Loading...

Follow FitnessRX for Women on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid


I’m writing about protein because I receive many e-mails asking about my diet; people wonder if I only eat protein, if I eat just fish, how much protein to include in the daily diet, etc.

First I want to be very clear about the quantity of protein, because over-eating protein or other macronutrients will result in fat and weight gain. It’s also important to know that the calories are very important when you design a diet. To know the exact grams that a person has to eat is impossible, but some research can help to find a good formula for a balanced diet.

So how do you calculate your protein needs? It depends on multiple factors, including height, weight, activity (sedentary, active, elite athlete).

Usually the formula is:

• Average healthy sedentary adult: 0.5-.7 grams of protein per pound bodyweight
• Average healthy active adult: 0.8-1 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight

You’ll also find this proportion in some bodybuilding and fitness articles: 0.8-1.5 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight.

Another way to calculate how much protein you need is by using daily calorie intake and the percentage of calories that will come from protein. To do this, you’ll need to know how many calories your body needs each day.

To factor protein into your total daily calorie intake, you just need to know that 1 gram of protein contains 4 calories. Multiply the grams of protein you’re going to eat each day by 4 to figure out exactly how many calories your protein intake will account for. For example, my weight is 130 pounds. I eat 130 grams of protein per day, and 130X4= 520 calories from protein per day.

Here are some protein facts:

• The American Heart Association recommends that 10 to 15 percent of your daily calorie intake come from a source of protein.

• Protein is a vital part of every tissue, cell and organ in your body. Protein is in a constant process of being broken down and replaced by the essential amino acids in your diet. Proteins are composed of chains of 20 different kinds of amino acids.

• Hair and nails are mostly made of protein.

• Your body uses protein to make enzymes, antibodies, hormones and other body chemicals.
Protein is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, teeth and blood.

• The smallest units of proteins (amino acids) fall in either of the following types:

• Non-essential amino acids: alanine, cysteine, glycine, serine, histidine, tyrosine, cystine, proline, arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and glutamine.
• Essential amino acids: Valine, threonine, leucine, lysine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine and tryptophan.

The most common high-protein foods are:
• Chicken (skinless)
• Turkey (skinless)
• Fish (all kinds)
• Beef (leaner cuts)
• Pork (leaner cuts)
• Whole eggs, egg whites
• Protein supplements (whey protein powder, casein protein powder, etc.)
• Beans (all kinds)
• Nuts (all kinds)
• Cheese

I hope this article helps you to understand that the quality, calories and quantity are important for achieving a balanced diet. If you eat more than your body needs, you will gain fat. Balance is the key!

References:

Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Mar;109(3):509-27.
DietaryFiberFood.com. RDA: Protein Requirement for Humans.
Accessed: Sept 22, 2009 http://www.dietaryfiberfood.com/protein-requirement.php.
http://exercise.about.com/cs/nutrition/a/protein_2.htm
http://www.livestrong.com/article/38701-importance-protein-diet/#ixzz2IkHXcdmE
http://www.bodhi.com.au/protein.html
http://www.acaloriecounter.com/diet/how-much-protein-per-day/

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
FitnessRX for Women by Jessie Hilgenberg - 5d ago

We rarely look at calves as traditional “problem areas,” but we sure do notice a nice set of calves when we see one. Is it just genetics…or is it something more? Genetics will most definitely play a part in the shape of your calves, but you can absolutely work toward building their size and strength!

The calves are a complex muscle, but you should be mainly concerned with the Gastrocnemius (Gastroc) and the Soleus. The Gastroc gets more stimulation during standing calf exercises where your knees are extended (not bent). The Soleus is the smaller muscle and hides below the Gastroc. It gets more stimulation during bent-leg exercises and responds well to slow-twitch endurance and high reps.

As a general rule with all of my training, I always put a priority on any muscle group that is lagging. If your calves are not as developed as they should be, it’s time to dedicate a couple (or more) days per week to them, hitting all the angles and working to failure.

I love the way my legs look in shorts and heels with great calves, but…good luck trying to squeeze into your skinny jeans once you start making gains!

Get Creative

Just because there are two dedicated calf machines at the gym (sitting and standing), doesn’t mean those are your only two options. You MUST get creative and think outside the box in order to hit all the angles and activate the entire calf.

You want volume when it comes to training calves, so lower the weight, increase the reps, vary the exercises and get busy!

The Workouts

Tip: I like to take my shoes off during my calf exercises in order to get a full range of motion and really focus on each muscle, including all the smaller, very important stabilizers.

These workouts are designed to have at least 2-3 days recovery between them. You can include them in your leg workout or add them to any other muscle group. If you add them to other muscle groups, be cautious not to go into other leg workouts with your calves being sore. Don’t forget that exercises such as sprinting, hill climbs, sand running, biking and jumping rope all contribute to calf training!

Calf workout 1:

Seated calf raise
6 sets 12-15 reps

* rotate toes approximately 2” (more is not necessary) inward and outward, in addition to straight forward each set.

Calf raise in leg press – narrow (feet 2-3” apart)
3 sets 20 reps

* squeeze fully at the top for 1-2 seconds and lower the weight slowly

Standing calf raise
6 sets 12-15 reps

* rotate toes approximately 2” (more is not necessary) inward and outward, in addition to straight forward each set

Calf workout 2:

Calf raise in leg press – neutral (feet hip-width apart)
3 sets 20 reps

* squeeze fully at the top for 1-2 seconds and lower the weight slowly

Donkey calf raise
3 sets 12-15 reps

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


As my Summer Squat Challenge continues to rock, I will be sharing with you several of my favorite squat variations throughout the challenge or in your daily workouts.

Since working out only at home and without the use of gym equipment, I have found squats to be an absolute must for keeping the legs toned and tight while booty round and lifted. With good form and mind-muscle connection, the results are amazing when you incorporate squats into your daily routine.

Have fun and let’s get our squat on!

THIS WEEK’S SQUAT VARIATION: BOX/BENCH SQUATS

 Box/Bench Jump Squats: Stand in front of a large, stable box (be sure the step/box can hold your weight). Lower down into a basic squat and instead of standing up explosively, jump with both feet, landing squarely on the box in a low squat position. Step or jump off and repeat. Start with a fairly low box— no higher than one foot— and work up to progressively higher boxes as your strength and confidence improves. Be very careful to land squarely on both feet, all the way on the box.

Challenge is underway but to join the fun and squat the remaining days of summer join HERE: https://ginaaliotti.mykajabi.com/summer-squat-challenge

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
FitnessRX for Women by Lauren Jacobsen - 1w ago

With summer being in full swing, lighter meals like salads are at the top of the healthy meal choice list. Unfortunately, typical salad buffet toppers like creamy dressing, bacon bits, croutons and macaroni salad can turn your bowl of green goodness into a calorie fest. However, that doesn’t mean you should be left with just a bed of leaf lettuce either. There is a better way to make a salad that doesn’t involve heavy, calorie-filled dressings, and the same boring ingredients. The best salads combine flavor and lots of good-for-you ingredients without being over the top in calories.

Here are six steps to building a better salad. Plus, as a bonus, read to the end for some easy-to-follow salad bowls that pull it all together!

Step 1: Start with a leafy base

Just because you are eating salad doesn’t mean you are limited to boring iceberg lettuce! In fact, this lettuce doesn’t offer much more than water. Try adding a dark, leafy green that is loaded in nutrients, vitamins, minerals and rich in antioxidants! Good options are romaine, leaf lettuce, spinach, mixed greens, arugula, frisee, mache, endive, radicchio, baby beet greens, butterhead lettuce or kale. The list is endless!

Step 2: Add a complex carb

You don’t have to limit yourself to just greens in your salad base. Try adding a complex carbohydrate to your greens for extra energy and fiber. Good options are cooked grains such as quinoa or couscous, or even whole-wheat pasta, soba or the low-carb Shirataki noodle. Starchy vegetables can also be a good option, such as cooked and diced potato or sweet potato. Keep calories in check by opting for smaller serving sizes of about ¼ cup.

Step 3: Add some colorful veggies and fruit

Load up on colorful vegetables, such as bell peppers, cherry tomatoes, shredded carrots, red or green onion, cucumber or even beets! Vegetables provide soluble fiber, vitamins and minerals. In addition to antioxidants, tomatoes offer up lycopene, while carrots provide beta-carotene! Fruit can also be a good option; strawberries and blueberries can add sweetness, while green apple slices can add tartness. And if fresh fruit isn’t your fancy, opt for a teaspoon or two of your favorite dried fruit such as naturally sweetened, dried cranberries, blueberries or raisins.

Step 4: Pick a protein

Adding protein takes your salad from an appetizer to the main course. Plus, protein provides your muscles what they need to stay lean and tight! Not to mention, protein offers up a satiating effect, reducing hunger between meals. Chicken is an obvious choice, but it’s not the only one. Try grilled steak, canned or fresh fish such as salmon or tuna. Vegetarian protein options are black beans, garbanzo beans, chick peas or marinated cooked tofu!

Step 5: Choose a flavor

You don’t have to opt for the same boring salad dressing every time you have salad. There are other options other than fat-free Italian! The dressing can completely change the flavor on a salad. Whenever possible try to make your own. All you need is a shaker bottle, a few tablespoons of good-for-you monounsaturated oil, vinegar or citrus juice and some herbs, and you are good to go! Olive oil can be a great base for Mediterranean-style dressings, while sesame oil can provide an option for an Asian style dressing. Add in fresh or dried herbs like basil, oregano, cilantro or tarragon. You can add some zest by using lemon, orange, grapefruit or lime juice or a specific flavor of vinegar such as balsamic.

Step 6: Finish it off with something soft or crunchy

Nuts and seeds are a great way to finish off an amazing salad, and are a great alternative to traditional croutons! There are many options when it comes to nuts such as pecans, walnuts, peanuts, almonds or even pine nuts. Nuts can be eaten raw and natural or can be toasted for a slightly different flavor. As for seeds, opt for poppy, pumpkin, sesame or sunflower. Nuts and seeds are full of good-for-you fats, and are high in fiber and antioxidants. Just watch the portion sizes. A single ounce of almonds provides 164 Kcal and 14 grams of fat.

But if you are not a nut or seed fan, there are always softer options such as cheese, avocado or even cooked artichoke hearts! Soft cheeses such as feta or blue cheese can add saltiness, plus protein and calcium. But again these are not calorie free, so use sparingly and opt for lower fat varieties.

Bonus Summer Salad Bowls

Try one of these delightful summer salad bowls! Each recipe makes two servings.

Berry-licious Chicken Spinach Salad

3 cups of baby spinach
½ cup of sliced strawberries
¼ cup of raspberries
½ cup chopped red bell pepper
2 chopped green onions
8 oz of chopped grilled chicken
2 tbsp of crumbled low-fat feta

Dressing:
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
¼ cup raspberry balsamic vinegar
Chopped fresh basil
Salt & pepper

Using a salad dressing bottle, combine all the dressing ingredients and shake. In a large bowl combine spinach, berries, pepper, and onions. Drizzle half the dressing over top and toss. Split salad between two plates. Divide chicken and feta into two equal portions. Place over greens. Top with remaining dressing.

Calories Per Serving: 381; Carbs: 15 g; Fat: 20 g; Protein: 38 g

Spicy Beef Thai Noodle Salad

3 cups of mixed Asian greens (tatsoi, mustard greens, mizuna and pea shoots)
1 cup of cooked Shirataki noodles
¼ cup of shredded carrot
12 snap peas
1 small Mandarin orange, peeled and segmented
¼ cup of diced heart of palm
½ cup chopped red bell pepper
2 chopped green onions
8 oz of chopped grilled beef steak
2 tbsp chopped peanuts
2 tbsp chopped cilantro
1 tsp black sesame seeds

Dressing:
1 tbsp rice wine vinegar
2 tbsp fresh orange juice
1 tbsp fresh lime juice
1 tbsp sesame oil
2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
1 tsp hot chilli flakes
1 tsp chopped garlic
1 tbsp chopped cilantro

Using a food processor, combine all the dressing ingredients and blend. In a large bowl combine greens, pepper, carrots, peas, palm, cilantro and onions. Drizzle half the dressing over top and toss. Split the cooked noodles over two place, then divide salad over top. Separate steak, peanuts and sesame seeds into two equal portions. Place over greens and noodles. Top with remaining dressing.

Calories: 444; Protein: 41 g; Carbs: 25 g; Fat: 23 g

Italian Tuna Potato Salad

1 can of tuna packed in water, drained
3 cups of mixed greens
½ diced avocado
½ small green apple, chopped
10 slices of cucumber
1 medium white potato cooked and diced
2 slices of red onion
8 cherry tomatoes

Dressing:
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
¼ cup lemon juice
½ tsp lemon zest
½ tsp Dijon mustard
1 tbsp fresh oregano chopped
1 roasted garlic clove
Salt & pepper to taste

Combine all dressing ingredients in a food processor and blend. In a large bowl combine mixed greens, avocado, apple, cucumber, onion, potato and tomatoes. Pour half of the dressing over top and toss. Split the salad over two plates. In a small bowl place the drained tuna, pour the remaining dressing over top and toss until well coated. Divide out two portions of tuna over the salads.

Calories: 424; Protein: 25 g; Carbs: 36 g; Fat: 23 g

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

As my Summer Squat Challenge continues to rock, I will be sharing with you several of my favorite squat variations throughout the challenge or in your daily workouts.

Since working out only at home and without the use of gym equipment, I have found squats to be an absolute must for keeping the legs toned and tight while the booty round and lifted. With good form and mind-muscle connection, it is amazing the results when you incorporate squats into your daily routine.

Have fun and let’s get our squat on!

widmill squats - YouTube

THIS WEEK’S SQUAT VARIATION: WINDMILL SQUATS

Start standing with your arms straight overhead and legs wider than shoulder-width distance apart, toes in a neutral stance. Squat down, bringing one arm to meet your opposite foot and gaze toward the side you are reaching. Bring yourself back up the starting position, and then repeat. Squat down while bringing your opposite arm to meet your opposite leg, rotating with each squat. Always keep your arm that is above your head straight and engaged, and core tight.

The challenge is underway but to join the fun and squat the remaining days of summer, join HERE: https://ginaaliotti.mykajabi.com/summer-squat-challenge

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

No matter how focused you are on your fitness goals, at some point your cardio routine can become a little tired. To minimize boredom and plateaus, you need to continually switch things up, whether it be with your intensity, duration or type of cardio. When you do, your motivation will be maximized and your body will keep responding andprogressing.

Like many of you, I log many hours on cardio equipment. Yes, my routines change, but I still need a break from the machines every once in a while. I’m sure you can relate! So, in the spirit of the Fourth of July, let’s declare our independence from our beloved “dreadmills” and “stairs to nowhere” and burn some fat with this intense, no machines required cardio program. Even better, you can save yourself a trip to the gym by doing this routine at your home before you head out to enjoy the holiday. So, grab a towel and get ready to sweat!

THE FOURTH OF JULY FAT BURN

DYNAMIC WARM-UP (5 minutes). These exercises are meant to get your body warmed up and prepared for the upcoming cardio blast.

1 minute: Running Butt Kick*
1 minute: Alternating Lunges
1 minute: Running Butt Kick
1 minute: Big Arm Circles*
1 minute: Running Butt Kick

CARDIO BLAST (25 minutes). Only rest where indicated. Otherwise, perform each exercise non-stop for the duration indicated and then move on to the next one.

Circuit #1 (7 minutes)
1 minute: Quick Squats*
1 minute: High Jumps
1 minute: Stationary Lunges, right leg forward
1 minute: Stationary Lunges, left leg forward
2 minutes: Jump Rope (If you don’t have one, hold light weights in each hand and mimic the jump rope motion.)
1 minute: Rest (Don’t sit— walk around, stretch, sip water.)

Circuit #2 (7 minutes)
1 minute: Burpee
1 minute: Mountain Climber
1 minute: Crunches
1 minute: Crab Kicks*
2 minutes: Jump Rope (If you don’t have one, hold light weights in each hand and mimic the jump rope motion)
1 minute: Rest (Don’t sit— walk around, stretch, sip water)

Circuit #3 (7 minutes)
1 minute: Push-ups (perform on knees, if needed)
1 minute: High knees, Run in Place
1 minute: Plank (on elbows or hands)
1 minute: Ski Jumps*
1 minute: Knee-up Jump Lunge, right leg*
1 minute: Knee-up Jump Lunge, left leg*
1 minute: Rest (Don’t sit— walk around, stretch, sip water)

Circuit #4 (4 minutes)
1 minute: Quick Squats
1 minute: High knees Run in Place
1 minute: Quick Squats
1 minute: High knees Run in Place

COOL-DOWN & STRETCH (5 minutes): Walk around for a few minutes, then stretch.

Descriptions

Running Butt Kick – Run in place kicking your legs back so that your heel strikes your glute with each kick.

Big Arm Circles – Hold arms out to the sides (parallel to the ground) and begin swinging both arms backwards in big circles. Continue for 30 seconds. Then, for another 30 seconds, repeat the circles but this time in a forward motion.

Quick Squats – Perform full-range, un-weighted squats as quickly as you can.

Crab Kicks – (See demonstration picture.) Sit on the floor with your hands palms-down, resting on the ground by your glutes. Feet should be flat on the floor with knees drawn toward your chest. Push your hips up. Shifting your weight into your hands, alternate kicking each leg into the air.

Ski Jumps – Stand with feet together. Bend the knees and jump to the right as far as you can. Land with soft knees and immediately jump laterally to the left.

Knee-up Jump Lunge – (See demonstration picture.) Stand with feet hip-width apart. Lunge back with right leg while swinging right arm forward and left arm back. Push off left foot and jump straight up (as high as possible), bringing bent right knee toward chest and swinging left arm forward and right arm back. Return to lunge as you land. Repeat same leg for duration of interval and then switch.

Push Toward Your Best

If you aspire to transform your body, going through the motions just doesn’t cut it. Our bodies easily adapt and progress slows (sometimes to a halt). You have to break out of your routine and continually challenge your body. This could mean increasing weight or reps, changing exercises or training methods and/or just bringing more intensity to your sessions. Not only will this enable you to make more progress faster, you will have fun with the challenge. So, don’t accept good enough when you want your best. Keep pushing–your best is waiting.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


My Summer Squat Challenge, rocking 100 squats every day of summer, is underway and on fire. Throughout the course of the summer, I will be sharing with you several of my favorite squat variations that you can use over the course of my challenge, for those that have joined, or in your everyday workouts throughout the year.

Since working out only at home and without the use of gym equipment, I have found squats to be an absolute must for keeping the legs toned and tight while the booty round and lifted. With good form and mind-muscle connection, the results are amazing when you incorporate squats into your daily routine.

I am excited to squat all summer long with all of you and share some of my favorite variations. Have fun and let’s get our squat on!

THIS WEEK’S SQUAT VARIATION: The Front Squat

A front squat involves placing weight (bar or dumbbells) across the anterior deltoids or the front of your shoulders. If you don’t have a bar, you can do this with dumbbells held to your upper chest with your palms facing your body. This squat is performed the same as your traditional squat but with the weight held in front of you, at your chest. Be mindful to keep your chest lifted and shoulders back, since the front weight can tend to pull you forward. Remember that it is better to use less weight with proper form, than it is to sacrifice form to lift heavier weight.

The challenge is underway, but to join the fun and squat the remaining days of summer join HERE: https://ginaaliotti.mykajabi.com/summer-squat-challenge

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Summer is officially here and that means my Summer Squat Challenge is kicking off soon. Over the course of the summer, I will be sharing with you different fun and effective ways to perform the magical movement, the squat. To join the full challenge and have the daily accountability and support, be sure to sign up for my Summer Squat Challenge, perfect for those looking for a fun challenge to keep you focused all summer long.

It is one of my favorite challenges of the year, and here is why …

1. NO GYM NEEDED! You do not need a gym or any machines to do your squats. There are a variety of squats that you can do with just your bodyweight and nothing more. Of course, variety and choices are important too. With 94 squat variations, you can see for yourself how creative you can get with this basic movement.

2.ANYWHERE! This is the BEST part: You can do them anywhere! It doesn’t matter if you are at home, the gym, the park, the beach or even shopping with friends— you can do your squats anywhere. Squats = No Excuses!

3. ANY LEVEL! It doesn’t matter if you are a beginner or more advanced, you can do whatever variation you want, depending on your preferences. There are variations to meet wherever you are in your journey or how you are feeling on any given day. Feeling motivated? Add some weights, a resistance band or hammer them out all at once. Just starting out? Break up the squats into fewer reps and complete them in sets throughout the day.

4. EFFECTIVE! Squats are one of the most effective ways to sculpt, lift and build your booty. With so many variations, you can stimulate your booty in different ways to keep your body responding.

5. BIKINI SEASON. ‘Tis the season for rocking your favorite bikini and there is no better way to feel confident than a nice round, perky booty. You will be surprised how quickly you will see the changes to your backside with consistent attention to your squats.

6. CRAZY SCHEDULE. Summer means family vacations, kids are out of school and your schedule is often a bit more crazy than usual. You may slack with your workouts or find that you don’t have time to go to the gym or get in your home workout. OK, that may be a bit of a stretch, because we all have time to squeeze in a G-Fit circuit … BUT … I get it; things need to be a bit more flexible during this time of year. If you can commit to 100 squats a day, even if you don’t get in your usual workout, you are still doing something. Your daily efforts will surely add up, I promise!

7. IT’S FUN! If it isn’t fun, why do it, right? “Have fun” is our family’s first rule. If it is fun, you will keep coming back for more and enjoy your journey. There is something about squats as a group that is just FUN! You can even use the opportunity to get others involved. Grab a friend, grab a neighbor. Heck, grab a stranger. Just get it done!

8. LESS IS MORE. This has become one of the mantras I live by and preach because I have found it to work. We often tend to overextend ourselves and risk overtraining. People think you have to do more, when actually doing less can yield better results. Rather than focusing on more this summer, we are focusing on the basics— quality and consistency, so let’s get back to basics!

9. REIGNITES THAT FIRE. Feeling burnt out or ready for a change? It’s normal to crush your New Year’s goals, or at least be super motivated to crush them, but then the months go on and you lose steam. This is a perfect way to reignite that fire and get you re-motivated. Fun challenges do it for me and I know they will do it for you too!

10. KID-FRIENDLY! When I say anyone, any age, and anywhere can do squats, I am talking our tiny tots to our older folks. When my kids were little I was squatting with them in my baby carrier and now they are squatting with me because it’s fun.


There is no better way to get the entire family involved than a fun, family Summer Squat Challenge. It is a great way to get the family active and start to introduce exercise. Make it a game! When you set the example, and show them that exercise can be FUN, it is less of a “chore” and becomes a lifestyle. Imagine that— build a booty while you reinforce healthy habits of daily exercise … WINNING!

Let’s rock our Summer Squat Challenge and build a booty together!

Sign up and join the squat fun here: https://bit.ly/2EYwaHl

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Achieving broad and sculpted shoulders takes consistency, dedication and the right exercises to hit the upper body from all angles. And while many women desire those toned shoulders that perfectly complement spring and summer clothing, many have trouble getting there. But it IS possible! You see, it all comes down to this— even when training gets tough, you’ve got to SHOULDER ON!

To help us achieve this goal, IFBB Figure Pro Candice Keene is the perfect inspiration. Candice is a Figure International champion and a true training expert who knows exactly what it takes. Here she demonstrates an upper body-sculpting workout that includes some less-than-traditional exercises to help you change things up in order to see results. Not only will you rock your short sleeves when the warmer weather hits, but also having a set of beautiful, toned shoulders can make your waist appear smaller, giving your physique a more balanced shape.

So come on, ladies— it’s time to SHOULDER ON!

CLICK TO PRINT GET IT RIGHT

How to perform the exercises in this workout

DUMBBELL MILITARY PRESS

Begin seated on bench, and hold two dumbbells at your shoulders with your palms facing forward. Press the dumbbells above your head, and lower back to starting position.

Candice’s Tip: “Keep your core nice and tight to protect your spine and keep stable. Also, don’t bring the dumbbells together all the way at the top. By doing this, it creates more time under tension.”

PRONE INCLINE BENCH DUMBBELL RAISE

Hold a dumbbell in each hand and lie facedown on an incline bench. Slowly raise the dumbbells in front of you, and keep your elbows locked. Squeeze at the top and breathe out. Lower arms back down to your starting position and inhale.

Candice’s Tip: “Keep your neck in neutral position, looking down. Be sure to only bring your arms up at the point of alignment with the body. Going past that point, you will be at risk of injury or tweaking your shoulder. And again, core tight!”

PRONE INCLINE BENCH REAR LATERAL RAISE

After performing the dumbbell raise, raise your arms to the side until your elbows are shoulder height and palms are facing the floor. Keep your elbows slightly bent. Return to the starting position.

Candice’s Tip: “Keep the same body position as first exercise (tight core, neutral neck position). When you bring the dumbbells to side, lead with the elbows. REALLY focus on working the rear delts and not the mid-back.”

DUMBBELL UPRIGHT ROW

Hold dumbbells and stand with palms facing the front of the thighs. With a relaxing neck and traps, lift the dumbbells up to front of the shoulder, with elbows facing out.

Candice’s Tip: “When doing this move, lead with your elbows upright. Hold for two seconds and really feel the squeeze.”

REVERSE-GRIP BARBELL PRESS

Sit on a bench holding a barbell with a reverse grip. Press the barbell upward and feel the stretch in your shoulders, and lower back down.

Candice’s Tip: “Keep your arms locked in the 90-degree position with palms upward. Use your mind-muscle to focus on working the front delts when raising and not your biceps.”

STAGGERED STANCE CABLE LEANING LATERAL RAISE

Grasp the left cable with the left hand. Begin facing away from the cable machine, one foot in front of the other, slightly leaning forward. Slowly stretch the cables up, keeping elbows slightly bent, until your elbows are parallel to the floor and then slowly lower, all the while leaning forward slightly and making sure your stance stays staggered. Repeat with the other side.

Candice’s Tip: “When in the staggered position, bring core tightly in to stabilize pelvic and lumbar area to ensure a more controlled movement with the lateral raise. First lead with elbows, then follow with the cable pulley. It should be a slow and controlled movement, making sure no other muscles are assisting.”

CABLE ROPE HIGH PULLS

Attach rope on cable machine, set the cable to the highest position. Grasp rope, lean back slightly, and pull rope toward forehead. Repeat.

Candice’s Tip: “I like to grab the ends of the rope with back of hands facing me, thumb position down. Position the pulley slightly above head level. Have a staggered stance for leverage, while keeping core tight, just slightly leaning back. When returning rope to starting position, go nice and slow with a good retraction of shoulders forward.”

REAR DELT REVERSE CABLE FLYE

Face and stand directly in the center of the cable machine, between the two stacks of weight. Set the cable to the lowest position or with just a few plates, and attach a rubber-grip handle. Begin grasping the left high-pulley cable handle with your right hand, and the right high-pulley cable handle with your left hand. Hold hands in front of your chest, elbows bent slightly, and pull the cables back in an arc until your elbows are behind your back. Bring your shoulder blades together, return and repeat.

Candice’s Tip: “Position pulley at chest/shoulder level. You don’t need a lot of weight here— just a few plates. When executing, stand upright with core and pelvis tight. And pull the handle back, elbows leading and really focus on only that rear delt muscle!”

STEP-UPS WITH HANDS

Get in a plank position behind an aerobics step. Then, step your palms up to a plank with both hands on the step and back down.

Candice’s Tip: Along with shoulder action, this really tests your core strength. Remember— belly button to spine, and tight core and pelvis. Try to keep neck in alignment with body.”

FOREARMS TO HANDS ON BOSU

Start in a plank on forearms, then place one palm on Bosu to press up to a plank, using both hands, and then back down to forearms.

Candice’s Tip: “To ensure proper activation and results, first and foremost proper and perfect form and alignment is important! Remember, mind over matter with these challenging core/shoulder moves. You can do it!!”

KEYS TO BUILDING SHOULDERS

Candice shares her top tips.
• Slow and controlled movements (no momentum/assistance from the body).
• Focus on the whole shoulder anatomy. “Incorporate a variety of different delt raises, hitting different angles.”
Warm up properly. “Warming up prior is very important. This prevents the risk of injury. When warming up, dynamic movement stretching, like the warm-up in this workout, is recommended. Static stretching is good during your workout in between sets.”
Train heavy!
• Make sure you incorporate different variations of presses (i.e., Arnold press, dumbbell press, barbell press, etc.)
• Change up your shoulder routine often— keep those babies guessing!
• Incorporate supplements into your diet plan. Candice’s favorites include BCAAs, creatine, ALLMAX’s Carbion (fast-digesting carb powder for post-workout), beta-alanine and ALLMAX’s Isoflex (clean isolate protein powder).

KEEP UP WITH CANDICE

Contact Candice via Facebook (IFBBFigureCandiceKeene). You can also find Candice on Twitter (@candicekeene) and Instagram (@candicekeene and @poselikeafigurepro)
Candice can be contacted for appearances through www.fmg-fitnessmanagementgroup.com.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

FT RX core circuit - YouTube

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview