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Our Summer 2018 issue of Food & Dining Magazine is now available on newsstands and online!

Sign up here for our free digital subscription and every new issue delivered to your inbox . You’ll also get special invitations to parties, tastings, and special events exclusive to our subscribers – like our issue release party on May 30.


Letter from Editor

My name is Jessica Lynn Mathis, and I’m your new editor-in-chief. Here’s what’s coming in the future for Food & Dining.


Comings & Goings

A summary of changes on the local restaurant scene — with openings. closings, moves and more.


Profile: ROC: Traditional Southern Italian With Flair

From Italy to New York to Louisville, this transplant brings Southern Italy cuisine and showmanship to this popular Highland spot.

Profile: Sarino: Carrying On Tradition

With family restaurants in Italy, Louisville (Vincenzo’s) and St. Louis,  this third generation offers authentic Italian and Neapolitan pizza in Germantown.


Profile: bar Vetti: A Kentucky Take on Italian

Inspired by an ancient house in Pompeii, bar Vetti gives new life to the ground floor of the 800 Tower, fusing Kentucky sourced ingredients with Italian methods.

Hip Hops: Rise of the NE IPA

Roger Baylor recounts the history of New England IPAs and dishes with Mile Wide Brewing about their Nomah!


Easy Entertaining |Bourbon Country Cooking

The Laird’s celebrate the 10th anniversary of this column with recipes from their newest  “Bourbon Country Cookbook” — a collaboration with Churchill Downs Executive Chef David Danielson

Cooking with Ron |When Summer Comes

Summer and picnics go together like Kentucky and Bourbon, but Ron takes you around the world with recipes for a globally inspired feast at the park


Restaurant Guide
Our comprehensive listing of over 1,400 area restaurants complete with reviews.

The post HOT OFF THE PRESSES — The Summer 2018 Issue Is On The Racks! appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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Challenge your wine knowledge at Brasserie Provence, 150 N Hurstbourne Lane, on Wednesday, May 23rd at 6:30 p.m. at a mystery wine dinner. The game spans four French regions and four new world wine countries selected by advanced level sommelier Julie Defriend from Vintner Select. The blind tasting is paired with Chef Patrick’s international menu. If you can Identify the regions, countries & cépages of all eight wines, you’ll  win a special bottle of wine. The dinner is $75 per person plus tax and gratuity. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 502-883-3153.

 Guests are welcomed with an artisan French-Kentucky cocktail, after which the game begins. Each course is paired with one French wine and one wine produced in a new world wine country. Guests will decide which is which. First course includes an asparagus, hearts of palm & snow pea salad with fresh goat cheese and cilantro vinaigrette accompanied by two wines from the same cépage. The second course of baked John Dory, ginger polenta and mango butter will also be paired with two wines from the same cépage. The third course of braised beef short ribs with chick pea purée and avocado relish will be served with two blended wines. Lastly, the dinner will end with a grilled lamb chop, wild mushroom eggplant gratin and barbecue reduction with an additional two blended wines.

Wines will be available for purchase with a 15% discount through Westport Whiskey & Wine.

The post Drink To Win at This Fun French Mystery Wine Dinner Game appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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Welcome to my very first ever confession of cluelessness. I’ve never had a reason to poach an egg, and so I never even took the time to learn. “Poaching an egg” is one of those things I’ve had swirl around me here or there, always skirting the edge of my consciousness or atop toast,  but I never knew what the technique was.

I always kind of envisioned the obvious joke of hunting easter eggs out of season— or maybe hunting eggs in other family’s yards. As my good friend pointed out, it probably involves “sneaking onto the land of nobility…” My wild imagination envisions turf wars where I terrorize the neighborhood egg hunt while wearing fine Easter lace and stockings, fleeing with a horde of wild dyed eggs and laughing maniacally before posting victory photos to social media. The more realistic side of me forced to cooperate with civilized society was pretty sure that’s not what a poached egg is, so I decided to look it up.

I would never have imagined that poaching is a 7th grade science experiment. I don’t know what I expected, but it’s cooking an egg in water so the egg white cooks into a pouch around the still runny yolk.  It seemed to me something you might witness in the Middle Ages and suspiciously cry “witchcraft!” But encyclopedia.com says that poaching was widespread in the ancient world. One of the earliest cookbooks —  Roman Apicius’s “De re Coquinaria” (ca. A.D. 900) — mentions poaching with ingredients like anchovies, sea urchins or even brains. Enlightened with this history, I felt a new sense of duty to not let the human race down by being unable to do something homo sapiens have been doing for thousands of years. With all that pressure weighing on my shoulders, I found myself filled with plenty of anxiety.  But, I figured if those people could poach — and eat — calf brains, I could at least attempt a poached egg.

Before you start spewing “I can’t believe its” over my lack of experience, I ask you to hold your judgments for what I’m about to reveal. Amidst magazine and other derby duties, I was especially overwhelmed by the thought of mad rushed poach trials. Dreading potential poach failure, I stood in the shower yesterday, eating a lone orphaned raspberry and lemon popsicle (left for dead in the freezer when my roommate moved to Tennessee) as I pondered the various poach techniques I had researched.

In further procrastination, I posted to Facebook with curiosity about how many know how to do this.

Does anyone know how to poach a @$#@ egg??  Thumbs up if yes, sad face if no and angry face if you are just an egg bigot and this post offends you.”

To my surprise, of the 129 immediate responses: 101 people knew how; 18 didn’t; one person “loved” my post. There were five egg bigots amongst my friends, and six people who just laughed mercilessly at me — I should obviously be more selective in recognizing good eggs to hang with.

Great. So, lots of people know how to do it. I guess I really should learn. Suggestions poured in with techniques. A few people suggested adding vinegar to the water. I would rather travel back in time to be the official taste tester of Apicius’s brains and sea urchins before I would ever consider the risk of a vinegar flavored egg. Ew. No. Bad.

Hoping for expert advice, I reached out to a few chefs. My good friend,  Richard E. Darshwood is a chef and a magician who also hosts and performs at events called “Magic, Dinner, & Bourbon” where he combines fine dining cocktails with prestidigitation, so I figured he would be the perfect person to help me master this kitchen wizardry.  He pretty much indicated that he liked to cook anything BUT poached eggs. When asked for his favorite way to use poached eggs, Paul Skulas — once of Portage House and now Couvillion fame —responded with “To have someone else do it…” However, sous chef Jess Inman over at Lou Lou Food + Drink told me, “I used to work with Daniel Orr at Farm in Bloomington, and we made this wood fired breakfast pizza that had pesto, fresh ground mozzarella, bacon and poached eggs on top, and when you cracked that egg over the pizza – man, it was so good.”

That sounds amazing, but only one in three chefs had something positive to say about poaching eggs? Those odds did not beat my egg frets.

I finally decided to relax and play. I set the stove with several pots of simmering water and the counter with a bucket full of eggs. I’m so glad I decided to live broadcast it on my Facebook, so others could advise and lead me from failure into success.  After a couple fails, local foodie Eric Cooper told me to slow down while swirling the water, giving me my first slight success, but I wanted a thicker white pouch. I about cried when people kept suggesting vinegar, but Louisville to Chicago Chef transplant Kevin Harp suggested adding a spoonful of bourbon to the water instead. That’s exactly what I needed to hear! Not only did it work like a charm, it was a great excuse to break out the “Kentucky Juice” in the middle of the day!

Maybe it was the bourbon I “had” to taste test, but after a couple successes, it was time to let my artistic child play. I was curious what would happen if I added food coloring to the egg first. Without thinking, I grabbed the closest tube and squeezed red dots into the egg. I immediately exclaimed to viewers,”Oh no; that was a horrible idea!” It looked like a murder scene. I quickly added blue dots and then dropped it into the pot. The result was a beautiful blue, red, and purple tie dyed poached egg. It gave me the strangest satisfaction to cut into it and see the golden yellow come pouring out in contrast. It was like Mardi Gras on a plate. 

Within an hour or so, I managed to master poaching eggs. As usual, all that anxiety was for nothing. Lots of people were willing to hold my hand. I found a new victory in life, and I learned that I agree with Chef Skulas. I’ll have my poached eggs à la someone else. I’ve got too many other things to learn from our city’s many experts to be a little less clueless. You bring the expert. I”ll bring the sauce (sass).

The post (Humor) The Clueless Ginger:  Water and Eggs? Wizardry! appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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MESA, A Collaborative Kitchen will be opening a MESA Kids Cooking School this summer at 154 E. Main St. in New Albany, just around the corner from MESA’s current location. MESA Kids Cooking School will feature cooking camps, classes and themed events for children ages 7 to 14.

“The Louisville and Southern Indiana region continues to grow its reputation as a food destination, and we are thrilled to offer a fun and educational place that will help train our next generation of chefs and teach children valuable cooking techniques,” said co-owner Bobby Bass. “As parents, my wife Ysha and I looked to our own two children as inspiration behind creating this new concept. We also tested the idea by hosting a kids baking competition earlier this year at MESA, which was very successful for all involved.”

Much like karate, students will also be able to earn culinary patches in a chef’s black coat program as they increase their cooking knowledge and achieve certain technique levels. Classes and camps will be taught by the region’s top chefs and culinary instructors. More details will be announced soon for MESA Kids’ opening date and class registration. Visit mesakidscookingschool.com to sign up for the latest information or follow @mesakidscookingschool on Facebook.

Photography by Jose Morones Vergara, courtesy of MESA

The post MESA Will Pair Kids With Top Chefs at New Kids Cooking School appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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Employees and customers alike were shocked yesterday (Monday) to find Rocky’s Sub Pub, , abruptly closed after 41 years collectively at two locations in Jeffersonville.

While management has been unavailable for comment and no reason has been given, the closing was unexpected and announced with a sign that read

“After 42 years serving Southern Indiana and Louisville, we regret to inform you that Rocky’s Sub Pub in Jeffersonville has closed. We would like to thank our loyal guests for their years of patronage and our amazing employees who helped build and run Rocky’s for over four decades….”

The sign did go on to say that management was working with staff to help them find other jobs. This closing comes just one week after the restaurant posted at the following comment  in response to positive feedback about their Thunder Over Louisville viewing event on their Facebook page — which does not have a closing announcement but does have updated “permanently closed” status on their about section.

“Your kind words and feedback really mean a lot, Eddie! We’re happy to hear you had a good time on Saturday. We’ll pass along o our staff and look forward to seeing you again next year :)”

The post Rocky’s Sub Pub on the River Closes Abruptly appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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We recently reported on Chef Miranda Stooksbury, Owner of Clover and the Greens, and her three course meal with cocktail pairings at MESA that had to be rescheduled. It’s been rescheduled for June 2nd, and the new menu looks absolutely mouthwatering. She’ll be joined by Paul Tuell, co-owner of Ballotin Chocolate Whiskey for a night of stories and intimate cooking  with cocktails at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m.

Mesa Collaborative Kitchen (216 Pearl Street, New Albany) hosts chefs in a beautiful space set up for chef dinners where  24 diners are seated around the cooking area, so they can enjoy the chef’s demonstrative cooking and conversation.

Read more for the menu.


 “We’ve tailored this menu to be abundant in the flavors and energy of summertime,” said Chef Stooksbury.  “With the warm weather, comes a time of gathering outdoors with our friends and family to share a meal, conversation and company. That’s what this dinner is all about. Relax and enjoy the lighter flavors of summer in a new and creative way. “

Menu:

  • Poached Shrimp Ceviche-, Lime, Mint, Cucumber and Avocado
  • NY Strip Entree Salad with Grilled Ballotin Peaches- NY Strip, Grilled Peaches, Spring Greens, Cherries, Spiced Pecans and Gorgonzola Vinaigrette
  • Ballotin Affogato with Raspberry Coulis

 This dinner is $60 per person, and tickets are non-refundable. They must be purchased online at  www.Mesachefs.com

Please note that 18% gratuity is not included and will be added at checkout, showing up as tax  on the receipt.

The post Chef Stooksbury Rescheduled At Mesa With Shrimp, Steak and Whiskeys June 2 appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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Comedian, writer Mike Glazer (HBO, Food Network, Funny or Die, BuzzFeed, FOX, truTV, FUSE, High Times, Fullscreen, The Chive, CBS, UCB Theatre, and Second City Chicago ) won third place on America’s Worst Cooks in 2014 but has since graduated a culinary program and been able to work on sets like The F Word with Gordon Ramsey and co-hosts a food podcast called Weed and Grub.  He has been following his love of food with increased food related appearances, leading to many types of opportunities. So, he seemed like a great person to bring along to Macy’s to interview Macy’s Culinary Council Chefs Anthony Lamas of Seviche fame and James Beard Award Winning Crumb on Parchment’s Michelle Bernstein, also known for her many television appearances.

Here, find the audio interview between Glazer and Chef Bernstein,  who later gave a demonstration and tasting of her Sweet Lemon Tea Brined Fried Chicken and gravy, Braised Greens and Rose Kissed Cupcakes to just over 100 eager audience members on the third floor in the home department of Macy’s at Oxmoor Mall. (See recipes below.) Attendee seats each had a free kitchen whisk, a pack of wet wipes, recipe cards and a bottled water upon arrival. Bernstein is also the author of “Cuisine a Latina” and Host of Check Please South Florida (WPBT2) and Host of Soflo Taste (Channel 10).

Read More to listen to the audio interview and to eat up her lovely recipes.


Mike Glazer interviews James Beard Award Winner Chef Michelle Bernstein at Macy’s Culinary Council Derby Demonstration - Vimeo

Michelle from Food & Dining Magazine on Vimeo.

Sweet Lemon Tea Brined Fried Chicken

makes 14 legs, serves 6-8

Ingredients: 

4 cups sweet tea (very strong black tea made with 1 cup of sugar)

4 cups water

1/2 cup kosher salt

1 teaspoon black peppercorns

2 lemons sliced thin, seeds removed

14 chicken legs (drumstick)

All-purpose flour, for dusting

Oil, for frying

For the Flour Mixture

2 cups All-purpose flour

1/2 cup Wondra flour

2 tablespoons cornstarch

1 tablespoon old bay

1 teaspoon black pepper

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 tablespoon garlic powder

1/2 tablespoon onion powder

Whisk together all ingredients to combine

Wet Ingredients

2  cups buttermilk

2 large eggs

Whisked together until homogenous

Method:

Combine the water, tea, lemon slices, salt and peppercorns, mix well. Add the chicken for 24-48 hours. Drain the chicken and allow to sit at room temperature for about an hour. Dust with all-purpose flour. Place in the buttermilk/egg mixture then into the flour mixture, shake off excess. Fry in vegetable oil at 300°F until golden brown and internal temp reaches at least 165° F. Season with Salt

For the Gravy: (serves 4-6)

2 tablespoons butter

1 cup yellow onion, 1/8 inch diced

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 wuart really good chicken stock reduced to 1 cup

3/4 cup heavy cream

In a small pot, cook the onion in the butter over medium low heat until soft, no color! Add the flour, stirring, for 3-4 minutes. Whisk in the chicken stock and then the heavy cream. Stir, allowing to reduce, until you reach the consistency you want, season to taste with salt and pepper.

Braised Greens (serves 4-6)

Ingredients:2 1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 cup yellow onion, 1/8 inch diced

1/2 teaspoon red crushed chili flakes

4 garlic cloves, smashed iwth the side of a knife

1 pound Tuscan kale, ribs removed, blanched for 1 minute, drianed, chopped

salt and pepper, to taste

Method:

Heat the oil in a large saute pan, add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until caramelized. Add the chili flakes and garlic, season with a pinch of salt and pepper, saute for 1 minute. Add the blanched, chopped kale. Cook on low for about 20-25 minutes, stirring.

Rose Kissed Cupcakes

(Makes 16-18)

Ingredients:

14 oz granulated sugar

2 sticks butter, room temperature

3 large eggs, room temperature

2 large egg yolks, room temperature

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 tablespoons rosewater

3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

3 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon fine salt

1 cup sour cream

Method:

Adjust oven rack to the middle position and preheat to 350°F.

Line standard cupcake tins with paper liners.

Cream the butter and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer until fluffy. Scrape down the sides, add in the eggs and yolks and beat for 3-5 minutes until light in color.

Scrape down the sides of the bowl, add in the vanilla and rosewater. Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt. Add the dry ingredients into the mixer and mix just until the batter starts coming together, add in the sour cream and mix just until combined. Scrape down with a spatula and mix by hand until no sour cream streaks remain. Divide batter among cups, about 2 ounces each. Bake until a toothpick comes out clean, about 20 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Top with toasted, crushed pistachios for garnish.

Frosting:

4 sticks butter

6 cups confectioners sugar

Pinch salt

2 tablespoons rose water

3-4 drops pink food coloring

2 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a mixing bowl fitted with a flat beater, beat the butter and sugar with the salt until smooth; mix in the rose water, vanilla and food coloring. Place in a pastry bag with a star tip.

The post (Audio Interviews, Recipes) Celebrity Chef Michelle Bernstein Talks with Comedian, Foodie Mike Glazer appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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The Louisville Independent Business Alliance (LIBA) will host the 10th Annual Buy Local Fair with a special Iron Chef-style cooking competition on Sunday, May 20th from 12:00 p.m. to  6:00 p.m. at Louisville Water Tower Park, 3005 River Road. Presented by Louisville Water Company, admission to the Fair is free, parking is $5 per car. 

Two chefs will go head to head with mystery ingredients at 3:15 p.m. and hope for a favorable ruling from a panel of four judges. Two of the judges are to be determined (one through a LIBA social media contest and another through a YELP affiliation), but the other two judges are Executive Chef Cody Stone from DECCA and Art Director and Foodie Rachel Quast, who from Common Table.

Read More for more details:

The winning chef gets all the glory and returns to face off with a new chef the following year. This year, Chef Jeff Dailey from Harvest is stepping in to represent Harvest’s win last year and will compete against Austin Cummins a previous chef and now salumiere at Commonwealth Cure, who makes meats for Foxhollow Farm. The two chefs have been given a list of 15 cuts of beef — ranging from ground beef to roast to steaks —  from the farm to choose from in advance. Then, when the clock starts ticking at the competition, they will open a Rainbow Blossom Community Supported Agriculture (CSA – produce sourced from local farms) box of mystery ingredients and decide on the spot what they will cook, using a grill and a stovetop supplied by Trend Appliances and the help of a sous chef if they choose to bring one.

An emcee will talk the audience through the competition before the judges make their decision based on the following criteria:  taste, healthiness, and how easily someone could replicate the meal for their own family at home.

“The idea is to make something fast, make something really good, but not make it super complicated, because they’re going to be using the ingredients that are really accessible to everybody,” said Foxhollow Farm’s Lauren Argabrite.

The event will also feature a cocktail competition (details to be announced) and include booths from a variety of local businesses, artists and craftspeople, community organizations and farmers, as well as live music, a children’s area, a cooking competition, food vendors, and local craft beer, bourbon, brandy and wine. Follow LIBA for more information or visit    keeplouisvilleweird.com/buylocalfair.

Photography:  Kriech-Higdon Photography, Courtesy of LIBA

The post Chefs Face Off at 10th Annual Buy Local Fair appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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Beer drinkers have one day to buy their tickets for the JTown Summer Craft Beer Fest in advance at a discount. Cox’s Smokers Outlet and Spirit Shoppe at 3920 Ruckriegel Parkway will host a parking lot pre-sale party on Saturday, May 12 from 2 to 5 p.m. Tickets will be $25, saving buyers $10 plus fees.

While grabbing your tickets, you’ll be able to enjoy special limited release brews from 3rd Turn Brewing, Mile Wide and Against the Grain in addition to food from El Mambo Food Truck and in-store cigar and discounted beer specials.

The festival itself, at the Pavillion in the heart of J-Town on Saturday July 7 from 4 to 8 p.m.,  promises growth this year with more breweries, more beer, and more bands on two live music stages.

The post JTown Summer Craft Beer Fest Discounted Pre-sale Ticket Party Saturday appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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610 Magnolia, 610 W Magnolia St, www.610magnolia.com (502) 636-0783 

May 13 Brunch – Usually, dinner only, this brunch is three courses plus canapes and a glass of champagne for $65 per person, plus tax and gratuity.  Reservations required.

8UP Elevated Drinkery & Kitchen, 350 W. Chestnut St www.8uplouisville.com 502-631-4180   May 13 Brunch or Dinner:  Festive brunch with à la carte sweet and savory specials from executive chef Casper Van Drongelen from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. with photo booth from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Smoked salmon crêpe, Crab omelet with lumb crab, spinach & tomato relish, veggie omelet, pork shoulder,  huevos rancheros, bourbon peaches & cream French toast, sticky bun à la mode and more.) Dinner from 4 to 9 p.m.Reservations are highly recommended

Brasserie Provence, 150 N Hurstbourne Lane,  www.brasserieprovence.com 502.883.3153 

May 13, Brunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. three course brunch   $45 per person or $15 for children under 12 plus tax and gratuity. A credit card is required to hold all reservations. See Menu Here.

Bristol Bar & Grille (All locations) www.bristolbarandgrille.com

May 13 Brunch: Everything from the classic scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, grits, biscuits and gravy, Belgian waffles to pastries, pasta, fresh vegetables, fried chicken, roast beef and green chili wontons will be available. Cost is $32 for adults and $10 for kids ages 4 to 11 plus beverages, tax and gratuity. Contact individual locations for reservations.Highlands: 1321 Bardstown Rd. (502) 456-1702; Downtown: 614 W. Main St. (502) 582-1995; East: 300 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy. (502) 426-0627.

Brown Hotel 335 W. Broadway, www.brownhotel.com 502-583-1234.

May 13 English Grill, Fine Dining Brunch: Seating between 11:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. accompanied by live music from pianist Brad Tomlinson. The cost is $69 per adult, or $22 for children ages 4 to 12, plus tax and gratuity.  Reservations required.

May 13 J. Graham’s Café Casual Brunch: Seating at 9 and 11 a.m. or 1 and 3 p.m. The cost is $46 per adult, or $19 for children ages 4 to 12, plus tax and gratuity. Children under age 4 eat free.  Reservations required.

Lupo 1540 Frankfort Ave, www.pizzalupo.com (502) 409-8440

May 13 Lunch: Regular lunch menufrom 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., featuring Neapolitan wood-fired pizzas and sandwiches made with bread baked on the pizza-oven hearth, along with a few brunchy specials designed for moms. At the bar, classic fresh-squeezed mimosas, harissa bloody marys, and our housemade sparkling limoncello.

Mesa, 216 Pearl St New Albany www.mesachefs.com

May 12: Mother and daughter afternoon tea: Teas from The Olivet and a three-plate light lunch including garden rose caprese salad, tea sandwich duo and lemon olive oil scone.

Proof On Main, 702 W Main St , www.proofonmain.com 502.217.6360

May 13 Brunch: From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Executive chef Mike Wajda is preparing all your brunch favorites, plus a few specials that mom will love. Three-courses for $32 per person. Call for reservations. See menu here.

The post Mother’s Day Brunch at Louisville Restaurants appeared first on Food & Dining Magazine.

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