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Volunteers with a nonprofit dog rescue said their beer stand was looted at a local festival and it was caught on camera.

Video posted on Facebook shows one festivalgoer saying “thank you” as someone hands him a beer, but an attendant at the stand said the people in that clip did not pay.

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=342819166621326

“It was unbelievable. There were just people just handing them out,” said Jerry English, a volunteer who was working the beer stand. “Then you have one guy that runs to the guy, grabs a beer, and then he gets offered another one, and he says, ‘no, I’m not greedy.’ I mean, you’re stealing — what’s going on?”

English was volunteering with DMK Rehoming, a nonprofit that works to rescue dogs on the verge being euthanized. One of their primary ways to raise money is by selling beer at local events. This past weekend his group volunteered to operate the beer concessions at the Global Dance Festival that was taking place at Mile High Stadium.

“We do all of the events over at Mile High and at Fiddler’s, but this tends to be one of the bigger ones for us. So, we were really hoping to have a good weekend,” said Karen Beeman, the volunteer coordinator with DMK Rehoming.

Read the full story at thedenverchannel.com.

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Fort Collins, church reach agreement on lockers for homeless - YouTube

FORT COLLINS — After two years of fighting, the Fort Collins Mennonite Fellowship might finally get to open their storage lockers to the homeless.

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The church got the lockers in 2018 to give the homeless community a safe place to store their stuff. But residents appealed to the city council, and they wanted to enforce restrictions.

The ACLU stepped in to help sue the city, and they recently reached a mediated agreement.

“We had to compromise some of our intentions, and the city has had to compromise the things they wanted,” Pastor Steve Ramer said.

Read the full story at thedenverchannel.com.

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A man in his 20s died Sunday night after falling off the rubber tube he was riding through whitewater currents along Clear Creek in a mountain canyon west of Denver.

Golden Fire Chief Alicia Welch said rescuers tried for more than an hour to revive the man before pronouncing him dead around 8:15 p.m.

It was at least the 18th death or disappearance this year on waterways around Colorado as rafters and others head to the mountains for recreation.

Heavy snow in the Rocky Mountains last winter has led to high flows along rivers, where more and more people go for rafting and tubing.

Golden and Jefferson County rescuers were notified around 5:35 p.m. Sunday that a man had gone missing after tubing on Clear Creek. Racing to the scene, the rescuers began a search and found the man around 7:10 p.m., Welch said.

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He was unconscious. Paramedics attempted cardio-pulmonary resuscitation for more than an hour, she said. No other information on the man was made available.

Jefferson County and Golden authorities in early July declared Clear Creek closed for private recreation after water levels rose above 1,200 cubic feet per second (cfs). They later opened up access when water levels decreased in response to public demand.

“We closed it down at the beginning of July for a week. They will close it again if the level gets up to 1,200 cfs,” Welch said.

“Two weeks ago, it went below 1,200 and they opened it back up. We’ve been having three to four rescues a day. It is people getting bounced off their tubes. A lot of kayakers help them out,” she said. “Even though the creek is open, it is very deceiving how powerful and dangerous it is. And people go in there without helmets, without flotation devices. Once they get bounced off that tube, it is very, very dangerous. To go in there without protection is not wise.”

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SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló said Sunday evening that he will not resign in the face of public furor over an obscenity-laced leaked online chat, but he will not seek reelection or continue as head of his pro-statehood political party.

Protesters said they were not satisfied by Rosselló’s concessions, and pledged to continue demonstrations that have filled the streets of Old San Juan for more than a week.

“He’s stretching things out. We had hoped he’d taken the decision to resign. He’s making the people’s pain last longer,” said Emmarie Morales, a protester from southeast coastal town of Patillas. She said the governor’s decision would not end the protests. “He’s given us more strength to protest. We aren’t going to sit around watching Netflix.”

In a brief video posted on Facebook, Rosselló also said he looked forward to defending himself against the process of impeachment, whose initial stages are being explored by Puerto Rico’s legislature.

“In spite of everything, I recognize that apologizing isn’t enough, that only my work will help restore confidence …,” the governor said. “Facing that scenario, I announce to you that I will not seek reelection next year.”

The 889 pages of chat on the encrypted app Telegram between the governor and 11 close allies and members of his administration, all men, showed the governor and his close advisers insulting women and mocking constituents, including the victims of Hurricane Maria.

Since the chat leaked July 13, hundreds of thousands of outraged Puerto Ricans have marched to Rosselló’s official residence in the largest protest movement on the island since Puerto Ricans successfully demonstrated to demand an end to U.S. Navy military training on the island of Vieques more than 15 years ago.

Puerto Rico’s justice secretary, Wanda Vázquez, would assume the governor’s role under the territorial constitution’s line of succession if Rosselló should quit.

The upheaval comes as the U.S. territory is struggling to recover from Hurricane Maria and trying to restructure part of $70 billion in debt amid a 13-year recession in this territory more than 3 million American citizens who do not have full representation in Congress or a vote for president.

“Today, I have the great responsibility to direct my efforts, and those of my administration, to keep searching for ways and means for us, united before God, to be able to keep guiding our island,” the governor said.

On Monday morning, tens of thousands of Puerto Ricans were expected to take over one of the island’s main highways to demand Rosselló’s resignation as legislators considered whether to take the first steps of the impeachment process.

Arriving late Sunday to prepare for Monday’s march was Nicole Quintana, a 32-year-old dentist, along with her husband and their 3-month-old son.

“We had to do it for him,” she said, gesturing to her son. She said they drove about two hours from the coastal town of Isabela to participate. “Finally people have said: ‘Enough is enough. This ends here.'”

Pressure on Rosselló to step down has grown throughout the week as the chorus calling for his resignation grew to include Puerto Rico music superstars Ricky Martin, Bad Bunny and Residente and a string of U.S. politicians including Congress members from both parties, several Democratic presidential candidates and Puerto Rico’s non-voting representative in Congress.

Rosselló was elected governor in November 2016 with nearly 50% of the vote, and he had already announced his intention to seek a second term. A graduate of MIT with a doctorate in genetics, he is the son of former Puerto Rico Gov. Pedro Rosselló, who flew to the island to marshal support after the chat was made public.

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The governor belongs to the New Progressive Party, which seeks statehood for the island, and he is also a Democrat. Most of his time has been spent seeking federal funds since Hurricane Maria devastated the island on Sept. 20, 2017, and battling austerity measures implemented by a federal control board that Congress set up to oversee the island government’s finances.

The upheaval against Rosselló prompted at least four cruise ships to cancel visits to Puerto Rico, and many officials worry about the impact a resignation would have on the already fragile economy as the island rebuilds from Maria, a Category 4 storm that caused more than an estimated $100 billion in damage.

Another concern is the recent string of arrests involving federal corruption charges targeting Puerto Rico officials, among them two former agency heads, including former education secretary Julia Keleher.

Associated Press writer Michael Weissenstein in Havana contributed to this report.

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DETROIT — The Miss World America organization has stripped its Michigan pageant winner of her title, which she says was because of tweets she made about Muslims and black people.

Kathy Zhu was crowned the pageant’s Michigan winner last week. She’s a University of Michigan conservative who’s active with a group called Chinese Americans for Trump.

In since-deleted tweets from the last two years, Zhu alluded to Muslim women wearing hijabs as “being oppressed under Islam” and disparaged black people for “blaming others” in regard to crime.

After being stripped of her crown, she posted a letter online in which pageant officials described her tweets as “offensive” and “inappropriate.” Zhu calls the decision discriminatory and defends the tweets.

Pageant officials didn’t respond to a Sunday message seeking comment. It’s unclear who’ll represent Michigan in Miss World America’s October competition in Las Vegas.

Miss World America is separate from the more widely-known Miss America contest.

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COMMERCE CITY — A 16-year-old boy was shot in the leg at a Commerce City park Sunday afternoon, according to police.

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The victim was transported to a nearby hospital with what is believed to be non-life threatening injuries, Commerce City police stated in a news release.

Police were called to Monaco Parks in the 5600 block of Monaco Street on a report of a shooting around 4:15 p.m.

Read the full story at thedenverchannel.com.

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SALEM, Oregon — Oregon will allow students to take “mental health days” just as they would sick days, expanding the reasons for excused school absences to include mental or behavioral health under a new law that experts say is one of the first of its kind in the U.S.

But don’t call it coddling. The students behind the measure say it’s meant to change the stigma around mental health in a state that has some of the United States’ highest suicide rates. Mental health experts say it is one of the first state laws to explicitly instruct schools to treat mental health and physical health equally, and it comes at a time educators are increasingly considering the emotional health of students. Utah passed a similar law last year.

Oregon’s bill, signed by Gov. Kate Brown last month, represents one of the few wins for youth activists from around the state who were unusually active at the Capitol this year. Along with expanded mental health services, they lobbied for legislation to strengthen gun control and lower the voting age, both of which failed.

Haily Hardcastle, an 18-year-old from the Portland suburb of Sherwood who helped champion the mental health bill, said she and other student leaders were partly motivated by the national youth-led movement that followed last year’s Parkland, Florida, school shooting.

“We were inspired by Parkland in the sense that it showed us that young people can totally change the political conversation,” she said. “Just like those movements, this bill is something completely coming from the youth.”

Hardcastle, who plans to attend the University of Oregon in the fall, said she and fellow youth leaders drafted the measure to respond to a mental health crisis in schools and to “encourage kids to admit when they’re struggling.”

Debbie Plotnik, executive director of the nonprofit advocacy group Mental Health America, said implementing the idea in schools was important step in challenging the way society approaches mental health issues.

“The first step to confront this crisis is to reduce the stigma around it,” Plotnik said. “We need to say it’s just as OK to take care for mental health reasons as it is to care for a broken bone or a physical illness.”

Suicide is Oregon’s second leading cause of death among those ages 10 to 34, according to data from the state Health Authority. Nearly 17% of eighth-graders reported seriously contemplating taking their lives within the past 12 months.

And it’s not just an Oregon problem, although the state does have a suicide rate 40% higher than the national average. The national suicide rate has also been on the rise and recently hit a 50-year high, climbing more than 30% since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Previously, schools were obliged to excuse only absences related to physical illnesses. At many schools, absences must be excused to make up missed tests or avoid detention.

Under state law, students can have up to five absences excused in a three month period. Anything more requires a written excuse to the principal.

Despite little public opposition from lawmakers, Hardcastle said she’s received pushback from some parents who say the legislation wasn’t necessary, as students can already take mental health days by lying or pretending to be sick. Other opponents have said the law will encourage students to find more excuses to miss school in a state that also suffers from one of the worst absenteeism rates in the nation. More than 1 in 6 children missed at least 10% of school days in the 2015-2016 school year, according to state data.

But those criticisms miss the point of the bill, said Hardcastle. Students are going to take the same amount of days off from school with or without the new law, but they might be less likely to lie about why they’re taking take a day off if schools formally recognize mental health in their attendance policies.

“Why should we encourage lying to our parents and teachers?” she said. “Being open to adults about our mental health promotes positive dialogue that could help kids get the help they need.”

Parents Roxanne and Jason Wilson agree, and say the law might have helped save their 14-year-old daughter, Chloe, who took her life in February 2018.

The Eugene-based couple said the funny and bubbly teen had dreams of becoming a surgeon but faced bullying after coming out as bisexual in middle school.

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When things at school were particularly rough, Chloe would pretend to be sick to stay home.

“Because she lied to get her absences excused, we didn’t get to have those mental health conversations that could have saved her life,” said Roxanne, who now manages a local suicide prevention program.

Chloe was one of five teens to die by suicide in the Eugene area that month. Roxanne and Jason, who moved to the rural city of Dayton following their daughter’s death, worry that those against the bill underestimate the hardships today’s teens face.

“Calling kids coddled or sensitive will just further discourage them from being honest with adults about what they’re going through,” Jason Wilson said. “We need to do everything we can to open up that dialogue between parents and children when it comes to mental health.”

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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Saturday that he and his contacts at top intelligence agencies were unaware of Russian attempts to hack Senate candidates until the issue came up publicly at a conference last year.

Speaking to NBC journalist Kristen Welker at the Aspen Security Forum — an annual Colorado gathering of government officials, industry experts and reporters — Schiff recalled his surprise when a Microsoft representative said at last year’s forum that three Senate campaigns had been attacked by what seemed like the same Russian group that interfered in the 2016 election.

“That should not be the first time the intelligence chair is hearing that,” Schiff said at the Aspen conference. The hacking attempts were also news to the National Security Agency and CIA officials he talked to later, the lawmaker said.

“And that told me, as a matter of quality control, that something is broken here,” Schiff added.

The congressman’s story comes amid fears that the United States remains vulnerable to foreign interference in its elections, as the 2020 presidential race amps up and as President Donald Trump continues to downplay the threat of Russian tampering. Last month, Trump seemed to joke about election interference with Russian President Vladimir Putin: “Don’t meddle in the election, please,” he told his counterpart at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, while wagging his finger.

Trump administration officials have said they are taking threats to election integrity seriously, working with states to secure their systems and gathering intelligence on groups behind cyberattacks. Still, the revelation that Schiff and the federal officials he consulted were unaware of the Senate campaign attacks shocked experts such as former CIA counterterrorism analyst and American University instructor Aki Peritz, who tweeted about the development Saturday.

“Did the FBI know?” he wrote. “Did DHS’s [Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency] know? Did [the Office of the Director of National Intelligence]? If not, why not? If so, how was this intel disseminated to the rest of the community?”

Mentioning last year’s incident after telling Welker he is “not particularly confident” in the government’s ability to deter election interference, Schiff said he’s not sure whether Microsoft didn’t convey the hacking problems to the right place or whether reports of the interference got “stovepiped” — sent straight to the top levels of authority. But “we need to find out what happened,” he said.

The CIA, the NSA and Microsoft did not immediately respond to requests for comment Sunday.

Speaking at the Aspen Security Forum last year, Tom Burt, Microsoft’s vice president of customer security and trust, did not name the three campaigns apparently targeted by the Russian-intelligence-linked group known as “Fancy Bear.” But Democrat Claire McCaskill, who lost her Missouri Senate seat in the 2018 midterms, announced last July that she was one of the legislators attacked.

The hackers tried to lure campaign staffers to a fake Microsoft domain, using spear-phishing tactics similar to those employed to access the servers of the Democratic National Committee in 2016, Burt said. Spear-phishing attacks hide malicious links in seemingly normal emails to gain sensitive information like passwords.

Microsoft removed the domain and with the help of the government prevented the attack from actually gaining access, Burt said.

The day before Burt’s statements, Trump had further muddied his position on Russian election interference, saying “no” when a reporter asked whether the country was still targeting the United States — a statement then-White House press secretary Sarah Sanders later said had been misinterpreted. Trump was simply refusing further questions, Sanders said.

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Others in the administration have signaled that they are working hard to thwart potential interference. NSA Director Paul Nakasone, for example, announced last year that the agency and the cyberwarfare branch of the military would collaborate to stop possible Russian interference.

Lawmakers have also been pushing to improve election security. In June, the House backed legislation that would mandate verifiable paper ballots and upgrade voting equipment with $600 million in grants, among other measures. But the bill drew opposition from Republicans who said the updates weren’t necessary.

Speaking in Aspen on Saturday, Schiff told Welker he believes Trump’s dismissive attitude toward Russian intrusions has made it harder to deter future assaults on election systems.

“He is essentially telling the perpetrator of the last attack that they’re invited to do it again as long as it’s on his side,” Schiff said. “He will not call them out.”

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MORRISON — Cancer and heart-attack survivor Steve Torrence has become a big winner in his bonus days of being alive — perhaps because he triumphantly ignores the inherent risks of driving a top-fuel dragster at 330 mph.

Andy Cross, The Denver Post
NHRA Top Fuel driver Steve Torrence has a laugh with other drivers during a rain delay for first round of qualifying for the 38th annual Mopar Mile High NHRA Nationals at Bandimere Speedway July 21, 2017.

“I don’t want to be mediocre. I want to be the best at whatever it is,” the victorious Torrence said Sunday at Bandimere Speedway. “And I think maybe going through some of that motivates me.”

Torrence, the defending NHRA top fuel champion, appeared in his ninth consecutive final Sunday at Bandimere and won for the eighth time during that stretch.

He’s lucky and good.

“We get in these race cars knowing there’s an opportunity to not come back. But you do what you enjoy to do. This is my job,” Torrence said. “Yeah, I’ve had cancer. I’ve had a heart attack. It may change my mentality of how I approach day-to-day life but … It maybe motivates me a little more, try to live more. I don’t want to park myself in that casket and have somebody say, ‘I bet ‘ol Steve would have done this.’ ”

Torrence, 36, survived Hodgkin’s disease in at age 17 and a heart attack — caused by his cancer treatment — at 33. Since his second near-death experience in 2016, the healthy and fit Texan has been on a train of success.

In 2018, Torrence was virtually unbeatable, winning a career-high 11 races and becoming the first driver to win all six of the Countdown to the Championship races. He won just one of the first five races this year but has dominated the last nine races, becoming just the second nitro driver to appear in nine straight finals. Tony Schumacher holds the record of 11, set in 2008.

Schumacher, who is temporarily sidelined from the sport and working for Fox in covering the series, said Torrence’s dominance might stem from forcing his peers to make mistakes like he did in ’08.

“When I was in it like that, and you’re in the middle of it, you just try to stay calm, and I can hear (Torrence) trying to stay calm,” Schumacher said.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Deric Kramer performs a burnout before the second qualifying round of the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Pro Stock Motorcycle racer Karen Stoffer watches the racers in front of her compete as she waits for her second qualifying race during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Deric Kramer and his crew prepare for the second qualifying race during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Deric Kramer zips up his racing suit before competing in his second qualifying race during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Deric Kramer, center, sits in his Pro Stock car as his crew watches the races ahead of him during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Deric Kramer poses for a portrait next to his Pro Stock Camero in between qualifying rounds during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Pro Stock driver Deric Kramer cools off in his trailer in between qualifying rounds during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019. Kramer lives in Parker and finished in 9th position at the end of the first day of nationals.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Deric Kramer watches the Pro Stock racers ahead of him run their second qualifying race during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Crew members plug their ears during one of the final Top Fuel races of the evening at the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Top Fuel driver Leah Pritchett waits in her car for the start of her second qualifying race during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Tami Bandimere, left, hugs Natalie Jahnke after Steve Torrence, Jahnke's boyfriend, broke the track speed record during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019. Torrence is the provisional number one qualifier and raced 330.31 mph during his second qualifying race.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Spectators watch the first qualifying races during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Funny Car driver Shawn Langdon competes in the second qualifying race during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Linley Humbert, 6, sits on the shoulders of her father, Chris Humbert, while watching the qualifying rounds of the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

  • Kelsey Brunner, The Denver Post

    Brittany Force gets assistance from her crew exiting her Top Fuel racing car during the Dodge Mile-High NHRA Nationals at the Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colorado on Friday, July 19, 2019.

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Torrence qualified No. 1 for the 40th Mile-High Nationals late Saturday night and, after receiving a first-round bye Sunday, he defeated Richie Crampton, Brittany Force and Clay Millican. Torrence edged Millican in a double-lane tire-smoking run, with both cars failing to reach a top speed of 300 mph. Torrence won in a relatively slow 4.044 seconds (270.21 mph).

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Torrence’s 35th career win tied him with “Big Daddy” Don Garlits for eighth-most all time.

“He is the legend of the sport and pioneered it so much,” Torrence said of Garlits. “It’s just humbling.”

The other winners Sunday were Tommy Johnson Jr. (funny car), Greg Anderson (pro stock) and Andrew Hines (pro stock motorcycle). Johnson won his first race at Bandimere since making his debut at the track in 1984. He previously lost in final appearances in funny car (2017), top fuel (1991), top-alcohol dragster (1987) and super gas (1984).

“It only took 35 years,” Johnson said of his win Sunday. “It took persistence!”

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NEW YORK — Last week, Rockies catcher Tony Wolters was named the team recipient of the 2019 Heart and Hustle Award, which honors players “who demonstrate a passion for the game of baseball and best embody the values, spirit and traditions of the game.”

This past weekend, Wolters reinforced his reputation as Colorado’s gutsiest player, catching games against the Yankees on both Saturday and Sunday as the heat index in the Bronx reached 106 degrees. How hot was it? A triathlon scheduled for the weekend in New York was called off, so was 10-mile marathon training run in Central Park, and the public swimming pools stayed open an extra hour.

“I don’t know how Tony did it,” said fellow catcher Chris Iannetta, who caught Friday night’s game but was the designated hitter Sunday.

Wolters, who said he lost “about 10 pounds” of water weight during Colorado’s 8-4 win on Sunday, didn’t make a big deal of his blue-collar job behind the plate, but he admitted he takes a sense of pride in such things.

“I want to put my whole effort in it and do it for the guys,” he said. “The catching position is a bigger position, and you are helping a lot of people out. It’s bigger than yourself. That’s one of the things I love about the position. … Yeah, it was a grind, but I like that. It’s a cool aspect of the game.”

Said manager Bud Black about Wolters: “He deserves a big pat on the back. I know the coaching staff and the players, both, were very proud of Tony and how he handled it.”

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Friends and rivals. Right fielder Charlie Blackmon led off Sunday’s game with a home run off Yankees starter James Paxton. In the bottom of the first, good friend and former Rockies teammate DJ LeMahieu upstaged Blackmon by hitting the first pitch he saw from German Marquez into the right-field bleachers to tie the game.

Asked for his reaction to LeMahieu’s home run, Blackmon quipped: “I wanted to punch him in the face.”

On a more serious note, Blackmon added: “That’s good baseball and good execution. He could have easily made a one-pitch out, but he didn’t. You have to tip your cap to him.”

Mr. Clutch. Nolan Arenado came to the plate in the third inning with the bases load. He worked Paxton to a full count before driving a two-run double into the left-field corner. Arenado is batting .422 (38-for-90) with nine home runs, seven doubles and a triple with runners in scoring position, the third best RISP average in the majors.

On Deck
David Zalubowski, The Associated Press
Colorado Rockies starting pitcher Peter Lambert looks back at a solo home run by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Justin Turner during the fifth inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 27, 2019, in Denver.

Rockies RHP Peter Lambert (2-1, 6.06 ERA) vs. Nationals RHP Erick Fedde (1-1, 3.50)
5:05 p.m. Monday, Nationals Park
TV: AT&T SportsNet
Radio: KOA 850 AM/94.1 FM

German Marquez stopped the Rockies’ six-game slide Sunday. Now it’s up to Lambert, a raw rookie with just seven starts to his name, to keep some positive momentum going. He’s coming off a strong start against the Giants at Coors Field, allowing two runs on six hits across six innings without allowing a walk. Colorado lost 8-4 in 10 innings, but it was a step forward for Lambert. Fedde, called up from the minors last Wednesday to face Baltimore, did just fine in his audition for the fifth spot in the rotation. He pitched six strong innings, and 11 of his 18 outs came via groundouts. He scattered five hits and allowed just a solo homer to Trey Mancini in the fourth inning. Fedde needed only 66 pitches to get through six innings.

Trending: Nolan Arenado has not hit particularly well this month, but the third baseman remains one of the game’s best clutch hitters. He’s hitting .422 with nine home runs, seven doubles and a triple with runners in scoring position.

At issue: With veteran Mark Reynolds being designated for assignment Sunday, the Rockies played with a three-man bench. They will probably have to add a right-handed bat Monday when they begin a four-game series at Washington.

Pitching probables

  • Tuesday: Rockies RHP Jon Gray (9-7, 4.11 ERA) at Nationals RHP Stephen Strasburg (12-4, 3.52), 5:05 p.m., ATTRM
  • Wednesday: Rockies LHP Kyle Freeland (2-7, 7.62) at Nationals Patrick Corbin (7-5, 3.40), 5:05 p.m., ATTRM
  • Thursday: Rockies’ TBA at Nationals’ TBA, 2:05 p.m., ATTRM

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