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Below, our online reading list on American Presidents and their environmental impact.

“America’s Greenest Presidents” (Emma Bryce, New York Times, 2012)

What do Theodore Roosevelt, Richard M. Nixon and Jimmy Carter have in common? They are viewed as environmentally progressive presidents… More…

“A Graphical Look At Presidents’ Environmental Records” (Marlene Cimons, Think Progress, 2016)

Nixon’s predecessor, Lyndon B. Johnson, knew of the dangers of climate change and spoke of them in a special message to Congress shortly after his 1965 inauguration. “Air pollution is no longer confined to isolated places,” he said. “This generation has altered the composition of the atmosphere on a global scale through radioactive materials and a steady increase in carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels….” More…

“8 Presidents Who Shaped Public Lands” (Department of the Interior, 2016)

Theodore Roosevelt, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jimmy Carter, Barack Obama, Thomas Jefferson… The legacies of eight presidents who made a big difference in American conservation….More…

“The Presidents Who Gave Us Our Best Parks” (Brian Clark Howard, National Geographic, 2016)

The concept of protecting natural treasures for future generations can be traced back to the founding fathers. Thomas Jefferson wrote about the benefits of open space and the danger of cutting down all the trees. He also sent Meriwether Lewis and William Clark on a voyage of discovery to catalog the nature in the great West.… More…

“Who Was America’s Greenest, Most Environmental President Ever?” (Paul Ratner, Big Think, 2016)

In 1970 alone, he signed the National Environmental Policy Act into law, which required environmental impact statements for major new building projects, created the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and signed the landmark Clean Air Act, perhaps the most significant air pollution control bill in American history…. More…

The post American Presidents and the Environment appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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Green New Deal

A group of Republican Senators may be trying to sink the #GreenNewDeal by pushing for an early vote, but the legislation’s popularity could hinder their plans: https://t.co/BT0ao6lf8L via @VanityFair pic.twitter.com/uQRC1QhUNt

— Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (@YaleClimateComm) February 16, 2019

“If Not the Green New Deal, Then What?” (Emily Atkin, New Republic)

As momentum for the Green New Deal grows, so do its detractors. The ambitious plan to fight climate change introduced by Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Ed Markey last week has been called everything from “brainless” to “delusional” by conservatives…. More…

Climate Change

“It’s official: El Niño is back. Now what?” (Eric Holthaus, Grist)

This year’s El Niño is expected to remain relatively weak, but that doesn’t mean this one won’t be felt — in fact, its cascading consequences already in motion…. More…

“My generation trashed the planet. So I salute the children striking back” (George Monbiot, Guardian)

“We tell you that if you make a mess you should clear it up. We tell you that you should take responsibility for your own lives. But we have failed to apply these principles to ourselves…”

We are so inspired by all the young people striking for climate justice today in the UK & all around the world. We stand with you in demanding that our leaders act with the seriousness that science & justice demand.https://t.co/pv5U5VibRZ#schoolstrike4climate #climatestrike pic.twitter.com/d2rwZy7ANI

— March for Science (@ScienceMarchDC) February 15, 2019

The Border Wall

“National emergency dashes hopes for 5 ecologically sensitive sites spared by the spending bill” (E.A. Crunden, Think Progress)

Thousands of scientists and researchers have expressed concern about the wall’s likely impacts on the environment and public health, in addition to broader humanitarian worries…. More…

“By the End of the Century, San Francisco’s Climate Could Feel Like LA” (Brian, Kahn, Earther)

The results show that cities’ climates will, at the end of the century, look more like cities 528 miles south do today if emissions continue rising in line with current trends….More…

Public Lands

“The Senate just passed the decade’s biggest public lands package. Here’s what’s in it” (Juliet Eilperin and Dino Grandoni, Washington Post)

The measure protects 1.3 million acres as wilderness, the nation’s most stringent protection, which prohibits even roads and motorized vehicles. It permanently withdraws more than 370,000 acres of land from mining around two national parks, including Yellowstone, and permanently authorizes a program to spend offshore-drilling revenue on conservation efforts…. More…

Plastic Pollution

“Plastic pollution: One town smothered by 17,000 tonnes of rubbish” (Yvette Tan, BBC)

…the 17,000 tonnes of rubbish left by these factories is still there – and not insignificant for a town of 30,000. Most of this waste has been repossessed by the authorities, but a staggering 4,000 tonnes of waste plastic still sits on a single site – open to anyone who might walk by…. More…

Environmental Protections

“E.P.A. Will Study Limits on Cancer-Linked Chemicals. Critics Say the Plan Delays Action.” (Coral Davenport, New York Times”

…environmentalists and Democratic lawmakers criticized the plan, saying it in effect delayed desperately needed regulation on a clear public health threat from chemicals that are commonly used in cookware, pizza boxes, stain repellents and fire retardants…. More…

The post Week In Review: Environmental News for Feb. 10-16 appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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How is climate change connected to extreme weather? Below, we’ve roundup up reports and posts by scientists and experts to explain the connection between climate change and extreme weather.

The Difference Between Weather and Climate

“Though they are closely related, weather and climate aren’t the same thing. Climate is what you expect. Weather is what actually happens…” More from NOAA….

Just a reminder. US is 2% of Earth. Australia is record hot. Earth Monday was 0.72 dF (0.4 dC) warmer than 1979-2000 average. Weather is not climate. Weather is fleeting, varies in locales. Climate is long-term, large area. Weather=mood; climate=personality. pic.twitter.com/83wavVonfe

— seth borenstein (@borenbears) January 29, 2019

Climate Change and Its Impact on Extreme Weather

NOAA’s Climate Extremes Index

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s Special Report on Global Warming

The Role Climate Change Plays In Weather Extremes https://t.co/sgdHQyM5Dt

— The NPR Science Desk (@nprscience) February 2, 2019

Every time it snows on the US east coast, there’s at least one politician or pundit who trots out the old chestnut: “Global warming?! Global cooling, more like!” This episode tackles that myth + explains how climate change affects the polar vortex, too: https://t.co/hX7yep8ZTE pic.twitter.com/907HQ7ohr5

— Katharine Hayhoe (@KHayhoe) January 30, 2019

Winter storms don’t prove that global warming isn’t happening. https://t.co/LDqfq4JH9n pic.twitter.com/ndmLD637Cb

— NOAA Climate.gov (@NOAAClimate) January 29, 2019

Climate Change and Extreme Temperatures (Hot and Cold)

The Polar Vortex Explained in 2 Minutes - YouTube

In Chicago, “the risk of almost instant frostbite.”

In Australia, the kindergartner who “will hardly have seen rain in her lifetime.”

Welcome to our age of extremes, by @SominiSengupta https://t.co/cMUhcQdeCT

— Jesse Pesta (@JessePesta) January 30, 2019

Not only does cold not disprove global warming, but it doesn’t even get cold anymore. A short joint-venture with @WeatherSullivan https://t.co/XeExys4SXE pic.twitter.com/NohY888FBa

— Eric Roston (@eroston) January 31, 2019

In January, there were 651 record daily highs across the U.S., compared to 321 record daily lows — a roughly 2-to-1 ratio.

Globally, the ratio of record highs to lows was about 20-to-1, with new all-time records in Namibia, Chile, and Reunion Island.https://t.co/bfyyrLAn9u

— Eric Holthaus (@EricHolthaus) February 1, 2019

Trump always dismisses climate change when it’s cold. Not so fast, experts say. https://t.co/N3OAihdVGp

— Post Green (@postgreen) January 29, 2019

Think this #polarvortex was cold? It should have been colder. The clear #globalwarming signal is in decline, warming of such events, @NOAA‘s Ken Kunkel, #NCA4, @EPA, other studies show. My @natgeo story: https://t.co/F3en34nFnr 1/ pic.twitter.com/FrMxb9Y8w6

— Andrew Revkin (@Revkin) February 2, 2019

Climate Change and Hurricanes

“Hurricanes are strengthening faster in the Atlantic, and climate change is a big reason why, scientists say” (Chris Mooney and Brady Dennis, Washington Post)

The study, published in Nature Communications, describes its conclusion in blunt language, finding that the Atlantic already has seen “highly unusual” changes in rapid hurricane intensification, compared to what models would predict from natural swings in the climate. That led researchers to conclude that climate change played a significant role….More…

Climate Change and Precipitation

How does climate change affect precipitation? (NASA)

Rising temperatures will intensify the Earth’s water cycle, increasing evaporation. Increased evaporation will result in more storms, but also contribute to drying over some land areas. As a result, storm-affected areas are likely to experience increases in precipitation and increased risk of flooding, while areas located far away from storm tracks are likely to experience less precipitation and increased risk of drought.

The post The Connection Between Climate Change and Extreme Weather appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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Earth Day Network by Earth Day Network - 6d ago

Free downloadable Valentines for animal lovers.

For Valentine’s Day, why not share your love for species that need our love the most? We’ve made these Valentine’s Day cards for you featuring the threatened and endangered species that Earth Day Network will be highlighting during our 2019 Protect Our Species campaign: bees, elephants, coral, giraffes, and whales.

Click to download, then share with your sweeties!

To learn more about these species and how you can help to save them, visit our website and explore our Toolkits!

Happy Valentine’s Day!

The post I CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT YOU! appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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By Stef McDonald

Give better bouquets. Choose flowers from providers who are pesticide-free. (On that subject, sign our pledge to stop using pesticides.) Also, favor local sellers instead of ordering online to reduce carbon emissions from delivery.

Give greens that last. Consider plants instead of cut flowers. For someone with a yard, give a rose bush instead of a bouquet of roses or consider outdoor plants that are drought-tolerant or attract pollinators. Or consider trees! (It’s only $1 to plant a tree with EDN’s tree canopy program).

Give better bling. Make sure jewelry sellers are fair-trade and use ethically-sourced minerals and gemstones. You can also look for jewelry designers who used recycled gold or silver, or buy antique or pre-owned jewelry.

Give better sweets. Choose fair-trade chocolates and sweet sweets made without palm oil, which is a major contributor to deforestation and threatens species such as the orangutan.

Have good taste. Is your loved one a foodie? My grandmother always said, “Food is love.” Bake something sweet or prepare a romantic meal made with locally grown produce and other specialty items. First stop: food vendors at your local farmers’ market. You could also give a farmers’ market basket or bag with fresh and local produce and a cookbook as a gift.

Toast to a brighter future. Choose champagne, wine, or other spirited drinks from winemakers and providers who use organic ingredients.

Give love letters. Support the independent businesses in your neighborhood by giving a book of love poems. Or: order the e-book version. (Tip: When you shop online while logged in to Amazon Smile, you can choose a nonprofit to receive a small portion of sales. Select Earth Day Network on Amazon Smile and you help us directly.)

Give twice. It’s true about one person’s trash being another’s treasure — and when you buy from antique markets, consignment and thrift shops, eBay, Etsy, Craigslist, and other sources of second-hand items, you do your part to reduce waste to landfills. Another way to give back is by buying from gift shops for museums and parks, in person or online.

Shop local. Support your local community, including local artisans. Even better: shop on foot or bike or use public transit and leave the car behind.

Encourage plastic-free living. Consider using a reusable mug instead of a box for sweets or a reusable market tote as a gift bag. Wrap edible gifts in a reusable bag or an alternatives to plastic wrap, such as beeswax-covered cloth.

Be a maker. Homemade gifts, including food and personal care items, are twice as nice. Extra touches: attach a recipe for the recipient and consider using a vintage glass jar, container, or tin that can be reused.

Make it an experience gift. Give concert or theater tickets, restaurant gift certificates, or museum memberships and you’re giving the recipient an experience to enjoy. Also consider giving personalized games or puzzles from a photo-printing service that allows you to create one with personal photos.

Buy better. Something to consider: the maker of the products and its ingredients. Give from companies with responsible business practices — organic, Fair Trade, sweatshop-free, environmentally-friendly, sustainable. Also: look at labels for ingredients that are organic and non-toxic.

Support Earth! It’s always meaningful to give experience gifts or contributions to good causes in the recipient’s name. For a limited time, EDN’s 2019 giraffe poster is your gift with donation.

The post Earth-Friendly Guide to Valentine’s Day appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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We’re excited to release the official poster Earth Day 2019!

In one stunning image, the poster visually conveys the meaning and importance of our 2019 Protect Our Species campaign. It features Brad Wilson’s photograph of a giraffe, part of his AFFINITY animal series, which includes threatened and endangered species.

Giraffe populations have declined from 155,000 in 1985 to under 100,000 in 2018. No international treaties protect giraffes, and the U.S. is the number one importer of giraffe trophies and parts. Habitat loss, civil unrest, illegal poaching and hunting, and climate change collectively contribute to the decline in giraffe populations.

“For its iconic and singular beauty, and the many critical threats to its survival, we chose the giraffe to visually represent our 2019 campaign,” says Earth Day Network president Kathleen Rogers. “We are grateful to Brad Wilson for joining our cause by donating this powerful photograph.”

Brad Wilson adds, “I photograph animals in part because they inhabit a world that we, as humans, have largely abandoned — a place of instinct, intuition and present moment awareness. They remind us that we are not separate — we are part of a beautifully rich and interconnected diversity of life. I donated this image to the Earth Day Network to bring attention to the plight of giraffes (and endangered animals everywhere) and to emphasize that our destinies are powerfully linked. The survival of one species helps to insure the survival of us all.”

The unprecedented global destruction and rapid reduction of plant and wildlife populations are directly driven by human activity: climate change, deforestation, habitat loss, trafficking and poaching, unsustainable agriculture, pollution and pesticides. The impacts are far reaching.

“If we don’t act now, the next extinct species may be our own,” adds Rogers.

Posters are available here for donations of $50 or more to Earth Day Network. Quantities are limited. All proceeds will support EDN’s campaign to Protect Our Species.

The post The Protect Our Species Poster for Earth Day 2019 appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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State of the Climate and Other Reports Show Climate Change Impacts

Catch up with our roundup of posts summarizing the State of the Climate 2018 report, which was released by NASA and NOAA this week.

Earth’s global surface temperatures in 2018 were the fourth warmest since 1880. The past five years are, collectively, the warmest years in the modern record. https://t.co/tx8nop89Fn

— NASA Climate (@NASAClimate) February 6, 2019

The world’s shellfish are under threat as our oceans become more acidic https://t.co/Ryq9LRbcIs #oceans #environment pic.twitter.com/4jS7w64iqW

— World Economic Forum (@wef) February 8, 2019

Globe was 1.42 degrees F hotter than 20th century average last year, NOAA says. You think that’s warm, it’s going to get even hotter in next 5 years predicts @metoffice https://t.co/suxfCxPxsx pic.twitter.com/kpM3cUohdD

— seth borenstein (@borenbears) February 6, 2019

Atlantic hurricanes are becoming stronger faster, largely due to climate change, according to a new study.

Between 1982-2009, the % of Atlantic storms that underwent rapid intensification—defined as an increase in wind speed >35 mph in 24 hours—tripled. https://t.co/Dp3QeVvh7k pic.twitter.com/NWcLDZmkXo

— Yale Environment 360 (@YaleE360) February 8, 2019

Green New Deal Introduced

We’ve put together a roundup of top stories offering facts and perspectives on the Green New Deal.

.@AOC unveils #GreenNewDeal: “Today is also the day that we choose to assert ourselves as a global leader in transitioning to 100% renewable energy and charting that path… We should do it because we are an example to the world.” https://t.co/2wVPSEx6SK pic.twitter.com/a6AG8TWtPK

— The Hill (@thehill) February 7, 2019

Local Actions to Protect Species

Key West votes to ban sunscreens that harm coral reefs https://t.co/Vdb4Zwl6xD pic.twitter.com/3x0NcLkEcb

— Earther (@EARTH3R) February 6, 2019

More Efforts to End Plastic Pollution

Plastic. Is. Everywhere. https://t.co/fKKgtUrCz2

— grist (@grist) February 8, 2019

RIP U.S. Representative John Dingell

John D. Dingell Jr., who served almost 60 years in Congress, dictated parting words for America on the day he died.

Read them here. https://t.co/DbVZzVfZP3

— The Washington Post (@washingtonpost) February 8, 2019

RIP John Dingell. He helped write and pass the Endangered Species Act, probably the most muscular US environmental law on the books.

As @jmooallem writes in his book, Nixon didn’t really understand how powerful the act was when he signed it https://t.co/RTxAf3hDID pic.twitter.com/lF7ai3HkvU

— Robinson Meyer (@yayitsrob) February 8, 2019

The post Week in Review: Top Environmental News for Feb. 3-9 appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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By David Ayer

All of us working in EDN’s Washington, D.C., office last week felt first-hand what climate change is already doing to our planet. In DC on Thursday, January 31, the wind chill factor dipped below zero. Like many others in the United States, we saw record low temperatures, then the weather completely reversed for us and the temperature reached 74 degrees Fahrenheit (23.3 Celsius) less than a week later — in what was the hottest recorded day on that date in DC.

The reason behind this recent cold snap in the United States and similar cold weather events: fluctuations in what is called the polar vortex. Polar vortexes are the two wide areas of swirling cold air above the north and south poles, which are generally kept in place by a strong jet stream. However, due to global climate change, the jet stream has started to fluctuate, allowing for events like last week’s extreme cold snap. And that is how you get the record-setting temperatures all of us were hiding from on that frigid Thursday.

The fact that climate change is having an impact on species populations can at times be a hard concept to grasp, with phenomena like coral bleaching and minute temperature changes in the ocean seeming like abstract ideas. But every once in a while, we can take a second to notice that there are impacts happening right before our very eyes.

Human beings can, given the resources, stay safe by staying inside, wearing layers, and cranking up the heat. But what happens to the rest of the species on Earth that don’t have homes and offices to hide in?

Animals and plants aren’t as prepared for the temperature to drop so precipitously. While animals from this region are accustomed to cold weather, these extreme dips of low temperature can be more deadly. Sometimes, harsh weather can be beneficial for animal populations. The old, diseased, and disabled are the first to die; the survivors who go on to breed after the weather will be stronger, healthier, and more adapted to extreme conditions. But when the temperatures reach extremes — at numbers that are nowhere near the normal operating conditions — the story can be different. Even the strongest animals and other outdoor species may not be able to weather the conditions. Some populations may have already been stressed by another threat; without the genetic diversity that comes with larger populations, these species may not have individuals that are able to survive the extreme conditions.

It is too soon to tell what the final impact of the polar vortex will be on the wildlife that experienced it. We know it was too cold for some animals. Polar bears have evolved to live on the North Pole and red pandas can withstand frigid temperatures on the Himalayan mountains, but both stayed indoors at the Pittsburgh zoo during this recent cold snap. The species that range from the middle of the United States to the east coast are not from the poles or the Himalayas, and most did not have the option of going inside.

As for local flora and fauna, we can also look at previous cold snaps to see impacts. There is a well-documented history of animals and plants struggling in unexpected extreme cold weather events. This is especially true of species that have more recently spread into the area, as a result of our warming climate or because their previous habitat was encroached upon by humans. The Virginia Opossum is a good example of this. They are able to handle the cold of a typical winter, but are not adapted to the extreme cold seen in polar vortex events. The most vulnerable part is the opossum’s bare tail; many opossums lose their tails when it gets unusually cold.

It may be a few more weeks or months before we can determine the full impact of this most recent cold snap. What we do know is that, just like humans, animals and plants have a threshold of temperatures in which they can survive. If our actions are causing temperatures to unexpectedly plummet below their threshold, we may have to consider changing our behavior for the benefit of all life on Earth, including our own.

The post Climate Change, the Polar Vortex and Threats to Our Species appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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Every species worldwide is impacted by climate change. Rising temperatures and sea levels, less rain and more droughts. By 2100, an estimated 50% of all the world’s species could go extinct because of climate change.

  1. Bumblebees are impacted by climate change in two related ways: Rising temperatures force populations northward to remain in cool climates and spring flowers bloom earlier than normal, leaving less time for bees to pollinate.
  2. Whales rely on specific ocean temperatures for their migration, feeding, and reproductive habits. As sea temperatures rise, these changes disrupt habits necessary for whale survival.
  3. Asian elephant habitat is negatively impacted by both lower rainfall and higher temperatures. Together, these threats have decreased the reproductive capacity of an already endangered species.
  4. Giraffes have seen their population decline by 40% in the last 30 years. In addition to illegal poaching, two the most pressing dangers shrinking habitat and fewer acacia trees (their main food source) due to climate change.
  5. Insects stand to suffer drastically from climate change. At the current rate of warming (2°C), roughly 18% of all insect species would be lost by 2100; if the planet were to warm by 3.2°C, that number would rise to 49%.
  6. Oceanic bird species are directly threatened by rising sea levels due to climate change. Rising waters can submerge their coastal habitats and nests completely.
  7. Sharks have difficulty hunting and a higher embryo mortality rate as ocean temperature and acidity rise worldwide. In the Pacific Ocean, rising temperatures force sharks northward by an average of 30 kilometers annually, disrupting ecosystems that depend on sharks.
  8. Coral reefs are endangered due to rising sea temperatures. In the last three years alone, 72% of the world’s coral reefs protected by UNESCO experienced severe heat stress. Sustained heat stress causes coral bleaching, an often deadly occurrence in which coral starves from a loss of nutrition.
  9. Monarch butterfly populations in California have fallen by as much as 95% since the 1980s due to habitat loss, increasing use of pesticides and loss of milkweed populations, all related to climate change caused by humans.
  10. Great apes of Southeast Asia, perhaps the most endangered ape species, are in jeopardy of extinction due to deforestation caused by climate change with nearly 75% of forest cover at risk of deforestation.

The post 10 Animals Threatened by Climate Change appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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Wondering about the Green New Deal? Here are some facts and perspectives on the bold proposal to face the climate crisis by moving to a clean energy future.

“The Green New Deal aspires to cut U.S. carbon emissions fast enough to reach the Paris Agreement’s most ambitious climate goal: preventing the world from warming no more than 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit by 2100….” (From “The Democratic Party Wants to Make Climate Policy Exciting” by Robinson Meyer, The Atlantic)

“Ocasio-Cortez’s proposal mandates a rapid decarbonization of the entire U.S. economy, including 100 percent renewable energy for the electricity sector, in just a decade — a very tall order. Additionally, it calls for “a job guarantee program to assure a living wage job to every person who wants one” and “additional measures such as basic income programs, universal health care programs….” (From “Ocasio-Cortez inspires Democratic presidential hopefuls to come out swinging on climate change” by Kiley Kroh, ThinkProgress)

“Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez gets much of the credit for bringing the Green New Deal into the mainstream….her staff collaborated with Justice Democrats, the progressive electoral outfit started by veterans of the Bernie Sanders campaign, to draft a policy proposal for a GND. But the plan truly owes its swift rise to a grassroots climate organization called Sunrise Movement, launched a year and a half ago by twelve young organizers—refugees from more mainstream climate organizations like Sierra Club and 350.org, and veterans of fossil fuel divestment and anti-pipeline campaigns….” From “The Story Behind The Green New Deal’s Meteoric Rise” by Sam Adler-Bell, The New Republic)

“Plenty of Democratic politicians support policies that would reduce climate pollution — renewable energy tax credits, fuel economy standards, and the like — but those policies do not add up to a comprehensive solution, certainly nothing like what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) suggests is necessary…” (From “The New Green Deal, Explained” by David Roberts, Vox)

“Clean energy is a problem of scale. If you don’t have scale, you have a hobby. I like hobbies. I used to build model airplanes. But you can’t mitigate climate change as a hobby. The reason I called for a Green New Deal was first and foremost to convey that this undertaking required a massive, urgent response commensurate with the scale and time frame posed by accelerating disruptive climate…. (From “The New Green Deal Rises Again” by Thomas L. Friedman, The New York Times)

“Twin resolutions from AOC and [Sen. Ed] Markey are expected to be introduced, according to representatives from Sunrise. But it’s no surprise that AOC and Markey’s legislation has changed during its gestation in D.C.; it will likely continue to evolve as it moves through the Washington meat grinder…” (From “We’re getting close to a bill for the Green New Deal. Here’s what we (kinda) know” by Zoya Teirstein, Grist)

Earth Day Network is among hundreds of organizations urging Congress to consider legislation to address the urgent threat of climate change.

The post All About the Green New Deal appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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