Loading...

Follow Euphoria Nutrition - Better Nutrition Means Bet.. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Forget those processed, deep-fried, and high salt vegetable chips. Do you know how easy it is to make your own? It’s so simple. And if you haven’t tried beet chips specifically, you’re truly missing out.

Beet’s are a nutrient rich vegetable. They’re a source of fiber, potassium, vitamin B6 and vitamin C. And what better way to get these nutrients than from these delicious and easy Rosemary Garlic Beet Chips.

To make the Rosemary Garlic Beet Chips, firstly preheat an oven to 300°F.

While the oven is preheating, scrub and wash the beets well, and cut off the tops. If you have a mandolin grater, this will work perfectly to ensure your beet chips are the same size.

If you don’t – no worries. Just cut the beets into slices about 1/16 inch thick. Try to be as consistent as you can when cutting. This is important so that your chips will bake at the same time.

Forget store bought #veggie #chips - Instead try these #healthy and #delicious Rosemary Garlic Beet Chips at #snacktime. They're #baked #nutritious and full of flavour Click To Tweet

Once sliced, place the beets into a large bowl. Toss with the grape seed oil and the salt. And using your hands, press into each beet chip to make sure each individual chip is covered with oil and salt. Let stand for 10 minutes. This will help some of the water from the beets to leech out prior to baking.

After 10 minutes, toss the beets with the garlic and 1 tbsp rosemary. Then line 1-3 couple baking pans with parchment paper. How many pans you need will depend on their size. Place the beets in single file on the parchment paper. Make sure they aren’t touching each other.

Then place pan in the preheated oven for 45-60 minutes, or until the chips are dry and crisp.

Once done, remove from the oven and toss with remaining 1 tbsp rosemary. Let the Rosemary Garlic Beet Chips cool prior to eating.

These can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to one week (if they last that long of course).

Whats your favourite type of vegetable chip?

Rosemary Garlic Beet Chips
Rate this recipe
Average: 0/5
0 ratings

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Yield: 2-3 cups

Serving Size: 1/4 cup

Ingredients

  • 8 medium beets
  • 1 - 2 tbsp grape seed oil
  • 1/8 tsp sea salt
  • 2 tsp garlic, minced
  • 2 tbsp fresh rosemary, minced and divided

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 300°F.
  2. Meanwhile scrub and wash the beets. Cut off the tops and slice into 1/16 inch pieces using a mandolin grater. If you don't have one, use a knife to slice into 1/16 inch pieces.
  3. Place beets into a large bowl and toss with grape seed oil and salt. Press into the beets using your hands to make sure each individual beet is covered with oil and salt. Let stand for 10 minutes. Then toss with garlic and 1 tbsp rosemary.
  4. Line a couple baking pans with parchment paper. Individually place beets on pans, and ensure they aren't touching each other.
  5. Place pan in preheated oven for 45-60 minutes, or until chips are dry and crisp. If you used a knife to cut the slices, keep a closer eye on the oven. Some chips may need to be removed before others if they're not the same thickness.
  6. Once done, remove pans from the oven and toss with remaining 1 tbsp rosemary. Let chips cool prior to eating.
  7. Chips can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to one week (if they last that long).
4.5.2.16
Euphoria Nutrition

The post Rosemary Garlic Beet Chips appeared first on Euphoria Nutrition.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Disclaimer: This post was developed in sponsorship with California Dried Plum Board, however all opinions are my own.

In case you didn’t know – March is Nutrition Month. And this year it’s all about Unlocking the Potential of Food.

So, I though’t I’d start with prunes. You know, those digestive power-houses that help keep you regular. Did you also know that eating just one daily serving of 5-6 prunes supports bone health? That’s right. Because of some new research they’re now being considered that “whole package” when it comes to maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Prunes are also a source of dietary fiber, and each serving of 5-6 prunes (40g) contains only 100 calories.

And they’re also incredibly versatile. You can add them to your smoothies, salads, and in this case – even crunchy delicious granola.

If you’ve never made your own granola before. You’re truly missing out. It tastes sooooo much better than any store bought versions. And it’s usually a lot lighter, as you can control how much fat goes in. Along with any un-needed extra ingredients. And as an added bonus, you can customize it to add whatever items you like.

#ad Prunes for bone health? That's right, 5-6 per day may support healthy bones. So reap the benefits with this #vegan easy & delicious Maple Coconut Prune Granola #EatCAprunes #Prunes4BonesClick To Tweet

Here I made sure to incorporate California Prunes so you get those heart, bones, and intestinal benefits. Because hey – those are all pretty darn important.

To make this tasty Maple Coconut Prune Granola, firstly preheat an oven to 300°F. Then in a large bowl, combine the oats, millet, walnuts and chia seeds. Stir them all together.

In a separate small bowl, stir together the maple syrup, grapeseed oil and coconut extract. Then add this mixture to the large bowl, stirring well until evenly combined.Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Add the granola to the pan and spread evenly. Place in preheated oven for 40 minutes.

Make sure you stir the granola every 10 minutes so that it doesn’t clump together. And add the coconut to the pan in the last 20 minutes of baking so that it roasts perfectly (and not too much).

Once the granola is a vibrant golden color, remove the pan from the oven and stir in the chopped California Prunes. Let it cool prior to serving, and enjoy! Your bones will thank you later.

Maple Coconut Prune Granola
Rate this recipe
Average: 5/5
1 ratings

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 4 cups

Serving Size: 0.5 cup

Ingredients

  • 2.5 cup large flake oats
  • 3/4 cup millet, un-cooked
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, chopped
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1/3 cup maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup grapeseed oil
  • 1 tsp coconut extract
  • 1/2 cup coconut flakes, unsweetened (or 1/3 cup shredded)
  • 1/2 cup California Prunes, chopped (about 7-9 prunes)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 300°F.
  2. In a large bowl, combine oats, millet, walnuts and chia seeds. Stir together.
  3. In a separate small bowl, stir together the maple syrup, grapeseed oil and coconut extract. Then add this mixture to the large bowl, stirring well until evenly combined.
  4. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Add the granola to the pan and spread evenly. Place in preheated oven for 40 minutes.
  5. Stir every 10 minutes. And add the coconut to the pan in the last 20 minutes of baking.
  6. Once granola is golden in color, remove from the oven and mix in the California Prunes. Let cool prior to serving.
4.5.2.16
Euphoria Nutrition

The post Maple Coconut Prune Granola appeared first on Euphoria Nutrition.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It’s shown that strenuous exercise can cause pain and stiffness on knees, and other joints. If your an athlete, this can have a huge negative affect on your performance.

This is why you’ll see many nutrition supplements marketed to target tissue recovery. One of which is collagen. I’m sure you’ve seen it yourself – it’s usually sold in pill format, and also goes by the name collagen hydrolysate.

But, do we need collagen for muscle repair – Is it worth the hype? or is it a waste of money?

What is Collagen?

Collagen is actually the most abundant protein in your body. In fact, it makes up about 25-30% of your total body’s protein.

It’s in your skin, muscles, bones, and tendons. And it works as the glue the holds your body together.

It’s believed that since the human body is so high in collagen – eating more can help repair it’s damage.

So far there is far more research on collagen intake and its effects on osteoarthritis (OA), or degenerative joint disease. Although there has been some promising studies – to date no actual benefit has been proven.

And unfortunately these studies cannot be representative of athletes. That’s because current research shows that tissues affected by OA are genetically, and functionally different than normal cells.

So, we’re left with looking at the limited studies using athletes.

What does research show?

The ability for dietary collagen to be absorbed and used by the human body is still up to debate. One in-vitro study did show that collagen was absorbed through the intestinal tract and deposited into cartilage. But, this doesn’t provide direct evidence of a mechanism in humans.

One of the most well known studies used 147 varsity athletes at Penn State University. They looked at joint pain changes over 24 weeks when given 10g per day of collagen hydrolysate. At the end of the study, they found huge gains in joint pain at rest, when walking, standing, or heavy lifting. Although promising – re-testing the same data using a different analysis resulted in no difference.

#Collagen for #Muscle #Repair and #Recovery in #Athletes - Is it Worth the #Hype?Click To Tweet

Another small study on eight athletes used 3g of collagen hydrolysate per day over a 6-week period. They were looking at joint soreness, discomfort, or pain – and found no difference at the end of the treatment.

A study on 100 athletes suffering from knee, hip, and shoulder pain did find some improvement after 12 weeks when given 10g per day. But, this wasn’t significant. And the lack of a control group limits it’s validity.

Recent research on 139 athletes given 5g of collagen hydrolysate over 12 weeks did find some encouraging results. A significant decrease in knee pain during activity, and during a physician’s evaluation. While exciting – more research is needed.

Also noteworthy – no studies showed any adverse affects with collagen hydrolysate supplements. And so far no toxic or harmful affects have have been found.

What’s the verdict?

There isn’t enough research to show any benefit on muscle recovery with collagen supplements. Although one study did show some encouraging results – more research is needed over a longer period.

But – there’s also no proven harm in doing so. So if your still keen on taking them, just know it might not be worth it’s hype.

The post Collagen for Muscle Repair – Is it Worth the Hype? appeared first on Euphoria Nutrition.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview