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Free Chennai Workshop on Eco-friendly Houses

 If you are keen on building an eco-friendly house or incorporating eco-friendly features in your existing house in Chennai, this will be a valuable workshop.  


Highlights

  • Venue: EAI, Nungambakkam, Chennai
  • Date & time: Aug 10 (Saturday), 11 AM – 1245 PM
  • Conducted by: An eco-friendly expert architect from Chennai
  • Fee: None (free)

Background

With significant societal concerns about climate change, as well as more practical concerns due to increasing energy costs, water scarcity, waste management and air pollution, eco-friendly buildings are becoming increasingly important.

While eco-friendly & green buildings are becoming quite commonplace in the industrial and commercial sectors, the eco-friendly residential sector is in its nascent stage right now in India. While there’s significant interest about eco-friendly houses among new house builders as well as those keen on remodeling/retrofitting existing houses, they have a number of questions and doubts.

To get answers to these questions, EAI, India’s leading clean energy and cleantech firm, is organizing a free workshop in Chennai. Anchored by an expert architect with a dedicated focus on eco-friendly building architecture, this workshop can benefit those keen on having their houses green, eco-friendly and sustainable.

Who will benefit from this workshop?

Chennai-ites keen on building a new eco-friendly house or those keen on incorporating eco-friendly features in their existing houses.

When and where is the event to be held?

On 10th Aug (Saturday), at EAI office, located on Nungambakkam High Road

Address: A5C, Anugraha, 41, Nungambakkam High Road, Next to Taj Coromandel Hotel, Chennai: 600034 (See map)

Who will conduct the workshop?

  • Krithikha Muthukrishnan, Principal Consultant, Green Sketch, Chennai
  • Dharini Ravi, Business Analyst, EAI

Program Agenda

11 – 11:15 AM

Welcome & Introduction to Eco-friendly Houses – Narasimhan Santhanam, Director, EAI

11:15 – 11:45 AM

A presentation on the basics of eco-friendly houses – by Krithika Muthukrishnan, Green Sketch

11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

Case studies on eco-friendly houses – a joint presentation by Dharini Ravi of EAI & Krithika Muthukrishnan of Green Sketch

12:15 – 1245 PM

Interactive Q&A from the audience

Is there any fee for the workshop?

The workshop if free, but pre-registration is required.

Please note that there is a maximum of 20 seats for the workshop, so only the first 20 who register will be accepted for the workshop

How can I register for the workshop?

By calling Dharini Ravi of EAI, at 7358263274 or sending an email to dharini@eai.in

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Here’s a compilation of the recent blog posts from EAI on electric vehicles

The India EV Story – Emerging Opportunities – An excellent compilation – Read post   http://www.eai.in/blog/2019/07/the-india-ev-story-emerging-opportunities-an-excellent-compilation.html

Electric Vehicle Insurance – Discounted Third Party Premium Rates Introduced by IRDAI – Read post

AI enabled Electric Motorbike RV 400 from Revolt Motors – Read post

Electric Vehicle Wireless Charging – Nissan Gets Patents for EV Electromagnetic Induction Charging Tech – Read post

Hyundai Kona Electric Car – 450 Kms on a charge – Launching in India Jul 9, 2019 – Read post

Hyundai to Sell Mass Market Electric Vehicles in India Soon? – Read post

Electric Vehicle + Shared Car / Cab Hailing Economy – a potent combination – Read post

Electric Vehicles for Waste Pickup in Chennai – Read post

Flipkart’s 40% vans to be electric by 2020 – Read post

EV Components Customs Duty Exemption in India – Read post

Ola Electric to Use Battery Swapping in its Fleet? – Read post

Electric Vehicle GST Rate Cut & Income Tax Benefit from Indian Budget 2019 – Read post

A million electric vehicles in Kerala by 2022? – Read post

India’s battery market by 2025 could be about $10 billion, driven by EVs – Read post

India Li ion Battery Thermal Management, Battery Cooling Solution Provider – Read post

Converting Indian 2 wheelers to electric by 2025 – a case of good intent but bad execution? – Read post

Ola Electric’s strategy & plans for EV infrastructure & electric vehicle growth India – Read post

Indian Li-ion Battery Cell Manufacturer Looking for Investments – Read post 

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A 2017 compendium & summary about the automotive and electric vehicle industry in India from the Innovation Norway organization.

While it is indeed a bit old (we are sitting a full 2 years from the time of its launch), this is nevertheless a well done report that can be used for lots of reference data points about the Indian auto industry, all of which are provided in an organized manner, in one place, in this 74 page report.

The India EV Story – from Innovation Norway

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Until recently, there has been no special insurance premium for electric vehicle insurance, so you had to pay the same premiums that you paid for conventional vehicles.

In Jun 2019, the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (IRDAI) has notified the premium rates for private EV third-party liability insurance cover for the financial year 2019-20.

The EV insurance premium rates are a 15 percent discount compared to rates for general private cars of similar categories.

Full details of the announcement on the IRDAI web site from here. (see at the end of the page)

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Among electric two wheelers, electric scooters are quite common. Electric motorcycles less so.

And the reasons are not far to seek: Compared to scooters, electric motorcycles require a relatively higher amount of battery, making them heavier and far more costly.

Revolt Motors RV 400 is hence a fairly bold launch. It was announced by Revolt Motors in June. With a max speed of 85 Kph, range of over 150 Kms, battery charging time of 4 hours, and a relatively affordable (expected) price tag of Rs 1.1-1.2 lakhs, this looks like an e-bike worth watching out for.

Its battery capacity is reported to be 3.2 kWh with a motor of about 4.5 kW.

It’s difficult to resist a comparison of this e-bike with the Ather 450, which is supposed to be in the top league in e-scooters right now in India: Ather 450 has a similar max speed (about 80 kph, similar motor power, but its range is about 75 Kms.

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In May 2019, Nissan announced it has received an Indian patent for its wireless charging technology for electric vehicle, which could help the vehicle to charge without connecting with a charging device.

When the vehicle is parked at a specific parking position, the power feeding coil will be positioned below the power receiving coil under the vehicle, without both getting into direct contact.

It is not clear whether Nissan already has patents from other countries from US or EU for this yet,

However, the following is what the Nissan web site says about its wireless charging process for cars: “Magnetic flux is generated vertically from the ground when electricity passes through the Ground Transmission Unit’s primary coil, which is installed on the surface of the parking place. Electrical pressure is generated by overlapping with the secondary coil in the Vehicle Receiver Unit in the vehicle, and electricity is supplied from the first coil to the second one (electromagnetic induction). The unique technology achieves a charging efficiency of 80-90%, equivalent to that of cable charging.” Source – Nissan web site

Wireless charging is still in its infancy worldwide, and even more so in India. While such charging will indeed make charging electric vehicles easier (perhaps all parking lots can have these), I reckon it will take a while before it gets commerciliazed in countries like India.

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A fully electric car, with a range of 450 Kms, launching in India tomorrow (Jul 9, 2019).

That would be Hyundai Kona, and I reckon it would be the first fully electric car to have such a long range.

Image source: Hyundai company web site – https://www.hyundai.com/in/en/find-a-car/kona-electric/highlights.html

The following are what the Hyundai company web site says are the highlights of Kona Electric –

“Highest Electric Driving Range

Convenience to charge anywhere

Packed with Hi-Tech & Premium features

Design optimized for superior aerodynamics

Automatic Transmission for a convenient driving experience

Super Silent”

I guess none of the points listed above, except the first, is anything super unique, but a 450 Km range surely is something to write home about.

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Appears that Hyundai is keen on bringing an electric car very soon to India.

Read that the car could be a mass market car, whose architecture could be shared between Hyundai & its affiliate Kia. It is also said that India will be the manufacturing base for the car – now that should not be any surprise really.

Timelines? News items on this suggest it could be 2-3 years, so we are looking at something like 2022. While that might not sound like “very soon”, in car-land, 2-3 years is indeed a short amount of time. Given that Hyundai is already one of the top 3 passenger car makers in India, its aggressive intentions for EVs does indeed bode well for the e-mobility sector.

In this context, Hyundai’s recent investment of $300 million (Mar 2019) could help too, with aggregators such as Ola keen on making a good percentage of their electric in the next few years.

Things are starting to get added up, aren’t they?

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Did you notice that the cab aggregators such as Ola & Uber are some of the first movers to try making a large part of their fleet electric?

Now, part of the reason could be just PR – or the push given by the government.

But if you think a bit deeper, the EV business case is stronger for the cab sector than the private car sector.

And it has to do with the high upfront cost and low operating costs.

An EV costs much higher than a conventional car, but its running costs are much lower than the petrol or diesel car. So much lower that the total cost of ownership of an EV is lower than that for a conventional vehicle.

If I save for every Km I operate the EV, then the faster I run more Kms, the faster I reach the breakeven point when my additional upfront cost is returned in the form of savings.

This is exactly what happens with cabs. They run, on average, many more kilometers a day than do private cars. Which means, the breakeven for them is reached much faster compared to that for private cars.

It makes reasonable sense to me. Does it, to you?

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In the way to office today (I work in Chennai), saw an electric tempo running slowly alongside. The realized that it was a local waste collection vehicle.

This was getting interesting. A bit of googling, and I get this news item about how the city is going electric in its waste management efforts.

The news item, from May 2019, goes on to say:“The battery-operated vehicle will collect garbage from about 600 houses and go straight to micro-composting centres or parks with mulch pits to dispose of the wet waste. ..The city will get about 2,800 to 3,000 vehicles at a total cost of Rs 60 crore approximately. Each vehicle costs Rs 1.80 lakh. …The vehicles can cover a distance of 50 kilometres on one charge. It can function for six hours daily which means that it can conduct multiple waste collecting rounds throughout the day. It will also lessen the time taken per round, doubling the number of households covered each day.”

I think segments such as these – short distance light weight goods carriers be they for waste materials or for quality goods – are apt for electric vehicle adoption in the early stages of the e-mobility sector. They tick all the boxes – only small batteries needed, short range is OK, and they can charge perhaps during off-duty hours as these vehicles operate in a scheduled manner.

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