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The midterms elections are behind us. So what do the results mean for the environment and climate change action? Good reports are below.

“Climate Change and the Elections: Five Takeaways” (Brad Plumer and Lisa Friedman, New York Times)

Several key climate policies on the ballot, including a carbon tax in Washington State and an aggressive renewable power target in Arizona, were defeated soundly. But Democrats who favor clean energy also took control of a number of key governorships and state legislatures, opening doors for expanded action… More…

“How Did the Environment Do On the 2018 Ballot?” (Eve Andrews, Grist)

Unprecedented spending by the fossil-fuel industry proved effective in defeating climate-friendly ballot initiatives in several western states. But there were a couple pro-climate statewide propositions that passed — including one in Florida!!!! — and several fresh candidates took out longstanding climate deniers in tight House races…. More…

“The US Just Elected 9 New Scientists to Congress, Including an Ocean Expert, a Nurse, and a Biochemist” (Hilary Brueck and Peter Kotecki, Business Insider)

“Scientists are essentially problem-solvers,” Shaughnessy Naughton, the president of 314 Action, told Business Insider before the election results came in…. More…

“Clean Energy Is a Winner in Several States as More Governors, Legislatures Go Blue” (Dan Gearino, Marianne Lavelle, Inside Climate News)

The six states that are gaining Democratic trifectas may be the first places where renewable energy agendas advance… More…

“Voters Rejected Most Ballot Measures Aimed at Curbing Climate Change” ( Brady Dennis and
Dino Grandoni, Washington Post)

“What we learned from this election, in states like Colorado, Arizona, and Washington, is that voters reject policies that would make energy more expensive and less reliable…” More…

“Climate Activists to Nancy Pelosi: Go Big or We Won’t Go Home” (David Roberts, Vox)

activists called on Pelosi to lead Democrats in developing an ambitious, comprehensive plan to address climate change — a Green New Deal. Halfway through the protest, rising Democratic star and Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez visited to show her support, which drew a torrent of media coverage…. More…

The post Midterm Elections Debrief: What the Results Mean for the Environment and Climate Action appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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By Tracey Ann Ritchie

Happy American Education Week to all of the incredible educators who work extremely hard every day to support our schools and our students to ensure a better planet.

American Education Week (November 12-16) is coordinated through the National Education Association (NEA). The idea came to fruition in 1919 after World War I, when members of the NEA and the American Legion met over the concern that 25% of World War I draftees were illiterate. The first official American Education Week took place in 1921 and is now celebrated annually the week prior to Thanksgiving.

While we don’t need reminders of the critical importance of good teachers and education programs, we won’t pass up an opportunity to thank all educators, in the U.S. and across the globe. To help support educators, we are currently hard at work preparing our materials for Climate Education Week 2019, which takes place the week leading up to Earth Day.

Do you have a teacher who inspired you to learn more about environmental issues or protecting our Earth? Share your story with us, via email at education@earthday.org and/or by tagging us in photos on social media and using the #EDNEducation hashtag.

The post Thanking Teachers During American Education Week 2018 appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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“The greatest environmental Latino on the planet, Antonio González, is gone,” says Kathleen Rogers, President of Earth Day Network. “Antonio was a friend and hero. He brought the issues of climate change and the environment to his beloved people and lived a passionate wonderful life.”

With his Southwest Voter Registration Education Project (SVREP),González was responsible for mobilizing thousands of voters and fostering a new generation of community leaders fighting for justice. Time magazine named him one of the 25 Most Influential Hispanics in America in 2005, and earlier this year he was named to the Frederick Douglass 200, honoring individuals who best embody the work and spirit of Frederick Douglass.

Earth Day Network sends best wishes to his amazing family and friends and colleagues at Southwest Voter Registration Education Project (SVREP).

More about his accomplishments and spirit:

Join statement from SVREP and the William C. Velasquez Institute (WCVI)

Tribute from Latino Rebels: “Unbent, Unbowed: Remembering Antonio González”

Statement on Passing of @SuVotoEsSuVoz Pres. Antonio Gonzalez. “Our state has lost an extraordinary man & we will always be grateful for the legacy he leaves behind in his pursuit of progress to our nation in the form of voter registration, education & engagement.” #SuVotoEsSuVoz pic.twitter.com/WIRmWSYTF2

— José Menéndez (@Menendez4Texas) November 13, 2018

The post Honoring an Environmental Leader: Antonio González appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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As we thank our veterans for serving and protecting our country, we also give a nod to the U.S. Military for embracing sustainable and resilient practices and a move to clean energy. Below, recent stories on the subject.

“U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: Living its Environmental Operating Principles Earth Day and Every Day” (Guest post by Karen J. Baker, Chief, Environmental Division, HQ, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

“US Military Microgrids Are Using More Renewables and Batteries” (Green Tech Media)

“Hurricane-Damaged Air Force Base Has an Opportunity to Rebuild for Resilience” (E&E Publishing)

“Coal Loses Again As US Military Pushes Clean Power Envelope” (Clean Technica)

“U.S. military marches forward on green energy, despite Trump” (Reuters)

“Former US Chief Sustainability Officer: The Military Is Leading the March Toward Energy Independence” (Green Tech Media)

“Trump’s Defense Secretary Cites Climate Change as National Security Challenge” (ProPublica)

The post Saluting the Military for Leadership on Sustainability and Resilience appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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Here’s our week-in-review roundup of the top environmental stories of the week, with reports on climate impacts and action, threats to public health and species, progress in the fight to end plastic pollution, and more.

At the World Health Organization (WHO) Conference on Air Pollution & Health, it was revealed that more than 90% of the 7 million deaths caused by air pollution each year are in low- and middle-income countries.

The first-ever Global Conference on Air Pollution and Health was held this week, organized by @WHO and with participation of @UNFCCC https://t.co/J6malVflJn #AirPollution is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and linked to #ClimateChange #ClimateAction pic.twitter.com/0WLNPKCYow

— UN Climate Change (@UNFCCC) November 3, 2018

Climate change is on the ballot in several states across the U.S. in the midterm elections. (E&E Publishing)

Climate politics is in play in many states this #midterms. Find out where and what’s the latest news https://t.co/xqwpFv8NzN#California #Florida #Washington pic.twitter.com/Dinf85Lw0q

— E&E News (@EENewsUpdates) November 3, 2018

In advance of next month’s UN Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nation’s biodiversity chief warned that we have to move fast to protect the species that are vital to our survival. (Jonathan Watts, The Guardian)

“The loss of biodiversity is a silent killer,” she told the Guardian. “It’s different from climate change, where people feel the impact in everyday life. With biodiversity, it is not so clear but by the time you feel what is happening, it may be too late…” More…

More than a year after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) removed information about climate change from its website, with a note that updates were coming soon, the website remains unchanged. (Oliver Milman, The Guardian)

“It’s an embarrassment. It is a ghost page,” said Judith Enck, who was EPA regional administrator during Barack Obama’s presidency. “It’s a bit like Amazon not allowing the public to order books via its website – it’s that fundamental. There’s no other issue at the EPA more important than climate change; it affects air, water, health and whether large parts of the world will survive….” More…

A new study indicates that people of color are more likely to suffer from the effects of wildfires.
(Kendra Pierre-Louis, The New York Times)

The study, which appears in the journal PLoS One this month, suggests that people of color, especially Native Americans, face more risk from wildfires than whites. It is another example of how the kinds of disasters exacerbated by climate change often hit minorities and the poor the hardest… More…

A new report reveals a shocking decline in populations of wild animals. (Michael Marshall, Forbes)

The report concludes that populations of vertebrates – animals with backbones, including fish and mammals – fell 60 percent on average between 1970 and 2014…. More…

The world’s oceans have absorbed more heat that previously expected. (Chris Mooney and Brady Dennis, Washington Post)

Over the past quarter-century, Earth’s oceans have retained 60 percent more heat each year than scientists previously had thought, said Laure Resplandy, a geoscientist at Princeton University who led the startling study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The difference represents an enormous amount of additional energy, originating from the sun and trapped by Earth’s atmosphere — the yearly amount representing more than eight times the world’s annual energy consumption…. More…

The post Week in Review: Environmental News for Oct. 28-Nov. 3 appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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The Administration wants to gut the regulation of greenhouse emissions from power plants — and they need to hear from you!

Eliminating the Clean Power Plan and replacing it with “Affordable Clean Energy (ACE)”, would increase emissions by between 20 million and 37 million tons of carbon dioxide per year.

Repeal of the Clean Power Plan could lead to 36,000 deaths over a decade from poor air quality, and an additional 630,000 cases of respiratory problems in children.

We can’t let this happen.

These proposed changes endanger our environment, health and the future of our planet. The time to act on climate is now.

Today is the last day to comment.

Say NO to Trump! And NO to these proposed changes!

The post Action Alert: Protect the Clean Power Plan appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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Earth Day Network by Earth Day Network - 2w ago

Bats are great, indeed! Not only are the winged mammals super cute, they help us humans out in many ways. Without bats, no one would pollinate our avocados, mangoes, or bananas. Bat colonies also consume thousands of mosquitoes and other pests every night, lessening the need for pesticides and bug spray. Bats that consume fruit are the main method those fruits use to spread their seeds.

Bats are our friends, but people don’t always know that. We need to spread the word that bats are nothing to be afraid of, and we definitely shouldn’t be trying to get rid of them.

This is the perfect time to act! It’s Bat Week and tomorrow is Halloween. We want everyone talking about bats and spreading the word on how cool and important they are. Did you know some species of bats go into a state of regulated hypothermia during the winter where they don’t move and can stay in that state for months? Its so unique that scientists were able to make developments in low-temperature surgery by studying the bats’ behavior. Do you want to learn more about bats? Check out this Fact Sheet.

You may have heard the saying blind as a bat, but bats are actually incredibly aware of the environment around them. By using echolocation, they bounce sounds off the objects around them, creating a three-dimensional picture in their brain. Its so precise some bats use it to hunt for flying insects – at night. Studying the echolocation in bats has led to advancements in the ways visually impaired people can navigate. Check this video.

So be sure to tell everyone you know about how important bats are, and please follow some of the suggestions in our email for protecting bats, provided by the Fish and Wildlife Service.

The post BATS ARE OUR FRIENDS! appeared first on Earth Day Network.

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