room“. This boy mom’s heart is full!

For more great Storybook activities, head over to Inspiration Laboratories for a month full of storybook inspired science activities!

The post Your own Draco Constellation using Fiber Optics – Storybook Science appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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I have always loved rain. I love the sound of rain as it hits the roof. I love the smell of rain, and how it refreshes the air. But most of all, I love the rainbow that comes after the rain. My middle son also loves rainbows, so I wanted to create a simple preschool science experiment he could do with me. A couple of years ago, I made an American flag with my oldest using the properties of water, and I decided the same method would be great to create a rainbow!

Using one of the Properties of Water to Make a Rainbow

When my son and I made the American flag, we cut separate strips of paper to create the red strips and blue rectangle. But since a rainbow is the color spectrum of light, we could use the primary colors (red, yellow, blue) to make the other colors of the rainbow (orange, green, indigo). All we needed to do was allow the primary colors to blend with each other!

Rainbow Properties of Water Experiment

Post contains affiliate links. Please see disclosure for more details.

Supplies:

Steps:

Step 1: Fill each jar with water.

Step 2: Pour 10 drops of red in one jar of water, 10 drops of yellow in another jar of water, 10 drops of blue in another jar of water, and 5 drops of blue and 5 drops of red in the last jar of water.

Step 3: Measure the paper towel lengthwise, and draw six (6) evenly spaced vertical lines.

Step 4: Draw down each line using the wax stick or white crayon.

Step 5: Cut a quarter of the way down each line from step 4. Bend back the second, fourth, and sixth sections.

Step 6: Place the jars of water from step 2 on a baking sheet.

Step 7: At the same time, place the first section of the paper towel into the red colored water jar, the third section into the yellow water, the fifth section into the blue water, and the seventh section into the purple water.

Step 8th: Watch as the water travels down the paper towel.


Step 9: Once the water has traveled all the way down, remove the paper towel from the jars. Lay the paper towel flat on the cookie sheet to dry.

Step 10: Once dry, you’ll have a beautiful rainbow, just like the ones after a rain!

Printable of American Flag Experiment

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Which Property of Water is being used?

As I explained in our experiment when we made an American Flag, this experiment shows capillary action in action! The water travels through the paper towel for two reasons. First, all paper is made of a sugar molecule call cellulose. Water is highly attracted to cellulose and wants to bond (or stick) to it. Second, the cellulose fibers in a paper towel are made with spaces between them. Since water likes to stick together, the water fills these spaces as it follows the water attracted to the cellulose. More spaces allow more water to be absorbed.

Looking for more Rainbow STEM Activities? Try some of these!

Rainbow Crayon – a Crayon Melting Point Experiment
Rainbow Shamrock Salt Painting Art Project
Rainbow Rainy Day Art STEAM Project for Kids
Rainbow Science for Kids: Homemade Spectroscope
Rainbow Science for Kids: Exploring Prisms
Book Inspired Rainbow Science STEAM Activities for Kids
St. Patrick’s Day STEM / STEAM Activity
Learning About Rainbows with Roy G Biv the Leprechaun!
Rainbow baking soda science experiment for kids
Make a Skittles Rainbow
Grow your own Crystal Rainbow!
Skittles density rainbow
Make Rainbows using CD

Or try more STEM Activities and Experiments by me!

Make an American Flag Using Water Science Experiments
Appearing Snowflakes
Painting Pumpkins with Paintballs
Paintball Forces
Making the Layers of the Ocean-A Density Activity

The post Make a Rainbow using one of the Properties of Water appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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Looking for some fun activities to do this St. Patrick’s Day? Try some of these great activities to add some learning to your St.Patrick’s day!

St. Patrick’s Day STEM Activities! Leprechaun STEM Activities

Leprechaun Rocks – Fun St. Patrick’s Day Chemistry Experiment
Hide the Leprechaun’s treasure in a rock, then use chemistry to find it again!

Leprechaun Traps
Check out some trap ideas, then design your own!

Articulated Leprechaun Paper Puppet for St Patrick’s Day
This St. Patrick’s Day, make a puppet leprechaun using levers!

LEGO Designs: Leprechaun Trap
Design and build a leprechaun trap using Legos!


Rainbow STEM Activities

Rainbow Crayon – a Crayon Melting Point Experiment
Learn how the color of a crayon changes when it will melt, then make a rainbow crayon!

Rainbow Shamrock Salt Painting Art Project
Art and science combine when you make a salt rainbow shamrock!

Rainbow Rainy Day Art STEAM Project for Kids
Play with the rain, and see what happens when you leave your art in the rain!

Rainbow Science for Kids: Homemade Spectroscope
Make a spectroscope at home this St. Patrick’s day!

Rainbow Science for Kids: Exploring Prisms
Explore how you can make rainbows of your own using prisms!

Book Inspired Rainbow Science STEAM Activities for Kids
Be inspired to make your own rainbow after reading “A Rainbow of My Own”.

St. Patrick’s Day STEM / STEAM Activity
Help the Leprechaun find its gold by making a crystal rainbow!

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Learning About Rainbows with Roy G Biv the Leprechaun!
Explore rainbows with these hands on science and math activities!

Rainbow baking soda science experiment for kids
Make an exploding rainbow with this simple chemistry experiment.

St.Patrick’s Day Activity (Make a Skittles Rainbow)
Taste and make a rainbow with Skittles!

Grow your own Crystal Rainbow!
Make a rainbow, then make it even more beautiful by crystallizing it!

St.Patrick’s Day Activity (Make a Skittles Rainbow)
Taste and make a rainbow with Skittles!

Grow your own Crystal Rainbow!
Make a rainbow, then make it even more beautiful by crystallizing it!

Skittles density rainbow
A fun density experiment using skittles!

Make Rainbows using CD
Making a rainbow can’t get easier than this easy light experiment!

More St. Patrick’s Day STEM Activities

Magic fizzing shamrocks
Paint lucky shamrocks, then make them fizz!

St. Patrick’s Day STEM Activity Sensory Bottle
Count and experiment while building this fun sensory bottle!

Screen Free Coding Activity for Preschoolers
Help your preschoolers practice matching and sequencing using their favorite cereal!

Coffee Filter Shamrock Craft
A great preschool science activity! Explore capillary action using coffee filters and water.

Combine music and art to make a beautiful St. Patrick’s Day cards
Explore what happens when you combine two colors, and then make St. Patrick’s day cards!

Math Games for Kids: Gold Coin Hide-and-Seek
Practice counting with this fun St. Patrick’s day game!

Coin Flip Ten Frame Activity for Kid
Help the leprechaun count his gold using a ten frame!

Lucky Charms Catapults for St. Patrick’s Day
Build a simple machine lever, then shoot Lucky Charms across the room!

Digging for St. Patrick’s Day Gold Activity
Dig for gold in ice this St. Patrick’s day! A great preschool STEM activity to learn about the phases of water, and to add some sensory play!

St. Patrick’s Day Fizzy Pots Science Activity
Make a fizzing pot of gold with this fun activity!

Other St. Patrick’s Day STEM Roundups

17 St. Patrick’s Day STEM Challenges
Count down to St. Patrick’s day with 17 fun STEM Challenges!

St. Patrick’s Day STEM Activities
Try one of these STEM activities this St. Patrick’s day!

Pick out some of these STEM Activities this coming St. Patrick’s and have some fun!

Interested in other STEM Activities? Check out of my others!

Levitating Pumpkin Experiment
Paintball Forces Experiment
Angular Momentum with Beyblades
Explore Different Types of Beyblades Science Experiment
Easy and Fun Garden Preschool Science Experiment
The Anti-climatic Volcano Experiment
Tensile Strength Experiment: Find the Strongest Spider Web!
Law of Inertia Experiment using a Fidget Spinner!
Center of Mass Fidget Spinner Experiment
Make an American Flag Using Water Science Experiments

The post 25+ St. Patrick’s Day STEM Activities appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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My oldest had his birthday party a couple of weeks ago. His grandparents know he LOVES science (like his mommy and dad), so all of his presents had something to do with science. This past weekend, we had some time to dig into one, and decided to open the volcano experiment kit by Smithsonian.

Our Volcano Experiment

This post contains affiliate links. Please see disclosure for details.

We opened the Smithsonian volcano experiment box, and made sure we had all the supplies. The first step was to build the support structure for our volcano. My 9 year old tried putting it together on his own, but struggled to keep the center support upright. I ended up building the frame of the volcano.

Once the volcano’s frame was built, my son and I laid pieces of wet plaster on the frame. Layering piece by piece, we carefully made the body of the volcano, then allowed time for our volcano to dry.

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Once the plaster was dry, my son painted the volcano with the paint supplied from the kit. It even included glow in the dark paint, for some added fun! My whole family waited patiently for the paint to dry (or as patiently as a family of 3 boys can wait).

When the paint was finally dry, it was time for the official volcano experiment! Following the instructions, we added baking powder into the volcano, then poured vinegar in. And we watched as the mixture slowly bubbled up. To be honest, it was anti-climatic.

My husband and I thought it was odd the instructions told us to add baking powder instead of baking soda. We decided to try the experiment again, but this time with baking soda. So my son poured all the remaining baking powder out. Then he added baking soda to the volcano, and poured in vinegar. That’s when we saw the explosion we all had expected!

While the volcano experiment instructions were a little off, my son still loved his volcano kit. And I would still recommend it to other parents for a few reasons. First, the process of building the volcano’s support structure, then laying down layers of plaster is a hands-on way to experience how other structures (like buildings) are built. Every structure has a support frame built first, then an exterior layer that relies on the support structure. Kids will learn that having a stable support structure is essential for the exterior layer to be stable. Second, the kit allows kids to use their artistic side to paint their volcano, instead of having a pre-made volcano like other kits include. And the last reason I still recommend the volcano experiment kit is they can compare the reaction between the baking powder and baking soda explosions, and see how one ingredient can greatly affect the outcome!

So, if you want to try the volcano experiment kit, just remember to add baking soda instead of baking powder like the instructions suggest. Then you’ll see the explosive chemical reaction we all expect from a homemade volcano!

Check out my other experiments for more science fun!

Levitating Pumpkin Experiment
Paintball Forces Experiment
Angular Momentum with Beyblades
Explore Different Types of Beyblades Science Experiment
Easy and Fun Garden Preschool Science Experiment
Rainbow Crayon – a Crayon Melting Point Experiment
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Next month, Carla from Preschool Powol Packets will be hosting the first ever Homeschool STEM conference! The conference will be dedicated to helping homeschoolers and educators incorporate STEM into their curriculum. Held March 7-9, the 3 day conference will include practical and encouraging advise from speakers of various backgrounds to help you teach STEM! If you need even more reasons to attend the conference, here are 10 more!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information please see disclosure.

Reason #1: Its online!
That’s right! All the conferences I’ve ever attended required me to get out of bed, take a shower, put on nice clothes, then drive somewhere. But not this conference! You can attend from the comfort of your own home, and without the burnt conference buffet coffee.

Reason #2: Its only $15!
What!?! Yep! You read that right! Most conferences with this kind of line-up cost over $100 per attendee. But the Homeschool STEM conference only costs $15!




Reason #3: Free Lifetime Access!
Every session was prerecorded, and registration includes anytime access to the sessions once the conference is over. So no need to worry about feverishly writing copious notes during the conference! Enjoy listening to each session first, then revisit them all at a later time to apply the concepts.

Reason #4: Phenomenal Speakers
You would not believe the speakers who will be at this conference! Some of the most popular STEM bloggers will be teaching sessions. A few include Cerys Parker, from Rainy Day Mum, Karyn Tripp, from Teach Beside Me, and the host, Carla Jansen, from Preschool Powol Packets and Teaching Without Chairs. Other presenters include homeschooling moms, teachers, a hardware and software developer, and (of course) me, an engineer turned stay at home mom! Click here to learn more about the speakers and their sessions!


Reason #5: You don’t have to choose between sessions!
One of the things that frustrates me the most about live conferences, is inevitably I want to attend two session during one allotted time. So I choose one, and miss out on the other. But registration for the Homeschool STEM Conference includes access to all of the sessions, so no missing out on important information to help with teaching STEM!

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Reason #6: Swag bag!
One of the best part about conferences is the free stuff. Well, the Homeschool STEM Conference isn’t any different! On the first day of the conference, all participants will be able to download a digital “swag bag!”. The digital swag bag will be filled with coupons to get FREE and DISCOUNTED products to help you teach STEM subjects! The savings in this “goodie bag” are WORTH MORE THAN THE CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FEE!!! So, basically, you’ll be attending the conference for free.

Reason #7: Relevant and Interesting Topics!
All of the sessions sound fantastic! Topics include making high school biology and chemistry fun, to block-based programming basics, to integrating art into math and science. My session is about simple machines, and includes hands-on activities with all six types of simple machines. For a full list of the sessions, click here! I hope you enjoy each session!

Reason #8: Daily Giveaways!
On the first day of the conference, all attendees will be invited to a live Facebook group that will provide giveaways and door prizes throughout the 3 day conference. How awesome is that? More free resources!

Reason #9: Vendor Hall!
Another amazing part of the Homeschool STEM conference is the Vendor Hall. The Vendor Hall is also an additional live group in Facebook where you can find products for sale that will help you teach STEM subjects. An invitation to join the group on the first day of the conference as well! 

Reason #10: Hands-on Session about Simple Machines!
Do you need an easy way to introduce your kids to simple machines? Then you’ll love my session on Simple Machines! In the session, I explain what simple machines are, and why we should study them. Then I go into details about all 6 types of simple machines. Each simple machine description includes activities to show how the simple machine is used. All of the activities can be easily done using materials you already have at home!

So are you excited now!?! If you’re ready to register, just follow this link! I hope to see you there!

The post 10 Reasons to attend the 2019 Homeschool STEM Conference appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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Next month, Carla from Preschool Powol Packets will be hosting the first ever Homeschool STEM conference! The conference will be dedicated to helping homeschoolers and educators incorporate STEM into their curriculum. Held March 7-9, the 3 day conference will include practical and encouraging advise from speakers of various backgrounds to help you teach STEM! If you need even more reasons to attend the conference, here are 10 more!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information please see disclosure.

Reason #1: Its online!
That’s right! All the conferences I’ve ever attended required me to get out of bed, take a shower, put on nice clothes, then drive somewhere. But not this conference! You can attend from the comfort of your own home, and without the burnt conference buffet coffee.

Reason #2: Its only $15!
What!?! Yep! You read that right! Most conferences with this kind of line-up cost over $100 per attendee. But the Homeschool STEM conference only costs $15!




Reason #3: Free Lifetime Access!
Every session was prerecorded, and registration includes anytime access to the sessions once the conference is over. So no need to worry about feverishly writing copious notes during the conference! Enjoy listening to each session first, then revisit them all at a later time to apply the concepts.

Reason #4: Phenomenal Speakers
You would not believe the speakers who will be at this conference! Some of the most popular STEM bloggers will be teaching sessions. A few include Cerys Parker, from Rainy Day Mum, Karyn Tripp, from Teach Beside Me, and the host, Carla Jansen, from Preschool Powol Packets and Teaching Without Chairs. Other presenters include homeschooling moms, teachers, a hardware and software developer, and (of course) me, an engineer turned stay at home mom! Click here to learn more about the speakers and their sessions!


Reason #5: You don’t have to choose between sessions!
One of the things that frustrates me the most about live conferences, is inevitably I want to attend two session during one allotted time. So I choose one, and miss out on the other. But registration for the Homeschool STEM Conference includes access to all of the sessions, so no missing out on important information to help with teaching STEM!

3 Engineering Activities!

Explore the fields of Mechanical, Chemical, and Electrical Engineers with this 3 day email course about engineers!

Success! Now check your email for the next step toward your free email course about engineers!

There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.

First Name
Email Address
We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer.
Send me the first one now! We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit

Reason #6: Swag bag!
One of the best part about conferences is the free stuff. Well, the Homeschool STEM Conference isn’t any different! On the first day of the conference, all participants will be able to download a digital “swag bag!”. The digital swag bag will be filled with coupons to get FREE and DISCOUNTED products to help you teach STEM subjects! The savings in this “goodie bag” are WORTH MORE THAN THE CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FEE!!! So, basically, you’ll be attending the conference for free.

Reason #7: Relevant and Interesting Topics!
All of the sessions sound fantastic! Topics include making high school biology and chemistry fun, to block-based programming basics, to integrating art into math and science. My session is about simple machines, and includes hands-on activities with all six types of simple machines. For a full list of the sessions, click here! I hope you enjoy each session!

Reason #8: Daily Giveaways!
On the first day of the conference, all attendees will be invited to a live Facebook group that will provide giveaways and door prizes throughout the 3 day conference. How awesome is that? More free resources!

Reason #9: Vendor Hall!
Another amazing part of the Homeschool STEM conference is the Vendor Hall. The Vendor Hall is also an additional live group in Facebook where you can find products for sale that will help you teach STEM subjects. An invitation to join the group on the first day of the conference as well! 

Reason #10: Hands-on Session about Simple Machines!
Do you need an easy way to introduce your kids to simple machines? Then you’ll love my session on Simple Machines! In the session, I explain what simple machines are, and why we should study them. Then I go into details about all 6 types of simple machines. Each simple machine description includes activities to show how the simple machine is used. All of the activities can be easily done using materials you already have at home!

So are you excited now!?! If you’re ready to register, just follow this link! I hope to see you there!

The post 10 Reasons to attend the 2019 Homeschool STEM Conference appeared first on From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom.

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