Loading...

Follow Emerging Internet Technologies on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Considering how quickly technology has developed in recent years, many of today’s teachers were likely also in the classroom when the overhead projector and cable were cutting edge.  Even just a few years ago, computers were nice to have, but not necessities for the job. Today, however, technology seems to dictate everything, from how we teach, to how we talk to parents — and perhaps more importantly, what we talk to them about.

Though the impact of parent engagement has been recognized for many years, recent research has pointed to the positive effect of frequent parent-teacher communication around student performance. And as concerning reports surface, like a 2017 study from Learning Heroes that showed a striking majority of parents believe their children are performing at higher levels than they actually are, prominent voices in the field including the Alliance for Excellent Education and the Data Quality Campaign are rallying behind the idea of transparency and sharing student data. As high school administrator Rachel Czerepak explained, “Grades tell a very limited story. When it comes to communicating student progress, we should go right to the data with parents if we want to make a difference.”

But deep data-based conversations and transparency have only recently become a realistic undertaking for schools with the advent of new technologies and software solutions that offer advanced analytics and reporting. We are also just now beginning to understand the implications of these systems and how they can support productive school-home connections around quantitative data.

Given that a recent Speak Up Research Project study revealed that effectively communicating information to parents is still a concern that literally keeps school administrators up at night, it is critical that educators work towards data sharing thoughtfully and are armed with the right tools.

Here are three steps that educators must follow in order to effectively shift communication with parents toward transparency and what to look for in data solutions:

1. Understand the whole student.

Just as grades offer a narrow view of student achievement, isolated data points don’t tell us — or parents — much of anything. Educators must look at student data holistically and aggregate information, including academic, behavior, attendance, social and emotional data, in order to be able to understand and communicate student needs in meaningful ways. As Marty Shudak, Director of Assessment and Accountability for the Council Bluffs Community School District shared in a recent webinar, educators in his district have started analyzing different data sources together to compare students with themselves — not a curve or arbitrary standard. This has helped teachers not only make more targeted instructional decisions, but also talk about student needs with families more effectively.

Using the term “data mining” to describe the process of identifying and aggregating student data sources, an issue brief from the US Department of Education explained that emerging technologies are now available, making it possible for educators to analyze the whole student. Look for a solution designed to integrate your district’s disparate data systems, as well as one that offers advanced data manipulation and visualization tools.

2. Demystify the data.

Perhaps one of the reasons report cards were created — and continue to be a primary method for communicating student achievement — is that data can be confusing. We have more data than ever before in schools; and while more is better when seeking to understand the whole student, it becomes more complicated (not to mention cumbersome) to analyze and understand.

According to an briefing paper from SEDL, data must be presented clearly and as simply as possible, with thought given to the terminology used and an emphasis on easy-to-read graphs.  Depending upon the resources available to educators, however, this can be extremely difficult. Districts should look for and invest in systems that generate intuitive graphic and tabular reports, as well as robust student profiles, that help educators and parents alike make meaning of data. 

3. Develop data-based action plans.

In my previous role providing professional development to teachers, we adopted the simple axiom, “Data is only as good as what you do with it.” And given that research indicates parental support and involvement in learning has a tremendous impact on student outcomes, we should aim to go beyond communicating data to parents and collaborate with them around it. Today, technology has given teachers new ways to connect data to instruction and share plans. Districts should therefore consider platforms that empower teachers and parents to make data-based decisions and work together to support students in reaching goals. Look specifically for systems that have integrated early warning indicators, notifications, and secure messaging systems (ideally with bidirectional translation) to keep teachers and parents on the same page when it comes to student performance and support plans.

As research and practice continue to highlight the importance of sharing data with parents, districts must focus on finding ways to make it happen. Fortunately, developments in education technology have given way to robust data warehouses and analytics systems that have the power to transform parent teacher communications and make the difference in student outcomes.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Inspiring, informative, useful, or just plain fun tweets posted on Twitter over this past week … collected here to share with our blog readers.

This week in ‘the wrap' … another higher ed institution puts some teeth into formal recognition for the vital soft skills employeers seek, Canvas sneaks ahead of Blackboard, connecting students and classrooms across the world, a look back at an eye-opening piece about the broken way we often approach edtech (‘pigeons'), a practical tip on adding a timer to a PowerPoint presentations, and much more to explore!

Davenport University launches a soft skills certificate program
http://observatory.itesm.mx/edu-news/davenport-university-launches-a-soft-skills-certificate-program

Special Education Students On the Rise (up to 13% of Ss now in the US)
https://www.usnews.com/news/education-news/articles/2018-06-06/special-education-students-on-the-rise

By the way, if you missed it, Canvas has now overtaken Blackboard as the leading LMS in the US
https://mfeldstein.com/canvas-surpasses-blackboard-learn-in-us-market-share/

Results From Triseum's Year-Long Game-Based Learning Validation Study Reveal Strong Student Engagement, Motivation and Knowledge Acquisition
http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/07/prweb15616066.htm

The Unique Power of Networked Teaching and Learning
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/unique-power-networked-teaching-learning-gabriel-flacks/

The Pigeons of Ed-Tech (how Edward L. Thorndike won and John Dewey lost) … nearly 4 years later, has much changed?
http://hackeducation.com/2014/12/25/pigeons

The Internet is amazing and empowering, yet we've collectively used and allowed it to maim journalism and cripple informed debate … Why We Have Bad News: The Disintermediation of the Media
https://blog.usejournal.com/why-we-have-bad-news-the-disintermediation-of-the-media-66bcdb331614

How Do Institutions Select Student Success Technologies?
https://encoura.org/how-do-institutions-select-student-success-technologies/

How to Add a Timer to PowerPoint Slides
https://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/07/how-to-add-timer-to-powerpoint-slides.html

Turning ‘Google Maps for Education’ From Metaphor to Reality: Evolving Framework to Connect Outcomes, Credentials, at a macro level
https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-07-14-turning-google-maps-for-education-from-metaphor-to-reality

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Exploring Powerful Web Apps for Interactive Classroom Collaboration

On Friday, July 6th, I conducted the first of what will be an ongoing bi-monthly series of webinars, hosted by the great team at WizIQ.

This inaugural webinar examined a bunch of free web tools that can be used by teachers and students to collaborate in or out of the classroom.

The recorded webinar is available for viewing here: 
http://webinars.wiziqxt.com/online-class/380874

Just click the “View” button in the lower right hand corner of the screen to access the video recording:

Following are the many of the tools and technqiues we discussed and in some cases, took for a spin!

  • Online, Collaborative Interactive White Boards such as WebWhiteboard and Twiddla
  • Google Drawings (an alternative way to collaborate whiteboard-style, but in this case the end result gets saved!)
  • Many different ways to use Twitter for collaboration
  • Using a Student Response System to help facilitate collaboration (we shared and tried my favorite SRS, Socrative)
  • The Google Doc “suite” (of course!), including Docs, Sheets, and Slides.
  • Collabortive Brainingstorming apps, such as MindMeister and Bubble.us
  • Padlet (sort of a collaborative bulletin board, but really much more)
  • Using Video Chat/Conferencing tools like Google Hangouts and Zoom to bring collaborators in from outside of the classroom
  • The idea of using any social media platform that has a discussion feature, to facilite collaborative dialogue
  • We then moved onto Online “spaces” for longer term collaboration, such a Wikis, Slack, Learning Management Systems, and WizIQ  

The presentation itself includes a good deal of discussion about ways to use these tools for collaboration, as well as shots of some of the tools in action.

Thanks to all the participants (over 100!), and the great questions, comments, and tools they shared (unfortunatly, there was a glitch that prevented the chat from being discussed during the start of the session – that was interesting mostly because it showed the many places from all over the world that viewers were from!).

Keep on eye out for upcoming webinar announcements by signing up for blog posts (look for the sign up form over there on the right ->), or following us on Twitter or Facebook!

The next webinar will be Friday, September , at Noon EST (topic to be announced soon)!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Today's guest writer shares her perspective on “what it's like growing up with [or without] technology in education.”

My preschool-high school education comes from a unique perspective, since all but one year of my life was spent homeschooled. Being homeschooled meant that my classes were either taught by mom or on a computer. Two to three times a day, three days a week I’d log into the family computer and set up the classroom on my screen. I’d sit there for an hour or so, usually clicking away at some YouTube video and not paying attention to my distant teacher’s voice coming through the headphones. Every paper I wrote would be emailed or submitted online, all my research took place on the computer. I learned how to type at a remarkably young age and could navigate Word when I was 12 years old. This idea of education fused with technology seemed so natural to me, I didn’t think anything of it. I just ‘went to class’ and accepted it as normal.

By the time I moved on to high school, I was so adjusted to using technology for my learning that when I switched to the public-school system for my senior year, I was taken aback by the inefficiency of handing in physical pieces of paper to my teacher, who would often promptly lose them and forget to give a grade. My math binder was constantly a mess, with tabs upon tabs marking important notes and a stack of flashcards always packed safely away in a pocket of my backpack. I had to carry a physical textbook with me on my back to and from school, eventually deciding to ditch it for the sake of convenience. The experience of a literal classroom was one I’d never had before; never before in my life was I required to submit hand-written papers, and I thought it strange that a teacher would accept something that hadn’t been typed. While I didn’t think much of it at the time, I can look back now and the inefficiency of binders full of papers and appreciate the advancements that have been made in education, technology wise.

After graduating from high school, I enrolled in the local community college and was glad to find that there would be no more hand-written papers. My Pre-Calc textbook was not a textbook at all, but a link I could click on to access my quizzes. Instead of carrying around a traditional graphing calculator, my teacher had me download an app onto my phone. I even enrolled in an online class that I completed entirely from home. Now, having left the community college, I am enrolled in fully online classes once again. The headquarters for this school is thousands of miles away from me and yet completely accessible. My school can now be portable, since all I need is a computer. It is more affordable, since the physical materials necessary are so limited. I can receive specialized feedback from an experienced teacher without having to take time out of my day to drive to a campus.

Although I didn’t touch much on personality, as a more introverted person, having an available path to achieve my goals on my own terms is a huge comfort. The potential of technology making education more accessible is huge: not just for those who don’t want to drive to school, but more importantly, for those who can’t. No longer must class, income, or location get in the way of someone’s desire to learn. With as little as a now-common smartphone anyone can learn a new language. This new era of technology has presented more opportunities that we know what to do with; the opportunity “market” so to speak is unbelievably saturated.

Now, I’m not suggesting to replace teachers with apps. What I am suggesting, however, and what I hope for, is the realization that technology has a huge potential in education, and with Artificial Intelligence around the corner, the horizon will only expand. One teacher may not be able to teach in twenty different styles to engage all their students, but one app can be customized to thousands of different people, needs, and situations. While the idea of artificial intelligence can seem frightening, I view it as a beam of hope; imagine a teacher finally being able to keep on top of all her papers with a virtual assistant, or a student with what seems like no more than a computer but is actually unlimited access to information that, without technology, could be oceans away.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
https://www.bls.gov/emp/chart-unemployment-earnings-education.htm

It is well documented that there is a correlation between education and income. Well-educated people tend to earn more than uneducated people do. Increasing global access to education should serve to reduce or perhaps even eradicate income inequality and global poverty.

Education technology is shaping up to be a promising means of delivering the increased access to education that is so desperately needed. Technologies such as online degree programs and massive online open courses (MOOCs) are creating opportunities for disadvantaged people in developing countries and even in disadvantaged areas of developed countries to obtain free or low-cost education without enduring the disadvantages of culture shock or prohibitively high travel expenses. Prestigious academic institutions such as Columbia University in New York, New York, Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama and RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia are creating online offerings for global citizens in a variety of their most popular specializations, ranging from certificates in environmental sustainability to MBA degrees to PhD degrees in software engineering.

At this point in time, such academic programs are beneficial, but they haven't made much difference in solving the world's massive poverty problem. Before we can solve that problem, we must first understand the things that are currently hindering educational technologies from eradicating income inequality. The following are 5 of the biggest issues:

1. Lack of Awareness of the Technology

Many underprivileged populations do not understand that new educational opportunities are becoming available to them. They've never heard of MOOCs. They have no idea that affordable online degree programs exist.

Possible Solution: Perhaps ed tech professionals could develop programs for educating governments about how to make their citizens aware of the opportunities available to them. Nonprofits and for-profit education technology companies could also play a role in educating underserved populations about the opportunities that are available.

2. Language Barriers

Currently, the vast majority of online degree programs and MOOCs make coursework available in English. There are also MOOCs available in French and some other languages. Unfortunately, few of these courses are available in languages spoken by the world's poorest populations.

Possible Solution: Volunteer course translators could help to solve this problem.

3. High Cost of Technology

In a world where more than one billion of the earth’s inhabitants still live without electricity, not everyone can afford a computer, the power to plug it in or the high-speed internet connection needed to access online video classes.

Possible Solution: Nonprofits, volunteers and governments could get involved with helping to make education technology available to poverty stricken populations — perhaps through public libraries or other public infrastructure so that it remains accessible to all.

4. Ignorance of How to Use Technology

Underserved populations don't necessarily understand how to use the technology that is available to them.

Possible Solution: Volunteers or public programs will be needed to educate people on how to use developing educational technologies. MOOCs, online courses and other education technologies could be used to supplement public education systems around the globe.

5. Lack of Motivation

Motivation to use educational technology is likely to be lacking unless someone explains its advantages. In some developing countries, parents are using online classes for homeschooling their children. This is an ideal way to use the technology, as the students have someone to guide them in its use and help to motivate them in their learning. Without someone to hold them accountable for learning, motivation often wanes. This happens even in affluent and well educated populations, as evidenced by the typical low completion rate of MOOCs.

Possible Solution: Online educational technologies will be more effective if providers can find ways of holding students accountable for course completion. One possible way this could be accomplished is through peer mentoring groups or peer study groups. Students involved in study groups could support each other and hold each other accountable for completing their online coursework. It would take effort on the part of course providers or volunteers to organize the study groups.

These are 5 of the most compelling problems that need to be solved before education technology can successfully eradicate global income inequality. If we as educators make an effort to work together at implementing solutions to these problems, we will succeed at dramatically reducing global poverty or perhaps even someday eliminating it.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Inspiring, informative, useful, or just plain fun tweets posted on Twitter over this past week … collected here to share with our blog readers.

This week in the wrap … another study supporting the advantage of blended learning over exclusively face-to-face or online, a couple pieces supporting the benefits of cross-curricular teaching and learning, explore a listing of over 60 events for K-12 educators coming during the 2018-19 school year, discover the Mastery Transcript Consortium – working to make mastery learning an accepted and recognized part of school transcripts, and more! 

Blended Learning Is Proving More Effective Than Traditional Education 
https://news.elearninginside.com/blended-learning-is-proving-more-effective-than-traditional-education/

Someone asked “What are good options for a back channel tool that also allows students to up- or down-vote questions based on their own needs?”, another participant shared https://www.tricider.com/. Looks good! Thanks!

The Future’s Open Wide With These 60+ K-12 Education Technology Events in 2018-2019
https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-07-03-the-future-s-open-wide-with-these-60-k-12-education-technology-events-in-2018-2019

At #FTEC18 some of us discussed challenges of Mastery Learning & Grading re: how it reflects on EOY grades. Check out Mastery Transcript Consortium! Students demonstrate mastery of skills, knowledge, etc., by presenting evidence
http://mastery.org/mtc-expands-membership-to-public-schools/

I love cross-curricular thinking like this: Incorporating humanities, arts, crafts, and design into curricula makes better scientists
http://blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/07/02/science-and-the-arts-essay/

“To prepare entrepreneurial innovative future-ready students, we must make a shift” – Great read on fostering innovation and entrepreneurship in the classroom, via @edtechdigest:
https://edtechdigest.com/2018/06/28/why-startup-culture-is-coming-to-a-classroom-near-you/

Wow – very interesting: Why Are We Still Personalizing Learning If It’s Not Personal?
https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-07-02-why-are-we-still-personalizing-learning-if-it-s-not-personal

82 “Math in Real Life” Lessons (who says they'll never use it!?)
https://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/06/82-math-in-real-life-lessons.html

Why You Should Enroll Your Kids in Piano Lessons, According to Science
http://time.com/5322121/music-lessons-language-learning/

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

All the motivated, hard working educators I met at the FlipTech 2018 conference this past weekend reminded me again and again of these vital truths: Teaching (as it should be) is NOT all about delivering content, and learning should NOT be about passing some damned test. Yet, too often, in too many classrooms and courses, we're not stretching much beyond those fundamental models. We can do better. Students can learn, be engaged, be empowered and given choice, and pass standardized test.

Thankfully, many teachers are willing to take the time and effort to keep working to up their game, to model lifelong learning (as we should), and to work hard to continuously improve at what they do.

I was fortunate to connect with so many amazing educators at the inaugural FlipTech conference at Collingswood High School in New Jersey. We shared our concerns and issues, taught each other about techniques and tools, and explored different ways that colleagues have approached both new and old ideas.

Over the course of the two days, we had so many interesting, rich discussions about many opportunities and many challenges. Here are some of those topics, in no particular order (I linked many of these to articles I've written on these subjects over the years): 

  • The vital importance of active learning
  • The move towards mastery learning
  • The ongoing challenge of changing the system
  • Student Centered Learning (the flipped learning ‘tribe' is all about student centered learning)
  • The power of Project Based Learning to fundamentally alter teaching and learning
  • The challenges of standards based grading
  • The value of freeing up class time by digitizing content for consumption outside of class
  • The importance of striving to ensure that digital content is engaging
  • Gamified flipped learning
  • Collaborative group learning in the flipped classroom
  • Universal Design for Learning
  • The importance of providing students choices as part of a larger effort to encourage self-driven learning
  • The value to raising student curiosity before engaging them in content consumption

We also watched the documentary Most Likely to Succeed, which was both pretty amazing (I wish it was easier for individuals to be able to watch online somewhere, but that doesn't seem to be the case, it does not appear to be generally available). This did lead me to the book, What School Could Be, which I have purchased and look forward to reading and writing about here.

Spending time with (as well as reading or watching) passionate educators who devote their time and energy to changing their classrooms and helping their students succeed, and who are gradually chipping away at the moldering old monument that is our too-slow-to-change school system, fills me with the strength to keep pushing, striving, and sharing.

Who knows if these efforts will ultimately lead to systemic improvements, but nothing is going to change if we don't try. In the meanwhile, making school a better experience that is more engaging for our student's and helps them grow is so much more than worth the effort.

I hope some of these words inspire you to keep the dream alive and keep pushing for improvements in our educational system, in your school, and in your own classroom.

In the meanwhile, grab a copy of the image at the top of this post and share it via social media to help make a statement and support someone else who needs to hear that they are not alone in the struggle …

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Inspiring, informative, useful, or just plain fun tweets posted on Twitter over this past week … collected here to share with our blog readers.

This week in the wrap … a couple reflections from ISTE – how they are expanding their role in PD, and choosing the best edtech; videos from the Buck Institute showcase examples of Gold Standard PBL; the power of curiosity; having just come back from FlipTech 2018, I can't help but share the post I just wrote about this amazing experience; and more! 

Reflections on an Amazing Experience at FlipTech 2018
https://flippedlearning.org/events/reflections-on-an-amazing-experience-at-fliptech-2018/

Personalized ‘deep learning' equips robots for autism therapy
https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/miot-pl062518.php

7 ways institutions can strengthen their digital learning strategy
https://www.ecampusnews.com/classroom-innovation/7-ways-institutions-can-strengthen-their-digital-learning-strategy/

RT @ValaAfshar: The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn. —Alvin Toffler

ISTE Wants to Be More Than Just a Conference. Learn How They Are Expanding
https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-06-25-iste-wants-to-be-more-than-just-a-conference-learn-how-they-are-expanding-their-work

Piqued: The case for curiosity – Scientists are discovering that curious learners from low-income households perform as well as affluent students 
https://hechingerreport.org/piqued-the-case-for-curiosity/

Making Better Ed-Tech Choices: Q&A With Richard Culatta of ISTE
http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2018/06/better_ed-tech_choices_culatta_q&a.html

Let Students Lead the Class with Active Learning
https://www.facultyfocus.com/uncategorized/let-students-lead-the-class-with-active-learning/

Augmented Intelligence – Opportunity or risk?
https://www.qassp.org.au/documents/item/360

PBL! The Buck Institute for Education produced these videos to showcase examples of Gold Standard PBL projects from a variety of grade levels, subject areas and settings
https://www.bie.org/object/video/water_quality_project

Piece takes a high level look at pros and cons of edtech: Understanding the Importance of Technology in the Classroom
https://www.customlogocases.com/blog/edtech-benefits/

We need to hold more student panels in education. Kids have so much to say about how our teaching methods affect them (both positive and negative). We only need to set aside more time to listen.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A few years ago, a Gates Foundation report, Teachers Know Best: What Educators Want from Digital Instructional Tools, indicated that teachers want tools “supporting student collaboration and providing interactive experiences”. While this was a back in 2014 (hmmm … how long is that in ‘tech years'?), I suspect that interest in these types of tools has only grown.

On Friday, July 6th, at Noon EST, my friends at WizIQ will host a Webinar that I will offer, exploring a variety of tools for interactive classroom collaboration, and ways to use them in the classroom. These are tools that are mostly free (some have advanced functionality for a fee).

This is the first in a series of webinars we will offer on the first Friday on every other month (at the same time – Noon EST). [Note: on the alternate month, the Flipped Learning Network will offer webinars]. These are entirely free sessions that will include the opportunity for Q&A.

Here are some of the types of tools we will look at:

  • Online Interactive Digital Whiteboards
  • Collaborative Mind Mapping
  • Microblogging
  • Collaborative Document Editing
  • Use student response apps to faciliate collaboration
  • Collaborative Diagramming
  • Using Video tools to collaborate
  • … and more! 

I hope you will join us! Click here to register: 
https://wiziq.com/webinar/powerful-free-web-apps-interactive-classroom-collaboration/

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

An interactive presentation should be a memorable one. It encourages your audience to sit up straight and pay attention to what you are saying. On the other hand, a bored audience, just passively sitting there and listening to teachers talk, is an undesirable one, and bored students will not pay much attention to what you have to say.

According to neuropsychologist Olivier Verdin, participants need more transitions during lectures, since the University of Dauphine has indicated that the attention span of a student is an average of 10 minutes. By adding these breaks in a presentation, teachers are able to vary a presentation’s pace and style, and affect the attitude of its participants. Varying the teaching methods and pedagogical activities is a must to help keep your audience captivated.

To spare you and your listeners the ordeal of a passive and boring presentation, I recommend an audience response system I came across at my University called Wooclap, for teachers out there in need of a more dynamic classroom.

Wooclap enables teachers to integrate their questions within their presentation slides with ease. Students respond online with a mobile device or computer, and feedback is immediately displayed during the presentation. This not only allows for more interactivity between the teacher and its students, but it also helps re-capture the student’s attention, in a meaningful way.

To make the best out of the use of such a tool, I have gathered here several tips to guarantee the success of your interactive presentation when using Wooclap.

Break the ice with a word cloud

Getting the attention of your audience is essential but can be challenging. To smoothly bring students into the presentation, I recommend starting a session with a word cloud. The teacher can ask students to respond to an open ended question and students’ responses are displayed in the work cloud.

This enables students to react and see the different perspectives in the classroom and gets them thinking about the subject at hand. Teachers can use this as a starting block for the presentation to survey what students think about the subject.

Timing is crucial

Another technique to leverage throughout a presentation is the timing for each question. When using Wooclap, for each question asked, the user can choose how much time to allot. Varying the timing depending on the question is crucial and can’t be overlooked. For instance, when asking an opinionated question only a short period of time (30 seconds) is needed. However, for example an open response question or a math question is being asked, students should have closer to two minutes to respond. These time limits should not be set in stone, but rather changed depending on the class and the amount of students in the auditorium.

Timing is just as important after the answers are in as well. Teachers should pause after each question, analyse the feedback given and let their students explain their choices to determine if the class understands the material before moving onto the next question.

Use videos strategically

While presenting with Wooclap, professors naturally invest more energy during an interactive presentation to make it effective. A strategy many professors have found useful, is placing a brief video within their presentation, to allow them to catch their breath. For obvious reasons, don’t overuse videos, since it can ultimately be counterproductive when trying to increase student engagement.

Create friendly competition

An interesting function in Wooclap that can help achieve peak productivity is the competition mode. This function tracks the correct answers and gives points accordingly. A leaderboard is then displayed in between each question. This added competition creates even more interaction and gives the instructor immediate feedback.

Evaluate the presentation

During presentations, the platform gives you immediate feedback on how many people got the correct answer, which allows you to explain information that isn’t understood. However, it's also recommended that teachers take a deeper look at the feedback after lectures to assess their own performance as a teacher. Wooclap allows teachers to export the data in an Excel spreadsheet to take a more analytical look at the results.

In conclusion, student response platforms are a revolutionary tool for educators. Instructors need to be able to use these tools effectively to get the best results and eventually get their students more engaged, and ultimately improve student grades and retention!

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview