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Interior design studio Handwerk has retrofitted the kitchen in a New York apartment with features including a pegboard wall for hanging mugs, aprons and other items, to make the most of the small space.

Handwerk Art and Design redesigned the gallery-style Fifth Avenue Kitchen for a couple that makes documentary films, after first seeing how they used the space.

The studio reconfigured the existing kitchen by removing part of a wall, which allowed them to alter the layout of doors to adjacent rooms, and helped improve the flow into and around the cooking space.

"Starting with a study of their cooking habits and spatial needs, we designed a set of custom cabinets for the whole kitchen that placed everything specifically and precisely," said the studio, led by Gregory Bugel and Fiona Sanipelli.

"The owners came to us with some uncertainties," they continued. "They wanted a kitchen that was finely tuned to their space and way of living, and were suspicious of off-the-shelf cabinets, and how well they might perform in a small New York City kitchen".

Located in a pre-war apartment building in Harlem, the kitchen measures 160 square feet (15 square metres), so hooks and nooks were incorporated to make the most of viable storage areas.

The new layout comprises an oven and an eat-in counter on one side, with a refrigerator and sink opposite.

"Working iteratively, we hit on a design that allowed the clients to use their kitchen in a much more efficient and performative way than before the redesign," Handwerk said.

A focal point of the space is a lightwood pegboard wall at one end. Holes cut into the wood accommodate pegs that can be used for hooking and storing items on, without the need for shelves.

Open storage areas include cubbies above the sink and fridge for kitchen tools and spices, and a tall bookshelf in one corner.

White doors conceal the upper cabinets, while vibrant blue is used for the cupboards below. In between, the backsplash features small, round turquoise tiles.

The juxtaposition of colours and materials, balanced against other white surfaces and light-toned floor, makes the kitchen appear roomy yet cosy.

"The clients wanted something that brightened the home and acted as a focal point, so we went through an extensive colour study before deciding on the palette of green, blue, grey, and natural wood," said the studio.

New York City apartments where the kitchen also formed a key part of renovation work include a pied-à-terre and a long narrow home – both in Chelsea – and a rowhouse in Queens.

Photography is by Perry E Hall.

The post Handwerk outfits Fifth Avenue Kitchen in Harlem with clever storage solutions appeared first on Dezeen.

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Rundell Associates has revamped the Harrods Fine Watches department by adding a marble staircase and a floor designed to look like a timepiece.

The local architecture practice has revamped the two floor showroom inside London's famous luxury department store.

The marble staircase sits at the centre of the gallery-like display spaces. One side of the curved staircase is covered in book-matched panels of creamy Cipollino Tirrenia, a stone favoured for its strong veining.

"The sweeping staircase is a significant new architectural feature that we hope will be enjoyed by customers for years to come," said Mike Rundell, architect and founder of Rundell Associates.

Materials used in luxury watches have been used throughout the department's interiors.

"The new Fine Watches department was conceived as a meticulously crafted environment that reflects the art and materiality of watchmaking, using the highest quality materials to create the sense of timeless elegance that Harrods is known for," added Rundell.

Terrazzo has been used for the floors and stairs, customised in a complimentary cream colour and flecked with fragments of mother of pearl, which is often used to decorate timepieces.

Bronze inlay strips designed to mimic the details of a watch face spoke out from the centre of the floor, which is inset with a golden H for Harrods.

The handrails are made from patinated bronze and topped with plush leather shaped to look like the strap of an expensive watch.

Pale leather has also been used to clad the walls of the department, tooled by master leather expert Bill Amberg.

Above the stairs a vaulted ceiling dome is illuminated by lights programmed to sync with natural daylight levels, gently shifting throughout the day.

According to the architects, the oval shape of the light feature was designed to reference the shop's original grand light-wells. Designed by British architect Charles William Stephens, work on the Knightsbridge department store begun in 1894 and the store has always featured ornate interiors.

Lights in the coving and along the floor edges provides a diffuse light throughout the gallery space and stairwell, and the individual display cases are lit to show their wares to their best advantage.

The pale colour scheme, carefully celebrated lighting and soft walls were all choosing to create a "calming" atmosphere and a hushed acoustic.

Rundell Associates also re-opened the historic entrance on Hans Road to create direct access to the fine watch department from the street.

There are ten brand boutiques in the department, including Audemars Piguet, Rolex, Tudor and Tag Heuer, along with a multi-brand shop and VIP areas spread across the ground and lower ground floor.

In Chengdu, China, Neri&Hu has designed a shop for an Italian accessories brand with an oculus based off of the Pantheon in Rome, and in Macau Foster + Partners has designed an Apple store with composite marble and glass walls that glow like a paper lantern.

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Canadian studio Naturehumaine has overhauled a 1950s duplex in Montreal, placing a slatted black volume at its centre alongside other stark contemporary surfaces.

Bessborough Residence is single-family home in the Canadian city's Notre-Dame-de-Grâce neighbourhood, whose ground floor was revamped by local design studio Naturehumaine.

Spanning 900 square feet (85 square metres), the project involved the renovation of the main level and the addition of a new stairwell as a focal point.

"The challenge was to open this 900-square-foot space by maximising living spaces while keeping a certain sense of spatial division," said the studio. "The architectural concept is built around three 'blocks'."

One of these blocks acts as the redesigned core of the house, and is wrapped in evenly spaced black rods that run from floor to ceiling. The unit conceals steps down to the lower level, as well as creating room for a coat closet.

"This volume plays on its transparency by using a rhythm between full and empty, with variations of glass, steel rods and medium-density fibreboard (MDF) panels," said the studio.

This black construction is found upon entering, past another stairwell that leads to a separate apartment upstairs.

The new staircase leads to a lower level, which belongs to the owner and contains a lounge, another bedroom and bathroom, and a one-car garage.

The boxy unit aids circulation on the ground floor, as well as acting as a buffer between the other spaces. To its left and right are the master suite and a guest bedroom. Grey-coloured volumes house a service room on one side, and a bathroom on the other.

The third block is covered in light wood panelling and contains a walk-in closet off the master bedroom. This natural material brings warmth to the otherwise stark interior palette.

The rear of the house is lined in new sliding glass doors, bringing more light into the open-plan kitchen and living room, which is rectangular in plan.

Accounting for the home's small footprint, a large terrace off the kitchen provides additional room for dining and relaxing. The home's cohesive greyscale palette overall gives the illusion of space.

On one side of the kitchen, built-in white cabinetry appears to form a full wall. A black kitchen island in the centre has a matching sink and is accompanied by two barstools.

On the opposite side of the room is a grey sofa, which matches the glossy grey floors that run throughout. A pale-wood bookshelf forms an extension of the timber-clad volume off the bedroom.

In between the cooking and sitting areas, a wooden dining table with black legs combines the various materials and finishes found around the interior.

Naturehumaine has overhauled many residences in Montreal, with recent examples including a mid-century house with a plant-covered wall and dark blue accents, and a Prairie-style residence with greyscale materials inside and out.

Other renovated homes in the city include a residence with a netted trapeze in its atrium by Robitaille Curtis and a mirrored staircase for an all-white home by Jean-Maxime Labrecque.

Photography is by Adrien Williams.

The post Naturehumaine adds rodded stairwell to Bessborough Residence in Montreal appeared first on Dezeen.

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Lithuanian practice Aketuri Architektai has paired pale grey interiors with dark timber joinery for this family apartment in Vilnius.

The apartment,  which is shared by a couple and their young child, is set within a recently-built residential development.

Being frequent travellers, they approached local practice Aketuri Architektai to create a series of contemporary yet comfortable rooms that they can relax in whenever they're in Vilnius.

"It had to be a place for recreation, comfort and composure," said the practice in a statement. "Willingness to make interior spaces calm, pure, and free of unnecessary details was one of [the project's] ruling intents."

The architects began by knocking through a partition wall to turn the apartment – which had initially been two separate units – into one singular living space.

The front of this enlarged apartment is dedicated to an open-plan dining and sitting room, completed in a dark, restrained colour palette intended to "bring balance and refinement to a cosy urban interior".

Walls have been painted a shade of pale grey, matched by a rough concrete ceiling and stone-coloured sofa that sits at the room's centre. The floors have then been clad in grey terrazzo, while clean white tiles form a grid-like splashback in the kitchen.

Touches of warmth are offered by a tan-leather armchair by Vitra and a timber dining table. Spherical lamps by Italian lighting brand Flos have also been used to dress the space.

The other side of the home plays host to the bedrooms, which have been concealed behind darkwood joinery to provide a sense of privacy.

Following the patina of the living area, the bathroom has also been completed in unevenly finished grey tiles.

Aketuri Architektai is one of several practices to tap into the ongoing trend of sombre-toned interiors – MWAI used a soft-grey palette in the renovation of a west London flat, while Wei Yi International Design Associates employed slate-coloured walls throughout a luxury apartment in Taiwan.

Photography is by Norbert Tukaj.

Project credits:

Architecture firm: Aketuri Architektai
Project architects: Milda Rekevičienė, Ieva Marcinonytė

The post Aketuri Architektai use grey tones to create contemporary family apartment in Vilnius appeared first on Dezeen.

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Mattress startup Casper has opened a space for New Yorkers to relax and refresh, and even sleep for a short while in tubular wooden pods.

Located in Manhattan's Soho neighbourhood, adjoining Casper's main retail shop that opened earlier this year, The Dreamery was designed by the brand's in-house team in collaboration with architecture firm Hollwich Kushner.

It was created as a place for visitors to rest and freshen up, "bringing better sleep to more people and to more places," according to the brand.

Inside is a bright lounge area with a separate, darker room for napping. Users can reserve 45 minutes of rest time for $25 (£19), which can be booked on Casper's website, via ClassPass or Mindbody, or simply walking in.

"Noticing that everyone was downing green juice and wearing fitness trackers — but falling asleep at their desks — Casper set out to champion sleep as an essential pillar of wellness," said a statement from the brand.

A dark blue archway with lights resembles a starry night, while a much brighter lounge has white floors and walls and a series of seating areas.

Sleeping pods are housed in a separate dimly lit room. A set of cylindrical wooden vaults serve as private nooks, with grey curtains to close them off while in-use.

Inside each wooden volume is a Casper twin-sized mattress, as well as linens and pillows by the brand.

"The Dreamery is about making sleep and rest a part of our regular wellness routines — similar to how many people prioritize a workout class,” said Neil Parikh, co-founder and COO at Casper.

Behind these sleeping pods are windows, which have been covered in a black material to virtually mask daylight.

Private wash and changing stations are also provided in a separate area with sinks, storage bins and mirrors.

Included in the experience are constellation-print pyjamas and cleansing amenities, yet there is no mention of how laundering services work.

Launched in 2014, Casper has become one of the biggest disruptors in the mattress industry in the US, with a foam mattress that is shipped in an easy-to-handle rectangular box.

The start-up focuses on innovation and frequently launches new sleep-related products, ranging from bed frames to travel-sized pillows.

"The [store's] concept enables us to pilot new ways of bringing better sleep to more people and to more places – whether that's here, the workplace, airports, or beyond," said Parikh.

Earlier in the year, the brand opened its first store, featuring small A-frame house designs where customers could test its mattresses.

The Dreamery is located at 196 Mercer Street, between Houston and Bleecker streets in New York City. Plans for the Casper store also involve hosting public events regarding wellness and sleep.

Other nap-bar designs include a room in Dubai with oversized curvy cushions by Smarin, and a pop-up "sleeperie" in London with red hammocks by Hassell and Draisci Studio.

The post Casper offers rentable nap rooms in the city that never sleeps appeared first on Dezeen.

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A horizontal shower replaces the bathtub in this futuristic six-square-metre home spa, designed for small-space living by German studio Sieger Design.

Realised in collaboration with bathroom brand Dornbracht, the Small Size Premium Spa, which the company refers to as SSPS, has been designed in response to urbanisation and shrinking apartment sizes.

"More and more people are moving into cities, resulting in increasing scarcity of living space and rising apartment prices. But at the same time, there's increasing demand for enhanced quality of life," said Michael Sieger, co-founder of Sieger Design.

"The bathroom is becoming ever more important as a part of overall living space. Not only does it serve to prevent illness and boost quality of life, but it is also becoming more and more of a refuge – a place to refresh and revitalise."

"The Small Size Premium Spa, SSPS for short, fulfils all the standards of a luxury spa in a compact area of approximately six square metres," he added.

The minimalist design is divided into a dry zone and a wet zone, which are separated by a glass screen. The wet zone features a vertical and a horizontal shower with customisable integrated strip lights, and spotlights, sound system and fragrance options.

"Since the innovative shower applications make it just as comfortable to shower lying down as to take a bath, there's no need for a bathtub," said Sieger.

"If a bathtub is expressly required, it can be precisely integrated (in combination with a footbath, for example) and covered when necessary so that it can be used as a seat."

Meanwhile, the dry zone features a double washbasin with an extendible sprinkler head that can be used to wash hair. A compact toilet sits in the corner, while a display built into the mirror or cabinet front allows users to individually control all elements of the bathroom. As the room is fully networked, it can be configured remotely ahead of time via an app.

Mirrors are used to create a feeling of spaciousness. A large screen that lines the wet zone acts as a virtual window, which can display a live camera feed of the surroundings and produce an atmosphere that harmonises with changes in the natural light outside.

The SSPS concept was originally debuted in 2015. Since then, Sieger Design has introduced a slightly larger eight-square-metre version for hotels called the SSPS Suite.

This year, it unveiled the SSPS Apartment – a concept for a 35-square-metre city home that features an integrated private spa, including a 3.5-square-metre washing and showering area.

The bath is located behind a translucent glass barrier that lets in daylight from the living area. In addition to the Vertical Shower and the rain panel integrated into the ceiling, the wet zone features special massage jets positioned to stimulate various parts of the body.

Additional electronically controlled water outlets enable residents to programme automated sequence showers while sitting, or they can select a "stimulating leg shower". While the bathroom is occupied or during the spa treatments, the apartment's separate guest toilet can be used at any time by others.

The apartment also features a compact seven-square-metre kitchen and plenty of built-in floor to ceiling storage. Functions, materials, finishes and colours can be tailored to meet individual needs and taste.

The design team said the concept could be used not only for private flats, but also for hotels or yachts.

The post Sieger Design creates tiny home spa that fits inside micro apartments appeared first on Dezeen.

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Pigmento Experimenta Studio has aimed to evoke the quaintness of Italian cafes and streets at this pizza restaurant in Córdoba by installing bicycles and street lamps inside.

The Pan Plano pizzeria is situated on a corner lot along a main avenue in the Argentinian city, and boasts a large patio for dining outside.

Despite occupying a recently built commercial property, with hardly any architectural charm, the local studio crafted its interiors to evoke a timeworn atmosphere.

Led by Sofia Asan and Manuela Madruga, the team overhauled the space by taking cues from Italy's charming restaurants and meandering passageways.

"We were inspired by the textures and moods of Italian streets," the studio said in an interview with Dezeen. "Every detail – from passages, walks, tables, lights, and vegetation – served as inspiration for the restaurant project."

Inside, walls are treated to appear centuries-old, with concrete and tiles floors adding to the aged feel. One dining area has brick floors, with mirrored wooden window designs evoking the exterior of a historic building.

The existing walls were made with concrete, so the studio covered them with layers plastic clay. The walls were then painted with different colours and sanded down to create the desired effect.

"Pan Plano aims to transport us to the outer space of some long-forgotten Italian memory," said the studio.

Visible cracks and moisture stains help to make the interior seem old and historic. In order to bring the outdoors in, a collection of plants decorate the space, along with a tree.

The space is furnished with a variety of outdoor cafe tables and chairs, alongside cast-iron lampposts, trees and even bicycles to make patrons feel as if they are dining al-fresco.

Overhead, warm lighting is provided by oversized woven lanterns, while other glass lamps drop low to a collecting of dining tables near a window.

Slatted wooden blinds and woven shades wrap around corner glazing to filter sunlight, while intending to help the building seem less commercial.

"The most difficult, but interesting, part of the project was to correctly adapt the existing modern structure that was made with concrete walls and glass into an old-looking space," said the studio.

Other restaurants around South America include a bakery and outdoor cafe in Uruguay housed in a refurbished heritage building by Pedro Livni Arquitecto, and a wood-lined sandwich shop with orange chairs in São Paulo by Guilherme Pianca and Gabriel Kogan.

Photography by Otero Constanza.

The post Pigmento Experimenta infuses Pan Plano pizzeria in Argentina with rustic charm appeared first on Dezeen.

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French duo Normal Studio have become the latest designers to overhaul an apartment inside Le Corbusier's Cité Radieuse building in Marseille.

Jean-Marc Drut is the owner of Appartement N°5, one of 337 homes inside the housing block that is one of Le Corbusier's most famous designs. Every year he hands over his home to a new designer to reimagine.

This year, Normal Studio's Jean-François Dingjian and Eloi Chafaï have filled the apartment with a selection of their most innovative designs. They see this as a response to the radical nature of the building.

"The Cité Radieuse is an experimental building, and this experimental dimension is important to our studio," they explained.

The Paris-based designers have positioned 30 objects inside the 98-square-metre apartment. These include one-off pieces created for galleries and exhibitions, as well as prototypes and exploratory work.

"We're used to seeing our pieces in large spaces such as our studio, or a factory," said the designers. "So this is one of the rare times we can see a large group of our projects brought together in a domestic setting."

On display for the first time are a series of experimental glass-blown lamps, developed at the International Centre of Glass and Plastic Arts (CIRVA), Marseille.

There are also several research projects, included pieces that explore the use of concrete as a material in furnishings. These include a panel made for Concrete LCDA that is moulded on a folded paper sheet.

"We love the contrast between a very fragile mould and a concrete volume," say Normal Studio. "We use concrete because we enjoy the way that this fluid material becomes solid and strong.

"For Le Corbusier, this material was an essential theme. While he worked with it on an architectural scale, in a more brutalist manner, we're using it in a more domestic sphere, moulded in paper or textile, which makes it look lighter."

There are also smaller accessories, such as the Mimic Mirror created for Muuto.

These new additions are accompanied by a selection of classic furniture pieces, by designers who worked closely with Le Corbusier in the 1920s and 1930s. They include chairs by Charlotte Perriand and a Pierre Jeanneret-designed armchair.

Cité Radieuse is the first completed project in Le Corbusier's Unité d'Habitation series, which redefined high-density housing for the 20th century. Its key features include human-scale proportions, chunky pilotis and interior "streets".

The ongoing Appartement N°50 project began in the building in 2008, when Drut invited British designer Jasper Morrison to reimagine the interior. Since then, Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, Pierre Charpin, Konstantin Grcic, Alessandro Mendini and students from ÉCAL have all had a turn.

In previous years, each designer has chosen the studio that will follow them. But for this year's edition, Drut himself chose Normal Studio.

The two designers are developing a reputation for their experimental approach to design. Their work focuses on how to pare back everyday objects to their most essential form using technology in the creation process.

Drut was particularly inspired by furniture the pair has designed for French furniture brand Tolix.

"They push the material to its limits without cheating: a concrete table is 100 percent in concrete, a glass lamp is 100 percent glass, a metal Credenza is 100 per cent steel. It is at the same time quite sophisticated but strong and honest," explained Drut.

"Also, their work with Tolix reminded me of the work of Jean Prouvé, who has a connection with the apartment as the staircase and various original metal elements are designed by him."

With all the lights and lamps that Normal Studio have included, the apartment has a distinctive character after dark.

As the light installations replace the daylight, the designers suggested they have – somewhat accidentally – created a private version of the exhibition for the owners.

The post Normal Studio refurbish Appartement N°50 in Le Corbusier's iconic Cité Radieuse appeared first on Dezeen.

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Vancouver's "lush" Stanley Park provided the cues for a painterly green and gold mural in this New York apartment, which local studio Stadt Architecture has renovated for a Canadian couple.

Located in the city's Chelsea neighbourhood, the 550-square-foot (51-square-metre) post-war apartment belongs to clients who spend most of their time in Vancouver. The project is called Chelsea Pied-à-Terre after the French phrase used to describe a small city escape away from the owner's permanent residence. Pied-à-terre translates as "foot on the ground".

Stadt Architecture designed the hand-painted mural on the wall behind the bed in response to the client's brief to "bring some of the lush natural landscape from southwestern Canada to mitigate downtown Manhattan's concrete landscape".

Based on the hues in a photograph of a dense wood in Vancouver's Stanley Park – a large public green space close to the city's downtown area – it features a green backdrop covered with large trickles of gold-leaf paint.

"We couldn't literally accommodate a green living wall into the living areas," said Stadt Architecture in a statement. "However, we reconsidered 'landscape' as a custom hand-painted wall covering."

"By using a photo of Vancouver's Stanley Park showing a golden sun streaming through a lush evergreen landscape, we developed our wall covering, which is a translation of this image – a gold leafed field that melds into a series of rich, saturated green tones," the studio continued.

Stadt Architecture extended the gold paint over the ceiling of the bedroom to form a canopy over the bed – an effect that it likens to that provided by a four-poster. The studio cites the Great Bed of Ware by Hans Vredeman de Vries – an ornamental, 16th-century wooden bed that sits in the collection of London's Victoria and Albert Museum – as a key point of reference.

"Using this example as a precedent, our custom wall covering is analogous to the canopy bed's use of upholstery and hand carved embellishments, which line the canopy and headboard wall," the firm said.

"For our design, the gold-leafed ceiling creates a luminous canopy over the bed, while the green field anchors the headboard wall."

Complementing the earthly tones of the mural are the dark wooden frame of the master bed and golden sconces either side, while the remaining walls are painted white.

The mural also forms the centrepiece of the rest of the apartment. A pair of sliding acid-etched glass doors that front the bedroom are intended to be left open, so that it can be seen from the adjoining living room.

When closed, the translucent glass also allows plenty of light to filter into the room.

Pale oak herringbone flooring runs from the bedroom into the lounge, which features bright white-painted walls. Tones in the large painting are picked out in the furniture, including a dark green sofa, a green-coloured glass table, and a wood and leather chair.

Other details include a yellow cushion that adds a touch of "sunset" and set of six photographs depicting landscapes mounted on the wall behind the sofa.

A circular dining table with two chairs is placed in the corner of the lounge in front of the main entrance.

Facing the front door is the kitchen. The studio reconfigured the space during the renovation of the apartment, to make the most of natural light from the windows in the lounge.

Predominantly white finishes now decorate the kitchen, including the cabinetry, marble countertops and terrazzo flooring. Wooden shelves built into the storage units and the metal taps provide a darker contrast.

A similarly blank palette, including terrazzo flooring, can be found in the en-suite bathroom adjoining the bedroom.

Chelsea is a historic neighbourhood on the West Side of Manhattan, which was grown in popularity and price as a place to live in recent years – partly due to the opening of its elevated High Line Park in 2009.

Other recent apartment renovations in the area include a redesigned loft space for a photographer, an interior reconfigured for an art collector and a dark divided residence that is now a light-filled home.

Established in 2016, Stadt Architecture has previously revamped another New York apartment, to which it added a built-in bed and white cabinetry.

The post Gold paint drips down green mural at Chelsea Pied-à-Terre by Stadt Architecture appeared first on Dezeen.

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Australian practice Breathe Architecture has transformed the former headquarters of Paramount Pictures in Sydney into a boutique hotel with warm and tactile interiors.

The Paramount House Hotel is situated on Commonwealth Street in the trendy Surry Hills surburb, set within the former headquarters of film studio Paramount Pictures and an adjacent warehouse.

The two buildings were restored and linked together with a two-storey extension in a nine-year project by local practice Fox Johnston.

Owners Russell Beard, Ping Jin Ng, and Mark Dundon, tasked Melbourne-based practice Breathe Architecture with turning the building's upper floors into a hotel.

The clients stated that the architects should use "the imperfect former warehouse as raw, rich backdrop, and [create an] impressive variety of suite types to ensure an engaging visit every time." With this in mind the architects created 29 guest suites that blend original and contemporary details.

"Working intimately with an existing building fabric brought its own inherent challenges from a design, acoustic and fire rating perspective," the practice told Dezeen.

"However, harnessing these quirks as opportunities is what makes this building so tactile, unconventional and intriguing for guests."

Worn brick walls in the bedrooms have been paired with new timber floors and exposed concrete ceilings. Bathrooms have been completed with terrazzo tiles and wooden baths meant to resemble those traditionally seen in Japan.

Several of the suites come with plant-filled terraces, separated from the rooms by black-framed panels of glazing.

Splashes of colour are provided by soft furnishings and bed linens that are in shades of burnt orange, forest green or deep blue. Patterned wall hangings and rugs have also been used for decoration.

"Rather than having specific features or themes for each room, the emphasis is instead on comfort, adaptability and robust tactility," said the practice.

The architects used copper chevron-shaped tiles to form a screen around the building's extension. These have also been employed to create metallic partition walls throughout the hotel's largely white-painted reception lounge, which sits inside the former film storage vault.

"[The screen] is a delicate jewel-like crown intended to capture the spirit and excitement of the golden era of film," the practice explained.

Breathe are among several practices to adapt disused buildings into guest accommodation. Last year Vector Architects converted a sugar mill in rural China into the luxury Alila Yangshuo resort, and Twelve Architects are currently planning to turn the ruins of Bodmin Jail in Cornwall, England into a hotel.

Photography is by Tom Ross and Sharyn Cain.

Project credits:

Architects: Breathe Architecture
Branding studio: The Company You Keep
Builders: Calida
Bathroom amenities: Aesop
Uniforms: Work Tones

The post Breathe Architecture converts film studio head offices into Paramount House Hotel appeared first on Dezeen.

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