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As a college graduate who studied English as her major, I would often get asked if I wanted to be an English teacher post-graduation. I would always respond, “Oh nooo! I want to write! I’m taking up English to develop my craft.” It’s almost as if most people believe that teaching is the only thing to do with an English degree. It is truly a popular major to pursue, but certainly not the only one. A plethora of career options falls under the umbrella of an English degree, as well as skills and qualities we acquire while studying English.

CAREERS WITH AN ENGLISH DEGREE

Journalism. With a bachelor’s degree in English, you can pursue a growing career in journalism, whether you are writing articles in print or reporting them live on the local news. While studying English—perhaps with journalism as a minor or concentration—aspiring journalists learn the art of research, citing sources, and communicating with others to produce a grabbing headline. Writing several essays within two months will help fortify writing skills, while oral presentations train their public speaking.

Writing. Writing jobs are everywhere now! There are sectors of employment that gladly accept writers of many kinds. Technical writers are needed to compose “how-to” or “step-by-step” instructions. They are also important for writing rules and procedures for non-profits or contracts. Content writers are appreciated for writing website content on a company site. Bloggers and other freelance writers who may work for a local newspaper or magazine also have skills amplified with an English degree. And, of course, you can always aspire to be a bestselling, Pulitzer-prize-winning author by practicing your creative writing! You can see about birthing your storytelling skills, either by taking a creative writing course or by using your imagination in your own time.

Publishing business. An English degree, likely only a bachelor’s, will prepare you for the publishing world. Within this business, you can seek careers in editing, proofreading, publishing, and even ghostwriting. While taking English courses, there will be “peer-review” days where students exchange rough drafts of their essays and read their fellow students’ work. Peer-review includes editing the other students’ work, marking up their drafts with revisions, and providing feedback to help make their drafts better. This is very similar to proofreading and editing a professional writer’s work. Can this be nerve-racking during school? Yes! But it is excellent practice if anyone wants a career in publishing. It also builds crocodile skin for future writers before they make their work public!

Marketing and Sales. Studying English builds vocabulary, rhetorical skills, strong communication and confidence speaking and writing—therefore preparing one for a career in sales and marketing, where those strengths are exalted. This is where copywriting comes in. Copywriters write advertising and promotional content. They are responsible for the writing on billboards, websites, brochures, and catalogs. They are basically “print salespeople!” But, of course, successful copywriting requires intense focus on the subject at hand. So, writing essays on a specific topic or idea helps to strengthen this needed skill for any marketing career.

Public Relations. This is where communication plays a key role. Studying English helps build the confidence that is needed to communicate effectively with the public. Public relations also requires strong marketing skills that come with being an English student, because you must know how to promote and advertise the company or organization you are representing.

WHAT DO WE LEARN WHILE STUDYING ENGLISH?

The strengths we gain being under the English major not only prepare us for our career, but for life. Through reading, speaking, and copious writing assignments, we gain strong communication skills. Reading assignments and open-class discussions mature our critical-thinking skills and decision-making. Our writing and grammar skills sharpen, as those are heavily needed in the workplace. We learn to employ abstract thinking, so we can make sense out of symbols and metaphors used in cryptic poetry and classic literature. And lastly, we learn the beauty of research in which we learn how to use the resources at hand to seek out new information, not only in academia, but also to add quality to our daily life.

English is a general subject with specific career choices!

The post Why Major in English? appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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There are many educational milestones in a child’s life. These moments can include starting and graduating from preschool, elementary, middle, and high schools. All of the transitions from one to another can be hard for a child, especially the transition from elementary to middle school. For example, a student is going from having one teacher all day to having four to six teachers with four to six classes daily. Plus, there are now lockers, more work, and additional responsibilities. Yet, the transition from elementary to middle school doesn’t have to stress out the student and their parent. Continue reading for some tips to help make the switch as easy as possible.

Routine – One of the biggest changes is in routine. As mentioned above, a child is transitioning between multiple classrooms, remembering a locker combination, and getting the needed materials at different times of the day from that locker. Other changes could be in the length of a class. Maybe in elementary school, subjects were taught for only 45 minutes. In middle school, some can be 60 minutes or up to 90 minutes with a block schedule.

  • Talk about the upcoming changes before your child’s middle school orientation or first day of school. Start at the end of elementary school and prepare them during the summer. For some students, this change is nothing. For others, it can be overwhelming. Let your child know what to expect and answer any of their questions.
  • Go over their class schedule early and review it often. Make sure your student has copies of their schedule in easy, accessible places, such as their agenda or locker.
  • Tour the school and go through your child’s schedule, just like a normal day of school. Sometimes during orientation, the school will also have students run through their schedules. However, it is always good to take a tour as many times as possible. Open house is a great night to do this. In addition, take time to find the cafeteria, gym, library, office, and restrooms.
  • Organize and label school materials. There isn’t much time for locker breaks and between classes. Students have to quickly grab their stuff for their next classes. Organization is key for a middle schooler. One trick to try is color-coding each subject. Also, you can keep everything in one place for all the classes. Let your child be a part of this process and help them choose what works best for them. Go from the teachers’ supply lists, as well, for organizational guidance. Lastly, reorganize whenever you need to and make sure to clean out lockers, backpacks, folders, and binders as often as possible.
  • Changes in routine also might mean changes in the routine at home. Middle school usually starts and ends earlier than elementary school, meaning a child’s morning might start earlier, too. To avoid stress, adjust bedtimes and prepare school materials at night. Keep backpacks, lunch boxes, etc. by the door. As for an earlier school release, you may find that there is more time in the afternoons. Create a schedule with your child’s input for the extra time. However, keep in mind that there may be extra homework, more obligations, and more extracurricular activities. Do the same for the evening time.
  • Teach your child time management. Create schedules and block out the time when your child has an activity, dinner time, homework time, etc. In addition, work with them to make the most of their time. Even five minutes here and there can add up and be a timesaver.

Other tips to remember are to keep the lines of communication open with your child and your child’s teacher, and to be aware of who they are friends with, and who might be bullies. Middle school is tough, especially the sixth grade. It takes time to adjust to the new routines. The good news is that you and your student aren’t alone. It is normal to be a little nervous. It is normal for them to be lost at first. However, let them know you are there for them, just as are their teachers and school administrators.

The post Your Stress-free Guide to Preparing for Middle School appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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It is instinctual to look skyward toward the heavens for answers.  For thousands of years, humans have studied cloud formations, wind, rainfall, temperature, the cycle and influences of the moon, the constellations, and planetary alignments.  And, during moments of peculiar quietness and impending dread, townships and villages, families and individuals prayed, sang, and pleaded for God’s mercy.

We can thank Polish astronomer Nicolai Copernicus, who discovered that the Sun, not the Earth, was at the center of our universe, while the planets revolved around it in an elliptical path.  Since 1508, humans have a grander scientific understanding of how the universe impacts every aspect of our world and life.

Location, Location, Location!

For all we know, Earth is the only planet in the universe with life. Circling the sun in orbit and held in this orbit by gravitational pull, the blue planet’s balance of life and cycling sustainability are dependent on its ideal distance from the Sun—93 million miles.  Through the emittance of energy, the Sun stirs our atmosphere, generates weather patterns, warms our surface and oceans, and gives strength for growing plants to make food and oxygen.  Some people can also harness heat and light to generate electricity or erect a structure on a smaller scale, such as a greenhouse.

Our Natural Satellite

Humans find relaxation among the grains of sand and the rhythmic ebb and flow coming from the tides. The beachgoer may not realize the tides are crucial to our planet.  The daily waxing to waning cycles impact our oceans and seas. The moon pulls through a gravitational force, causing high tides or tidal forces.  The result is a bulge, which triggers a collection of water and a release, leading to low tide.

Similarly, the gravitational pull from the moon also impacts water flow and weight inside plants.  Sap movement is vigorous during the waxing stage, in which the moon grows fuller, and movement slows as the moon wanes to a thin crescent.  Water weight can vary up to 10 percent in the one week leading towards a full moon.  The action of cutting, harvesting, and pruning foliage or plants follows a similar pattern.  The term “lunar burn” describes the effect of cutting a limb full of new developing buds. The consequence is that the increased levels of sap will engorge the small channels, potentially rupturing them, and destroying future growth. To take advantage of our satellite, timing is essential to foster healthy seedlings, or promote the growth of canes or shoots and fuller branches.

Electromagnetic Spectrum

The definition of light is what the eyes can see that surrounds the body. If we extend beyond the sliver we see to the range of brightness that actually exists, the term broadens to the electromagnetic spectrum.  Most of the light in the universe is invisible.  For instance, water sprayed in light results in a prism of rainbow colors, comprising short wavelengths of light.  Astronomers use the electromagnetic spectrum to peer inside and study dense clouds, dimming stars, the temperature of planets, and the dust found in the Milky Way.  The Hubble and Spitzer telescopes show infrared energy at a distance of 300 light-years away.  We necessarily need an instrument to look into the heavens, where wavelengths appear as colors, which can reveal energy, viability, and life.

Researchers understand that moonlight, while similar to sunlight, reflects and shifts towards infrared. The effect is a less intense version of the Sun; however, it adds nutrition, which explains the growth in healthy plants and the boost of development in seedlings. Studies prove moonlight has a healing component for plants that promotes regeneration and growth, a full recovery due to the potential for absorbing water content one week before the full moon.

Look up toward the heavens and study the forces at work either with the naked eye, or using a tool such as a telescope!  The moon is one aspect of celestial study. Delving into the stars, planets, and beyond will help you understand the powerful forces aiding our world.

The post The Impact of the Universe appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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In the Triad, “Novant Health WomanCare” is a name synonymous with quality-care initiatives designed to meet the unique needs of women.  As an organization that is 25-years strong, WomanCare has been a part of the Novant Healthcare system for the last ten years. When it comes to choosing a healthcare provider, few choices are as deeply personal as a woman’s decision for an OB/GYN partnership.  Dr. Haley Landwehr shared some insight into what makes WomanCare such a great choice.

“The WomanCare experience brings a host of opportunities for today’s woman.  At WomanCare, we have nine doctors on staff, as well as five nurse practitioners and a physician assistant,” said Dr. Landwehr.  “Our providers, nurses, dietitian, and sonographers form a dedicated team of professionals who work together as a family to ensure that our patients are cared for—whether it’s for a general gynecological checkup or for those who are preparing to welcome a new member of the family.”

Gynecology and Obstetrics For a woman, her gynecological health is vitally important and therefore, it’s essential that she choose a doctor and facility in which she is comfortable.  She must feel safe and able to share concerns or ask questions of the most intimate nature.  “At WomanCare,” said Dr. Landwehr, “we realize how important this visit is.  As a gynecologist, one of the things that drew me to this field of medicine was the opportunity to grow with my patients. Not only do I get to be there when they welcome a new baby (which is always an exciting time!), but I get to be with my patients through the various phases of their life.  It’s a lifelong relationship—one that my partners and I are proud to take part in.  The field of gynecology is twofold—we want to provide quality health care to our patients, but we also care about them as people.”

Childcare Services For patients who are moms of young children, WomanCare offers complimentary childcare for children aged six weeks and up.  “Judy is our childcare provider,” said Dr. Landwehr, “and she is amazing.  Our childcare service is available at our Winston-Salem location, Monday through Friday from 8 AM – 1 PM.  It’s a great benefit to moms who need childcare, but may not be able to coordinate it easily, so that they can get to their appointment.  Judy is a natural with children and it’s safe, secure, and a valuable resource for our patients.”

Ultrasound “We also have three ultrasound suites.  The ultrasound rooms of WomanCare all feature large, wall-mounted televisions, so patients can watch if they want to,” said Dr. Landwehr. “The suites are large enough to accommodate several family members, and, of course, ultrasound technology is amazing and gives us invaluable information.  We offer genetic screening ultrasounds and anatomy ultrasounds for all our OB patients.

“But ultrasounds aren’t exclusively for those in obstetric care,” explained Dr. Landwehr.  “We also use ultrasound technology for our GYN patients, too, in order to look at the uterine cavity.  This can help identify uterine issues such as fibroids or polyps as well as ovarian cysts or masses.”

WomanCare also offers new parents and soon-to-be parents a fun way to share pictures, maybe even a gender-reveal photo, with the Photo Wall Station.  A great backdrop with an assortment of pink and blue props makes a trip to the doctor a little more fun!  Plus—every new baby gets their own WomanCare purple onesie!  “We love to celebrate with families on the arrival of their new babies,” exclaimed Dr. Landwehr.

In-house Lab “Gone are the days when we have to send our patients to another facility for lab work,” said Dr. Landwehr.  “We have partnered with Lab Corp so that our patients can have their tests done in our office, rather than making a trip to another location.  This is a great value-added service that we offer.”

Nutrition WomanCare is all about the total care of women, including their nutritional health.  “We have an amazing, registered dietitian on staff,” said Dr. Landwehr.  “She works with our pregnant patients who may be at risk for gestational diabetes, but also helps our other patients with nutrition for weight loss, managing cholesterol through diet, diabetes care, eating disorders, and more.”

Minor Surgeries and Procedures “No one likes to go to the hospital,” affirmed Dr. Landwehr.  “It’s time-consuming, expensive, and stressful.  Thankfully, there are some minor surgeries and procedures that we can handle in-house now, thanks to our partnership with anesthesiologists from Piedmont Triad Anesthesia.

“We offer a variety of procedures in our Winston-Salem office each Thursday, including hysteroscopy, ablation, removal of uterine polyps and other minor procedures.  A full list of the procedures we do is on our website,” continued Dr. Landwehr.  “It’s been a wonderful addition to our list of services.  It enables our patients to get in and out far more quickly than they would in a hospital, plus there’s no operating room bill with which to contend.”

Other Services In addition to being a unique approach to women’s health care, WomenCare offers adolescent care for young women.  “This is a great service to get young girls acclimated to regular gynecological visits and reproductive health care.  Also, when we establish these relationships early, we can help young women understand their bodies and be there when questions or concerns arise. We are partnered with Twin City Pediatrics; however, we see adolescent girls no matter who their primary pediatrician may be.”

Dr. Landwehr shared exciting news, too!  “Coming soon, we are going to have an app for prenatal education. We are partnered with the Mayo Clinic to put together a wealth of information that women can have at their fingertips!  The app should be out by this fall, and we are very excited to make this additional resource available to our patients.”

WomanCare has spent 25 years in the community, building a practice that meets the evolving needs of women in the Triad.  This family-oriented environment is warm, inviting, and is a true team.  “We love working together,” said Dr. Landwehr.  “It is a privilege to work at this practice, with these professionals, and to serve our patients.  We love what we do, and we believe it shows in the extra-mile approach we take to give our patients the service they need, expect, and deserve.”

NovantHealthWomanCare’s main office is located at 114 Charlois Blvd. in Winston-Salem.  The Clemmons office is located at 4130 Clemmons Road, and the Kernersville location is at 1730 Kernersville Medical Parkway, Suite 104. Appointments for any of these three locations can be made by calling 336.765.5470, or by using MyChart through the Novant Health online patient portal.  Visit online at nhwomancare.org.  You can also like Novant Health WomanCare on Facebook. 

__________________

The medical team at Novant Health WomanCare includes:

  • Melissa Helman, MD
  • Philip Ponder, MD
  • Pam Oliver, MD
  • Jaleema Speaks, MD
  • Laura Ramsay, MD
  • David Miner
  • Haley Landwehr
  • Samantha Sinclair
  • Jessica Rhee
  • Cindy Backus, WHNP
  • Rhonda Dixon, WHNP
  • Jennifer Keiger, FNP
  • Isabel Munera, WHNP
  • Melissa Tharpe, WHNP
  • Cristie Gibson, PA-C
  • Sandi Hamilton, MS, RD, LDN

The post The Novant Health WomanCare Difference appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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Not that long ago, slate boards, highlighters, and classroom libraries were tools promoting educational progress, while lessons in phonics, cursive, and spelling comprised the foundation for an effective language program. Over the decades, new teaching methods, which experimented in pedagogy, instituted programs that fostered various levels of progress, but endured setbacks. Educational professionals wondered, “Couldn’t we balance the old proven standards while implementing new ideas?”

One debate continues between policymakers and educators, parents and students: how far should technology impact teaching styles, curriculum, and students?  With the arrival of Common Core, one mandate prompted students to become technologically skilled.  Each student received a laptop, which encouraged self-pace personalized lessons. Preparing young adults for the 21st-century workplace, technology in schools offers both sides of the coin, positives as well as drawbacks.  

Digital “Natives”

Growing up in a digital world defined how students learned, maintained friendships, and spent their leisure time.  Every heart’s desire, from filling a glass of water, turning on the oven, washing and drying clothes, driving, and finding the shortest means of traveling between two destinations required one action—applying one finger to a touch-screen or swiping it in a certain direction.  The answer connected students with the tools necessary to survive in the future.

Surprisingly, teachers, who used technology on a minimal basis within their classrooms, discovered the students were both engaged and productive. Hands-on activities, labs, small groups, and creative projects fostered a positive impact on the growth and development of the students.  Furthermore, classmates engaged in conversations by bandying about ideas, practicing critical thinking and deductive reasoning skills while broadening friendships.  Students who balanced technology with interaction experienced positive feelings about attending school.

The Smartboard Promotes Differing Learning Styles

Visitors to public and private schools will find today’s classrooms brimming with technology.  The interactive Smartboard replaces the overhead projector and the chalkboard. The multi-functional whiteboard includes a touchscreen option for students to view diagrams, charts, pictures, and videos.  By enhancing a student’s learning experiences, the Smartboard helps all types of learning styles. No longer are learners focusing on one format of a lesson, taking notes; instead, the large screen offers students the opportunity to experience learning through sensory options.  

The Nature of Playing has Changed

Keyboarding practice and lessons help children to prepare for a technological future; yet, abandoning paper and a writing tool comes with repercussions.  The overuse of touchscreen applications prevents the finger muscles from developing sufficiently, impacting hand strength and the dexterity needed to hold a pencil or pen correctly. Children need a firm control of the fine muscles at the fingers to control, grip, and move a writing utensil.  While children can easily maneuver through screens of an iPad at a tender age, they also require muscle-building opportunities with building blocks and Legos, as well as interacting with toys that swing and force a child to engage in climbing.  Returning to traditional forms of playing while utilizing art supplies and pencils will keep preschool children, especially, from experiencing delays in using a utensil and help them learn to write without associating pain and cramping with the act of writing.

What is Blended Learning?

Technology is a powerful tool for tailoring education to each student’s academic strengths and weaknesses, interests, and optimal pace for learning. Through digital devices and software, students strive toward completing set goals.  Blended learning combines traditional teacher-to-student lessons, both small-group and class instruction, with technology.  Students receive blocks of time which rotate between online activities and in-person stations.  The goal of the “flex” schedule still enables children to receive individualized instruction while offering opportunities for student interactions, group work, and problem-solving.

 Flexibility and Balance

Technology is a tool that will only expand farther in our daily lives. While there are many positive aspects to a technological educational platform, parents can better control their child’s sedentary activities by suggesting an alternative to screen-time.  It is challenging to enforce powering down or silencing cellular devices for a digital “native”; however, balance is a necessity.

The post Technology, Schools, and Students appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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“Rustic” desserts—sloppy, decadent-looking desserts, if you will—are easy and classic. Simply assembled desserts are perfect for casual parties or at-home Sunday suppers. The fresh berries and lemon curd are a classic combination for summer evenings. Swap out other preserves and seasonal fruit to have a year-round recipe staple!

 

Ingredients:

Cake:

1 stick of butter, softened

1 cup granulated sugar

2 eggs

1½ cups flour

¼ teaspoon baking powder

¼ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon salt

½ cup milk

2 lemons, juiced and zested

1 teaspoon vanilla

 

Fruit:

Store-bought lemon curd

1 pint whipping cream

¼ cup sugar

Berries and fruit

 

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a mixer, fitted with paddle attachment, cream together butter and sugar for three minutes. Add eggs. In a separate bowl, combine together milk, lemon juice, zest and vanilla. Add half of the wet ingredients to the butter and sugar mixture, mix for 5 seconds, then add half of the dry ingredients and mix for 5 seconds. Repeat with second half of ingredients, ending with dry ingredients. Pour batter into 6- or 8-inch cake pans. Bake for 30-35 minutes.

Meanwhile, whip cream with a whisk attachment until stiff peaks form. Add sugar and whip for another 30 seconds.

After cake has cooled, layer with lemon curd and whipped cream between both cakes. Top with whipped cream and berries of your choosing.

The post Vanilla Pound Cake with Lemon Curd and Fresh Fruit appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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In the United States, half of all marriages end in divorce. Most first-time divorces occur when couples are in their 30s. This means that a lot of children are caught in the crossfire when their parents divorce. That is, in fact, why I chose the title, Caught in the Crossfire: Children of Divorce, for the book I wrote in 1986. In 1992, the divorce rate was still 50% and the book was retitled, Children of Divorce: Helping Kids When Their Parents are Apart, and given a new cover. Today, the divorce rate is still 50% and the book is still in print, presumably because so many children are still being impacted by the divorce of their parents.

When I began to explore the topic of children and divorce, I decided to ask the experts—the kids themselves—how they had been affected by their parents’ divorce. I learned a lot from viewing parental breakup through their eyes:

“What upsets me most about my parents’ divorce is the hurt that you get down deep.” ~ Candace, age 8

“I think that divorce is terrible and that parents shouldn’t be able to do it.” ~ Ben, age 10

“I wish my mother would understand that it’s hard on us kids and not just her.” ~ Anna, age 17

“I think that divorce is the most emotionally painful situation a child can go through. I will never put my kids through a divorce if I can help it.”  ~ Carol, teenager, age unknown

When parents are divorcing, they are in the midst of their own crisis, which makes it harder for them to parent their children who are in crisis, too. So I wrote Children of Divorce, not for divorcing parents, but for those outside the family who want to reach out to children whose parents are divorcing: neighbors, teachers, coaches, scout leaders, Sunday school teachers, nannies, etc. My goal was to help these helpers understand what kids go through when parents divorce. This varies by age, and there are separate chapters for babies and toddlers, preschoolers, five-to-eight-year-olds, preteens, and teens. The remaining chapters deal with children’s academic, spiritual, and relationship struggles, and what adults outside the family can do to help.

The book was a labor of love from start to finish. I felt the pain of both the parents and the kids, and sometimes their stories brought tears to my eyes while I sat at my writing desk. If there was one thing I was grateful for, and entirely certain of, it was that my child would never be one of those kids, the children of divorce I was writing about.

How wrong I was.

Just a few years later, incredibly, ironically, the unthinkable happened. Divorce blindsided me; I never saw it coming. In its wake, I was emotionally devastated and inconsolable. Life as I knew it was going through a shredder, and I had a precious little boy to take care of, a child who was now one of those kids. Both my son and I needed time to grieve and regain our balance. One good thing about having written a book about children and divorce was that I knew some of the “first aid” that needed to be administered. I remembered that…

* Children need assurance that divorce is not their fault. It is important to tell them, “Divorce is a grownup problem and only grownups can cause it.”

* Children need to know that they still are, and will always be, dearly loved by both parents.

* After divorce, to spare children additional stress, the rule of thumb is: keep as much as possible the same for as long as possible.

I wrote Children of Divorce with great empathy and a sincere desire to help kids weather the storm of parental divorce. But I wrote it, of course, from the perspective of a journalist, not a mom who had held the hand of a child experiencing the breakup of his or her family. Now, years later, people sometimes ask me if I would write a different book today, in hindsight. The answer, of course, is “Yes.” Will I ever write that book?  Probably not. My heart tells me that it’s best to view this now very personal topic only in the rearview mirror of my life.

Children of Divorce: Helping Kids When Their Parents are Apart (Zondervan) by Debbie Barr is available in paperback, Kindle, and Nook at Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com, and Christianbook.com.

The post Children of Divorce: Helping Kids When Their Parents are Apart appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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In June, the owners of Mac & Nelli’s announced that their restaurant is going through some changes, including a new logo, a new head chef, and a new menu!  These are exciting changes for the nine-year-old restaurant.

The New Logo

Owners Lori and Art Shaver are excited about the bold new look of their name.  “With all the changes we were going through, a fresh new logo seemed apropos,” said Lori.  Their mission has always been to serve good food in a friendly, fun environment so their new slogan, “Come for the food, stay for the fun” is a perfect fit!

The New Chef

Chef Antwan Hairston joins the Mac & Nelli’s family as head chef.  A graduate of Providence Culinary Training Program, Chef Hairston has worked at noted Winston-Salem restaurants such as Mozelle’s, Tre Nonne, Tanglewood Pizza, and Diamondback Grill.  He has an unparalleled passion for food and is certain to be a dynamic driving force in the continued success of Mac & Nelli’s.

“We are thrilled to have him on our team,” said Lori.  “He has revamped and streamlined our menu in a great way.  Antwan has embraced the core of who our restaurant is by adding his own signature touch to established dishes, and bringing in his own recipes to the menu.”

The New Menu

“Our customers can expect us to continue with favorites like our wings and burgers,” Lori shared. “Antwan is making sure those Mac & Nelli traditions continue.  However, he has a heart for Southern Comfort Food.  And he’s bringing his own signature flavors to the menu.”  Some examples include:

APPETIZERS

  • Fried Pickles: Is there any appetizer more southern? Beer battered, house-made pickles are fried to crispy perfection and served with a chipotle crème sauce.
  • 3 Little Pigs: Another Southern-inspired appetizer, fried pork rinds are topped with pork, bacon, jalapenos, and a decadent pimento cheese sauce.
  • Goat Cheese and Jam: Chef Antwan makes this jam, and it’s a perfect combination with creamy goat cheese and crostini.

SALADS

  • Goat Cheese Salad: Chef Antwan continues to embrace the amazing goodness of goat cheese with this salad! Mixed greens, onions, and strawberries are tossed with goat cheese and candied pecans.  Add some chicken or salmon for a hearty and delicious salad.

SANDWICHES & BURGERS

  • Country Cuban: This classic favorite is served with Chef Antwan’s house-made bbq mustard sauce.  Filling and delicious!
  • Southern BLT: Any good southerner loves their BLT, but Chef Antwan serves his with another southern favorite – fried green tomatoes.  MAZ. ING.
  • Black Bean Burger: A vegetarian delight, the black bean burger’s addition to the Mac & Nelli’s menu is sure to become a favorite for veggie and meat lovers alike!

ENTREES

  • Bone-in Pork Chop: As any good Southern chef will tell you, a well-cooked bone-in pork chop is a work of art. And Chef Antwan is an artist.
  • Grilled Jamaican Jerk Island Tacos: Hello, Taco Tuesday?  The game just got real.  Delicious shrimp or chicken tacos are served with a sriracha cream sauce, pineapple salsa, and lettuce.  Incredible flavors!
  • Sun-dried Tomato Pesto Pasta: In a word – fantastic.  Creamy and packed with flavor, this is a filling entrée that is designed to be savored.

BRUNCH

  • Chicken & Waffles: It should be illegal to have a brunch menu without this staple.  Fried chicken is served over a golden waffle and drizzled with hot honey and served with pecan butter.
  • Southern Benedict: Chef Antwan’s take on the traditional eggs benedict includes a slice of country ham with fried green tomatoes and redeye gravy.

There are numerous reasons to enjoy Mac & Nelli’s, and with all the exciting changes going on, you’re sure to want to try it for yourself very soon!

Mac & Nelli’s is located in Harper Hill Commons Shopping Center at 4926 Country Club Road in Winston-Salem.  Call them at 336.529.6230 or visit them online at MacAndNellisWS.com.  Be sure to like them on Facebook and follow them on Instagram!

The post A New Dining Experience at Mac & Nelli’s appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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What could be more eye-opening than learning that 75% of all store-bought honey contains artificial sweeteners, such as rice, wheat, and sugar-beet syrups? Despite the high-dollar price, the missing ingredient is pollen!  By removing the essential microscopic particles, manufacturers can not only conceal the identity of the source of the honey but pass government purity tests.  New technology, termed “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance” (NMR), can determine the quality by recognizing syrups that come from plants.  Surprisingly the United States does not have a standard for identifying purity.  In 2011, a lab analysis through an American university discovered that honey from big box stores, drugstores, fast-food chains and elsewhere contained dangerous antibiotics, artificial sweeteners, and large quantities of metals in their brands.

Considering the production of seven million pounds of honey produced annually, how do you know which brands are worth the price?

The Do’s and Don’ts of Buying Honey

  • Do not trust a label which states, “100% Honey” or “U.S. Grade A.”
  • Be wary of labels that list multiple countries of origin, and include the United States.
  • Look for raw and especially locally made honey at small markets, some specialty food stores, and farmer’s markets.
  • Contact your local beekeeper’s association. The Forsyth County website, fcba.wildapricot.org/, includes a tab titled, “Local Honey for Sale.”
  • Ask family and friends where they purchase their “raw” honey. Buying from a reputable source is critical. The extraction and canning process begins in late June; ask to have your name added to a “wait” list. The wait may be long, but worth it!

Amazing Facts about the Honeybee

Did you know one honeybee can produce one tablespoon of honey in its lifetime? Please do not swat the honeybee, it is either on a foraging mission to gather nectar, possessing a high water content of between 60% and 80%, or returning to the hive.  Through the transformation process to honey, the bees will flap their wings to remove the moisture.  Statistics state that it takes approximately 680 honeybees to fly 32,500 miles to collect nectar from over a million flowers.  Once capped, the honey will fill roughly one nine-ounce jar.

Additionally, if you have ever wondered about the shape of the honeycomb, a hexagon offers the most efficient pattern to ensure the cells do not waste space.  Despite its delicate structure, the comb holds a tremendous amount of weight.

What is Raw Honey?

To achieve perfection, honey does not require pasteurization to remove the nutrients—such as vitamins and antibacterial and antioxidant properties—which keep the body’s immune system healthy.  In place of this type of production, there is a more straightforward process.  When beekeepers remove frames directly from the hive, the frames go through a procedure of extraction using centrifugal force. After straining it to remove wax and other particles, the honey is in its perfect state and ready for canning.

Only raw honey contains 20 vitamins, 18 amino acids, 16 minerals, and antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties.  Addition to B2-B6, and C vitamins, ingredients include magnesium, potassium, calcium, sodium chlorine, sulfur, and phosphate. And, it remains eternally preserved!

Save the Bees, Save the Flowers

The message to save the bees also extends to flowers, fruit trees, vegetable gardens, and weeds such as the dandelion.  What caused the world-wide plea for protection?  Pesticides and chemical-resistant crops placed our pollinator populations in peril; yet, that is just one factor. Farmers, who converted wetlands and prairies to 35,000 square miles of crops, have altered pollinating habitats.  Each of us can play a part in our yards by planting native species that will attract the birds, variations of bee species, butterflies, and other pollinators. Additionally, start reading labels on the chemicals you use to ensure safety for pets and all winged creatures!

In our love for raw honey, we must advocate an environmental kindness towards pollinating creatures while supporting our local beekeeping communities.  Find a beekeeper, today!

The post The Buzz of Honey! appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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BY FAMILY SERVICES

Winston-Salem has a lot to be proud of. In recent years, it has been hailed as:

  • One of the 14 best places to travel in the U.S.
  • Highest average growth in number of small businesses—tied with Charlotte and Austin
  • 33rdof Best Large Cities to Start a Business
  • 37thon the list of best places to live, out of the 100 most populous cities in the country
  • 6thbest place to retire

All these accolades would seem to suggest that Forsyth County is filled with promise for the 24,000 children under age five who live here—all of whom deserve to wake up:

  • Safe in their home and neighborhood
  • Ready to succeed in school
  • Supported within a strong family

Unfortunately, 8,000 of those young children (about one-third) do not wake up this way.

Family Services is working to change that, and you can join us by participating in the Wake-Up Walk & 5 K on August 24th at Bailey Park.

Every step we take together has the power to close the opportunity gap that is preventing our most vulnerable children and their parents from reaching their full potential.

That’s why we are asking you to become their champion and help eliminate the constant stress and pressures of living in poverty.

Your support helps to:

  • Ensure that all preschoolers are prepared for success in school.
  • Provide access to resources, so that parents can improve the safety and security of their families.
  • Reverse the generational cycle of disadvantage in Winston-Salem/Forsyth County.
  • Build a better future for all of us.
  • Create more opportunities and pave the way for quality Pre-K development programs that will give every child the opportunity to succeed and achieve the American Dream.

When we step up together, we can help all our neighbors rise and shine.

We invite you to help our community put its “best feet” forward by joining us this year for the annual Wake-Up Walk & 5K.

Learn more at WakeUpWalk.org.

The post All Children Should Wake Up Safe, Ready and Supported appeared first on Forsyth Family Magazine.

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