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Commercial cooperation with Camping Hossan Lumo

Have you ever dreamed of spending your holiday in a peaceful place surrounded by the pristine nature, where you still have everything you need for an active winter holiday? In a place, where cosy lakeside cabins invite you to warm up in a traditional Finnish sauna after a long refreshing day outdoors? A place, where you can fulfill your heart by breathing in the silence and just enjoy the beauty of storybooklike forests? Well, I know just a perfect holiday destination for your next winter getaway and it’s called Camping Hossan Lumo.

Camping Hossan Lumo is situated right beside Hossa National Park

As you might already know from my previous post about Hossa National Park, Hossa is located in northeastern Finland, near the Russian border, in one of the most thinly populated areas in whole Europe. So no wonder why relaxing quietness is one of the major things that draw people to pay a visit into these fairytale forests. Hossa is home to countless of ridges shaped by the melting ice from the Ice Age, now growing wild green forests of pine trees that almost appear to reach to touch up the sky. Below the ridges are crystal clear ponds, lakes, and colorful swamps creating a mosaic-like scenery.

In the middle of this pure nature landscape is Camping Hossan Lumo, laying by the shore of beautiful lake Hossanjärvi. Besides campsite services, Hossan Lumo offers homely cabins for rent year-round. Their cottages vary from 2-6 people and five of the cabins are equipped with their own private sauna, where you can relax and wash off after a rewarding snowshoeing trip. New wooden lakeside sauna, which uses ecological sun power to heat up its water, is also available for visitors to book.

Camping Hossan Lumo’s facilities include a mini market and a café with free WiFi (market and cafe are running during the summer months), equipment rental, amenities building with showers and sauna, WC’s, washing machine and communal kitchen.

Green values and respect for the nature

One of the main things why I personally love to visit Hossan Lumo so much year after year, is that the adorable entrepreneur couple, Maija and Lenny, take the nature into consideration in everything they do and encourage all their visitors to do the same thing! They are developing their business and facilities to more ecological and greener direction all the time. I already mentioned sun power used in the freshly finished sauna building, but also their newest cabin uses only geothermal energy. They also aim to have more sun power usage in their other cottages in the near future. Careful recycling and ecological cleaning detergents are used on a daily bases and they also offer local & ecological products in their summer time mini market.

Countless of possibilities straight from your door steps

It’s so cool that you can enjoy Hossa’s endless natural wonders straight from your Hossan Lumo’s cottage doorsteps. During the winter months, frozen lake Hossanjärvi invites you to pack your bag with hot beverages, and hop on to your snow shoes or cross-country skis to explore the surrounding mesmerizingly beautiful winter landscape. 40 kilometers of cross-country skiing tracks starting just around the corner provide you a great opportunity to get to know the National Park’s snowy views. And if you are lucky – you might see Santa’s Little Helpers, reindeers, herding in the rugged forests.

Or how about trying out something new and rent a fat bike or pair of HOK-ski’s from Hossan Lumo? Besides snow shoes, HOK-ski’s are excellent for moving in deeper snow too. With these equipments you can navigate yourself towards the golden sunset, which you can easily witness over the lake Hossanjärvi. In addition to the setting sun, you can admire millions of stars twinkling on clear nights. And even get a once in a lifetime experience by witnessing the famous Green Lady, Northern lights, dancing on the dark night sky.

National Park of your dreams

If you are keen on natural beauty and enjoy the silence as much as I do, Hossa may just be the National Park of your dreams too. There you don’t have to stand in a queue or weave yourself through selfie-taking crowds. And yet there are so many one-of-a-kind features worth to see! Like at least 4000 years old Värikallio Rock Paintings and Finland’s biggest canyon lake Julma Ölkky, to mention a few. Camping Hossan Lumo is a great base for your epic exploration trip all year-round. So next time when you are looking for a new unforgettable place to pay a visit – you should consider traveling to this nature paradise. I’m sure you won’t regret it.

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How to get there? Flights from Helsinki to Kuusamo (88 km away), Kajaani (207 km away) or Oulu (247 km away) will take you quite near. From the airport the easiest way to reach Hossan Lumo and the National Park area is by a rental car.

The post Stepping into winter wonderland at Camping Hossan Lumo appeared first on fallintofinland.com.

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Almost one thousand peat headed figures stand in complete silence at the edge of the forest. Stormy wind is blowing far from the Arctic Ocean, fluttering the golden hay hair of these soulless characters. The wooden bodies are covered with different kinds of winter gear, and the arms of the coats are wobbling rhythmically with the gust. When the summer comes, this mute crowd will transform their clothing to something lighter. Then this motionless army will continue their stagnant life under a pair of shorts and airy dresses – until the autumn will change their clothing again.

The Silent People were first built to Suomussalmi in 1988 by the artist Reijo Kela. I can remember those strange and slightly frightening figures from my early childhood. Next time these peat heads saw the daylight in 1994, when they debuted at the Senate Square, Helsinki. 700 silent people’s representatives were erected on the steps of the Cathedral of Helsinki during the night’s dark hours, so you can imagine what kind of attention and publicity they received when the sun rose. After two days in Helsinki, the hay heads were removed from the church stairs secretly and brought back to their home in Suomussalmi, where they have stood expressionless for more than 20 years now.

I have often wondered what on earth do the Silent People represent. Staid Kainuu people? Forgotten souls? Their creator, Reijo Kela, will not give the answer. Each viewer will have to make their own conclusions. One thing you might be interested in knowing is that if the Silent People’s peat-heads and clothing were completely taken away, one thousand wooden crosses would remain standing on a lonely field.

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The field with its mute inhabitants is impossible to miss, even though it appears to the passer-by out of nowhere, 30 kilometers north from Suomussalmi. Silent People is a must-see place to have a pit stop if you are on your way to the magical Hossa National Park.

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The post Silent People – speechless yet not voiceless appeared first on fallintofinland.com.

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This year has been amazing and full of adventures in our beautiful home country. We’ve been exploring Lapland, Lakeland, Kanta-Häme, Kainuu, Helsinki area and experienced so many memorable moments in the Finnish nature.

We wanted to collect a few of our favourite memories from this past year 2017, when our beloved Finland turned 100 years.

A magical winter hike in Riisitunturi National Park

“Living in the bustling city of Helsinki, we too miss total silence from time to time. I had almost forgotten how utterly wonderful it feels like to close your eyes and hear – nothing. In the evening, when the last day trekkers left the wilderness hut where we would be spending the night at, we were surrounded with such peace. No cars or trams rattling by, no busy people, no screaming kids and no obligations.

Heaven.”

Repovesi National Park and last colors of the fall

“Is exploring the wilderness, or even spending a night out there, something you might want to try on your travels to Finland? Answer to your longing might be Repovesi National Park, which offers something for everyone. It doesn’t matter if you’re a wilderness newbie or a true forest ranger, you will undoubtedly find outstanding views and unique experiences by roaming these bare cliffs, forests and waters of Repovesi.”

Nightless Night I will never forget

“So, did I end up using my long johns or mosquito repellent during the workshop? Nope. The weather was rather amazing and we all enjoyed the warm summer breeze during those days in Saariselkä. Did I get to conquer a fell? Oh I sure did! And as you can see from these images, the scene was truly out of this world. Fell Kiilopää near Saariselkä treated us so well. It offered us the most perfect Nightless Night moments one can imagine! To just sit on top of the world in total stillness, listening to the traditional Sámi women singing and watching how the sun colors the endless wilderness in all shades of yellow, was something I will never forget.”

An unforgettable canoeing trip to Julma Ölkky

“The silence is almost complete, if you don’t take in count the casual squeals of the Siberian Jay’s, or the splashing paddles. We don’t feel the need to talk – we just want to absorb everything out of this perfect moment. Our goal is to reach the suspension bridge on half way of lake Julma Ölkky, and carry on as long as we feel like. I notice the fish jumping and can’t help but wonder what lies in the depths of this 50 meter deep lake.”

So here they were, our favourite moments from this past year. Maybe they included some of your favourite posts too? We hope this list of posts might help you find something, you hadn’t read before from this blog. Or if not, then all we can say is a huge thank you for being such an active follower!

Having experienced these moments here in Finland, our homeland, during this year full of celebration, we cannot be anything else but thankful. We have travelled more in Finland than ever before, which was the goal for this year. But it doesn’t have to stop here! There are still loads and loads of places to explore and forests to roam. For example, next summer we hope to travel more in our beautiful archipelago.

Welcome 2018 – let’s see where it will take us!

The post Our favourite moments from the past year appeared first on fallintofinland.com.

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Today marks the 100th day of our independence here in Finland. We have been amazed to see, how many countries around the world have remembered our special day, and sent their congrats to us. Many magazines (like The Telegraph) have also written humbling listings why Finland is the most amazing country in the world. This kind of attention makes us blush – and proud. When we were thinking about what things make us proud to be Finns a couple of weeks ago, we came up with these.

We are proud to be Finns because…

…Finland was the first country in the world to give women the right to vote.

…our nature is one of the purest and greenest in the world…

…and our cities have the cleanest air too.

…our education system is great, and its free even at the university level…

…which is probably why 99 % of the adult citizens can read.

…we can trust our parliament and police are non-corrupted.

…we have a social welfare system that takes care of people when things don’t go as planned.

…our country can still be described as one of the safest places on Earth.

…Finland is one of the best countries in the world to be a mother.

…there are more saunas than cars in Finland.

…we have the so called every man’s rights which give us the freedom to roam the land and enjoy the treats the mother nature provides us.

…the one and only Santa Claus comes from Finland. And so do the Moomins!

…we speak one of the weirdest and most difficult languages in the world. Like for example our longest word is “epäjärjestelmällistyttämättömyydelläänsäkäänköhän”. Try saying that out loud!

…we have the best and most amusing events ever. Like the world championships in wife carrying, air-guitar playing, mobile phone throwing, rubber boot throwing and swamp soccer.

We are proud to Finns because during the war years so many brave Finnish heroes – men and women – gave their lives in defending our independency. We owe so much to them.

Today is the day when every Finn raises their glasses and wishes a happy 100th independence day to our dear home country!

Hölökyn kölökyn!

The post We are proud to be Finns because… appeared first on fallintofinland.com.

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Something totally amazing and unpredictable happened on Friday night. As some of you might remember, the Blog Awards Finland announced their shortlist of this year’s nominees in August, and this little blog of ours was shortlisted in the Travel category. This alone felt unbelievable, and we were so honoured to receive this kind of recognition.  After all – this blog has been born out of pure love towards our native land and its wonders, people and design.

Friday was The Day. We were shaking of excitement already at the hairdresser’s. We dressed up into our lovely matching outfits from one of our favourite Finnish brands Uhana Design, and headed to the venue with our dear friends on our side.

The gala was held at A-Lehdet in Kulosaari, Helsinki, and all the topical Finnish content creators were there. The venue and all the people looked beautiful, food tasted great and bartenders were mixing amazing drinks. These kinds of balls aren’t really our comfort zone places, as we are more outdoorsy type of ladies rather than dashing bling bling girls, but something felt different this night. There were such positive vibes in the air.

We were competing against two hard core content creators (go check out Timo Wilderness and Fangirl Quest if you haven’t already!). When the time to announce the winners finally came and the travel category was announced to be the first one, we swear our hearts were beating so fast we were afraid they would just jump out.

And the winner of the Blog Awards Finland 2017 travel category is… FALL INTO FINLAND!

Screaming, crying and bouncing out of joy we went to the stage and couldn’t think of anything to say that would actually make sense. What the heck had just happened?

We still can’t really believe it’s true. It is an honour to receive acknowledgement like this. We know we are not the biggest, but we also do know this: we are in this with full hearts, doing our own thing, and want to continue with this same kind of passion. We want to keep on telling you about Finland: share stories about it’s nature and people, phenomena and traditions.

We couldn’t be happier that our blog about Finland has been welcomed with such warmth – after all, Fall into Finland has been around only less than a year. This is also a good moment to thank you, our dear readers, for all you nice comments, social media shares and amazing stories you have shared with us. It has been truly wonderful to read how this blog has made our Finnish readers look at their homeland with more pride in their eyes. But it has also been such a privilege to read, how our non-Finnish readers have felt a growing interest towards Finland, or how some of you have even found a way to connect better with your Finnish heritage and roots via our blog. Thank you all!

We have a lot of ideas on what to write about in the future, but if you guys have some hopes and dreams you would like to share with us regarding this blog and its upcoming content, please do let us know in the comments below or by email.

Thanks for the picture of us from the gala, amazingly talented Kirsi Tasala Photography.

The post May we present: the travel blog of the year! appeared first on fallintofinland.com.

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It’s an early Monday morning. I wake up to the familiar sound of my phone’s alarm clock. On a normal morning the sound would be kind of annoying, but not today. Today that beeping noise calls me out for an adventure. I ensure that I still have time to dress up without hurrying and eat a quick breakfast before leaving. Ten minutes later it’s 6 am and I’m sitting in a car with my sister and her boyfriend. It’s still dark outside, but slowly the day starts to conquer the night as we are driving towards our destination Julma Ölkky.

The journey isn’t long, because we have spent the night in the cozy traditional cottage of Hossan Lumo in the heart of the Hossa National Park. After a 15 minute drive we park our little car to the parking space near Julma Ölkky lake. It is so still, that you can almost hear a pine wood’s needle drop. There’s nobody else around and it’s almost an hour before the sunrise.

According to yesterday evening’s weather forecast, I was sure this morning would be foggy. And I was happy to notice I was right. The lake was as calm as our minds. We pushed our canoe to the water and started slowly floating along the largest canyon lake of Finland.

The silence is almost complete, if you don’t take in count the casual squeals of the Siberian Jay’s, or the splashing paddles. We don’t feel the need to talk – we just want to absorb everything out of this perfect moment. Our goal is to reach the suspension bridge on half way of lake Julma Ölkky, and carry on as long as we feel like. I notice the fish jumping and can’t help but wonder what lies in the depths of this 50 meter deep lake.

Eventually we are approaching the canyon’s narrowest point where the bridge is hanging. Sempiternal rocks rise from the foggy waters as high as 50 meters. The dense mist creates such mystical environment and you almost can’t see the treetops near you.

I don’t know if it is the drizzling rain or undescribable love towards these wilderness views, but I could feel a tear rising to the corner of my eye. My heart was filled with joy and thankfulness, because I was able to share this unforgettable experience with my little sister.

The colors of the fall have started to fade now, and we just had our first snow fall here in Southern Finland. The canoeing trip to Julma Ölkky was a perfect way to end this season and turn our minds towards the upcoming wonders of winter time.

PS. Did you notice my other post I wrote a week ago about Hossa National Park? You can find it here.

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The post An unforgettable canoeing trip to Julma Ölkky appeared first on fallintofinland.com.

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The idea for this blog post actually came from one of our readers, a Finnish-American woman I have gotten to know a little bit through Instagram. She asked me for some tips about Finnish kid’s design brands and before I knew it, I had uploaded a gazillion links to her Instagram message box. Oopsies. I was afraid I had gotten a bit carried away with all those tips and she would just roll her eyes around and never talk to me again, but no! Instead, she told me I should write a blog post about my favourite Finnish kid’s fashion brands.

What a great idea, I thought – and here we are. From this blog post you will find out what are the coolest Finnish children’s fashion brands (coming from a mom who has  truly fallen in love with some of them). So if you don’t have any kids, this post might not be your cup of tea (although it does include pretty nice fall themed pictures!) I will also make this a mini series of blog posts, as I have already decided to give you tips on some of my favourite Finnish brands I myself like to wear. But let’s get cracking!

One great thing about these Finnish kid’s brands is the fact that most of them are ecologically and ethically made. For me, it’s really important to know that my kid is not wearing a piece of clothing another child around the world had to sew. I also do not appreciate the idea that the clothes were made in factories that don’t meet the standards they should and the employees are not getting paid well enough for their work. I also like to buy and sell a lot of my boy’s clothes as second hand. That’s why a big plus side with these brands is that they are really durable, which makes the life-cycle of the product more sustainable.

PAPU DESIGN

Papu has been a favourite of ours almost since day one of my little man’s life. Papu makes playful, yet simple clothing with a unisex print design. The clothes are designed in Finland and made in the EU. In the making of these clothes, they use GOTS certified organic cotton which comes from Turkey. As they tell on their site, Papu’s design philosophy builds on collaboration, transparency, sustainability and positive vibes – so what’s there not to love!

The quality of Papu clothing is great. I have bought them as second hand in great condition, but also as new. After washing my boy’s Papu clothes in the machine for tens of times, there are still no signs of tips in the fabric. What’s also great with these clothes is that you can use them for a really long time on your child, thanks to the clever design. For example, the bodysuits for babies have double buttoning, shirt sleeves come with rollable cuffs and you can turn up the pant legs. Read more about Papu and the people behind the brand here.

In these pics my boy is wearing a tube scarf and patch leggings in perfect autumn colors from Papu.

MAINIO CLOTHING

Mainio has also been a cornerstone of my boy’s closet for more than a year now. They have simple black and white pieces that go with everything, but also goofy and adventurous prints that really have a personality and a quirky street cred side to them.

Mainio products are designed in Finland and manufactured partially in the EU in Lithuania, and partially in an Indian factory that has a SA8000 certification, a social accountability standard, and working conditions which the company has known for 15 years. The fabrics are GOTS certified organic cotton, and they can also take so many washes that you can happily sell the clothes as second hand even after your kids have grow out of them. I have happily bought them as second hand as well, and even as used they have been almost like new.

Mainio’s pieces have been spotted on Fergie’s son, on Sarah Jessica Parker’s daughter and on Gwen Stefani’s son, so they are definitely doing it right! Read more about Mainio and the philosophy behind the brand here.

In these pictures my boy is wearing the coolest “Mime” bomber sweatjacket (*) from Mainio.

GUGGUU

Gugguu is one of the most popular brands in Finland at the moment. They sell out some of their drops in a heartbeat. We have only recently bought some of our first Gugguu items as their fit is slimmer, and my boy has been a bit more sturdy since he was a newborn, haha. But now we do love our simple Gugguu tricot pants and college baggy pants! I have bought also Gugguu as second hand, and they have stayed in a superb condition too.

Gugguu wants to produce their clothes nearby, so the clothes are made in Finland and in Estonia. The fabrics also come from Finland and Estonia, and 100% organic cotton has GOTS as well as Oeko-Tex 1000 Standards, which makes them safe for the child. Read more about Gugguu here.

VAI-KØ CLOTHING

VAI-KØ Clothing actually started by making beanies only for adults, but now they have made these great merino wool beanies also for kids for over a year now. We have these lovely beanies for the whole family, and I couldn’t be happier about the quality! The merino wool comes from licensed farms in Patagonia, Argentina. It is bluesign and GOTS sertified, thus also mulesign free. All VAI-KØ beanies are manufactured here in Finland, and they have a free shipping all over the world when your order exceeds 100€. Read more about VAI-KØ and their philosophy here.

In these pictures my boy is wearing the kid’s Timberjack beanie in autumn gold colour.

VIMMA

Vimma has been super popular for the past couple of years, thanks to their hit pattern “Letti” (translates to braid) by designer Maija Louekari (who has also worked for Marimekko). Vimma is known for their colourful and distinctive, graphic patterns. Vimma has a big store in Helsinki, at Telakkakatu 6.

Other interesting brands:

TAIVAL CLOTHING (a fairly new brand)

KAIKO CLOTHING (also a fairly new brand)

METSOLA (an older brand that has gone through a small face lift recently)

YO ZEN DESIGN (they make also lovely jewellery!)

Where to buy?

Most of these clothes can be bought online, but when visiting Finland, you can find most of these brands for example at Stockmann in Helsinki. Check out other retailers from the brands own website – some of them, like Mainio and Papu, have retailers across the globe!

(*) Special thanks to Mainio Clothing for the amazing Mime bomber they sent for my boy for these photos!

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The post Finnish design pt. 1 – kid’s fashion appeared first on fallintofinland.com.

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When talking about Hossa National Park, the first vision is it’s endless eskers, rugged paths, clearest ponds and stillness. Yes – stillness and mindfullness are a new global trend, and there is no better place to enjoy these kinds of things than Hossa National Park. Suomussalmi, where Hossa is located, is actually my childhood home town and I know what I’m talking about, cause I’ve been exploring these landscapes countless of times. That’s why I wanted to reveal a few of my favorite must do’s, while you are visiting the 40th National Park of Finland for the next time.

Paddle through Finland’s largest canyon lake Julma-Ölkky

3 kilometers long and 50 meters deep canyon lake with it’s high reaching rocky walls is, in my opinion, something you will have to experience with a boat or a canoe. But don’t you worry if paddling isn’t your cup of tea. You can always enjoy the views by foot and cross the canyon over from it’s narrowest point by a suspension bridge. The best time to visit Julma-Ölkky is in the early morning hours just before the sunrise, or at the summer time during the nightless night. Then you can be almost sure to experience the magical still atmosphere just by yourself.

Breath in the stillness

Imagine yourself sitting by the calm lake witnessing, how the fog is rolling in and covering the whole landscape with its white mantle. Or maybe you could find a perfect spot where to hang your hammock and just lay still listening to the sounds of nature, and hail in the quiet whispers from the surrounding woods. Instructed mindfulness moments and yoga lessons are of course available too, but if you decide to enjoy a healing forest bath by yourself, I think the most important thing is just to be still and breath in peace. This is the place where you don’t have to rush and where time looses its meaning.

Meet the locals

Brown bears, mooses, wolfs and Siberian jays. Hossa is home to many wild animal species. While you are very unlikely to meet a brown bear on the park’s surroundings, you are almost sure to encounter one on an organized bear safari. Santa’s little helpers, reindeers, can be seen all over the National Park and curious Siberian jays will escort hikers through the wilderness.

Taste the wilderness

Blueberry is one of my favorite berries growing on Hossa’s soil. And they are free for you to pick! Can you envision how lucky us Finns are – superfood can be found straight from your nearest forest. Golden cloudberries grow at moist swamps, so be sure to bring waterproof boots with you if you are hoping to find them. Lingonberry is more bitter than other wild berries and it’s usually a side dish to other food, like spinach crepes. In Suomussalmi they actually organize World Championships every fall for lingonberry picking, so you can imagine how much berries are around there. I really don’t want to brag, but my father has been crowned as World Champion of lingonberry picking for eight times now! Talking about the genes – hey?

Explore the clearest ponds you can imagine

Can you imagine that there are over a hundred of lakes and ponds in Hossa National Park? Many of the clearest ones were formed by the Ice Age. You can easily witness fishes swimming in the clear waters while you are just standing on the shore. If you want to spend a night outdoors, I suggest you to find your way to narrow Muikkupuro Stream. Its lean-to is said to be situated on one of the most beautiful camping grounds in whole country.

As you can see, Hossa is the perfect place to spend a week or two. I can guarantee that after your visit your mind will be relaxed and your heart will be full of joy. Hossa’s wilderness will charge your batteries like nothing else before.

If you would like to read more details about Hossa National Park, like how to get there and where to stay at, you can find my article from Go Finland’s blog. 

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If there are two things that are sacred to us Finns, they must be sauna and coffee (not combined, though). Coffee belongs to most of the situations in a Finn’s life. Whether it’s about joy or sorrow, home or work, spending time with family and friends, waiting for the bus, sitting by a campfire or a first date – there has to be coffee. As we all know, communication between us Finns isn’t our strongest part. So whenever we get into a difficult or awkward situation, it’s always handy to have a cup of coffee nearby. Taking a sip from your mug is a great way to fill a silent moment, and gives you a second to think of your next line.

The average amount of coffee consumption per Finn is 2,64 cups a day. That makes altogether 9,6 kg’s of coffee beans per year. But how do we even have the time to drink this much coffee, one might ask?

One thing that definitely helps, is that all people in working life are blessed with legal coffee breaks here in Finland. It’s common that one can have two 10 minute coffee breaks a day, in addition to a half-an-hour lunch break. This means most of us drink coffee about three times during the work day, since most of the lunch restaurants include a free cup of coffee when purchasing a lunch.

In Finland we also have this thing called santsikuppi, which means that in many places when you buy a cup of coffee, you can have a free second fill. One coffee place in Helsinki is particularly famous for their santsikuppi policy. In Cafe Regatta they give you 5 cents back for each santsikuppi you drink. This, if anything, is a good example of Finnish customer service at its best, and servers well us coffee drinking nuts!

In fact, we have a theory that the coffee addiction we nowadays have here in Finland, is due to our history. Coffee drinking hasn’t always been this easy in Finland, since the Second World War almost ended Finnish coffee culture. During those years of war, at first coffee was regulated and at some point it simply wasn’t available at all. But luckily us Finns have always been inventive, especially when it comes to coffee, and so we created a coffee substitute. This substitute was for example made of grain, pine bark, sugar beet, potato peel or beetroot – so basically the ingredients were anything you can imagine. We don’t know about the taste, but can imagine that it wasn’t quite like the original product.

The arrival of the first shipment of coffee after the war years in 1946, was a huge event in the Turku harbor. People gathered to witness when ship Herakles floated to the dock, full of long awaited coffee beans.

So when a baby is born, we drink coffee. When our kids end their school year or graduate, we drink coffee. When one gets a promotion, we drink coffee. When your best friend gets married, we drink coffee. When someone gets divorced, we drink coffee (and mix some strong alcohol like Jaloviina in it). When kids play and set an imaginery coffee table to their friends, moms drink coffee. When supermarkets put coffee on promotion, we queue to stock up our coffee storage so that we can drink coffee.

As you can imagine by now, coffee truly plays a significant part in our daily lives. Many people say they can’t properly start their day if they haven’t had their morning coffee. For those coffee drinkers who also want to enjoy this nectar of life in the evening, there is of course de-caffeinated coffee. This is a good way to ensure you can have both coffee and a good night’s sleep.

So the next time you have a cup of coffee with your Finnish friend, observe how their nostrils vibrate as they smell the fresh coffee, and eyes fill with happiness when they raise the mug to meet their lips. While having a casual conversation over a cup of coffee, you might even want to surprise your friend with some trivia you just learned from this blog post.

Oh, it’s coffee-o’clock! Until next time folks!

PS. Approximately four cups of coffee per person were consumed while creating this blog post.

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Commercial cooperation with Siida

When thinking about Lapland, most of the times word mystical seems to pop up to one’s mind. This is no wonder, since the pristine arctic nature with it’s white summer nights is really unique for one to experience. But at the same time the environment for domestic wild animals and plants is quite extreme, especially because of the long dark winter months. When talking about Lapland you also mustn’t forget the Sami people, who formed Finland’s first nation, traditional culture and lifestyle. Did you know that they are actually Finland’s indigenous people? These two, Sami culture and nature of Northern Lapland, are entwined together and will be the most important main themes you will get to know when visiting Siida in the heart of Finnish Lapland.

Diving into Sami culture and Lappish nature

Did you know that there are thousands of different reindeer related terms in the Sami language? Or that Sami joik is one of the oldest song traditions in Europe? How about the fact that the beautiful packed snow crust over the trees is formed mainly by the moisture in air condensing, or that the most important wildberry for Laplanders is cloudberry? These are only few of the interesting facts you will learn while exploring Siida’s fascinating permanent and changing exhibitions, where seasonal cycle of the arctic nature and survival strategies in the extreme conditions of the north are in focus. There is such a great variety of scientific information to look into, impressive visual experiences like photographs, genuine objects and the open-air museum for the exhibition visitor to see and feel and a rich sound world to hear, that after your visit your heart will be fulfilled with northern magic.

As been said, Sami culture and arctic nature are bound together and they are introduced to the public as a whole at Siida. That’s why it’s only natural that The National Museum of the Finnish Sami and the Nature Centre of Metsähallitus are together responsible of Siida’s inspiring exhibitions. And Siida is a great learning place for kids too! Children’s exhibition By the Forest (open until the Apr 08, 2018) is a trip into Sami children’s culture and Arctic nature. After spending hours in Siida (because it really is such an interesting place, that you just don’t want to miss any part of it!) you might need a moment to digest everything you have seen and learned. Sit down for a bit, grab a coffee or taste Lappish lunch menu at a pleasant restaurant Sarrit on the second floor of Siida. After the break you will most probably be ready to explore some more of Siida’s treasures.

Inari – in the hearth of Lapland

Siida is situated in the village called Inari in the heart of Northern Lapland. The nearest airport is located 50 kilometers away in Ivalo and there are a few travel service busses operating both from Ivalo and Saariselkä to Inari. The most easiest way to reach Siida and its surroundings is by your own or rented car, because when in Lapland you really want to see everything it has to offer. The Customer Service of Metsähallitus at the Nature Centre Siida is an excellent starting-point for an excursion in nature. Questions like where should I go, how will I get there, what kind of permissions do I need or where can I spend the night will find an answer at the Customer Service of Metsähallitus on the first floor of Siida.

Within an hour’s drive from Siida you will find a couple of the most beautiful hiking destinations in the whole country. Take for instance Finland’s two largest national parks: the legendary Lemmenjoki National Park and Urho Kekkonen National Park, where you can visit a fell called Kiilopää and be fascinated by the views across the whole National Park area. On a clear day you might be lucky and get to see from top of the Kiilopää even the remote Korvatunturi fell – the home of Father Christmas. In Kevo Nature Reserve almost 80 meters deep canyon-like valley of the River Kevojoki forms the core of the area, but you will need at least few days to hike to canyon and back. Hammastunturi, Vätsäri, Muotkatunturi, Kaldoaivi and Paistunturi Wilderness Areas charm adventurers to feel the nature’s pristines of the Far North. And last but definitely not least, the beautifully rugged lake Inarijärvi, which clear waters are a real paradise for canoeists and boaters.

Lapland is well-known for it’s nature wonders and it’s amazing landscapes. Experiencing Northern lights dancing in the dark night sky while the frost is biting your cheekbones, or witnessing the ever setting golden midnight sun on top of the Finnish fell is something you’ll have to experience at least once in your life. But when you want to dive beneath the surface and expert your knowledge about Northern Lapland’s most important things, it’s adapting nature and ancient culture, I warmly recommend you to pay a visit to Siida’s . I promise you won’t regret it.

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The post Getting to know mystical Sami culture and arctic nature – SIIDA appeared first on fallintofinland.com.

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