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For the last few weeks, I have been nudging you toward a new outlook in life…hope, faith, plus action…being guided by your heart. I have been nudging you toward seeing things from a positive perspective instead of a negative perspective, and not just seeing some things this way, but seeing everything this way. Today is the next installment of seeing your life through positive eyes…it encompasses a look at abundant gratitude.

Gratitude was a big part of my recovery, and it remains a big part of my daily life. Ultimately in my recovery, I became so grateful for the daily opportunity to be alive with my soul in a human body (even one with Parkinson’s), that the Parkinson’s simply did not matter. I have expressed that it was like my mind and body watched as my soul got on the train and left the station. Eventually, my mind and body had to jump on board.

Some people struggle with looking at their present life with Parkinson’s and feeling gratitude. Here is a new way to look at the situation and to fill yourself with abundant gratitude.

If you can think back to a happy or joyful event in life, get a clear picture of it, and then give gratitude for having had that joyful event take place in your life, something in your brain captures the event, finds it inside you, and releases dopamine as if you were experiencing the joyful event in the present moment.

Since I have been told over the years that many people have difficulty with visualization, I have modified this form of gratitude as follows:

Get out an old photo album, or go to a digital photo album on your computer. Most of the time, the pictures depict happy occasions (birthdays, anniversaries, vacations, graduations, nature). Find a picture where you have a clear memory of the joyful event. Then, give gratitude for the event. Do this repeatedly, picture after picture after picture…day after day after day.

Do what feels right, a certain number of pictures, a certain amount of time. It does not matter. What matters is that you are taking action and that you keep doing it. Why? It is your dopamine flowing on a regular basis again that will help bring you to your full recovery.

It is not a competition or a race. It is a way to reflect on life and give abundant gratitude. Most of the time in life when wonderful things are happening, we just enjoy the moment. This new gratitude practice is a way to go back to so many enjoyable moments, stop and reflect on the joyfulness of the moment, and then give gratitude for having had that moment in your life.

You now have something simple to do that can have overwhelmingly positive results in releasing your dopamine and enhancing your recovery.

I am abundantly grateful for all of you.

You can do this!

You are worth it!!!

All my best,

Howard

ps Happy Birthday, Sally! I love you, and I am abundantly grateful for you!!!

 

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In my previous two posts, Fighting Parkinson’s, and hope, faith, plus action, and Fighting Parkinson’s, and hope, faith, plus action, part 2, I discussed why hope and faith without action are meaningless in Parkinson’s recovery. In those posts, I discussed action of the body and the mind. Today I am discussing action of the soul.

I feel that your soul is not touched by Parkinson’s. I have expressed this point in the past. The action of the soul encompasses letting go of the past issues and attitudes that block your recovery. This means letting go of attachments to self-judgment, self-criticism, lack of forgiveness of yourself, lack of compassion for yourself, and lack of love for yourself. Essentially, you are letting go of the toxins of your body and your mind so that your soul can shine through.

The action of the soul is realizing that the real you, your soul, in underneath all of the toxicity of the Parkinson’s body and mind, and that your soul has been there all along as pure as the day your were born. I have pulled a reminder from an “oldie but goodie” post:

Let’s say you go to the store and buy a shining silver teapot. You take the teapot home and put it on the sideboard to admire it. And then, you get busy with life and you do not spend any time with the teapot for the next six months. When you return to the sideboard, you are horrified to see that your teapot is covered in tarnish.

At first you think, “Oh no, what have I done. I have neglected my teapot and it is ruined.” Then, somebody points out to you that if you get silver polish, you can remove the tarnish. So, you get the silver polish, grab the teapot, and head to the kitchen sink.

You moisten the sponge, dip it in the silver polish, and you begin to rub the teapot. The first thing you notice is that it begins to look worse than when you started — there is black and gray pasty junk and it smells bad. In this moment of “cleaning crisis,” you think, “I have faith that the silver polish will work,” and you press forward.

Eventually, you have cleaned the entire teapot, washed it, dried it, and shined it. It looks like a brand new teapot. However, in that moment of admiring your “brand new teapot,” it occurs to you that you are admiring the original, beautiful teapot you brought home from the store six months ago. And you realize that although the teapot had been covered in tarnish, the tarnish did not damage the teapot at all.

The original shining silver teapot was under there all along, unblemished by the tarnish. When somebody comes over to your house, they say, “That is a beautiful new teapot you got to replace the old tarnished one.” And you smile and say “thank you” because deep down you know they are staring at the original teapot, and it shines.

Original you, your soul, your essence, your spot of grace (whatever you call the “something” inside you that powers the rest of you and makes you uniquely you)…he or she is in there. Right now, you are just covered up with a tarnish called Parkinson’s. The Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery® is your tarnish remover.

The Recipe helps bring your life back into balance by healing your soul, mind, and body. It helps you remove the toxins in your body so your organs are clean and functioning well. It helps you clean the toxins in your mind by calming your mind so your stress, anxiety, anger, frustration, worries and fears leave you and do not return. And, finally, it helps you to not be afraid to be the real you by opening your heart to yourself and the world fearlessly…and then your dopamine flows…and then your soul shines again.

Be the real you…new you/original you. To others who have known the old you, you will appear to be a completely new person. However, you will know that what they are seeing is the original you, the real you, and you will shine.

You are worth it!!!

All my best,
Howard

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In my previous post, Fighting Parkinson’s, and hope, faith, plus action, I discussed why hope and faith without action are meaningless in Parkinson’s recovery. In that post, I discussed action of the body. Today I am discussing action of the mind.

The best way I can demonstrate for you what it is like to experience pain and then to take action in a positive way in your mind is to share with you exactly what was happening in my mind when I had Parkinson’s and was experiencing pain.

Here is Fighting Parkinson’s, It fights me back, posted May 2, 2010, eight years ago today when I had Parkinson’s and had been doing the Recipe for seven and a half months:

“I got out of bed yesterday morning and had to sit down on the floor for a while because my hips and lower back hurt. The pain was greater than the usual achiness I experience when first getting out of bed. I went to the living room and sat in a chair so I could close my eyes and focus on the pain.

Odd as this might sound, I find pain to be good for me. The first reason is that in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), pain often is related to releasing of toxins…that is what I meant in my title…I am fighting Parkinson’s and it is fighting me back. The second reason I find pain to be good for me is that most of the time I feel nothing. At my skin’s surface level, I do not feel if I scratch or cut myself, mosquito bites do not itch, and I cannot differentiate hot and cold until the sensation penetrates below the surface level. Pain lets me know my nerve endings are working, so I welcome pain even though it is a double-edged sword.

As I focused on the pain and noticed three other places where I felt pain: 1. The right edge of the nail of my big toe on my right foot; 2. The outer part of the knee area of my right leg; and 3. The base of my left thumb toward the webbing between the thumb and forefinger. Sally and I looked in the Integrative Acupressure book and the pain related to exact acupressure points on the liver, gall bladder and large intestine meridians.

Those are the three organs on which I have been focused with my dietary considerations and Qi Gong exercises. So, I am going to view the pain as a result of progress in those areas and continue doing what I am doing. I woke up with the same hips and lower back pain this morning, but not the other three. Fighting Parkinson’s comes in small steps, sometimes one step forward and half-a-step backwards.

All my best,

Howard”

Please consider these words very carefully:

“I am going to view the pain as a result of progress in those areas and continue doing what I am doing.” That is action of the mind in full force in this recovery. I had hope and faith, and I took action to control my mind and say that I was going to “view the pain as a result of progress…and continue doing what I am doing.”

Hope and faith without action are meaningless in Parkinson’s recovery. I knew that doing the physical part of the Recipe was going to result in pain and discomfort. Even though I had hope and faith in my recovery, they would have been meaningless without the positive action of my mind to choose to view the pain as a result of progress and to continue doing the Recipe. That is exactly why it worked.

My Parkinson’s body was a rigid, out-of-balance, twisted mess. My expectation was that for it to become a flexible, in-balance, straightened healthy body, there would be some pain and discomfort involved in the recovery. To me, this made sense. So, when pain arrived, I said, “Good, I must be making progress.”

Is that hope? Yes.
Is that faith? Yes.
Is that taking action to control my mind? Yes.
Did that result in a full recovery from Parkinson’s? Absolutely yes!

Okay! Now grab onto the Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery® and take positive action to control your mind in your recovery.

You are worth it!!!

All my best,

Howard

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I will be the first one to acknowledge that fighting Parkinson’s requires a lot of hope and a lot of faith. However, I also will be the first one to tell you that no matter how much hope and faith you have in your recovery, hope and faith without action are meaningless in Parkinson’s recovery.

Think about this:
1. If you hope to pass a test in a subject where you have no previous knowledge and you have faith in yourself, but you never study and learn the material, what is your chance of success?
2. If you stand at the Par 3 tee and hope for a hole-in-one and have faith in your ability to make a hole-in-one, but you do not swing the club, what is your chance of success?
3. If you hope for a bullseye and have faith in your ability to make a bullseye, but you do not take the arrow out of the quiver, place it in the bow, pull it back, aim and let go, what is your chance of success?

You need action to bring your hope and faith to fruition.

Think about this:
1. If you hope to pass a test in a subject where you have no previous knowledge and you have faith in yourself, and you study for 5 minutes, what is your chance of success?
2. If you stand at the Par 3 tee and hope for a hole-in-one and have faith in your ability to make a hole-in-one, and it is the first time you have hit a golf ball, and you hit only 1 ball, what is your chance of success?
3. If you hope for a bullseye and have faith in your ability to make a bullseye, and you take the arrow out of the quiver, place it in the bow, pull it back, aim and let go 1 time, what is your chance of success?

You need action to bring your hope and faith to fruition.

Think about this:
1. If you hope to pass a test in a subject where you have no previous knowledge and you have faith in yourself, and you study every day for one hour for a few months leading up to the test, what is your chance of success?
2. If you stand at the Par 3 tee and hope for a hole-in-one and have faith in your ability to make a hole-in-one, and you have taken golf lessons and hit an hour’s worth of balls from that tee to that hole every day for a few months, what is your chance of success?
3. If you hope for a bullseye and have faith in your ability to make a bullseye, and you take the arrow out of the quiver, place it in the bow, pull it back, aim and let go after practicing an hour a day for a few months, what is your chance of success?

You need action to bring your hope and faith to fruition…continuing, repetitive action. Action is success, in and of itself.

As Shunryu Suzuki says in Not Always So, a bullseye is the result of 99 misses. Hope and faith are the things that get you coming back day after day after day and doing the same thing, which increases your hope and faith that you will be successful, which increases the vigor with which you perform your actions.

The saying from Dan Millman that sat next to my computer screen for years said, “We can control efforts, not outcomes.” I agree with this. However, I have found that although I may not be able to “control” the outcome, the more I stay focused on positive efforts and the more I repeat them them with the hope and the faith of a desired outcome, the more likely I am to be successful with the desired outcome.

I knew I would recover from Parkinson’s and every day I controlled my efforts. I had hope and I had faith, and they were the fuel that ignited my undying action and my passion to succeed.

Repeat this phrase, “I have the power to heal myself.” Okay! Now, put it into action with your best efforts. Believe in yourself and your recovery.

Control your efforts. Grab onto the Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery® and take action in your recovery. The success is in the doing.

You are worth it!!!

All my best,

Howard

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In my last post, I discussed the importance of vulnerability in recovery from Parkinson’s. By being vulnerable in all you do, you fearlessly face life as your real self. This issue of vulnerability brings up a lot of fear, and we need to discuss this today because defeating the fear of being vulnerable could serve to open the final blockage to bringing your life back into balance and finishing your recovery.

This issue has come up so many times in coaching calls this week that today I am re-posting a post on vulnerability from three years ago. Here is Fighting Parkinson’s, and vulnerability, vulnerability, and…vulnerability:

In the past, I have shared with you this:

“I announced it [my realization] to Sally at breakfast on June 11, 2010, like this: First I told her I know what I need to do to complete my recovery and what I was about to tell her might sound like the most selfish thing ever to come out of my mouth, but it was not selfish, and then I said, ‘There is no person on this planet worth me continuing to have Parkinson’s Disease just to make them happy.’”

I was speaking about this issue recently and here is what else came out. After I made my announcement to Sally, and she agreed with me that I needed to be happy, I then announced this to her: “And, after the dust settles and I am cured from Parkinson’s, if nobody talks to me, I still will be the happiest guy in the world because I will no longer have Parkinson’s. Plus, I know you will still be talking to me, and I am okay with that.”

Sally seemed puzzled and asked why would people not be talking to me. I explained that nobody knew the real me except her so I knew she would still talk to me. However, maybe nobody would accept the real me, and maybe nobody would like the real me, and thus, maybe nobody would talk to the real me.

As you can see, the fear of being the real me is what had been holding me up. The more I resisted being absolutely vulnerable, being genuinely me, the more physically miserable I had become in the last month leading up to my recovery. And through that physical misery, I let go.

I surrendered.

I realized that I needed to clear my shelf of my annual Academy Award for Best Actor in the part of Howard Shifke, and I threw them all in the trash along with the script I had been acting from for the previous 45 years or so. I realized that the script from which I had been acting the Howard Shifke part all those years had been written by others (parents, siblings, teachers, coaches, relatives, friends, etc.); the script had not been written by me, and it had very little to do with who I really was, the real me. And I decided that my script of life going forward would have to be whatever rolled out in front of me, trusting and accepting that if it was rolling out in front of me then it was necessary in my life…accept it and deal with it in the moment, moment after moment. That’s it.

And that night, I let go of the remaining fear of being me. As I have shared with you in the past:

“That night, when Sally came to do the Governing Vessel Acupressure as she had every night for nine months, I told her things were okay and it would not be necessary. If you scroll down to the bottom of the Recipe, you will find the following, which was done at the end of my usual meditations and prayers before going to sleep on June 11, 2010:
“Near the end, I added the following one night before going to bed: “Dear God, I surrender my ego to you. I surrender my attachment to my Parkinson’s Disease to you. I am not afraid anymore. I no longer fear Parkinson’s. I no longer fear the scorn I may face by being cured from a disease the experts say there is no cure. I no longer fear the people who may say I was misdiagnosed or that I faked having the disease. I am surrendering my ego to you, that part of me that felt I needed to remain attached to Parkinson’s because the experts say once you have Parkinson’s you always have Parkinson’s. I am forgetting about my old self (Parkinson’s) and stepping into my new self (No Parkinson’s).” I awoke the following morning with my remaining symptoms gone.” That was nearly 5 years ago [now 8 years], and I remain cured of Parkinson’s.

You see, I had found me again. That silly, funny, joyful little 5 year-old boy who had never left me, but who clung so tightly to fear of being his real self. Yes, that little boy whose teacher wrote in his report card in 1966, “Howard also has a sense of humor, which is not common in a kindergarten class.”

In the vulnerability of my recovery, I had found him, me, my essence of who I had been since the beginning, but who I had become too afraid to show to anybody except Sally. I am grateful that she has put up with my silliness for almost three decades.

So, my friends, I share my vulnerability with you. By being vulnerable and casting my fear of being me to the side, I am cured from Parkinson’s, and I have been living a very joyful life. And as a result of that, I have all of you in my life. I am blessed, truly blessed.

I ask you to cast aside your fear of being the real you. Yes, many people will not recognize you. That’s okay. In fact, at first, you may not even recognize yourself. That’s okay, too! However, you have a worldwide community of people right here who already love you and accept you and appreciate you, and we all want you to be the real you and be liberated…each and every one of you. Click here for a refresher on being your real self.

Vulnerability, vulnerability, and…vulnerability. You can do this.

You are worth it!!!

All my best,

Howard

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This is Parkinson’s Awareness Month. In my previous post, Fighting Parkinson’s, and Parkinson’s Awareness Month, I asked you to share our message of hope. Thank you very much! The number of shares on Facebook and other social media, plus the sharing of our message through emails and word of mouth have amounted to record numbers of people coming to this website every day since the post. I am grateful to all of you for being the beacons of hope for yourselves and others. In your recoveries, you are winning, winning…and winning!

As you know, I periodically ask all of you to let go of your over-thinking, self-judging, self-criticizing, adrenaline-driven minds in favor of your heart-feeling, compassion-feeling, joyful-feeling, dopamine-producing hearts. When I read the comments you have been writing on the blog and the emails I receive, I know one thing for certain: you absolutely are winning, winning…and winning!!!

As you continue to move forward, please do not be afraid of being vulnerable. As Socrates tells Dan in The Peaceful Warrior, “A warrior is not about perfection or victory or invulnerability. He’s about absolute vulnerability.” Part of winning your fight against Parkinson’s is being a warrior who is vulnerable, admitting that you are not perfect, and knowing that your best is good enough.

Vulnerable: Open to censure or criticism.

Let’s take a look at the journey to recovery from Parkinson’s. It begins by announcing, “I have the power to heal myself. I am going to cure myself from a disease the experts say is incurable.” This alone opens you up to censure and criticism from non-believers.

In the middle of the journey, you feel better on the inside, but you are not looking so great on the outside. In the middle, you announce, “I have the power to heal myself. I am going to cure myself from a disease the experts say is incurable. I have faith in my recovery and I understand that there are times when I am going to feel worse and look worse before I get better.” This alone opens you up to censure and criticism from non-believers.

In the end, you announce, “I am cured.” This alone opens you up to censure and criticism from non-believers.

This is why your faith in your recovery has to be more powerful than other people’s opinions about what you should be doing about your Parkinson’s. This is why you have to stop caring what the other people think about you and what you are doing.

It was my final issue from which I needed to let go, from which I needed to surrender, from which I needed to extricate from the very being I thought was Howard Shifke — and just when I let go, totally and completely, surrendering caring what anybody was going to think about me or my having cured myself, I had a shift…and my dopamine flowed, and as it cascaded down my body and through my body, I was transformed from imbalance to balance, from illness to health, from thinking to feeling, from Parkinson’s to cured from Parkinson’s.

For those who haven’t read the final section of the Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery® because you still are thinking the Qigong exercises are all there is to the Recipe, I ask you to open your minds and your hearts and not be afraid to be vulnerable. Excerpted from the end of the Recipe, here is what it looked like at the end for me:

“‘Dear God, I surrender my ego to you. I surrender my attachment to my Parkinson’s Disease to you. I am not afraid anymore. I no longer fear Parkinson’s. I no longer fear the scorn I may face by being cured from a disease the experts say there is no cure. I no longer fear the people who may say I was misdiagnosed or that I faked having the disease. I am surrendering my ego to you, that part of me that felt I needed to remain attached to Parkinson’s because the experts say once you have Parkinson’s you always have Parkinson’s. I am forgetting about my old self (Parkinson’s) and stepping into my new self (No Parkinson’s).’ I awoke the following morning with my remaining symptoms gone.”

That was nearly eight years ago. You can do it, too!

Fear blocks being vulnerable. You become afraid of the censure and criticism. Faith says it is okay to be vulnerable. Not only is it okay to be vulnerable, it is necessary in this recovery. In the end, complete vulnerability means completely surrendering the person who you think you are and not being afraid what the other people will think when you again become the essence of who you are, on the inside…the new you…the you who has been in there all along but who is covered up by a mountain of toxicity…chip away, day by day…be vulnerable, and do not be afraid.

Here is a quote Sally has shared with me:

“First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, and then you win.” Mahatma Gandhi

“First they ignore you” when you say you are going to cure yourself from Parkinson’s.
“Then they ridicule you” when they realize you are ignoring traditional conventions of what to do about Parkinson’s.
“Then they fight you” when they realize how strong your faith is and that you are actually curing yourself from Parkinson’s.
“And then you win,” you cure yourself, in part because you finally realize that those who ignore you, then ridicule you, then fight you about curing yourself from Parkinson’s are nothing more than suffering beings themselves…so instead of being in your mind and caring what they think and then changing what you are doing, you find compassion in your heart for their suffering…and then your dopamine flows.

This, my friends, is why you are winning, winning…and winning!!!

You can do this!

You are worth it!!!

All my best,

Howard

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April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month. As a group, we are carrying a message of hope and recovery like nobody else. Let’s work together and make this a Parkinson’s Awareness Month everybody will remember.

I have seen some of the literature from the major Parkinson’s organizations in the States and it is the old gloom and doom story…make people aware that Parkinson’s is a horrific degenerative disease and then ask the people to make a donation for research to try to find a cure.

I have a different message, a message of hope. Parkinson’s is curable, the Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery® is a cure, six of us have been cured doing the Recipe, hundreds of you are reversing your Parkinson’s doing the Recipe, and we have a worldwide community of courageous warriors who are cheering each other on, through thick and thin, all the way to each of their cure.

That is the awareness I am asking you to share. To assist you in sharing the message, I offer you the following.

Recently, I have participated in radio interviews about my story of recovery and my book. Below are three radio interviews, two around twelve minutes and one that is approximately an hour. You may share these interviews to assist you in explaining the message of recovery.

DeAnna Lee Interview With Howard Shifke, Seattle Wolf Entercom Radio
https://www.fightingparkinsonsdrugfree.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Conversations.mp3

Mike Schikman Interview With Howard Shifke, Mike Schikman Show Harrisonburg Radio
https://www.fightingparkinsonsdrugfree.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Mike-Shickman.mp3

Patrick Timpone Interview with Howard Shifke, One Radio Network
https://www.fightingparkinsonsdrugfree.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/One-Radio-Network.mp3

Other things you can do are:
You can tell people about the recovery process yourself, including sharing this post on social media.
You can tell people about my website and they can read it all for themselves.
You can tell people about my book, Fighting Parkinson’s…and Winning, and let them know that they can buy a copy on Amazon. Click here for the book page.

The important part of all of this is AWARENESS OF HOPE! We need to be loud and bold, and scream it from the mountaintops:

“Parkinson’s is curable. We are here, and we are curing ourselves. There is hope for everybody with Parkinson’s.

And…

You are worth it!!!”

All my best,

Howard

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The issue of self love has been coming up a lot over the last week. If you do not love yourself, then you do not think that your best is good enough. If you do not think that your best is good enough, then you do not feel worthy and deserving of your full recovery because whatever you did was not “good enough” to justify your full recovery. Love yourself and just let go.

I feel that each of us is part of the greater whole. Our mind creates an illusion that we are separate, and that we are not good enough or perfect enough, and we feel unworthy and undeserving. It fills us with fear and makes unreasonable demands of how we are supposed to act in life. That is the mind that needs to be surrendered in the end.

If you drop one drop of poison into the Atlantic Ocean, I do not believe the Atlantic Ocean even notices. It is so vast that the one drop of poison instantly becomes part of the whole.

The Universe is exponentially more vast than the Atlantic Ocean. And, your internal Parkinson’s “poison” is so small compared to the vastness of God and the Universe. In the final surrender, it is letting go of the poison within you and sharing in God’s Universal Energy, His healing energy…opening up and literally becoming one with everything.

It is a sense of belonging, a sense that nothing is wrong with you, a sense that all will be well. And when you let go, the Parkinson’s ceases to exist. You go from illness to health, just like that.

When you love yourself, you accept that your best is good enough. When you accept that your best is good enough, then you accept that what you have done in your recovery is enough, thus making you worthy and deserving of your full recovery.

Love melts all remaining blockages. Let go and surrender your over-thinking mind and set yourself free.

You are worth it!!!

All my best,

Howard

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With Parkinson’s, you can become consumed with the disease, you can forget to live life fully each day, and you can forget what it feels like to “have a life.” Today, we will discuss living life fully each day.

In Shunryu Suzuki’s, Not Always So, there is a chapter entitled Sun-Faced Buddha, Moon-Faced Buddha. In short, the Sun-Faced Buddha was said to live one thousand eight hundred years while the Moon-Faced Buddha was said to live one day and one night. The thing is, we do not know which one we are, or where it is in-between that we fall.

Parkinson’s has a harsh way of removing you from the formula altogether…you stop “living.” At that point, Parkinson’s is in control. You need to start living again to get control of your life back from Parkinson’s.

So, how do you look beyond your Parkinson’s and start living again…in spite of your Parkinson’s? Think about this:

What if every time you take a walk, you say to your Parkinson’s, “I did this before you, you cannot stop me from living my life fully each day.”
What if every time you go to the movies, you say to your Parkinson’s, “I did this before you, you cannot stop me from living my life fully each day.”
What if every time you go out to dinner, you say to your Parkinson’s, “I did this before you, you cannot stop me from living my life fully each day.”
What if every time you go to a ball game, you say to your Parkinson’s, “I did this before you, you cannot stop me from living my life fully each day.”
What if every time you go shopping, you say to your Parkinson’s, “I did this before you, you cannot stop me from living my life fully each day.”
What if every time you visit with friends, you say to your Parkinson’s, “I did this before you, you cannot stop me from living my life fully each day.”
What if every time you (fill in your own experiences), you say to your Parkinson’s, “I did this before you, you cannot stop me from living my life fully each day.”

What if your Parkinson’s sees you starting to get your life back and starting to live your life fully each day again. Maybe it will become discouraged. Maybe it will start to loosen its stronghold on you. Maybe it will start to lose its entire grip on you. Maybe it will let go of you altogether. Isn’t that what we call full recovery?

Live your life fully each day!

You are worth it!!!

All my best,

Howard

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The current medical profession view and the view of most people not reading this blog is that Parkinson’s is a progressively degenerative neurological disease where they do not know the cause and for which there is no cure. The current medical profession view and the view of most people not reading this blog is that “how good you are doing” is determined 100% by how your physical symptoms look. If you are viewing Parkinson’s through these same lenses, it is time to re-focus your view.

The Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery® view is that we do know the causes, the Recipe is a cure, and that even though you may look worse while doing the Recipe, you are getting better.

I have written before that this is a race won by the tortoise, not the hare. Here’s another look to help you re-focus your view.

The hare follows the current medical view. He runs the race like he is on performance enhancing drugs…he runs here, there, on the path, off the path, takes a nap, doesn’t see the flowers, doesn’t smell the coffee. However, even though he moves fast and looks good, he NEVER finishes the race and he NEVER reaches recovery.

The tortoise moves slowly by following the Recipe, thus conserving energy that can be utilized for healing. The tortoise moves slowly, and by moving slowly, he notices more things, good and bad, so he has to decide: “Do I stare at my tremors or do I stare at the pretty flowers.”

The tortoise moves slowly, so he has the choice to be frustrated by his slowness or to accept what the Universe is offering.

The tortoise moves slowly, so he has time in each thing he does to be with his Higher Power to give him the faith and hope and perseverance to take the next laborious step…and his does it with GRATITUDE…because he is grateful for life, even life in a tortoise shell.

With correctly focused lenses, the tortoise decides, “I have the power to heal myself. I will win the race. My faith is stronger than other people’s opinions of what I should be doing about my Parkinson’s. I am recovery! I am worth it!!!”

It is time to re-focus your view of Parkinson’s and see it through the eyes of the tortoise…slow and steady, compassionate and grateful, knowing that if you stay on the path toward full recovery with faith and perseverance, full recovery is at your Parkinson’s finish line.

Along the way, you re-focus your understanding that the journey you are on is life, and Parkinson’s is just a hurdle to get beyond…and your heart opens to the liberation of this understanding, and your dopamine flows…you are recovery.

You are worth it!!!

All my best,

Howard

 

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